Deuteronomy, Chapter 10 According to Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :

" Therefore, Spero says, there is the fifth requirement, calling the reader to keep the commandments and statutes. Spero explains: "where the reverence and love are weak, the actual observance of the commandments, with its evocation of the Presence of God, can strengthen these elemental emotions. Thus, the function of the practical commandments is both expressive and impressive" (p. 155).

The book of Deuteronomy, and specifically its tenth chapter, has multiple meanings and may be interpreted differently, depending on one's approach. But it is clear that the chapter speaks to us, to the community of faith today. Even in his secular interpretation, Nelson (2003) tried to link the book to values we consider important today (the system of checks and balances or democracy). But the book has a theological message, which is as relevant today as it was for Israelites thousands of years ago, as explained well by Tanner (2001). And the uses of history, etiology, analogy, and allegory help us see a larger message of the book, enriching our understanding of the overall message as well as references to other important themes. For example, as Work (2009) points out, Deut: 10:1 may allegorically refer to the growth of Christ. God commands Moses to
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make an ark because the "ark makes the words portable" and "in the Messiah the Word will be on the move again" (p. 126). So, regardless of the methods of inquiry we use (history, etiology, analogy, and allegory), or the approaches we take (religious or secular), it is clear that the book of Deuteronomy speaks to us as much as it spoke to ancient Israelites. It reminds us of God's Love and Mercy, offers us hope for the future, and admonishes us against sins.

References

Blacketer, R.A. (2006) Calvin on Deuteronomy 10:1-2 Smooth Stones, Teachable Hearts. The School of God: Studies in Early Modern Religious Reforms, 3, 201-231. Retrieved on February 9, 2001, from SpringerLink.

Guzik, D. (n.d.) Commentary on Deuteronomy 10. David Guzik's Commentaries on the Bible. Retrieved on February 9, 2011, from http://www.studylight.org/com/guz/view.cgi?book=de&chapter=010

Mann, T. (1995) Deuteronomy. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press.

Miller, P.D. (1990) Deuteronomy. Commentary. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press.

Nelson, R.D. (2003) Deuteronomy. A Commentary. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press.

Nicholson, E. (2004). Deuteronomy. A Commentary (Book). Journal of Theological Studies, 55(2): 606-609. Retrieved on February 9, 2011, from EBSCOhost.

Spero, S. (2008) After all, the Lord Does Not Ask for Much! Jewish Bible Quarterly, 36(3): 153-156. Retrieved on February 9, 2011, from EBSCOhost.

Tanner, B.L. (2001) Deuteronomy…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Blacketer, R.A. (2006) Calvin on Deuteronomy 10:1-2 Smooth Stones, Teachable Hearts. The School of God: Studies in Early Modern Religious Reforms, 3, 201-231. Retrieved on February 9, 2001, from SpringerLink.

Guzik, D. (n.d.) Commentary on Deuteronomy 10. David Guzik's Commentaries on the Bible. Retrieved on February 9, 2011, from http://www.studylight.org/com/guz/view.cgi?book=de&chapter=010

Mann, T. (1995) Deuteronomy. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press.

Miller, P.D. (1990) Deuteronomy. Commentary. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press.

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