Weimar Republic the Weimer Republic essay

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I saw them digging up potatoes...while the farmer...watched them in despair and the local policeman looked on gloomily from the distance...What did it remind me of? Of the war, of the worst period of starvation in 1917 and 1918, but even then people paid for the potatoes.|...|

Hauser does not agree with Ostwald that times are finally returning to normal and in fact has his own moral message about the events of the day, as gangs of many men overtake well intentioned farmers by stealing their crops, without recourse and whole families, rather than just unemployed men roam the streets seeking food and refuge. The two, living in the same time see things froma very different perspective, and yet both harbor undertones of morality as a breaking point in the culture of the nation.

It is also important to mention that Germany was seeking and finding solutions in more than one camp, as it was not just the Nazi's who formed whole platforms of reform on the fears of the populous. One fantastic example of this is from a speech given in 1918 by Rosa Luxemburg, a leader of the communist movement in postwar Germany.

It was typical of the first period of the revolution down to December 24 that the revolution remained exclusively political. Hence the infantile character, the inadequacy, the halfheartedness, and the aimlessness of this revolution. Such was the first stage of a revolutionary transformation whose main objective lies in the economic field, whose main purpose it is to secure a fundamental change in economic conditions...but within the last two or three weeks a number of strikes have broken out quite spontaneously. Now, I regard it as the very essence of this revolution that strikes will become more and more extensive, until they at last become the focus of the revolution. (Applause) Thus we shall have an economic revolution and therewith a socialist revolution. |...|

Luxemburg stresses that the German people are seeking revolution, as a result of real economic hardship, a hardship that did not improve for many years, and makes clear that the Nazi party was not the only system that was seeking to resolve the problems of Germany. Luxemburg, speaks unfailingly and is warmly received as a bringer of truth, in much the same manner as Hitler did later.

Germany was seeking change, sweeping change that would lend rapid resolution to the desperation and the symptoms of such desperation that resulted from the great depression and then the post-war reparations and economic instability of a nation. It is for these reasons and others that the Weimer republic, of post-WWI Germany was in many ways doomed to social and political failure, most profoundly because of the economic climate of the period which it encompassed. Seeking rapid change led the people to look for resolutions in places where the message gave them the most hope as to the manner in which their lives would be transformed. The nation sought an end to crippling inflation and jarring social unrest that resulted from it.

Bibliography

Hauser, Heinrich. "The Unemployed" (April 1933) in the Weimar Republic Sourcebook, ed. Anton Kaes, Martin Jay, and Edward Dimendberg, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1994. 84-85.

Kroner, Friedrich. "Overwrought Nerves." In the Weimar Republic Sourcebook, ed.

Anton Kaes, Martin Jay, and Edward Dimendberg, (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1994. 63- 64.

Luxemburg, Rosa. "Founding Manifesto of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD)"

1918) in the Weimar Republic Sourcebook, ed. Anton Kaes, Martin Jay, and Edward Dimendberg, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1994. 40-45

Ostwald, Hans. "A Moral History of Inflation" in the Weimar Republic Sourcebook, ed.

Anton Kaes, Martin Jay, and Edward Dimendberg, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1994. 77-78.

Widdig, Bernd. Culture and Inflation in Weimar Germany. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2001.

Bernd Widdig, Culture and Inflation in Weimar Germany (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2001), 3.

Hans Ostwald, "A Moral History of Inflation" in the Weimar Republic Sourcebook, ed. Anton Kaes, Martin Jay, and Edward Dimendberg, (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1994). 77-78.

Bernd Widdig, Culture and Inflation in Weimar Germany (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2001), 7.

Friedrich Kroner. "Overwrought Nerves." In the Weimar Republic Sourcebook, ed. Anton Kaes, Martin Jay, and Edward Dimendberg, (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1994). 63- 64.

Heinrich Hauser "The Unemployed" (April 1933) in the Weimar Republic Sourcebook, ed. Anton Kaes, Martin Jay, and Edward Dimendberg, (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1994). 84-85.

Rosa Luxemburg, "Founding Manifesto of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD)"…[continue]

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