Thomas Paine Essays (Examples)

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Throughout the duration of the war, Paine was responsible for publishing a series of propaganda pieces which were published in the Crisis. In these, he often addressed the British Crown and warned of the Americans' united spirit: "In all the wars which you have formerly been concerned in you had only armies to contend with; in this case, you have both an army and a country to combat with," (Paine, Crisis 68). During this time he was also appointed to the position of secretary to the Committee of Foreign Affairs in 1777. Paine was partially responsible for securing supplying deals with France for the benefit of the American war effort. Yet overall, his role in the war was that of an essayist, in the aim of promoting American morale by artfully composing works that reminded the individual colonist of the ideals for which he or she fought and sacrificed.….

Moreover Thomas made people realize that kings are the cause of all wars with his evidence from the Bible:
In the early ages of the world, according to the scripture chronology, there were no kings; the consequence of which was there were no wars; it is the pride of kings which throw mankind into confusion." (Thomas Paine)

Thomas was an expert in reaching down to the souls of common man and with his knowledge about the deepest desires of the Americans he was able to stir up emotions and the desire in them to have a land of their own - to gain their independence. Thomas stated poetically to the people of America to "bring the doctrine of reconciliation to the touchstone of nature, and then tell me, whether you can hereafter love, honor, and faithfully serve the power that hath carried fire and sword into your land?" (Thomas Paine)

And to….

Thomas Paine's influential pamphlet, Common Sense, provided the inspiration for America's independence from Great Britain. Common sense reflected the common belief that British rule was often heavy-handed, unnecessary, and even unfounded. Thus, the success of Paine's Common Sense can be attributed to Paine's ability to tap into the beliefs of his audience, the American people.
Paine's Common Sense is divided into four key sections, plus an introduction. The first section describes Paine's thoughts on the origin and design of government and the relationship of these spots to the English constitution. The second section presents Paine's arguments against the validity of the English and monarchy in the colonies. Section three is an examination all of American political life in the late 1770s. The final, fourth section, describes the present ability of America to exist as a nation independent of British rule.

Paine's arguments for American independence are based on his understanding of the….

Thomas Paine -- a Man
PAGES 3 WORDS 951

In the second chapter of Common Sense, Paine wrote: "Society is produced by our wants, and government by our wickedness; the former promotes our happiness Positively by uniting our affections, the latter negatively by restraining our vices." Also, Paine's philosophy was also unusually critical, compared with the singers of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, in its uncompromising embrace of a non-theologically-based state order, a state based upon the concept of the author's beloved vale of reason. The value of reason vs. religious ideation was a popular concept during the Enlightenment amongst some European philosophers, but a controversial one on a mass level -- still, Paine was unafraid to advocate the idea of religious belief always being subordinate to political doctrines that could be justified through logic.
This is important to remember when issues of religion are debated today, in the contemporary public discourse. It is interesting to remember….

Thomas Paine -- Common Sense
Thomas Paine wrote "Common Sense" as an argument for American independence from Great Britain.

Paine begins his essay with general reflections concerning government. He begins the second paragraphs with "Society in every state is a blessing, but Government, even in its best state, is a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one" (Paine pp). ith this statement Paine is appealing to the masses by laying out his general view of government, assuring them that yes, it would be ideal to live without government, yet in reality impossible, however, it is not necessary to tolerate one in which treats its citizens unfairly. Paine continues, "for when we suffer, or are exposed to the same miseries by a government, which we might expect in a country without government, our calamity is heightened by reflecting that we furnish the means by which we suffer" (Paine pp). In this….

This person named Paine could not even come out of a charter for his imaginary independent America without borrowing from the English Magna Carta. The colonies are part of the British nation and we have been treating the colony like the mother country. And if the traitors like Paine and others like him decide to rebel, we will have no choice but to use our military might to pacify the colony and bring it under control.
Thomas Paine: The English King's response validates every argument I made in my pamphlet. The King needs to realize that we have nothing against England and nothing against Magna Carta, which was a document written by those who were fed up with the tyranny of British monarchs. We are only against British tyranny and King's brutality in treating its subjects in the colonies. We want to enforce a better document than Magna Carta to….

Thomas Paine
It is difficult to think of the founding of the United States without calling to mind Thomas Paine. Paine's "Common Sense" and "Age of Reason" have become not only part of American history, but part of classic American literature.

In "Common Sense," Paine wrote, "The new republican materials, in the persons of the commons, on whose virtue depends the freedom of England" (Paine pg). Paine is perhaps the least revered and celebrated of all the founding fathers, but, perhaps, one of the most patriotic and influential.

Thomas Paine was born January 29, 1737 in Thetford, Norfolk, England. His mother was Anglican, his father was Quaker. The family was poor, and Paine had only a brief education before going to work for his father, and went to sea at age nineteen. Later, he had various jobs, and eventually became an excise officer, collecting taxes from smugglers (Encarta pg). In 1772, he was….

Rights of Man
Thomas Paine wrote his book "Rights of Man" between 1791 and 1792, as a response to a French book written by Edmund Burke's called "Reflections on the Revolution in France." Paine is one of the most well-known writers of revolutionary times in the United States. Amazingly enough, Paine was a native Englishman, but when he came to America he became a true American, and for the rest of his life he wrote about freedom, liberty, and the "Rights of Man," as they related to both the English and Americans.

The "Rights of Man" is a lucid and compelling book, written when the American Revolution was still fresh in history. From the beginning, Paine maintains he is not on any side, but simple stating his strong beliefs and convictions. "I am not contending for nor against any form of government, nor for nor against any party here or elsewhere. That….

Frederick Douglass and Thomas Paine
Thomas Paine and Frederick Douglass are two men who inspired two very different revolutions, one of which led to the founding of a new nation, the other of which led to the freedom from slavery of an entire race of people. These two revolutions were nearly a century apart, yet the principles of each are the same. Both Paine and Douglass spoke with such eloquence and forethought that it is not surprising that their writings made such an impact on citizens as to inspire such profound change that the course of history was altered forever.

Each author spoke to a particular audience. Paine's work was addressing the American colonists who were under the rule of the British monarchy, and Douglass was addressing the issues of slavery within the new nation. Both issues, within their era, were topics of heated debates and passionate protests. Paine and Douglass knew….

" Paine explains that the next war may not be as kind on the people of Britain, therefore it is necessary to learn the errors of past views and perspectives in order to spare future generations and relationships between Great Britain and surrounding areas. Paine begins focusing on the effects of this continued perception of negativity on future wars. "The next war may not turn out like the last, and should it not, the advocates for reconciliation now will be wishing for the last..."
Paine uses this essay as a platform not only to inform the reader about the current situations concerning past and future wars, he also uses the essay as an opportunity to open the readers eyes to the similarities in man regardless of his location or circumstances. He expresses that the government and its rain like all things must end. "The authority of Great Britain over this continent….

Common Sense Thomas Paine
PAGES 2 WORDS 673

1. What was so revolutionary about Common-Sense when it was first written in 1775?When Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense, he dared the colonists to rise against one of the worlds greatest empires and encouraged them to build their new nation as a democratic republic. Paine argued in Common Sense that the colonies should pursue complete independence from Britain (Paine, 1776). His pamphlet persuaded many people who were dubious about the wars aim and influenced the views of laypeople and legislators alike. Common Sense was therefore revolutionary and instrumental in moving public opinion in the United States against Britain, and it was also a major element in the colonies choice to fight for complete independence.2. What is still revolutionary about the work globally today concerning the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights?Paines Common Sense remains revolutionary because history has shown that some governments and individuals continue to oppose the concept….

Paine explains: "A government of our own is our natural right: and when a man seriously reflects on the precariousness of human affairs, he will become convinced, that it is infinitely wiser and safer, to form a constitution of our own..."
His concept of independence as a nation-state is no different from people's common notion of independence of the individual as a human being's natural right. Each American has the natural right to be free; and so, upon the creation of a nation in America, the country itself attains 'collective independence.' Paine speaks of independence in the purest and natural sense, where every individual shall actively participate in the process of nation-building of a newly-independent America.

While Madison shares Paine's argument that independence should be given to America, his was an altogether different kind of independence. He firmly believes that the American nation should have representative or a "minority" who will….

Language of Ordinary People
The American evolution could not have been as strong as it was if it were not for one man, Thomas Paine. He was the one who supported and fought for it with all his synergies, combined in the written form of most celebrated and valued book and pamphlet Common Sense and The American Crisis, which turned the tables for revolution and brought a vibrant change in the history of America. Thomas Paine spoke the language of common people through his words. This assisted them in being able to rise up for their individual rights. He believed that ordinary people should defend their liberty and this concept was written strongly in his top works of eighteenth century, which is still remembered and read throughout the America as an inspiring piece of inscription to raise the most necessary revolution to change America. This thesis tends to explain how Thomas….

Homelessness in the United States
Common Sense by Thomas Paine

The political situation in the colonies of America were more than ready to receive the pamphlet entitled Common Sense by Thomas Paine. Paine's writing provided a nation confused about their future and issues surrounding it, with a needed spur towards action and clarity of thought. The ambivalence of the time from the end of 1775 results from equally strong but opposing forces in the collective consciousness of the American mind during this time.

On the one hand, there was the urge towards autonomy and independence, while on the other a fundamental dependence on the ritish still reigned. Exacerbating the confusion within people's minds was the political upheaval manifest in the war breaking out in Massachusetts during April, as well as the Second Continental Congress. Further battles against the ritish were fought in New England and the South (Foner 79).

Furthermore there was the opposition….

Common Sense & Fed #
Thomas aine: Common Sense

Thomas aine argues in Common Sense that America should declare independence from Great Britain because submission to, or dependence on, Great Britain tends to directly involve the colonies in European wars and quarrels and sets them at odds with nations that would otherwise "seek our friendship, and against whom, we have neither anger nor complaint."[footnoteRef:1] [1: Thomas aine, "Common Sense." Constitution Society (1776). Accessed September 19, 2012. http://www.constitution.org/tp/comsense.htm ]

aine asserts that the strongest arguments for staying part of the British Empire are that she had her military protect the colonies and furthermore, that America has flourished under this relationship. He also points out that some argue that this connection is necessary if the colonies are to continue to flourish and it will always be this way.

However, aine rejects these arguments claiming that America would have flourished as much, and probably more without her….

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16 Pages
Term Paper

Black Studies - Philosophy

Paine Thomas Paine's Political Religious

Words: 5156
Length: 16 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Throughout the duration of the war, Paine was responsible for publishing a series of propaganda pieces which were published in the Crisis. In these, he often addressed the…

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3 Pages
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American History

Thomas Paine's Common Sense Thomas

Words: 999
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Moreover Thomas made people realize that kings are the cause of all wars with his evidence from the Bible: In the early ages of the world, according to the…

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3 Pages
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American History

Thomas Paine's Common Sense

Words: 993
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Thomas Paine's influential pamphlet, Common Sense, provided the inspiration for America's independence from Great Britain. Common sense reflected the common belief that British rule was often heavy-handed, unnecessary, and…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

Thomas Paine -- a Man

Words: 951
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

In the second chapter of Common Sense, Paine wrote: "Society is produced by our wants, and government by our wickedness; the former promotes our happiness Positively by uniting…

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3 Pages
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Government

Thomas Paine's Common Sense

Words: 781
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Thomas Paine -- Common Sense Thomas Paine wrote "Common Sense" as an argument for American independence from Great Britain. Paine begins his essay with general reflections concerning government. He begins the…

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2 Pages
Essay

Government

Thomas Paine in His Pamphlet

Words: 627
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

This person named Paine could not even come out of a charter for his imaginary independent America without borrowing from the English Magna Carta. The colonies are part…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

American History

Thomas Paine it Is Difficult to Think

Words: 1117
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Thomas Paine It is difficult to think of the founding of the United States without calling to mind Thomas Paine. Paine's "Common Sense" and "Age of Reason" have become not…

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2 Pages
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Government

Rights of Man Thomas Paine Wrote His

Words: 785
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Rights of Man Thomas Paine wrote his book "Rights of Man" between 1791 and 1792, as a response to a French book written by Edmund Burke's called "Reflections on the…

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3 Pages
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American History

Frederick Douglas and Thomas Paine

Words: 847
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Frederick Douglass and Thomas Paine Thomas Paine and Frederick Douglass are two men who inspired two very different revolutions, one of which led to the founding of a new nation,…

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4 Pages
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Black Studies - Philosophy

Common Sense by Thomas Paine

Words: 1151
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

" Paine explains that the next war may not be as kind on the people of Britain, therefore it is necessary to learn the errors of past views and…

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2 Pages
Essay

Literature

Common Sense Thomas Paine

Words: 673
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

1. What was so revolutionary about Common-Sense when it was first written in 1775?When Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense, he dared the colonists to rise against one of the…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Government

Independent Governance in Thomas Paine's

Words: 809
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Paine explains: "A government of our own is our natural right: and when a man seriously reflects on the precariousness of human affairs, he will become convinced, that…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

American History

Language of Ordinary People Thomas Paine

Words: 1806
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Language of Ordinary People The American evolution could not have been as strong as it was if it were not for one man, Thomas Paine. He was the one who…

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5 Pages
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Government

Synthesis of Thomas Paine's Common Sense

Words: 1398
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Homelessness in the United States Common Sense by Thomas Paine The political situation in the colonies of America were more than ready to receive the pamphlet entitled Common Sense by Thomas…

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2 Pages
Essay

Drama - World

Common Sense & Fed Thomas Paine

Words: 580
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Common Sense & Fed # Thomas aine: Common Sense Thomas aine argues in Common Sense that America should declare independence from Great Britain because submission to, or dependence on, Great Britain…

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