"Environmental Scan Essays"

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Environmental Science Common Workplace Problem Essay

Words: 363 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87282584

Very often workers must choose jobs based upon benefits, not where they wish to work. Workers may decide not to open up small businesses or work for smaller businesses who cannot offer them comprehensive care. and, of course the children of uninsured workers suffer, innocent victims of the system.

Even companies like Safeway that have made heroic efforts to foster healthy living and disease prevention initiatives to cut costs have stated that universal health care is necessary to contain costs and keep their workers healthy enough to work, with as few sick days as possible. (Cohen 2007:4). Unions, companies, and the government must work together to create a healthy, safer and more affordable medical tomorrow.

Works… [Read More]

Bibliography:
Cohen, Jonathan. "What's the One Thing Big Business and the Left Have in Common?" The New York Times Magazine. 1 Apr 2007. [10 Apr 2007]. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/01/magazine/01Healthcare.t.html?pagewanted=6&ei=5070&en=6ff729a7fa6330ac&ex=1176350400
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Environment Scan Assessment of Resources Team Member Essay

Words: 353 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9365391

Environment Scan

Assessment of resources

Team Member One has a handy-man organization that uses a mentor, already experienced in the handyman business, as a resource. By shadowing this mentor, Team Member One will gain a wealth of knowledge and capitalize on years of experience. The team member also has access to military personnel on a government installation. Theses prior relationships with military personnel also aid in growth of his business.

Team Member Two also works on a military installation. This team member's tutoring business benefits from the number of soldiers who require tutoring for military tests that they take to advance their careers.

Team Member Three's main resource is creativity. Sendoutcards is a new company that needs customers. The quality of the product is an asset, but the Team Member will also need to cultivate marketing skills in order to build the market.

Competitive position

Team Member One can offer lower prices in order to compete. His expenses are lower because he does not have advertising, unlike his competitors.

Tamara's Tutorials will compete on the basis…… [Read More]

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International Environmental Laws on Oil Gas Production Effects Essay

Words: 2138 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30626844

International Environmental Laws on Oil/Gas Production

Effects of Oil and Gas Production to the Environment in Norway

Over the years, oil and gas production companies have been a serious global concern. This is due to impacts on the environment associated with its production. International principles setup aims at governing the extraction and usage of such sources of energy. Norway is located in Europe, located near North Sea. Its high level of energy production has highly boosted the Gross National product (GNP) of Europe. Oil, gas and hydroelectric power having contributed significantly to the rapid development of industries in Europe and contribute around 50% to the economy. Discovery of oil and gas was in early 1960's, and currently, Norway is the seventh largest producer of oil and gas internationally. There have been contravenes between energy producing industries and the environmental activists. Several principles set to govern energy production have been set, and any energy company willing to expand should put such principles into (Gardinerr et al., 2003) consideration (Edwards, 1998, p 23-25).

Extraction of oil and gas as sources of energy involves combustion of fossil fuels, which in turn emit carbon dioxide gas to the atmosphere. These gases build up in the atmosphere causing global warming effects especially in the Northern part of Europe where Norway lies. Oil spills and chemicals are discharges into the water bodies during transportation of oil from the offshore to mainland. This endangers the life of aquatic and terrestrial animals and causes imbalance of the ecosystem. Fishing in Norway along the shores is also another economic practice of the Norwegians that has declined over time due to gas and oil extraction in Norway. Oil and chemical spillage threats this industry, although fishing plays a vital role in building up the Norwegian economy too (Harn et al., 2008, p. 73).

Therefore, policies have been set to govern the environment, to maintain the non-polluted environment during extraction and production of oil and gas. The principle of common, but differentiated, responsibilities in oil and gas production focuses on reducing emission of gases during production, that build up in the atmosphere (Rio Declaration, 1992: chapter 7). Oil and gas producing…… [Read More]

Sources:
Development of E.C.O.A., 2001. Environmental Performance Reviews: Norway. Holand: OECD publishers.

Edwards, J., 1998. Europe. Scandinavia: Nelson Thornes Publishers.
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Business' Environmental Responsibilities and Stewardship Essay

Words: 4956 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82302299

In addition, we might ask ourselves if the richer nations have or not a greater responsibility as far as the research and development in the area of sustainable energy are concerned. (Reid, environmentalleader.com)

Believing that there are such energy sources or consumption policies which would allow the planet's resources to be maintained for a longer period, while making sure that all the nations are provided with a comfortable living is rather naive. Under these circumstances, it has been argued that doing the moral thing means choosing the least terrible solution. The problem is that this implies a relativistic evaluation of the matter which impacts the manner in which the moral principles are conceived.

Before stepping into a debate regarding the character of the moral principles, we may state that we agree with the opinions which state that there is no such thing as objective moral principles."Ethics can be seen as a system of principles or judgements which state whether something is good or bad, right or wrong" (Amberla, T, Wang, L., Juslin, H., Panwar, R, Hansen, E., Anderson, R., 45).

In other words, there are no universally valid moral principles existing somewhere and waiting to be discovered and applied by man. On the contrary, it is man who judges the reality in which he lives in order to understand what is moral and what is not. Reading between the lines we understand that an objective evaluation of the sustainability issue is required, evaluation which is likely to lead to some relevant conclusions regarding the ethical "things to be done": "At the macro level, the definition of business ethics particularly encompasses the moral evaluation of the economic system of free enterprise, as well as possible alternatives to and modifications of it"( De George in Amberla, T, Wang, L., Juslin, H., Panwar, R, Hansen, E., Anderson, R., 46)

There is no action that man can perform which…… [Read More]

Bibliography:
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (Ross, W.D. Translator). Retrieved fromhttp://socserv.mcmaster.ca/econ/ugcm/3ll3/aristotle/Ethics.pdf September 30, 2010

Hartman Laura P. & Joe DesJardins. Business Ethics Decision Making for Personal integrity & Social Responsibility, Second Edition
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Brain Scans as Evidence Brain Essay

Words: 2688 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84044762



Disadvantages of fMRI

lshani Ganguli (2007), Harvard University, asserts in the article, "Watching the Brain Lie," that fMRI lie detection does not yet merit a place in the courtroom or elsewhere. Kanwisher stresses: "No published studies come even close to demonstrating the kind of lie detection that would be useful in a real world situation."

In addition, according to Ganguli (2007), a number of various types of lies exist that include omissions, white lies, exaggerations, and denials which potentially involve differing neural processes that scientists have not yet mastered.

Jed Rakoff, U.S. .District Judge for the Southern District of New York, admits that he doubts fMRI tests will conform to the courtroom standards for "scientific evidence (reliability and acceptance within the scientific community) anytime in the near future, or that the limited information they provide will have much impact on the stand."

As most lies in court include omissions or exaggerations of the truth; they would be tricky to recreate in a laboratory. The potential for harm overshadow any foreseeable benefits from fMRI, Rakeff purports. Yet another drawback could materialize if an individual actually believed a lie. Whether or not a machine would identify this data as a truth or a lie is not yet clear.

Stacey a. Tovino (2007), Assistant Professor of Law, Health Law Institute, Hamline University School of Law, contends that fMRI presents a number of practical issues. "Individuals whose brains are being scanned must lie completely still for a period of time within an MRI scanner, which can be loud and claustrophobic. Brain motion resulting from the individual's movement or, even, the individual's respiratory and cardiac cycles, can interfere with data acquisition."

The validity of results from the fMRI also depend on the person's willingness and ability to comply with and complete the assigned mental task.

Henry T. Greely, Deane F. And Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law, Stanford University and Judy Illes (2007), Associate Professor (Research) of Neurology, Stanford University, relate another concern as they assert that fMRI-based lie detection is not currently covered by any type of regulatory scheme. In human trials for fMRI, no guidelines cover how an effective and ethical trial could best be conducted.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:
Mark Pettit Jr. FMRI and BF Meet FRE: Brain Imaging and the Federal Rules of Evidence, American Journal of Law and Medicine, (2007); available at HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1436644681.html

Stacey a. Tovino. Imaging Body Structure and Mapping Brain Function: A Historical Approach. American, Journal of Law and Medicine, (2007); available at HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1436644641.html

Wiliam P. Cheshire Jr. Can Grey Voxels Resolve Neuroethical Dilemmas?, Ethics & Medicine, Bioethics Press Highland Park, IL., (2007); available at HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1350089161.html
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Chick-Fil-A Identifies Analyzes Important External Environmental Factor Essay

Words: 1353 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54655337

Chick-fil-A

Identifies analyzes important external environmental factor remote, industry, external operating environments o Identifies analyzes important internal strengths weaknesses organization: Include assessment organization's resources.

Chick-fil-A: A forward-thinking, old-fashioned restaurant

Chick-fil-A: A forward-thinking, old-fashioned restaurant

Chick-fil -- A is a rare type of fast food restaurant. Like In-and-Out Burger, it attracts the patronage of many loyal 'foodie' customers who would otherwise not darken the door of a franchise. Chick-fil -- A is known for its high standards of quality and service. Founder Truett Cathy created a sandwich made of high-quality white breast meat that was then fried in a pressure cooker with peanut oil, placed on a fluffy white bun, and seasoned with a unique blend of spices topped with a signature pickle. The company's owner has also assumed a high degree of personalized control over the evolution of the company, which is unusual in a fast food enterprise (Chick-fil-A, 2010, Company histories).

External operating factors

Remote

On a macro level, the fact that America is still widely perceived as being in shaky economic straits could prove beneficial for Chick-fil-A's future health. People are going out to eat at fancy, sit-down restaurants far less. Eating a Chick-fil -- A is an ideal opportunity for people to enjoy an 'affordable luxury' in the form of a fast food chicken sandwich. Fast food is widely regarded as 'recession proof,' and often people turn to comfort food in hard times, like fried chicken. Fast food is cheap and filling, albeit not particularly nutritious (Kordares 2009).

Industry

Within the fast food industry, since the recession there has been a renewed focus on low-cost menu items. Despite highly-publicized efforts to encourage Americans to eat more healthfully, it was Dollar Menu sales of burgers, nuggets, and fries that enabled McDonald's to register a 5.4% sales increase during the height of the credit crisis (Kordares 2009). Healthy foods tend to cost more, even at fast food restaurants, and offer more caloric bang for every buck spent. Additionally, when people are stressed, they are biologically speaking, more apt to crave high fat foods.

While not as famous as McDonald's, Chick-fil -- A also lacks some of the 'bad' brand associations of McDonald's, and to a lesser extent…… [Read More]

References:
Chick-fil-A. (2010). Company histories. Retrieved December 12, 2010 at http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/ChickfilA-Inc.-Company-History.html

Chick-fil-A. (2010). Official Website. Retrieved December 12, 2010 at http://www.chick-fil-a.com/#home
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Student Inserts His Her Name Here Essay

Words: 1203 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15792651

It gives useful information to Apple about what improvements and innovative features its potential consumers want to see in its products.

As far as the effectiveness of these measurement guidelines are concerned, Marketing Research is the most effective way of knowing the consumers' response, whereas Development brings the most stylish and highly advanced products in the market. The investment which Apple makes on R&D never goes waste; instead, gives it returns that are many times higher than those investments.

Environmental Scan for Marks & Spencer's

Marks and Spencer's, incorporated in 1884 is among the top market leaders in garments and food industry in the United Kingdom (marksandspencer.com, 2011). Facing a stiff competition in both the businesses, Marks and Spencer's ensures the highest quality of its products all the way through highly efficient business operations and Total Quality Management (TQM) so as to maintain its top position.

Thus, the most important competitive advantage of Marks and Spencer's is its due concern for Total Quality Management principles. Marks and Spencer's garment products are known for their first-class quality, reliability, style, and variety. Since its incorporation in 1984 and international expansion in 1974, Marks and Spencer's has never compromised on these important factors; the reward of which is in the form of loyal customers all over the world (marksandspencer.com, 2011). To ensure the strategic effectiveness, Marks and Spencer's expends a lot on highly advanced machinery and takes the service of highly specialized engineers and professionals. The measurement of effectiveness is done by comparing its business operations with the international standards of quality and efficiency. These strategies and measurement guidelines are very effective to compete in such a stiff business environment. Reason being, customers want 'value' for their money which can only come from efficient business operations and TQM principles (Waters, 2006). Truly deserved, Marks & Spencer's has…… [Read More]

Sources:
Business Insider.Com, (2011). Apple. Retrieved on August 28th, 2011 from

Ferrari.com, (2011). About Ferrari. Retrieved on August 28th, 2011 from
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Employing Strategy in a Competitive Environment Essay

Words: 1485 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78856702

Deltacom

Environmental Scan

The environmental scan is focused on identifying and analyzing the threats in the external environment. There are factors outside of the company that can reduce revenue or profits for the future. These can be obstacles, externally-driven changes or just competition (MindTools, 2013). Deltacom faces a number of such threats. The main threats in the external environment are competitors, regulators, and economic threats. Competitors are a significant threat. Deltacom operates in eight southern states, and it competes against other national and regional players. Deltacom has been purchased by Earthlink and renamed Earthlink Business, indicating that it competes for business with corporate customers (Deltacom.com, 2013). The competition includes some major companies, like AT&T, Verizon and more, in addition to smaller, more regional players. Competitors will use all manner of enticements to attract competitors, and this can affect the prices or the margins that Deltacom earns. Clearly, Deltacom faced substantial competition in its market, as it was forced to sell out to Earthlink, a tactic normally associated with a struggling company.

The second major environmental threat is regulatory. While all businesses face basic regulatory burden in the form of human resources and environmental laws, the telecommunications industry is one of the more heavily-regulated industries. The industry is governed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), a body that among other things investigates the conduct of telecommunications firms and auctions off wireless bandwidth. Because most of Deltacom's business is landline-based, the company is not as heavily-impacted by regulatory burden as many other firms in the industry.

The third major environmental threat is economic. When the economy is struggling, firms will often reduce their expenditure on all items, including telecommunications. It could be argued that a sluggish economy represents an opportunity to grow telecommunications businesses as a substitute for travel, but when businesses are closing and contracting, the net effect is at best a wash, and more likely a revenue downturn for firms that service other businesses.

Strengths

Deltacom does not have too many strengths. The company was bought out by Earthlink, and this gives it two main sources of strength. First, the Earthlink brand is more widely-known as this was one of the tech companies that rose to prominence in the late 1990s. Deltacom has a presence in eight states, and has built up a network of customers in that region -- this geographic base is a source…… [Read More]

References:
Deltacom.com. (2013). Retrieved November 1, 2013 from http://www.deltacom.com/

MindTools.com (2013). SWOT Analysis. MindTools.com. Retrieved November 1, 2013 from http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTMC_05.htm
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Southwest Airlines External & Internal Essay

Words: 1093 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23263604

This savings on fuel has also given Southwest more funds to invest in programs to reduce turn-around time of their jets between flights .

Southwest Airline's Internal Weaknesses

As with any company the size of Southwest, they have several weaknesses, with the most significant being their heavy dependence only on passenger traffic as their primary source of revenue. Despite efforts to move into logistics and supply chain services, the company is still struggling to gain significant success in more profitable business services markets (Kumar, Johnson, Lai, 2009).

Despite having an employee base that has the lowest turnover and highest levels of morale, Southwest also has one of the most rapidly declining sales-per-employee revenue levels for U.S.-based airlines (Kumar, Johnson, Lai, 2009). One of the factors that contribute to this is the fact that Southwest has more ground crew members than other airlines, an investment the company makes to attain the rapid MTTR figures mentioned earlier. This weakness however is also tied to the fact that the company has been struggling to break out of being a passenger-only airline.

Opportunities for Growth

Southwest needs to take the exceptional skills they have in logistics and apply them to the areas of business freight and transportation services. The logistics strengths of Southwest could more than outclass the regional freight forwarders and providers according to industry experts (Carter, Rogers, Simkins, 2006). The company could also create a more effective approach to selling supply chain management services as well based on this strength (Carter, Rogers, Simkins, 2006). Creating a supply chain practice as UPS has done would also help the company to alleviate the declining revenue per seat issue and also position them to move into more lucrative business-to-business markets as well.

Conclusion

Southwest is uniquely positioned to capture even more market share in the low-end of the U.S. passenger provider market. To do this they will have to concentrate on adding new services that can expand their services more profitably in the freight markets, supply chain services industry as FedEx and UPS have successfully done, and also continue hedging fuel contracts to save on this largest expense category. Southwest also needs to consider how it can be more effective in branching into entirely new markets, of which the AirTran acquisition opens up for them. The future of Southwest will be defined however by how well the company can make all…… [Read More]

Resources:
Christopher P. Ball. (2007). Rethinking Hub vs. Point-to-Point Competition: A Simple Circular Airline Model. The Journal of Business and Economic Studies, 13(1), 73-87,116.

Bernoff, J., & Li, C.. (2008). Harnessing the Power of the Oh-So-Social Web. MIT Sloan Management Review, 49(3), 36-42.
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Pacific Oil-Strategic Plan Pacific Oil Startegic Plan Essay

Words: 3280 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 138344

Pacific Oil-Strategic Plan

Pacific Oil Startegic Plan

COMPANY BACKGROUND

Vision

Values

ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN-ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY

RISK Management PLAN

Monthly Monitoring

Accountability

Responding of Risk management Process

Evolution of Risk Management

Policies and Procedures

152011 Identified Risks

Risk Disclosure

Pacific Oil-Strategic Plan

This paper presents a strategic plan or Pacific Oil. The paper starts with organizational background consisting of business mission, vision and the corporate values. The nature of the business of Pacific Oil has been clearly identified with some highlights on the business divisions operating in the oil industry. An environmental scan has been performed in order to have a clear insight into the circumstances in which the Pacific Oil is operating. This environmental scan for Pacific Oil is accompanied by a SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunities & Threats) Analysis. Strengths and weaknesses of Pacific Oil relate to internal organizational environment while opportunities and threats relate to external environment of pacific Oil. After environmental scan, the corporate strategies of Pacific Oil have been identified in order to pursue for an implementation plan of the selected strategy. In the end, this strategic plan is accompanied by a Contingency/Risk Management plan for catering risks which Pacific Oil is facing.

COMPANY BACKGROUND

Pacific Oil is a start-up business specializing in delivering cost competitive oil and gas products to various parts of the world. Pacific Oil has a focus of delivering the oil and gas products in Asia, due to emerging demand of oil products in that area. The headquarters of Pacific Oil are located in America, with supporting offices in UK, Germany and Canada. (Melissa & Crittenden 2009) Pacific Oil owns 4 gas stations and couple of commercial and residential properties for rent.

Together with the strategic partners, Pacific Oil's goal is to invest in the development, exploration, refining and operations of the projects related to oil & natural gas, such as a large combined energy power plant users, an integrated supply chain cycle, the receiving terminal, the LNG liquefaction plant, and to the upstream development. Pacific Oil…… [Read More]

Works Cited:
Polyack, Jolene, 2009. " Organizations Need Marketing Strategies To Meet Goals." Business Journal -- Serving Fresno & the Central San Joaquin Valley, Issue 322490.

Ramanathon, Kavasserei V. And Hegstad, Larry P., 2007. Readings in Management Control in Organizations, New York: John Wiley and Son's Inc.

Stone, Melissa, Bigelow, Barbara, & Crittenden, William, 2009. "Research on Strategic Management in Organizations." Administration and Society.
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Employing Strategies in a Competitive Essay

Words: 1316 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14560647

Particularly McDonalds and Starbucks fight daily on sales as well as share prices (Brush, 2011). The Starbucks growth has been slow during last some periods yet it offers a tough competition to the McDonalds by offering extensive sale points. The two companies are in competition war yet the customer base of the two is totally different. The Starbucks customers are more affluent and the McDonalds customers are more price sensitive (Shaughnessy, 2013).

The company can work on the customer pool that lies between total affluent and totally price sensitive. The company, like it has done before in 2012, can float the videos of its hygienic processes on YouTube. It can show that McDonalds operates cleaner that the clean companies and that eating at McDonalds mean eating healthy and quality. Thus there should be deals and sitting areas designed for middle and rich class too so that a big customer base is not overlooked.

McDonald's play areas are a fun for the kids thus the families like to come to McDonalds than going at other restaurants. The company can improve its play areas by offering 3D motion experience in the toy areas so that it is an unforgettable experience for the kids and the family feels entertained too besides eating their favorite burger.

4. Assume that the U.S. economy is in a state of decline requiring modifications to the strategy. Evaluate how the strategy should be modified. Provide a justification of how this will help the company continue to compete in the marketplace.

The company's business directly depends on the buying power of the consumers. As the consumer gets more buying power or the income, he eats out more and the company revenues increase. In the face of supposed decline in the economy of the country, there will be fewer sales, less revenue and less income. To deal with that the company can take measures to compete by either dropping the prices of deals or by cutting its costs.

The company's growth rate is already lagging behind the Wall Street expectations (Choi, 2013). It can…… [Read More]

Sources:
Brush, M., (2011), "McDonald's or Starbucks: Who wins?" Retrieved from:

http://money.msn.com/investment-advice/mcdonalds-or-starbucks-who-wins-brush
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Strategic Plan Validation of the Essay

Words: 575 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76131345

The focus of this analysis will conform to the guidance provided by Rhodes and Keogan who note that, "External environmental analysis involves examination of opportunities and threats, competitive stance, political, economic, social and technological influences, and relations with stakeholders among others" (2005, p. 123). Some of the methods that can be used to accomplish the external environmental analysis of Southwest Airlines include a PEST, Porter's Five Forces, scenario planning and stakeholder mapping (Rhodes & Keogan, 2005).

Sources expected to perform an internal environmental analysis

In contrast to the external environmental analysis, the internal environmental analysis of Southwest Airlines will focus on the organization's status, strengths, and critical issues (Bower, 2003). To achieve this analysis, sources such as the company's quarterly and annual filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission will be reviewed, as well as Southwest's print and online versions of its organizational vision, mission, and values statements, with a particular focus on identifying any changes in content and direction in recent years.… [Read More]

References:
Ahmed, P.K. & Rafiq, M. (2005). Internal marketing: Tools and concepts for customer-focused management. Boston: Elsevier Butterworth Heinemann.

Bower, D.F. (2003, Winter). A practical guide for the busy administrator. Journal of Staff
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Operation Decision Essay

Words: 744 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52433883

fictitious business that you created for this assignment.

Light Up the Sky, Inc. is a company that manufactures luminescent kites. This company has been in business for the past 10 years and during this time has established itself as a high quality manufacturer of these kites. Even though this company appeals to a small fraction of the entire kite industry, they had been able to maintain a 20% profit margin. Due to the lagging economy, their profit margin dropped below the breakeven point and they are now considering shutting down production.

Assess the current environmental scan factors. Determine the factors that will have the greatest impact on plant operations and management's decision to continue or discontinue operations.

When considering whether or not to continue operations, there are several factors to consider. First is to perform a market analysis to determine whether or not continuing operations is really feasible. For example, luminescent kites may have been a fad whose time has come and gone. Determining whether or not there is still a market for this product is the first step. Next would be to evaluate how manufacturing costs could be cut without sacrificing the quality of the product. Other factors to consider are:

* Can the company still be profitable by cutting production back to 400 units per month?

* Could less skilled workers be employed in order to decrease the cost of labor?

* What fixed or variable costs could be reduced?

* How feasible would it be to move productions to another area of the country or world in order to reduce production costs?

3. Evaluate the financial performance of the company using the information provided in the scenario. Consider all the key drivers of performance, such as company profit or loss for both the short-term and long-term. Be sure to show the calculations that helped you reach your conclusions.

The following calculations assisted in illustrating decision to "Continue Operations":

Employee Wages: 100 workers x $70/day = $7,000/day x 20 days/month = $140,000/month spent on employee wages.

Variable input cost: $2,000/day x 20 days/month = $40,000/month in variable costs.

Taking into account that the marginal cost…… [Read More]

Bibliography:
1. Planning Resource Center. What is an Environmental Scan? Retrieved from http://work911.com/planningmaster/faq/scan.htm.

2. Minnesota Management and Budget. Internal and external environmental scanning factors. Retrieved from http://www.mmb.state.mn.us/keyinfo3/1708-internal-and-external-environmental-scanning-factors.
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Kudler Fine Foods Strategic Plan Essay

Words: 3431 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2264853

Kudler's advertising and marketing in its present form is through the Easter and Thanksgiving holidays with the local newspaper flyers every month. Marketing is a key component of a successful business and KFF should consider different methods of involving the community. For example, television advertising, Internet, radio stations and more promotions are viable. Secondly, employees must be sufficient time for KFF to obtain benefits. Many organizations have begun to provide additional part-time employees package was found, but 30 hours per week. (Shim & Siegel 2010)

In addition, Kudler is to buy stock, catering, and any major issues such as responsible business, so if she fell ill, no one can proceed on the basis of business operations. Most organizations have managers that work with the president so that if necessary, they are available. Kudler is important to hire more administrative staff to assist some of the duties. Finally, the payment offered to employees by KFF is very low as compared to other organizations in the same location.

Recommended Strategy

From the above environmental scan, it can be recommended that Kudler Fine Foods should expand its store location to Carlsbad area and Canada. In order to implement this expansion strategy, KFF should follow a combination of strategies. In this portfolio of strategies, KFF should merge certain strategies in order to gain market share in the new locations. This portfolio includes product differentiation, market segmentation, and niche market and cost differentiation strategies.

KFF should assess all the factors in the external as well as internal environment of the new locations in order to take maximum advantage in gaining market share. The cost differentiation strategy will help KFF to attract more customers as KFF will be giving quality products at low prices. The product differentiation strategy will provide advantage to KFF as KFF will be launching new products with excellent quality according to the demand of the customers in Canada and Carlsbad. KFF should also consider…… [Read More]

References:
Turban, E., Rainer, R.K., & Potter, R.E. (2003). Introduction to Information Technology: Strategic Systems and Reorganization. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Wilson, R.M.S. & Gilligan, C. (2005). Strategic Marketing Management: Planning, Implementation and Control (3rd ed.). Butterworth-Heinemann.