Appalachian Trail Conservancy Grant Proposal essay

Download this essay in word format (.doc)

Note: Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from essay:

Appalachian Trail Conservancy Grant Proposal

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy having served the American population is experiencing high incidences of congestion of its premises and most of the premises are worn out. This problem has reached a point where public safety as well as hiking activities may be in jeopardy. Therefore, the Conservancy respectfully submits its proposal to the Corporate Giving Program for $250,000 to support its land acquisition and renovation of outdoor facilities for hikers. Appalachian Trail Conservancy is an innovative firm utilizes technology to make the hiking activities enjoyable for the hikers. In addition, the conservancy offers a variety of programs that serve community members of every age and background (Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, 2013). This particular proposal seeks funding for one of our most important programs; outdoor resources and land expansion. This program is the cornerstone of the organization and its strategy to bring hiking experiences to low-income children and teenagers. To reach this mission, the organization seeks to launch an innovative partnership with Microsoft and Google Corporation consisting of funding and volunteer efforts. Given the grant, the conservancy will provide occupational training construction skills and on-the-job-experience as well as basic educational services and leadership development to both hikers and employees in conjunction with the rehabilitation of 40 units of outside catering and buying more vacant space for the conservancy. This proposal requests $250,000 from the federal government for the conservation of the trail, employees' payments and renovation of existing structures. The organization anticipates that the grant will be an essential and primary part of its program and will add a crucial training and educational component to the program permitting us to both extend our efforts in the field of counseling and training as well as lower construction costs so that the organization may serve the community with a larger number of assisted units. The program which the partners envision is multifaceted, comprehensive and innovative. The trail has a tremendous need for additional spaces and buildings with a large vacant land and few appropriate sites. The organization having identified an appropriate site, will proceed to construct newer structures and rehabilitate a 40-unit building with 36 units of housing and 4 commercial units as a component of this program. The Housing component will provide aid to clients requiring assisted housing after long hikes or requiring lodges for some days when visiting the trails. Moreover, the organization anticipates that 25% of the units will be set aside for transitional housing for homeless families that are victims of disaster who will get social and other necessary services on site. The housing component will be financed through the State Housing Fund and Federal low-income tax credits.

Introduction

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) formerly known as Appalachian Trail Conference is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the conservation of the Appalachian Trail, which runs from Maine to Georgia. The Conservancy works to protect the trail's 2,179 miles greenway and coordinates the work of more than thirty hiking clubs performing trail maintenance. The ATC was established in 1925 in Washington, DC with Major Welch as chairman and Torrey as treasurer. In 1927, Welch was replaced by Judge Arthur Perkins and in 1928, J.A. Allis became Treasurer. In line with this, the ATC is headquartered in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. It is committed not only to trail maintenance and protection, but to education, science and awareness as well. The trail's size, uniqueness and the environmental effects of it and on it can provide valuable insights and advances for science and ecology. The ATC currently has a MEGA-Transect scientific study underway, which will use data collected to provide critical information toward preservation on a global scale. Additionally, the Conservancy strives to heighten awareness via the ATC's Community Recognition Program that recognizes and highlights the communities through which the trail's 2,000 miles run. As well, the ATC's 'A Trail to Every Classroom' is a school program that utilizes the trail to teach students about conservation, preservation, earth science and ecology.

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy's mission is to preserve and manage the Appalachian Trail ensuring that its vast natural beauty and priceless cultural heritage can be shared and enjoyed today, tomorrow, and for centuries to come. Moreover, the Conservancy's vision is to connect the human spirit with nature while preserving the delicate majesty of the Trail as a haven for all to enjoy. The organization is also committed to nurture and protect this sacred space through education and inspiration. We strive to create an ever-expanding community of doers and dreamers, and work to ensure that tomorrow's generations will experience the same mesmerizing beauty we behold today. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy is guided by a set of core values that represent the organization's commitment to preserve and manage the Appalachian Trail. The conservancy pursues its mission and vision by dedication to; volunteerism and community support; cooperation, sustainability, integrity, creativity and innovation, health and safety as well as enjoyment.

Since its establishment, the number of clients served by the conservancy has increased and as such, congestion and wearing out of facilities has taken place. New businesses and industries, attracted by the ample labor force resulting from bankrupt farming, have provided an unexpected source of economic growth. Therefore, to serve this community, the Corporation now has more than 13 full-time employees; all of them have completed the required basic training and eighty percent of the employees have at least 120 hours of advanced training in such subjects as accident investigation, trail marking, rope climbing and rock climbing. Moreover, Appalachian Trail Conservancy is one of the few state recognized conservation agencies that successfully underwent certification by the National Council of Environmental Conservation. This designation denotes that the organization has achieved exceptionally high standards of performance in all its initiatives. In addition, more than half the employees have earned commendations for service beyond the call of duty, and three officers have been awarded the Mayor's Medal of Merit for risking their lives to save others.

Statement of Problem

Hiking is an outdoor activity which consists of walking in natural environments, often in mountainous or other scenic terrain. People often hike on hiking trails. Hiking has become the favorite past time for many people living across the globe. This is because a person is able to visit new places and explore new destinations offered by nature with extra ordinary scenic locations. But there are many common hiking problems that are faced by hikers that would lead to serious infections if not provided immediate medical attention. Generally, blisters are also a major problem faced by hikers and caused by the friction of shoes or socks or rubbing of boots against the feet. When this happens continuously for a longer period of time, it leads to breakage of skin and eruptions called blisters (Carlson & O'Neal-McElrath, 2008). It is such a popular activity that there are numerous hiking organizations worldwide. The health benefits of different types of hiking have been confirmed in studies. Some of the health benefits of hiking include, but are not limited to, losing excess weight, decreasing hypertension, and improving mental health. However, hiking may produce threats to personal safety. These threats can be dangerous circumstances while hiking and/or specific accidents or ailments. Diarrhea has been found to be one of the most common illness afflicting long-distance hikers in the United States. In addition, dangerous hiking circumstances include losing the way, inclement weather, hazardous terrain, or exacerbation of pre-existing medical conditions. Specific accidents include metabolic imbalances such as dehydration, topical injuries such as frostbite, and attacks by animals, or internal injuries.

Based on this, the conservancy together with a non-profit group of mountain bikers, the Central Alabama Mountain Peddlers (CAMP), is busy expanding and renovating the trails and the joint venture is supposed to build 15 miles of new trails in the park. The group also plans to renovate and improve other facilities; the trails are a mix of new track and expansions of existing trails including some of original Civilian Conservation Corps trails. According to the conservancy, the new trails are developed with notable historic points of interest and natural beauty in mind. The primary goal is to help bring the park to life as a thriving facility that offers many different opportunities to enjoy the great outdoors. While dependent upon funding, some of the planned improvements include a zip line, updated playground equipment, a disc golf course, adding more than 10 miles of flow-type mountain bike trail, adding two pump tracks, and a bike wash/changing room station. The conservancy also requires securing a recreational trails grant that would make some of the park improvements possible (Browning, 2011).

Project Objectives

Once granted the required funding, the conservancy aims at bringing together businesses and Conservancy experts to learn about the value of nature and develop corporate conservation best practices. The organization thus requires members to demonstrate corporate leadership in valuing and investing in nature, and to collaborate to develop common positions and advocacy strategies in key areas of public policy and to advance global…[continue]

Some Sources Used in Document:

"About-PATC" 

Cite This Essay:

"Appalachian Trail Conservancy Grant Proposal" (2013, February 27) Retrieved December 9, 2016, from http://www.paperdue.com/essay/appalachian-trail-conservancy-grant-proposal-103670

"Appalachian Trail Conservancy Grant Proposal" 27 February 2013. Web.9 December. 2016. <http://www.paperdue.com/essay/appalachian-trail-conservancy-grant-proposal-103670>

"Appalachian Trail Conservancy Grant Proposal", 27 February 2013, Accessed.9 December. 2016, http://www.paperdue.com/essay/appalachian-trail-conservancy-grant-proposal-103670


Read Full Essay
Copyright 2016 . All Rights Reserved