Theoretical Orientation Essays (Examples)

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Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Words: 3177 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56691092

Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Personality is defined as a person's exceptional deviation on the general evolutionary design for human temperament. A personality trait refers to a durable disposition to act in a certain manner in different situations. Personality traits represent some of the most significant sets of individual disparities in organizations. It is the comparatively set of psychological characteristics that differentiates one person from another. People should strive to comprehend fundamental personality attributes and the manner in which they influence a person's behavior (Griffin 2007).Most perspectives to personality presuppose that some traits are more fundamental compared to others. This concept underlie that a small number of basic personality traits determine other, more superficial traits. With respect to the biological approach to personality, personality traits are determined by human genetic inheritance, behavioral tendencies that develop from evolutionary history and human conduct that generate through intricate biological…… [Read More]

References

Andrewes, D. (2001). Neuropsychology: From theory to practice. New York: Psychology Press.

Ashton, Q. (2012). Advances in Nervous System Research and Application: 2011 Edition. New York: Scholarly Editions.

Carducci, B. (2009). The psychology of personality: Viewpoints, research and applications.

London: John Wiley & Sons.
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Theoretical Approach to Generational Poverty

Words: 3947 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70625438

Theoretical Approach to Generational Poverty

Poverty is one of the most pressing social problems and the generational nature of poverty remains one of the reasons it is so difficult to eradicate poverty. While there are several different theories suggesting why poverty is transmitted from generation to generation and theorists sometimes strongly disagree on those reasons, there is almost universal acceptance of the idea that poverty is transmitted from one generation to another. In fact, there has been a significant amount of study directed at chronic poverty in the developed and developing countries. This research suggests that while poverty may be simplistically defined as a lack of money, the problem of poverty actually addresses the "absence of transfer of different forms of capital: human, social-cultural, social-political, financial/material and environmental/natural" (Moore, 2001). This more complex definition of poverty helps explain why simply providing financial resources to a family does not generally fix…… [Read More]

References

Andrisani, P. (1977). Internal-external attitudes, personal initiative, and the labor market experience of black and white men. The Journal of Human Resources, 12(3), 308-328.

Bartos, O. & Wehr, P. (2002). Using conflict theory. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Buck, M. & Austrin, H. (1971). Factors related to school achievement in an economically disadvantaged group. Child Development, 42(6), 1813-1826.

Duckitt, J. & Mphuthing, T. (1998). Political power and race relations in South Africa: African attitudes before and after the transition. Political Psychology, 19(4), 809-832.
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Counseling Orientation Integrated Counseling Orientation Key Concepts

Words: 1561 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82672828

Counseling Orientation

Integrated Counseling Orientation

Key Concepts of the Integrated Approach

My theoretical orientation as a counselor will be based on an integration between the psychoanalytical approach, the cognitive-behavior therapy approach and the reality therapy approach. These approaches complement one another and serve to address issues of concern in a multicultural society. The key concepts in the psychoanalytical approach are the conflict between the id, ego and superego. This conflict is created as an individual tries to balance needs with social norms and expectations, pleasure and reality. These conflicts are generally present in the unconscious but psychoanalysis helps to bring these issues into the conscious of the client so that their ego strength is increased and they can take better control of their behavior.

In cognitive-behavior therapy, the key concepts are learning and skill acquisition. A number of interventions are formulated, administered and evaluated to enable the client to acquire…… [Read More]

References

Corey, G. (2012). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy (9th ed.). Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning

Hofmann, S.G. (2012). An introduction to modern CBT: Psychological solutions to mental health problems. John Wiley & Sons

Wubbolding, R.E. (2010). Reality therapy. American Psychological Association
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Theoretical Perspectives and Organizational Practices

Words: 2119 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36172444

The topic of workplace diversity has attracted more and more scholarly attention in the past few decades. Indeed, the topic has become one of the most crucial organizational issues in the 21st century, with organizations in both the public and private sector increasingly seeking to tap the advantages diversity brings. Two major areas of focus have been the extent to which organizational members support diversity and the impact of diversity on work-related outcomes such as job satisfaction. This paper dwells on these two aspects. First, Soni's (2000) model of receptivity to diversity is discussed, along with a summary of her findings. Then, attention is paid to the relationship between diversity and work-related outcomes as presented by Pitts (2009).

According to Soni (2000), the success of any diversity management initiative is largely influenced by the degree to which members of an organization are receptive to the initiative. Without managers and employees…… [Read More]

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Theoretical Characteristics for Leadership as

Words: 643 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72141659

(Clark, 1) This is an approach which is given foundation by such theories as Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, which dictates that personnel will perform according to the manner in which certain ranked needs are met by leadership.

The Political Framework which is offered "suggests some characteristics linked to the concept of political leadership: (1) an interactive process, (2) the emphasis on individual political behavior, (3) the collective purpose, and (4) the non-routine influence over the political process." (Peral, 68) These are instructive in promoting such theoretical characteristics as coalition building which garners real support and dedication from members of the organization at every level and which balances the use of persuasion, negotiation and coercion as various instrumental ways to achieve intended organizational outcomes. (Clark, 1)

The fourth leadership framework is the Symbolic Framework, which relies upon the leader as a symbol through whom certain organizational characteristics and cultural conceits are…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Clark, D. (1998). Bolman and Deal's Four Framework Approach. NWLink. Online at  http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/leader/framwork.html 

Meyer, K. (2006). The Structural Framework. University of Memphis. Online at https://umdrive.memphis.edu/kmeyer/.../Structural%20Frame.ppt

Peral, N. (1998). Political Leadership: A Tentative Framework. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 4(3), 68-83.
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Sexual Counseling Approach Theoretical Overview

Words: 793 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40617010



Analysis:

CBT can be effectively used in a variety of stressful or tense situations. Depending on the nature of the issue, focusing on changing behaviors often aids the individual in reducing an addiction, changing their approach to a situation, or focusing on interaction and dialog issues. CBT may be used, for example, with:

Severe anxiety from a recent sexual assault -- CBT may be used to unearth the issues surround the assault and resulting anxiety by helping the client focus on adaptation. The therapist should help the client understand that they were a victim, did not choose the issue, and the fault of the issue is with the perpetrator. Anxious feelings are a rational response to trauma, but by practicing assertion training, the client can take charge of their own emotions and begin to heal (SOUCE, p. 23).

A Gay/Bisexual person struggling to come out to friends and family --…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Follette, V. And J. Ruzek, eds. (2007). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Trauma, 2nd ed. New York: Guilford Press.

Fong, T. (2006). Understanding and Managing Compulsive Sexual Behaviors. Psychiatry. 3 (11): 51-58. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2945841/ 

Wright, J. (2004). Cognitive Behavior Therapy. In J. Wright (Ed.), Review of Psychiatry (Vol. 23). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.
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Constructive Therapy Constructivism Is a Theoretical Perspective

Words: 3489 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13177749

Constructive Therapy

Constructivism is a theoretical perspective that asserts that people attempt to make sense of the world by developing their own set of personal individualized constructs. Personal experience, interpretation, social context, and linguistic factors define a person's subjective reality. Constructive psychotherapy focuses on individual experience, personal resilience, change, and the therapeutic relationship to assist people with change. The current article asserts that constructivism and constructive psychotherapies heavily draw from principles of past theorists such as George Kelly and Kurt Lewin, and constructivism and constructive psychotherapies do not represent facets of a new paradigm. In this sense constructive psychotherapy is not a unified form of psychotherapy but instead a form of integrated psychotherapy. Finally the article applies five basic principles of constructivism: activity, order, the self, social-symbolic relations, and lifespan development in the proposed psychotherapy of Sam, a man who is experiencing frustration and anger-management issues at his work and…… [Read More]

References

Arkowitz, H. (1992). Integrative theories of therapy. In D.K. Freedheim, H.J. Freudenberger, J.W. Kessler, S.B. Messer, D.R. Peterson, H.H. Strupp, & E.L. Wachtel (Eds.), History of psychotherapy: A century of change (pp. 261-304). Washington, DC: APA Press.

Chiari, G., & Nuzzo, M.L. (1996). Psychological constructivisms: A metatheoretical differentiation. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 9, 163-184.

Dollard, J. & Miller, N.E. (1950). Personality and psychotherapy: An analysis in terms of learning, thinking, and culture. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Kelly, G.A. (1955). The psychology of personal constructs (Vols. I & II). New York: Norton.
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Group Social Influence Group Orientation and Social

Words: 569 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99931012

Group Social Influence

Group Orientation and Social Influence

Human behaviors are not always guided by personal feelings or internal urges. To the contrary, human behavior is inextricably linked to the context with in which it is committed. In other words, we often behave according to certain standards, norms, expectations and ideals that have originated outside of us and typically in broader systems like families, cultural identities, communities, ethnicities and nationalities. These social systems are often directly at the root of behavioral patterns and tendencies, and may help us to explain human behaviors as they occur en masse.

In the field of behavioral psychology, B.F. Skinner stands above others for the insight which he would provide on the relationship between individual behaviors and their broader social contexts. B.F. Skinner's ideas regarding operant behavior are crucial to understanding the way that group orientation causes individuals to behave. Human beings, Skinner would surmise,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Boeree, C. George. (2006). B.F. Skinner. Shippensburg University.

Janis, I. (2003). Groupthink. Group and Public Communication: McGraw-Hill.

Lahey, Benjamin B. (2007). Psychology, introduction (9th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill
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Personal Counseling

Words: 2354 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17119225

Counseling

Develop your theoretical orientation to the counseling process and identify how this approach compares to Cognitive Behavioral theory

Since its inception nearly fifty years ago, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) has become recognized as perhaps the most effective therapeutic approach. Indeed, CBT has myriad uses, and is applied in a number of situations, including depression, personality disorders, and wellness and rehabilitation. However, there also exist limitations to cognitive behavioral therapy, mainly surrounding treatment with patients from diverse cultures. This paper develops appropriate therapeutic orientations, discussing different therapeutic concerns and approaches. First, attention is paid to the nature of people; next, the role of the individual in families and other systems is addressed. Then, multicultural considerations, wellness and prevention, and the nature of problems are discussed. Finally, the paper addresses the process of change and how the orientations enacted are successful in practice.

The nature of people

People are diverse, not…… [Read More]

References

Beck, J., & Tompkins, M. (2007). Cognitive therapy. In Handbook of Homework Assignments in Psychotherapy. (pp. 51-63). New York: Springer Science.

Brown, J. (1999). Bowen family systems therapy and practice: Illustration and critique. A.N.J.Z. Family Therapy, 20(2), 94-103.

Lay, K.R., & King, L.J. (2007) Counseling strategies. In Drug Courts: A New Approach to Treatment and Rehabilitation. (pp. 166-182). New York: Springer Science.

Shedler, J. (2010). The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy. American Psychologist, 65(2), 98-109.
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Licensed Professional Counselors Are Individuals Who Are

Words: 1378 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64527511

Licensed professional counselors are individuals who are certified to provide a high level of quality health as well as substance abuse care to hundreds and possibly millions of Americans (American Counseling Association, 2012; 2006). These individuals possess either a masters or doctorate degree in the field of counseling or any other related field which includes a coursework or internship in human behavior and development. They also have effective counseling strategies and ethical practice I various other knowledge areas. More than 80,000 professional counselors who are licensed in close a total of 48 states together with the District of Columbia State licensure are usually required to have either a master's or doctorate degree, 2-3 years of supervised clinical experience as well as the passage of a counseling examination. In the states where licensure or any other certifications are not required, the professional counselors are required to be certified by the National…… [Read More]

References

National Guidance Research Forum (2004).Multicultural Counseling.

http://www.guidance-research.org/EG/impprac/ImpP2/new-theories/mcc

Patterson, CH (1996).Multicultural Counseling: From Diversity to Universality. Journal of Counseling and Development, 72,227-231

Pedersen, P.B. (1991) Multiculturalism as a generic framework, Journal of Counseling and Development, 1991, 70, 1: 6-12
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Integrated Counseling There Are Many

Words: 3907 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79621522

CBT integrates theory, i.e. The tenets of psychotherapy, with practical, behavior modification exercises. This, in turn, creates real tangible results. As Cooper writes, "If, on the one hand, you look at the particular therapies that have been shown to be effective for particular psychological problems -- as advocates of empirically supported treatments have done -- there is no question that the evidence base is strongest for CBT. hile, for instance, there are scores of high quality controlled trials demonstrating the effectiveness of CBT for depression17, there are just a handful of studies demonstrating the same thing for person-centred therapy. And while CBT has been shown to be effective for numerous psychological difficulties -- such as phobias, panic, PTSD, bulimia, sexual problems and deliberate self-harm -- there is little equivalent evidence for the vast array of non-CBT practices18 (2008).

CBT is an approach that has been empirically proven to be successful…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (n.d.). The Free Dictionary By Farlex. Retrieved from  http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/cognitive-behavioral+therapy 

Cooper, M. (2008). The Facts are Friendly. Therapy Today.net. Retrieved from http://www.therapytoday.net/article/15/8/categories/

Gelso, C., Fretz, B. (2001) Counseling Psychology Second Edition. Orlando, FL:

Harcourt, Inc.
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psychotherapy using IPT and ACT

Words: 2750 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50111321

Jen is a 19-year-old female of mixed ethnic background. When asked what her therapeutic goals are, Jen states that she wants to "get over" the physical abuse she was subjected to her from her mother's ex-husband (her stepfather). In the third therapy session with Jen, she abruptly claims that she may not be continuing with therapy because she is just "therapist shopping."

Also in this session, Jen mentioned for the first time that she works as an exotic dancer. She asks with a belligerent tone, "You don't have a problem with that, do you?" Even though there was no response, Jen quickly defends herself, saying, "I love my work. I make so much money. There is nothing else I can do to make this much money. All my friends work harder than I do but they make less than me! I mean, I not only pull in what I make…… [Read More]

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Setting the Stage for the Group Psychological

Words: 4820 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96691655

Setting the stage for the group

Psychological intervention might be most efficient when females start modification by leaving the abuser and get in a shelter. Shelters are an essential resource for victims because they offer females and kids security and link them with social, legal, and financial resources (Dutton, 1992). Furthermore, battered females in shelters have a greater threat for PTSD than those who do not look for shelter (Jones et al., 2001). Provided the problems connected with PTSD, these signs might disrupt victims' capability to successfully utilize resources made to enhance their security once they leave the shelter (Foa, Cascardi, Zollner, & Feeny, 2000).

Unlike various other PTSD victims, damaged ladies in shelters deal with continuous security issues. Numerous of their viewed dangers are genuine (Foa et al., 2000). For that reason, conventional PTSD therapies that include exposure are contraindicated, as habituation to feared stimulations might enhance their danger…… [Read More]

References

Baer, R.A. (Ed.). (2006). Mindfulness-based treatment approaches: Clinician's guide to evidence base and applications. New York: Academic Press.

Bagshaw, D., Chung, D., Couch, M., Lilburn, S. And Wadham, B. (2000), Reshaping Responses to Domestic Violence: Final Report, University of South Australia.

Beauchamp, T.L., & Childress, J.F. (2001). Principles of biomedical ethics (5th ed.). New York: Oxford.

Betan, E.J., & Stanton, A.L. (1999). Fostering ethical willingness: Integrating emotional and contextual awareness with rational analysis. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 30, 295-301.
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Child Counseling

Words: 2053 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2474313

Child Counseling

The objective of this work is to provide viable research techniques to use in order to help a child and her family. This report represents a summary of Alicia Thomas, a nine-year-old African-American 4th grader with a series of legitimate medical as well as possibly psychosomatic physiological and psychological concerns. The young lady has been specifically diagnosed as having a duodenal ulcer with the inherent gastrointestinal symptoms including vomiting and intermittent pain. The pain has been linked to increased absenteeism from school, four hospitalizations, adverse sleeplessness, nightmare experiences with detail of dismemberment and professed fears of death for herself and for her family members.

The family consisted of eight total children and an intact parental situation but of these members, there has also been a history of mental retardation, depression and one sibling who has since deceased but in life was a main care provider. There is also…… [Read More]

References

Annunziata, Jane. (n.d.). "Play Therapy With A 6-Year-old With Jane Annunziata, PsyD." Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://www.apa.org

College of Agricultural Sciences (1999). Cognitive Development/Play-Overview. College of Agricultural Sciences, Penn State University. Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://www.penpages.psu.edu/penpages_reference/28507/2850764.htmL

Ferguson, E.D. (1989). "Adlerian Therapy: An Introduction." Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Adlerian Psychology Association of British Columbia.

Wikopedia. (n.d.). Post-traumatic stress disorder. Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-traumatic_stress_disorder
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Rick Houser's Book Counseling and Educational Research

Words: 6074 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60383503

ICK HOUSE'S BOOK COUNSELING AND EDUCATIONAL ESEACH

ick Houser's book "Counseling and Educational esearch"

ick Houser's book "Counseling and Educational esearch"

Why is it important to acquire necessary skills in research for a counselor?

Clinical counselors are doctoral-level providers of health services skilled in counseling clients while evaluating and treating emotional and mental disorders utilizing scientific theories and methods. Adequate interpersonal correspondence skills are imperative. A clinical counselor must have the ability to listen eagerly and understand what customers communicate with them, and have the capacity to talk clearly with customers about sensitive issues. This occupation also requires basic thinking skills, as clinical therapists must have the capacity to utilize logic and reason to solve and interpret complex issues. Houser writes: "… but I believe acquiring the skill to evaluate how knowledge was generated is a key skill in functioning as a professional and dissociates those with advanced graduate degrees…… [Read More]

References

Houser. R. (2009). Counseling and educational research: Evaluation and application. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage

McLeod. J. (2003). Doing counseling research (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
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Interpersonal Psychotherapy it Appears That There Is

Words: 970 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36068151

Interpersonal Psychotherapy

It appears that there is a significant amount of utility in interpersonal psychotherapy. This utility extends beyond that of the patient and also includes a degree of usefulness for the therapist and for afflictions involving both mood disorders and non-mood disorders. Interpersonal psychotherapy seems like a viable option for helping patients to assert themselves and their control over their own lives and happiness. In consideration of these reasons, I would advocate utilizing this methodology for a variety of therapeutic applications and am all but convinced at the sort of good it can produce in the process.

Perhaps the principle reason that I am in favor of interpersonal psychotherapy is that many of its core tenets are aligned with my personal worldview. For instance, one of the fundamental principles of this psychological approach is that there is a direct correlation between one's environment and the forces that it asserts…… [Read More]

References

Wedding, D., Corsini, R.J. (2014). Current Psychotherapies.
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Multicultural Theories

Words: 851 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26631217

Multicultural therapies like ethnic family therapy recognize the multiple worldviews and diversity of values among clientele. Moreover, multicultural therapies avoid problems associated with decontextualization and the ignorance of politics and power structures in people's lives (Comas-Diaz, 2014). Therapists working in a diverse environment do need to develop cultural competence to serve their communities. Cultural competence requires self-awareness and recognition of one's own worldview, biases, and attitudes. Likewise, cultural competence leads to effective means of helping people whose worldviews and backgrounds are different from the therapist. Without branching too much into related social sciences like sociology, anthropology, and social work, multicultural psychological therapies do draw from other disciplines in order to form a more cohesive vision of cultural competence. No person develops in isolation of his or her culture or background. Therefore, it is critical to include dynamics of oppression, experiences of racism or stigma, issues related to the immigrant experience,…… [Read More]

Reference

Comas-Diaz, L. (2014). Multicultural theories of psychotherapy. In Corsini, R.J. & Wedding, D. Current psychotherapies (10th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning.
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Skills and Professional Attributes You Bring to

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21791186

skills, and professional attributes you bring to your area of practice or specialization.

I bring several different types of skills and professional attributes into my area of practice of specialization. First, my capacity for empathy, sympathy, and understanding are all beyond reason of a doubt. I have always had the ability to converse well and calmly with individuals suffering from a variety of emotional states and recovering from different emotional capacities. In my own practice and attempts at counseling, I have been able to use my calming and comprehending personality to a therapeutic advantage. Therefore, I feel my own personality is attributed and akin to tuning into the needs of disabled veterans when counseling. Furthermore, I have had personal relationships with veterans, so I have a solid understanding of their sufferings and needs. For the most part, I realize it is incredibly difficult for them to talk about these instances,…… [Read More]

References

Allis, S. & Globe Staff (2005). "Frontline" examines war's psychological toll: [THIRD Edition]. Boston Globe, p .E.5.

Bookman, J. (2007, May 9). OUR OPINIONS: War strains troops, U.S. credibility: [Main Edition]. The Atlanta Journal - Constitution, p. a.14.

Mckenna, Phil (2006). Stress syndrome affected one in five Vietnam veterans. (August 21) Boston Globe, p. C.3.

Military History Companion (2004) the Oxford Companion to Military History. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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Contemplative Psychotherapy

Words: 909 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49617811

Contemplative Psychotherapies

My thoughts and feelings about contemplative psychology are somewhat conflicted. On the one hand, there are several tenets with this particular approach to psychology that I think are valid. However, I am not sure that many of them have a place in true psychology. Psychology is a science and a discipline -- it is based on empirical evidence and fact. Many of the Eastern philosophical concepts that are incorporated into contemplative psychology are not based on empirical evidence or fact. Therefore, my view on this particular aspect of psychology remains conflicted (if not outright contradictory) -- I see some boons of this methodology, yet am not sure that I could validate them from a purely scientific perspective.

From a personal standpoint, there are numerous aspects of contemplative psychology that I intuitively can relate to and which I utilize as focal points for my own life. One of the…… [Read More]

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Ethical Issues and Legal Issues

Words: 705 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57562239

However the only aspect that I disagree with is that in some parts of the writing it often feels as if diversity is seen like an overwhelming task to surmount. Diversity should not be viewed in this manner. We are all different and there should be a global respect for those differences. These differences should not be viewed as an obstacle yet just as a state of being.

The next cite discusses the responsibilities of the therapist. I actually agree completely with all the writings on this particular cite. I s is important that therapists be held to a higher level of responsibility than most other positions. The site states that the group psychotherapist must provide services with respect for the dignity and uniqueness of each patient/client as well as the rights and autonomy of the individual patient/client. The group psychotherapist safeguards the patient/client's right to privacy by judiciously protecting…… [Read More]

References

AGPA (2002, February). Responsibilities to patients/clients. AGPA and NRCGP Guidelines for Ethics,. Retrieved 09/17/06, at http://www.agpa.org/group/ethicalguide.html

Boutelle, C. (2006). SIOP Member to make Capitol Hill Presentation. Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Inc.,. Retrieved 09/17/06, at  http://www.siop.org/ 

Haley-Banez, L., Brown, S., & Molina, B. (1998, August 1). Principles for Diversity-Competent Group Workers. Association for specialists in Group Work,. Retrieved 09/17/06, at http://www.asgw.org/diversity.htm

Rapin, L. (1998, March 29). Best Practices. Association for specialist in Group Work,. Retrieved 09/17/06, at http://www.asgw.org
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Ethnomethodology the Social Science of

Words: 2885 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91891783

He wanted to show how conversation analysis and ethnomethodology may elucidate two interrelated matters of continuing concern to the ethnographer: the role of culture in shaping an informants' behavior and the apparent capacity of an investigated culture to compel the fieldworker to follow local habits of thought.

For this research, Watson defined ethnomethodology as "the study of how people, in their everyday lives, constitute the world as a recognizable state of affairs." Similar to conversation analysis, it is concerned with explication of order in social interaction and attempts to replace the existing Parsonian motivational approach to the analysis of social action to one with procedure. It asks not why but how. stipulates four basic moves in conversation analysis of ethnomethodology: 1) Conversation analysis and ethnomethodology look at utterances as tools for the performance of activities, not just things that stand in for other things. Further, activities performed by utterances are…… [Read More]

References

Button, G. & Dourish, P. (1996) Technomethodology Paradoxes and Possibilities. In Proceedings of ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems CHI

Durkheim Emile. 1933 the Division of Labor in Society. Glencoe, Ill.: Free Press

Frances, D. & Hester, S. (2004) an Invitation to Ethnomethodology: Language, Society and Interaction. New York: Sage

French, B. (2005) Issues and Innovations in Nursing Practice. Journal of Advanced Nursing 49(2), 125-134
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an explanation of the definition of'science

Words: 610 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56269917

Science is a “way of knowing,” meaning that it is one way of ascertaining the truth about the world. Although it is not the only way of knowing, it is the most reliable way of knowing the physical universe because it is based on systematic, rigorous methods of testing, experimentation, and calculated observations. According to the Union of Concerned Scientists (2017), science yields “unbiased and verifiable information to make important decisions,” (p. 1). The scientific method is used to acquire and analyze information. Using the scientific method, it is possible to test hypotheses again and again, to come up with verifiable and repeatable experiments that can yield factual and provable data.

The most important elements of the scientific method include observation, identification, description, investigation, and explanation. Observation is often the genesis of scientific inquiry. Observing an interesting, important, unique, or unusual phenomenon might lead to a hypothesis about why that…… [Read More]

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Personal Theory of Therapy the

Words: 1766 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78835853

These three seminal perspectives may possess a lot of similarities, yet each of them has contributed novel ideas that are consistent with its theoretical underpinnings. In many of the substance abuse treatment arenas, the significant aspects of all these three approaches are blended to provide for a cognitive-behavioral model that gives the best result in terms of all the other therapies. (Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy)

Three theorists who have influenced the behaviorist theories are:

1. Watson J.B. - One of the originators of behaviorism and a proponent of the reductionist approach to the study of human behavior.

2. Skinner B.F. - He was the one most responsible for the spread of the behaviorist philosophy.

3. Wolpe, Joseph. The method of systematic desensitization to deal with fear was created by him. (Theories and Theorists)

eferences

Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy." NIDA. etrieved at http://www.addictionalternatives.com/philosophy/briefcbtherapy.htm. Accessed on February 15, 2005

Bush, Winston John. (December 22,…… [Read More]

References

Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy." NIDA. Retrieved at http://www.addictionalternatives.com/philosophy/briefcbtherapy.htm. Accessed on February 15, 2005

Bush, Winston John. (December 22, 2003) "Learning theory: A fuller-fuller explanation of CBT" Retrieved at http://www.cognitivetherapy.com/learning.html Accessed on February 15, 2005

Cognitive Therapy for Depression" Retrieved at  http://www.psychologyinfo.com/depression/cognitive.htm . Accessed on February 15, 2005

Grohol, John M. (July 21, 1995) "Theoretical Orientations and Practices of Therapists"
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Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Does Not Go Down Easily

Words: 1496 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85397091

Psychodynamic and Humanistic Theory

Psychodynamic & Humanistic Theory

A seminal study on the personality trait differences of therapists practicing with different theoretical orientations is an interesting place to begin this compare and contrast discussion. Tremblay, et al. (1986) administered the Personality Orientation Inventory to 90 male and 90 female psychotherapists who self-designated and were equally distributed in groups designated as behavioral (BEH), psychodynamic (PSY), and humanistic (HUM). Interestingly, the study suggested that a core therapist personality exists and that further distinction can be achieved through consideration of the patterns of personality that were associated with theoretical orientation. The caveat was that the patterns associated with theoretical orientations were characterized more by overlapping traits than unique traits. Of the three theoretical categories, the HUM group exhibited the most unique traits: they were more flexible, more accepting of personal aggression and expressing feelings in action, and differed in their development of intimate…… [Read More]

References

Boreman, D. (2010, November). The Science of Psychology. Chapter 10 Personality. Retreived from http://www.mesacc.edu/~edmny04781/psy101_oc/Chapter_10.pdf

Leichsenring, F. & Leibing, E. (2003). The effectiveness of psychodynamic therapy and cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of personality disorders: A meta analysis. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 160(7), 1223-1232. Retrieved from http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.ajp.160.7.1223

Shedler, J. (2010, February-March). The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy. American Psychologist, 65(2), 98-109. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/amp-65-2-98.pdf

Tremblay, J.M., Herron, W.G. & Schultz, C.L. (1986). Relation between therapeutic orientation and personality in psychotherapists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 17(2), 106-110. Retrieved at http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0735-7028.17.2.106
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Psychology Testing Psychometric Emotional Intelligence

Words: 12427 Length: 45 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79715879



As emotionally intelligent employees are reportedly more content, conscientious and committed in the workplace, businesses and organizations are repeatedly advised to recruit and retain these individuals. Abraham (2006), nevertheless, reports that the strongest findings emerging from her study was.".. The effect of job control on emotional intelligence." She contends that emotionally intelligent employees will not just naturally thrive in their workplace; that the work environment needs to provide independence in decision making for employees to succeed.

Aims and Objectives

Aim

To explore concepts encapsulated in and related to EQ testing, through intensive research and appropriate assessment of collected data.

esearch for this project proposes to increase understanding of EQ testing, as well as, complementary components.

Each objective presented in this proposal reflects an area of interest which will be expounded upon. As Objective 5, however, mirrors a primary consideration, plans are to include numerous samplings of related studies.

1.2 Objective…… [Read More]

References

Abraham, Rebecca. "The Role of Job Control as a Moderator of Emotional Dissonance and Emotional Intelligence -- Outcome Relationships.(Statistical Data Included)," the Journal of Psychology, March 1, 2000.

Bar-on, Reuven Ph.D (2005). "The World's First Scientific Measure of Emotional Intelligence."(2006). PEN Psychodiagnostics [26 September 2006]. http://www.eqiq.nl/eqivol.htm.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5008598359

Before You Start Your Fruit and Fibre Diet You Should Speak to This Man. (2005, February 9). Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), p. 12.
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Clinical Supervision

Words: 3503 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79384338

Likewise, engaging in too much control over a Stage III supervisee could lead to quite a bit of tension in the supervisor/supervisee relationship and result in negative transference to clients in counseling sessions. Nonetheless, this notion that counseling supervisees develop in relatively predictable stages and that an effective supervisor can best help them progress by approaching them at the level of supervision that corresponds to their own development is very helpful in performing efficient and rewarding supervision for counseling trainees.

Empirical research has validated the approach of the integrated developmental models to some extent. In order to determine the supervisee's developmental McNeill, Stoltenberg, and omans (1992) developed the Supervisee Levels Questionnaire -- evised (SLQ -- ). Lovell (1999) found that the SLQ -- results from trainees indicated that the level of education and prior supervised experience was related to the level of the supervisee opposed to such concepts as cognitive…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, C.E., & Bang, K. (2004). Using the Integrated Developmental Model in a Substance

Abuse Practicum. Journal of Teaching in the Addictions, 2(2), 67-82.

Bernard, J.M., & Goodyear, R.K. (2009). Fundamentals of clinical supervision (4th

ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
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Qualitative Nursing Study on Hourly Rounding

Words: 1657 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14111540

Nursing Study on Hourly ounding

Qualitative nursing Study on Hourly ounding

Similarities and difference to other quantitative articles

Similar to other qualitative papers, ethnographic researchers target the inclusion and representation of the views and observations of the subjects. The questions in qualitative and ethnographic researchers try to focus on the understanding of the subjects in their engagements in the day-to-day experiences. It is the interests of qualitative and ethnographic researchers to seek the relative positions and evaluations of the subjects about the subject matter (Green, Dixon, & Zaharlick, 2002).

Qualitative and ethnographic researchers obtain guidance on implementation and design in conducting their study from the theoretical orientations. These orientations include data collections tools -- interviews, artifacts, participant observation -- and data analysis measures (Green et al., 2002). Theoretical guides also direct on measures of entering the field, data to collect, the relevant literature to retain, necessary records to make and…… [Read More]

References

Green, J., Dixon, C., & Zaharlick, A. (2002). "Ethnography As A Logic Of Inquiry." In Handbook For Methods Of Research On English Language Arts Teaching, Ed. James Flood, Julie Jensen, Diane Lapp, And James Squire. New York: Macmillan.

LoBiondo-Wood, G., & Haber, J. (2013). Nursing Research: Methods and Critical Appraisal for Evidence-Based Practice: Elsevier - Health Sciences Division.
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Counseling Approaches

Words: 1753 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90488234

Cardsmax

Abramson, R. (2010). Psychotherapy of psychoses: some principles for practice in the real world. he Journal Of he American Academy Of Psychoanalysis And Dynamic Psychiatry, 38(3), 483-502. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Abramson, R. (2010) explains that treatment of psychoses must include psychological treatments for the mind joined with the commonly employed biological treatments for the brain. here are various schools of psychotherapy, but psychoanalytic treatment is the only Western discipline devoted to comprehensive understanding of the subjective mind. Psychoanalytic authorities have written extensively on the psychodynamics involved in treatment of psychoses, but such approaches are limited by the realities of limited resources and number of therapists who have advanced training. Also, the techniques and understandings developed by prominent authors cannot always be implemented by many therapists who do not enjoy as robust a theoretic background. Presented here are five principles that are useful to keep in mind during the treatment…… [Read More]

The author attempts to develop some of the basic models and concepts relating to mourning processes in psychotic patients on the assumption that situations of loss and mourning are key moments for psychoanalysis, psychotherapy, and therapeutic approaches in general. Secondly, he reminds us that 'mourning processes in psychotics' are not always 'psychotic mourning processes', that is to say, that they do not necessarily occur within, or give rise to, a psychotic clinical picture. These ideas are illustrated by a number of sessions and vignettes concerning two psychotic patients in psychotherapeutic and psychoanalytic treatment. In theoretical terms, it seems vitally important in this context to combine a relationship-based approach within a framework of special psychoanalytic psychopathology with an updated view of processes of mourning and affective loss.

Witkiewitz, K., & Marlatt, G. (2010). Behavioral Therapy Across the Spectrum. Alcohol Research & Health, 33(4), 313. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

This article discusses that there are numerous effective behavioral therapies have been developed that can bring the treatment to the patient rather than bringing the patient to treatment. These behavioral therapy techniques, which can provide effective treatment across the spectrum of severity of alcohol abuse disorders, include facilitated self-change, individual therapies, couples and family approaches, and contingency management. New methods of delivery and successful adjuncts to existing behavioral treatments also have been introduced, including computerized cognitive -- behavioral treatments, Web-based guided self-change, and mindfulness-based approaches. Although a wide variety of behavioral approaches have been shown to have good efficacy, choosing the treatment most appropriate for a given patient remains a challenge for most therapists.
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Psychological Foundations Towards Education

Words: 1898 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57954418

Psychological Foundations Towards Education

Major characteristics of Freud's theory and Erikson's theory

Looking at pages 143-164 of the article, Freud and Erikson address the basic issue of self-definition. According to Freud believes that a person's sense of self stems from parental projections in the course of the genesis of super-ego. In addition, he argues that these introjects form the foundation of a person's self-definition in childhood and that such parental identifications are not significantly updated or revised during childhood or adolescence. Either way, an individual's self-concept is believed to be a function of the fundamental identification process, which takes place during one's pre-school years. Although Freud has extensively written on the human development process, Erikson was the pioneer in writing about the formation of identities. In his works, Erikson has gone far and beyond Freud's parental introjects and childhood identifications (Austrian 37). He argues that the presence of self-selected identity…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Austrian, Sonia G. Developmental Theories Through the Life Cycle. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. Print.

Lipsitt, Lewis P, and David S. Palermo. Research Readings in Child Psychology. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2011. Print.

Miller, Patricia H, and Ellin K. Scholnick. Toward a Feminist Developmental Psychology. New York: Routledge, 2010. Print.

Harris, Margaret. Exploring Developmental Psychology: Understanding Theory and Methods. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications, 2008. Print.
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Verification of Interpretation -- Trustworthiness Credibility Transferability

Words: 5584 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15080339

Verification of Interpretation -- Trustworthiness

Credibility

Transferability

Dependability and Confirmability

Advanced Qualitative esearch Methods

The role of research methods knowledge and its benefits for social research is an area of debate and confusion since the beginning of the profession's inception (Austin, 1983). Central to this understanding is the broader context of social research as new found study areas. In social research, the knowledge of research methods helps in selecting appropriate method for a particular area of research as well the knowledge of strengths and weaknesses of particular methods can lead a researcher to choose combine methods and adopt strategies to address the weaknesses of a particular method. In this research report the author intends to describe advanced qualitative research method, theory, practical implications, ethical consideration as well as types of advances research methods, the importance and significance of employing qualitative research methods, the sampling procedures and data collection and analysis…… [Read More]

References

Bates, R.A. (2005). Mulivariate research methods. In R.A. Swanson, & F.H. Elwood (Eds.), Research in organizations: Foundations and methods of inquiry (pp. 115-142). San Francisco, CA: Berrstt-Koehler.

Borg, W., & Gall, M. (1989). Educational research: An introduction. White Plains, NY: Longman.

Carspecken, P.F. (1996). Critical ethnography in educational research: A theoretical and practical guide. NY: Routledge.

Churchill, Jr., & Gilbert A. (1998). Basic Marketing Research, Second Edition. The Dryden Press, Orlando.
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Sociological Theory in the 21st

Words: 2675 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4609524

In addition, the views presented by sociologists concerning idealistic tradition is based on the significance of the concerned group that is sort to motivate, influence to belief and the subject of interest. In this regard, sociologists will not disassociate from the scientific data but will involve the subject of interest to attempt to understand the environment in its own context, showing how sociologists have subjective explanations and not objective ones (Adams et al. 267).

ith regard to the above, there exists queries on whether the sociological theory is a micro or a macro understood occurrence. Apart from the philosophical aspects of knowledge, the micro and macro aspects of sociological theory are highly debated in there associations. It inquires on how these sociological theories on character, reactions, and interpersonal procedures can associate with other social influences. Just like in sciences where there exists micro-macro differences which even with the advanced technology…… [Read More]

Works cited

Adams, Bert, et al. Sociological theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. 2001. Print.

Calhoun, Craig, et al. Contemporary sociological theory. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2007.

Print.

Dunaway, Wilma. Emerging Issues in the 21st Century World-system: New theoretical directions for the 21st century world-system. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood
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Analyzing the Study Method

Words: 3750 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24146111

data collection and the sources to be utilized for this project. The highlighted gaps in knowledge will be investigated with the help of two research methods. The research methods have been chosen on the basis that they have the best chance of answering the research questions. Lastly, the procedures that will be utilized to analyse the results and also the limitations of the methods will be highlighted. Ethical considerations will also be given (Frandsen & Johansen, 2010).

There is a need for a comprehensive evaluation in order to capture the sophisticated processes of public relations crisis communication and also to provide a broader perspective on the matter in addition to helping with the investigation of the related issues. A mixed-method study approach (a mix of quantitative and qualitative study methodologies) will be employed for the purposes of providing an overview of the subject matter and also to help provide data…… [Read More]

References

Bryman, A. (2008). Social research methods (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press

Collis, J., & Hussey, R. (2003). Business research -- a practical guide for undergraduate and postgraduate students (2nd ed.). Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.

Cutler, A. (2004). Methodical failure: The use of case study method by public relations researchers. Public Relations Review, 30(3), 365-375. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2004.05.008

Falkenheimer, J., & Heide, M. (2010). Crisis communicators in change: From plans to improvisations. In W. T. Coombs, & S. J. Holladay (Eds.). The handbook of crisis communication. (pp. 512-526). Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
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Jake Green Case Study Group Counseling

Words: 3282 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23639234

Group Counseling for Jake Green

Group Description

The group will be designed for children suffering from Attention Deficient Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The group will be for young children aimed at focusing on self-awareness. The children will be taught self-management skills like positive self-talk techniques and self-soothing behaviors. All this is aimed at improving their social skills and improve interactions with others. Having a group of ADHD children will allow Jake to recognize he is not alone and he will be able to interact with other children who have the same challenges. The group to be created will be a psychoeducational group because the purpose is to develop the members feeling, thinking, and behavioral skills by using a structured learning format. Psychoeducational groups are aimed at high-functioning individuals who have a deficit in specific areas (Pitschel-Walz et al., 2006). The group will be focused on educating group members regarding their disorder…… [Read More]

References

Ates, B. (2016). Effect of solution focused group counseling for high school students in order to struggle with school burnout. Journal of Education and Training Studies, 4(4), 27-34.

DeLucia-Waack, J. L., Kalodner, C. R., & Riva, M. (2013). Handbook of group counseling and psychotherapy. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Erford, B. (2014). Research and evaluation in counseling. Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Furr, S. R. (2000). Structuring the group experience: A format for designing psychoeducational groups. Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 25(1), 29-49.
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Gorski PC 2009 What We're Teaching

Words: 2475 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47266008



Vavrus, M. (2002). Transforming the multicultural education of teachers: Theory, research, and practice. New York: Teachers College Press

Weiner, L. (2000). esearch in the 90s: implications for urban teacher preparation. eview of Educational esearch, 70(3), 369 -- 406.

Zeichner, K., & Hoeft, K. (1996). Teacher socialization for cultural diversity. In J. Sikula, T. Buttery, & E. Guyton (Eds.), Handbook of research on teacher education (pp. 525 -- 547). Old Tappan, NJ: Macmillan

De Vita, G. (2001) "Learning Styles, Culture and Inclusive Instruction in the Multicultural Classroom: A Business and Management Perspective" Innovations in Education and Teaching International 38(2): 165-174

Introduction

In this paper, the author stated that in many occasions a number of teachers and most administration educator find that even a well -- organized lecturers and workshops usually don't connect all students when it comes to the composition and working with different cultures. The paper highlighted that most traditional…… [Read More]

References

De Vita, G. (2001) "Learning Styles, Culture and Inclusive Instruction in the Multicultural Classroom: A Business and Management Perspective" Innovations in Education and Teaching International 38(2): 165-174
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Personal Awareness of Cultural Bias in Social and Cultural Diversity

Words: 2763 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49030133

Cultural bias implies an emphasized distinction or preferential status that indicates a predilection for one culture, over another. It is often discriminative, and is characterized by an absence of integration in a group, in terms of social principles, codes of conduct, and beliefs. Cultural partisanship introduces the accepted behaviors of one group as superior, and more valued, than those of another lesser-respected cultural group. In my surroundings, most of the residents, and hence, patients are white, making us (Afro-Americans and Asians) minorities, feel different if not isolated. Such deferential factors are responsible for establishing where specific individuals live, and what opportunities are available to them, in the healthcare and educational context (Sue et al., 2009)

Question 2

The presence of cultural bias within the context of healthcare-related recommendations and decision-making gives rise to significant challenges. Well-documented inequalities in health status of different racial and ethnic communities, in addition to nationally-publicized…… [Read More]

Resources and Services Administration (http://www.hrsa.gov/culturalcompetence/)

American Psychiatric Association's Steering Committee to Reduce Disparities in Access to Psychiatric Care (2004) (Natl. Assoc. Social Workers 2007).

These and many more substantive readings from research are listed by the author for assimilating culture-centric education. (Sue, Zane, Nagayama Hall, & Berger, 2009)

Question 7

As a Counselor, I will need to be aware that being culturally aware implies delivering services in a manner consistent with the recipient's culture, through regards to linguistic variation and cultural discussion. I would seek to be more sensitive to unaccultured ethnic minority clients. In addition, I would use discretion in cases where patients of a particular community or ethnicity are prone to certain clinical problems (for which I would study the ethnic group and its history in more depth) and if certain ethnic groups respond poorly to EBT (Evidence-based Treatment). (Sue et al., 2009)
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Devised it Has to Be

Words: 5709 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84896866

At times, even though the research may be complicated by varying definitions of homelessness, researchers are establishing methods for estimating the size of the homeless population, which includes people who have nowhere to go; at risk of losing housing through eviction or institutional discharge (Drury, 2008).

Case Study Methodology

In the case study methodology, a form of qualitative descriptive research, according to M. Dereshiwsky (1999) in "Electronic Textbook - Let Us Count the Ways: Strategies for Doing Qualitative esearch," the researcher using the case study methodology does not focus on discovering a universal, generalizable truth, nor do the researcher generally search for cause-effect relationships. Instead, the researcher emphasizes the exploring and describing process. As the researcher examines one individual or small participant pool, he/she then draws conclusions only about that one particular participant or group; only in the designated, specific context Case Studies 2008).

In considering or defining the case…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Andrade, A.D. (2009). Interpretive research aiming at theory building: Adopting and adapting the case study design. The Qualitative Report. Nova Southeastern

Inc. Retrieved May 26, 2009 from HighBeam Research:

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-196440938.html

Arellano, M.A. (2005). Translation and ethnography: The anthropological challenge of intercultural understanding. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 11(1), 165. Retrieved May 26, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5009119378
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Samantha Jones Like Will Rogers

Words: 1513 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82101148



There is disagreement as to whether CSB is an addiction, a psychosexual developmental disorder, an impulse control disorder, a mood disorder, or an obsessive-compulsive disorder, however most scientists dispute the idea that someone can become addicted to sex in the same way they become addicted to alcohol, thus abstinence as a treatment is viewed as an oversimplification of the problem (Compulsive).

Samantha Jones might be the first to admit that she has CSB, or not. But as long as it does not harm anyone, then "ho cares what you are just enjoy it."

orks Cited

Compulsive Sexual Behavior. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://www.uc.edu/psc/sh/SH_Compul_Sexual_Behav.htm

Quotes: Samantha Jones. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://en.thinkexist.com/quotes/by/character/samantha_jones/

Samantha Jones. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://www.hbo.com/city/cast/character/samantha_jones.shtml

Stein, Daniel J. "Sexual Addiction: An Integrated Approach." Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://ps.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/51/1/123

Vukadinovic, Zoran. "Sexual addiction, sexual compulsivity, sexual impulsivity, or what? Toward a theoretical model." The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Compulsive Sexual Behavior. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://www.uc.edu/psc/sh/SH_Compul_Sexual_Behav.htm

Quotes: Samantha Jones. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at  http://en.thinkexist.com/quotes/by/character/samantha_jones/ 

Samantha Jones. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://www.hbo.com/city/cast/character/samantha_jones.shtml

Stein, Daniel J. "Sexual Addiction: An Integrated Approach." Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://ps.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/51/1/123
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Counseling Is Described by Kobeisy as the

Words: 5150 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51824402

Counseling is described by Kobeisy as the professional form of guidance that is aimed at addressing concerns as well as aid individuals in improving their attitude, coping skills as well as behavior (Kobeisy 1).Counseling can help people, families as well as groups in achieving optimal growth and development for the stages of life in which they go through. Counseling as a profession has many specialties like marriage, grief, and pastoral as well as career. It is worth noting that apart from pastoral counseling, the field of counseling is meant to be a free.This is to imply that the counselor should be open minded while approaching their clients with an attitude that is non-judgmental. They are also not allowed to impose or even direct their clients. The counseling process should therefore help the clients to clearly see their choices, appropriately set their objectives while making the necessary changes in order to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Caldwell, Benjamin E, Woolley, Scott R, Caldwell, Casey J. Preliminary estimates of costeffectiveness for marital therapy. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 33:392 -- 405, 2007

Carr, Alan. Family Therapy: Concepts Process and Practice (2nd edn). Chichester:

Wiley.2006

Cohl, D'Vera "At Long Last, Divorce." Pew Research Center < http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1617/long-duration-marriage-end-divorce-gore
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Local College University Employs ESL Instructors However There

Words: 2118 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88293114

local college/university employs ESL instructors however there is a problem with the manner in which ESL instructors teach the students. They follow a very linear and singular method of instruction that generates lack of interest in students and decreases student's linguistic ability during class. The literature reviewed will focus on the subject: teaching English as a second language, foundation strategies for teachers in Puerto ico. The first literature to review is: Factors of Significant Impact on Proficiency Levels of Adult ESL Learners Within Post-Secondary Education in Puerto ico by Perez. Perez performed a case study in where ESL learners within a four-year university in Puerto ico were observed and identified as having higher or lower levels of second language proficiency. He determined that students with lower levels of second language proficiency fared worse academically overall. The identification of certain factors that may influence the development of second language proficiency can…… [Read More]

References

Larrotta, C., & Brooks, A. (2009). Identity Issues in Building an ESL Community: The Puerto Rican Experience. In Bringing community to the adult ESL classroom (pp. 45-53). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Nieves, R.E. (2009). Teachers' strategies to improve oral communication skills in secondary level of the public school system of Hatillo district of Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico: Universidad Interamericana de Puerto Rico (Recinto de Arecibo), Programa Graduado de Educacion.

Ortiz, E.A. (2010). Exemplary English Teachers in Puerto Rico (16). Retrieved from  http://biblioteca.uprag.edu/ICONO/icono16.pdf#page=7 

Perez, R. (2011, April). FACTORS OF SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON PROFICIENCY LEVELS OF ADULT ESL LEARNERS WITHIN POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION IN PUERTO RICO. Retrieved from proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=2338026921&Fmt=14&VType=PQD&VInst=PROD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1365276423&clientId=79356
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Empathy and Counseling Review and Critique of

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7986704

Empathy and Counseling

Review and Critique of "The Relationship Between Clients' Perceptions of Therapist-Parent Similarity with Respect to Empathy, Regard and Unconditionality and Therapists' Ratings of Client Transference" (1998) by Barrie Mariner Arachtingi and James W. Lichtenberg

From a counseling perspective, it is clearly much easier to have sympathy for others in need, such as "sympathy for the poor," than it is to have empathy, which requires a significant mental and emotional involvement. A study by Barrie Mariner Arachtingi and James W. Lichtenberg (1998) investigated the similarity between clients' perceptions of their therapists and their perceptions of their parents (or early parental figures) in terms of the relationship qualities of empathy, positive regard, and unconditionality of regard and how those perceptions compared with their therapists' ratings of transference.

ypothesis. The study hypothesis was that there was a positive associated between the similarity of the therapist and parents or parental figures…… [Read More]

Hypothesis. The study hypothesis was that there was a positive associated between the similarity of the therapist and parents or parental figures on the relationship dimensions of empathy, regard, and unconditionality and therapist ratings of transference. The researchers cite Freud's (1912) definition of transference as being.".. The experiencing of feelings, drives, attitudes, fantasies, and defenses toward a person in the present that are inappropriate to that person and are a repetition or displacement of reactions that originated regarding significant persons in early childhood" (p. 143).

Study Participants and Methods. The study participants were 62 actual therapy dyads (27 women and 35 men), ranging in age from 19 to 63 years (M = 40.18, SD = 12.01). Clients of varying diagnoses were included in the study; however, clients with thought disorders were eliminated due to potential problems concerning informed consent. The actual number of sessions attended by clients ranged from 5 to 200 (M = 40. 18, SD = 44.77); 29 therapists participated in the study as well (17 women and 12 men) and the therapists' credentials were supplied. The authors report that the therapists' ages ranged from 25 to 61 years (M = 43.59, SD = 10.07). Therapists' descriptions of their theoretical orientations were varied, although the most common orientations included psychodynamic, eclectic, and cognitive behavioral. The average number of clients that were seen by each therapist was 2.14 (SD = 1.62).

Results. The results of the study failed to support their hypothesized positive association between the similarity of the therapist and parents or parental figures on the relationship dimensions of empathy, regard, and unconditionality and therapist ratings of transference. Rather, the researchers suggested that the clients' relationship ratings of their parents and therapists indicated that the therapists' perceptions of transference may more accurately reflect their perceptions of their clients' nontransferential (i.e., real relationship) reactions to the therapist. In summary, Arachtingi and Lichtenberg conclude that the results of their study raise the question of whether therapist-observed transference adequately reflects a distortion of the current therapy relationship and a perceptual repetition of the relationship the client had with earlier parental figures, with such repetition being defined in terms of the perceived similarity of the relationship conditions offered by the clients' therapist and parents. Rather, they suggest that there appears to be the potential that the therapists' own perceptions of transference are a function of clients' reality-based reactions to the therapist; this may result from the contrast between clients' relationships with their parents and current therapy relationship experiences. As a result, they recommend that therapists consider such a possibility when analyzing a perceived transference reaction during therapy. "Specifically," they say, "it may be appropriate for therapists to consider that a client's positive image of
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Role of a Group Counselor Group Psychology

Words: 1975 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15306305

mental health clinic is understaffed and counselors decide to use group work to deal with more clients during a particular period of time. The counselor organizes a group and asks for candidates from colleagues and places a message on the clinic's bulletin board. However, the incoming members are not prepared, and the announcements fail to inform them about the purposes and goals of the group, the background and qualification of the leader, the expectations of the group and the techniques that will be used. Consequently, the receptionist admits the first 12 people who sign up or call regardless of the nature of their problems. During the first meeting, one depressed and suicidal member takes up the entire session and the important matters are not discussed. The intensity of the client's crisis also scared some of the members and they fail to return for the next session.

How to screen more…… [Read More]

References

Berg, R.C., Landreth, G.L. & Fall, K.A. (2013). Group Counseling: Concepts and Procedures. (5th Ed.) New York, NY: Taylor & Francis Ltd.

Corey, G. (2013). Case Approach to Counseling and Psychotherapy. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning

Corey, M., Corey, G. & Corey, C. (2008). Groups: Process and Practice. (8th Ed.). Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning

Weimels, L. (2014). Group Dynamics: How to Successfully Work in Groups. Retrieved 23 July 2015 from https://www.naspa.org/constituent-groups/posts/group-dynamics-how-to-successfully-work-in-groups
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Abnormal Psychology Theories Issues Diagnosis

Words: 2437 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61912524

The DSM explicitly "strives to be atheoretical, using merely observationally referent terms. The hope with this is to make the manual as acceptable as possible to professionals with different theoretical orientations (Gilles-Thomas 1989, Lecture 2). Specific criteria and systematic descriptions are offered as guidance for making diagnoses. "Essential features, associated features, prevalence rates, sex ratios, family patterns, and differential diagnoses are listed" and it is noted when "alternative or additional diagnoses…should be considered," such as the possibility that a manic episode could mask itself as schizophrenia (Gilles-Thomas 1989, Lecture 2). This might occur if the clinician was unacquainted with the patient and the patient's past history of depression, for example, and/or mood disorders in the patient's family.

Also key to the efficacy of the DSM in approaching the ideologically and theoretically charged world of abnormal psychology is its multiaxial system. The multiaxial system "allows for a more holistic and comprehensive…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abnormal psychology. (2009). a2psychology. Retrieved September 23, 2009 at http://www.a2zpsychology.com/articles/abnormal.htm

Gilles-Thomas, David L. (1989). Definitions. Abnormal psychology: Lecture 1. University of Buffalo. Retrieved September 23, 2009 at  http://ccvillage.buffalo.edu/Abpsy/lecture1.html 

Gilles-Thomas, David L. (1989). Classifications. Abnormal psychology: Lecture 2. University

of Buffalo. Retrieved September 23, 2009 at  http://ccvillage.buffalo.edu/Abpsy/lecture2.html
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School-Based Mental Health Program on

Words: 8166 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67429057

This is discussed at length by Fusick and ordeau (2004) "...school-based counselors need to be aware of the disturbing inequities that exist in predominantly Afro-American urban school districts, where nearly 40% of Afro-American students attend school in the United States" (Fusick and ordeau, 2004) This again places emphasis on the need for mental health programs in these areas of concern. This is also related to findings from a study by McDavis et al. (1995) Counseling African-Americans, which refers to research that stresses the "...widening achievement gap between Afro-American and Euro-American students." (McDavis, et al. 1995)

An important study Laura a. Nabors, Evaluation of Outcomes for Adolescents Receiving School-ased Mental Health Services (2002) refers to the particular issue and problems experience at inner-city schools. The author states that, "School mental health (SMH) programs are an important setting for providing mental health services to adolescents, especially urban youth who typically face in-…… [Read More]

Bibliography.aspx www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308

Smith, P.B., Buzi, R.S., & Weinman, M.L. (2001). Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic. Adolescence, 36(142), 323. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622

Stern, S.B., Smith, C.A., & Jang, S.J. (1999). Urban Families and Adolescent Mental Health. Social Work Research, 23(1), 15. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228

Sternberg, R.J., & Dennis, M.J. (1997). Elaborating Cognitive Psychology through Linkages to Psychology as a Helping Profession. Teaching of Psychology, 24(3), 246-249. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383

Stock, M.R., Morse, E.V., Simon, P.M., Zeanah, P.D., Pratt, J.M., & Sterne, S. (1997). Barriers to School-Based Health Care Programs. Health and Social Work, 22(4), 274+. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383
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Nursing Culture Overcoming Barriers to Change Introduction

Words: 5230 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4699596

Nursing Culture: Overcoming Barriers to Change

Introduction and Theoretical Framework

This program of study continues personal research and professional practice in the field of nursing within the area of public and private health systems. In an era characterized by increasing calls for more efficient approaches to healthcare delivery and accountability on the part of healthcare providers, there is a growing need for identifying opportunities to overcome organizational barriers to change that facilitate the implementation and sustainment of evidence-based practices over time. In order to accomplish this challenging enterprise, the nature of existing organizational barriers must be better understood, an issue that directly relates to the problem to be considered by the study proposed herein and which is discussed further below.

Statement of the Problem

According to Mannion, Davies and Marshall et al. (2005), the results of much of the research to date have identified a relationship between nursing culture and…… [Read More]

References

Banyard, V.L., & Miller, K.E. (1998). The powerful potential of qualitative research for community psychology. American Journal of Community Psychology, 26(4), 485.

Burton, S., & Steane, P. (2004). Surviving your thesis. New York: Routledge.

Dennis, C., & Harris, L. (2002). Marketing the e-business. London: Routledge.

Department of Health. (2000). The NHS plan: A plan for investment, a plan for reform. London:
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Counseling Theories & 8230 THERE Is No

Words: 2699 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41114157

& #8230; in its heyday there was elitism and arrogance among psychoanalysts, a sense of having superior knowledge that set us up for a fall" (Altman, ¶ 3). In a field that claims to possess knowledge of the unconscious, Altman asserts, this constitutes an occupational hazard. To counter the temptation to feel more knowledgeable than others, whether patients or the public in general, therapists who practice psychoanalytic therapy, need to remember that the depths of their own unconscious realms are as unfathomable as those they treat.

Psychoanalysis, nevertheless, possesses particularly valuable offerings, despite numerous attacks on meaning. Due to the fact that people currently, continuing to move faster and faster as they pursue success and security. Consequently, "thoughtfulness and self-reflection get crowded out. People are instrumentalized, working around the clock, on their cell phones and e-mail and Blackberries, allowing themselves to be exploited in the service of the corporate bottom…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Altman. N. (2007). Renewing psychoanalysis for the 21st century. Psychoanalysis & Psychotherapy. Heldref Publications. Retrieved October 01, 2009 from HighBeam

Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-171440479.html

Bacal, H.A. (2007). Discussion of Judy Pickles's case presentation from the perspective of psychoanalytic specificity theory. Psychoanalytic Inquiry. The Analytic Press, Inc.

Retrieved October 01, 2009 from HighBeam Research:
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Culture Concept and Overseas Subsidiaries

Words: 2919 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11683844

They wanted to know the best places to go after work, and expected him to help them in that regard.

Hanes finally told his Japanese trainers "he preferred not to mix business with pleasure." ithin a couple days, the group requested another instructor. The critical issue here, one can quickly discern, is that Hanes did not do his homework on the Japanese business culture; if he had, he would know the Japanese are intensely committed to their work, on duty and off duty.

The "Miscue No. 2" involves Ray Lopez, top salesperson for his company who was fluent in Spanish; he was sent to Buenos Aires to make a marketing pitch to a distribution firm there. He arrived and was picked up at the airport and surprised to learn that the meeting had been postponed for two days "...so that Ray could rest after the long trip" and also have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hult, G. Tomas M.; Cavusgil, S. Tamer; Deligonul, Seyda; Kiyak, Tunga; & Lagerstrom,

Katarina. (2007) What Drives Performance in Globally Focused Marketing Organizations? A Three-Country Study. Journal of International Marketing, 15(2), 58-85.

Keeley, Timothy Dean. 2001, International Human Resource Management in Japanese Firms: Their Greatest Challenge, New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Kim, Youngok, Gray, Sidney J. 2005, 'Strategic factors influencing international human resource management practices: an empirical study of Australian multinational corporations', International Journal of Human Resource Management, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 809-830.
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Episode of the Hard Talk

Words: 880 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47992695

The concept of ideal type was also discussed during the discussion, it was agreed that the 'an ideal type is a concept constructed by a social scientist, based on his or her interests and theoretical orientation, to capture the essential features of some social phenomenon'. The program also discussed the significance of the religious books, and it readings. The program sought the justification for the integration of the capitalism and religion, and the impact of the religious affiliation and social stratification on the Spirit of Capitalism was identified. In the program the Marx theory was referred, 'and capitalists and proletarians are equally alienated'.

The social evolution has been predicted, and the sources of the evolution have been regarded as controversial, therefore the capitalism has been placed against religion, where the capitalism. The host refuted the affects of religious affiliation and social stratification on the Spirit of Capitalism, and regarded both…… [Read More]

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Parental Involvement in Urban School

Words: 11020 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27657969

Overall parental involvement has an effect on the child from the early stage to the secondary stage. Students need the parents for guidance, integrity and confidence to become successful in life because it is not the teachers job to make sure the students have these qualities. "In reality, parent involvement is a more diverse and complex concept than is generally acknowledged" (Dom & Verhoeven, 2006, p.570).

The study will help to determine the reason for the different challenges students may face due to the lack of parental involvement.

esearch Design and Methodology

The proposed study will use a quantitative research design that uses both secondary resources as well as primary data collected specifically for the purposes of this research. The research procedure will proceed in a step-wise fashion, beginning with an exploratory review of the literature to identify common themes and trends in the research concerning current patterns of parental…… [Read More]

References

McDermott, P. & Rothenberg, J. (2000). Why urban parents resist involvement in their

children's elementary education. The Qualitative Report. 5(3/4).

Blasi, M.J. (2001). Rethinking family-school relations: A critique of parental involvement in schooling. Childhood Education, 78(1), 54.

Ainscow, M. & West, M. (Eds.). (2006). Improving Urban Schools: Leadership and Collaboration. Maidenhead, England: Open University Press. Retrieved July 30, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=111655146
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Leadership Has Been in Existence Since Ancient

Words: 1145 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93691084

leadership has been in existence since ancient times with various contributions on this phenomena having been cumulative. egardless of these cumulative contributions, there are still more significant concerns and deficiencies in the existing knowledge on leadership. Examples of these deficiencies is that many studies have ignored the type of organization and culture with which leaders function, services provided by the leader's organization, and the relationships between leaders and their superiors. On the contrary, these studies on leadership mainly focus on the relationship between leaders and their direct followers.

Leadership and Management:

Leadership is described as the creation of a vision or direction for a group of people to follow making a leader to be the head of new direction or vision. Leadership and management are terms that have continued to be used interchangeably though they are very different. These two concepts are necessarily connected and complementary with attempts to separate…… [Read More]

References:

Carless, S.A., Wearing, A.J. & Mann, L. (2000). A Short Measure of Transformational

Leadership. Journal of Business and Psychology, 14(3), 389-405.

House, R.J. & Aditya, R.N. (1997). The Social Scientific Study of Leadership: Quo Vadis?

Journal of Management, 23(3), 409-473.
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Multicultural Counseling

Words: 1460 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37512508

Multicultural Counseling Competency

The development of American society as a multicultural society in the recent years resulted from the numerous incidences of diaspora and migration among individuals who belong to various cultures and societies all over the world. At present, the United States is host country to peoples of various race, ethnicity, worldviews, as well as social class, which include Europeans, Asians, Africans, Hispanic, and Native Americans. The diversity of American society thus necessitates an awareness of the cultural differences among these groups to further understand and tolerate these differences as each group interacts with the other and the whole of American society.

Understanding cultural diversity is indeed imperative for the counselor, who faces the challenge to provide efficient mental health service for an individual who may belong to a culturally-different group other than the white Americans. The hybridization of American society serves as a challenge for multicultural counseling to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Arredondo, P. (2004). "Multicultural counseling competencies=ethical practice." Journal of Mental Health Counseling, Vol. 26, Issue 1.

Baruth, L. And M. Manning. (1999). Multicultural counseling and psychotherapy: a lifespan perspective. NJ: Prentice Hall.

Constantine, M. (2001). "Multicultural training, theoretical orientation, empathy, and multicultural case conceptualization ability in counselors." Journal of Mental Health Counseling, Vol. 23, Issue 4.

Liu, W. And D. Clay. (2002). "Multicultural counseling competencies: guidelines in working with children and adolescents." Journal of Mental Health Counseling, Vol. 24, Issue 2.
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Reality Therapy a New Approach

Words: 1682 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58158231



He realizes and wants the reader to realize that those roots have merit and modern day approaches simply that the field of mental health to the next step or next level of the industry, but he stresses the importance of action therapy not reflection therapy. Each step is a building block toward the eventual goal of having answers more quickly and more accurate than the past answers, however without Freud and those who came after him the new theories would not be possible.

he book is a refreshing approach and puts Glasser's reality therapy into play by acknowledging the others who have developed theories and giving them their dues before moving on to examine the next step which he believes is his approach.

Glasser's book is based on an individual's power to choose. hey can choose how they react to life, they can choose how they react to people and…… [Read More]

This book is written in a style that a mental health professional can read it and pick up the underlying meanings and ideas but a layman can also read it and gain valuable insight about how to change the way they have been approaching their life. It is an exciting how to for those who are ready to use their power to choose and get their lives on track toward success and happiness.

REFERENCE

Glasser, William (1989) Reality Therapy: A New Approach to Psychiatry Harper Paperbacks
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Marx Historical Context Classical Sociological and Economic

Words: 1342 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59721592

Marx Historical Context

Classical sociological and economic theories like those of Karl Marx emerged in Western Europe when it was experiencing the Enlightenment, the emergence of scientific method, a growing sense of individual autonomy over one's life conditions, the emergence of private property, urban growth, and a total shattering of the social balance of relations among peoples that had been in place for centuries if not millennia. Christianity and other traditional religions were being undermined by the new developments in science and technology, while urban, industrial capitalism was breaking up the old feudal-agrarian order in Europe and the Americas. All the founders of modern sociology had to deal with this radically new society, and attempted to describe its historical origins, the new social and economic problems of industrial capitalism, and how governments and societies should deal with them. Karl Marx received his PhD in economics in Germany during the dawn…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Appelrouth, S. And L.D. Edles (2010). Sociological Theory in the Classical Era: Text and Readings, 2nd Edition. SAGE Publications.

Greene, J.C. "Biological and Social Theory in the Nineteenth Century: August Comte and Herbert Spencer" in John Offer (ed). Herbert Spencer: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists, Volume 2. Routledge, 2000, pp. 203-26.

Marx, Karl and Friedrich Engels. The Manifesto of the Communist Party. Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1969.

http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/
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Dysfunctions and Their Therapies Dysfunctions and Remedies

Words: 1220 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16972289

Dysfunctions and Their Therapies

Dysfunctions and emedies involved

Treatment and Control of Dysfunctions

The Thought Focused Treatment System

The thought focused treatment systems are those which narrow down to thought processes and systems of belief. The system believes in the child developing process being the cause of dysfunction. Social learning and modeling of ideas result to the personalities of an individual. The personalities result to experiences such as thoughts and feelings, critical learning, and the imitation of these behaviors. For instance, the child develops thoughts and behaviors from the parents. If the parents hide their feelings and never cry, the child grows knowing that crying is not the solution. The environment directly affects the child's thoughts. Therefore, if an individual's development is distorted in any manner, there is likely to be an experience of dysfunctional issues or poor health. An individual learns how to cope with stress and problems in…… [Read More]

References

Grohol, J.M. (2004, September 21). Types of Therapies: Theoretical Orientations and Practices of Therapists. Retrieved from  http://psychcentral.com/therapy.htm 

Grohol, J.M. (2011). 15 Common Cognitive Distortions. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/lib/2009/15-common-cognitive-distortions/
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Multiple Therapeutic Models of a Family the

Words: 1306 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92071633

Multiple Therapeutic Models of a Family

The main components of structural therapy

Structural therapy is a family treatment model founded on the frameworks of systems theory. The distinctive component of this model is the emphasis it has placed on structural adjustments as the primary objective of the therapy session. This emphasis is prominent over details of adjustments in individual behaviors. This model is distinctive because the therapist is the most active agent and receives much attention in the course of family restructuring (Lock & Strong, 2012).

The main purpose of structural family therapy is prevention of sequences from repetition by coveting the hierarchical structures of families. This encompasses shifts in power distribution among family members by adjusting interaction styles. Nevertheless, structural family therapy operates by making alterations on the dysfunctional family structure through encouragement and promotion of growth among family members with the primary intention of re-building the family (Petridis,…… [Read More]

References

Goldenberg, H., & Goldenberg, I. (2008). Family therapy: An overview. Australia: Thompson Brooks/Cole.

Lock, A., & Strong, T. (2012). Discursive perspectives in therapeutic practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Peterson, G.W., Steinmetz, S.K., & Sussman, M.B. (2009). Handbook of marriage and the family. New York: Plenum Press.

Petridis, N., Pichorides, S.K., & Varopoulos, N. (2010). Harmonic analysis, Iraklion 1978: Proceedings of a conference held at the University of Crete. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.
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Delayed Speech Late Talkers

Words: 1213 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4584751

Delayed Speech: Identification and Treatment

One common question parents ask is if and when they should be concerned when a child manifests delayed speech. For an infant, delayed speech is of concern when the baby "isn't using gestures, such as pointing or waving bye-bye by 12 months; prefers gestures over vocalizations to communicate by 18 months; has trouble imitating sounds by 18 months; [and] has difficulty understanding simple verbal requests" (Delayed speech or language development, 2012, Kid's Health: 1). In an older child, a lack of developmentally-appropriate speech becomes worrisome when the child does not engage in spontaneous speech; repeats words or phrases without apparent understanding; cannot follow simply instructions; and has difficulty being understood by members outside of the family (Delayed speech or language development, 2012, Kid's Health: 1).

Early intervention for children who exhibit language delays has a significantly higher success rate than later interventions. "First, there is…… [Read More]

References

Esch, B.E., Carr, J.E., & Grow, L.L. (2009). Evaluation of an enhanced stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure to increase early vocalizations of children with autism. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42(2), 225-41.

Delayed speech or language development. (2012). Kid's Health. Retrieved:

http://kidshealth.org/parent/emotions/behavior/not_talk.html#

Kelley, M.E., Shillingsburg, M.A., Castro, M.J., Addison, L.R., & LaRue, Robert H., Jr.
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Ulysses An Odyssey of Errors Critics of

Words: 5176 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77075890

Ulysses: An Odyssey of Errors

Critics of James Joyce call his work cryptic and rambling, not easily followed by most readers. They proclaim that it lacks plot and classical elements of modern literature. However, Joyce did not intentionally write a bad novel, rather he was experimenting with a new literary style, one which broke almost all of the rules of modern literature. None the less, there have been those in society who have attempted to "correct" and "improve" upon Joyce's works. These attempts at "improvement" are to be the subject of this research. This research will approach the controversy surrounding Ulysses in reference to its place as a piece of art. In such a context, it is doubtful whether later versions of Ulysses have succeeded in clearing up the obscurities in the original novel, but rather have served to further confuse the issue.

Joyce was the first to use the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davies, John. "Kidd's craft in editing." The Times Higher Education

Supplement.February 12, p. 19. 1993.

Ellmann, Richard. James Joyce.New York: Oxford University Press. 1977.

Gabler, Hans Walter. Ulysses: A Critical And Synoptic Edition. Garland: New York.
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Early Childhood Literacy

Words: 1706 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7586266

Alternative Methods in eading Assessment for Young Learners

eading is one of the arduous tasks to teach in the early childhood subject. At the same time, it is also a very interesting process. As mostly believed, the beginning of the language learning process always involves enthusiasm and the joy of the subject going through trial and error, recognizing the closest parts of their life. It goes through that way - until one day the process becomes a real and conscious workshop.

As children start getting their formal education, they need to go through the development process with a series of goals, which mostly are carefully set up for them, in order to obtain an addressed achievement in a given time schedule. As the result, they may look a little bit nervous and reluctant to show their real competence, as the process of assessment considered threatening.

This issue has been a…… [Read More]

References

Beck, J.W. (1999). How to Raise a Brighter Child: The Case for Early Learning. Pocket Books. 352

Katz, L.G. (1997). A Developmental Approach to Assessment of Young Children. Retrieved November 6, 2002 from ERIC Digest. ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education Urbana IL. Web site: http://ericps.ed.uiuc.edu/eece/pubs/digests/1997/katz97.pdf.

Latha, R.H. (1999). A Reading Programme for Elementary Schools. The English Teaching Forum. Vol. 37. No. 4. pp. 12-15.

Meisels, S.J. (1995). Performance Assessment in Early Childhood Education: The Work Sampling System. Retrieved November 6, 2002 from ERIC Digest. ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education Urbana IL. Web site: http://www.ed.gov/databases/ERIC_Digests/ed382407.html.
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Technology Adoption by Small and Medium-Sized Logistics Providers

Words: 620 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10591231

technology adoption by small & medium-sized logistics providers," using a qualitative methodology. However, the use of a mixed methods approach could add another dimension to this study. Instead of engaging in a relatively small number of interviews of logistics providers, I could also submit questionnaires to be quantitatively assessed to a much wider framework of logistics competitors within the same industry. Qualitative research is always limited to some degree in scope because its focus is on depth, not breadth, and individual experiences. The introduction of a quantitative component would allow me to gain a broader perspective on the issues raised and qualify my findings from my more anecdotal, qualitative research. "Mixed methods begins with the assumption that investigators…gather evidence based on the nature of the question and theoretical orientation" rather than are shackled to a single worldview ("Best practices," 2014).

Mixed methods approaches to research offer 'the best of both…… [Read More]

References

Best practices for mixed methods research. (2014). NIH. Retrieved from:

http://obssr.od.nih.gov/scientific_areas/methodology/mixed_methods_research/section2.aspx

Conducting mixed-method evaluations. (2013). U.S. Aid. Retrieved from:

http://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1870/Mixed_Methods_Evaluations_Technical_Note.pdf