Aristotelian Sense There Are Nearly Research Paper

Length: 5 pages Sources: 5 Subject: Black Studies - Philosophy Type: Research Paper Paper: #17272505 Related Topics: Thomas Hobbes, John Stuart Mill, Nicomachean Ethics, Bell Hooks
Excerpt from Research Paper :

Mill believed that any act may itself be inherently moral, so long as the outcome of that action produces a benign effect. Mill believed that the most ethical act is that which produces the most good, even if the act itself is one which is traditionally considered evil. An example of utilitarian philosophy would include the killing of innocent animals to determine a cure for some infectious disease. And while there are components of this philosophy that would certainly align with Aristotle's definition of ethics, it seems difficult to picture the latter condoning any method to achieve moral behavior, particularly in regards to the following quotation from Nichomachean Ethics. "A man will not live like that by virtue of his humanness, but by virtue of some divine thing within him. His activity is as superior to the activity...

...

107)."

The ultimate result of Aristotle's moral excellence, it appears, would be to express the divinity of mankind's creator within men and women. The "immortality" referenced is the immortality of God, creating a parallel into how man should attempt to act and how God does, which would certainly seem to rule out Mills' utilitarianism. The means of an action are equally as important as the result.

Works Cited

Aristotle. Nicomachan Ethics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. Print.

Hobbes, Thomas. Leviathan. Indianapolis: Hacket Publishing, 1994. Print.

Mill, John Stuart. On Liberty. New York: Penguin Classics, 1985. Print.

Minch, Michael and Weigel, Christine. Living Ethics. Washington: Thomson, 2008. Print

Nietzsche, Friedrich. The Gay Science. New York: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 1882.…

Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited

Aristotle. Nicomachan Ethics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. Print.

Hobbes, Thomas. Leviathan. Indianapolis: Hacket Publishing, 1994. Print.

Mill, John Stuart. On Liberty. New York: Penguin Classics, 1985. Print.

Minch, Michael and Weigel, Christine. Living Ethics. Washington: Thomson, 2008. Print


Cite this Document:

"Aristotelian Sense There Are Nearly" (2011, May 30) Retrieved May 11, 2021, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/aristotelian-sense-there-are-nearly-45152

"Aristotelian Sense There Are Nearly" 30 May 2011. Web.11 May. 2021. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/aristotelian-sense-there-are-nearly-45152>

"Aristotelian Sense There Are Nearly", 30 May 2011, Accessed.11 May. 2021,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/aristotelian-sense-there-are-nearly-45152

Related Documents
Othello Aristotle's Poetics Is the Most Informative
Words: 2410 Length: 7 Pages Topic: Literature Paper #: 93941294

Othello Aristotle's Poetics is the most informative piece of work on the nature of art. It is in the Poetics that Aristotle defines the fundamental nature of tragedy. For Aristotle, what defines tragedy (and all art, in general) is in the way that it is imitation (Golden 142). Every form of art (qua imitation) can be compared in terms of the artistic means, object, and manner used in their creation. In

Shirley Jackson Is the Kind
Words: 2912 Length: 9 Pages Topic: Literature Paper #: 97109900

Jackson was born in San Francisco, to father Leslie Jackson, an English immigrant and Geraldine Bugbee Jackson, who was related to the famous California architects, an association some give credit for driving her sense of place and detail for architecture in her stories. She spent most of her years in Vermont and is associated as a New England writer. The last work Jackson published, like the Lottery was one

Ophelia As Victim or Tragic
Words: 1188 Length: 3 Pages Topic: Literature Paper #: 93086285

3.47-51). While Ophelia clearly is intelligent enough to take care of herself as well as offer her own rebuttals against the male characters' altogether creepy insistence on controlling her sexual life, she suppresses this intelligence and ability out of deference for her father. Thus, her eventual fall is inevitable and largely her own fault, because by allowing her relationship to her father to overshadow everything else, including her own thoughts

Feminist Interpretation of Aristotle and
Words: 3381 Length: 10 Pages Topic: Sports - Women Paper #: 4904586

Aristotle believed that human flourishing (NE: 12) is the definition of good. The mere presence of women in Congress suggests that voters rejected a man, but it is better to look at this not as the rejection of one (male or not), but as the result of human flourishing. This increased competition of more women pursuing what they feel is their own responsibility will result in more unemployment for men,

Aristotle Dante Goodness According to
Words: 1666 Length: 5 Pages Topic: Black Studies - Philosophy Paper #: 54007907

Aristotle is inclined to view human interaction as something which incites one to desire the happiness of his relational partner as the chief end of the relationship. This is a point which is absolutely essential to the conception of goodness which Aristotle holds as most valuable. He identifies a self-love, as it were, as one of the most important elements in forging a meaningful and positive relationship to the

Cultural and Construction History of
Words: 5800 Length: 20 Pages Topic: Drama - World Paper #: 2908770

Charles Van Doren has concluded that the Copernican Revolution is actually the Galilean Revolution because of the scale of change introduced by Galileo's work. The technological innovation of the Renaissance era started with the invention of the printing press (the Renaissance). Even though the printing press, a mechanical device for printing multiple copies of a text on sheets of paper, was first invented in China, it was reinvented in the