Trust the Narrator -- Montresor Data Analysis Chapter

Excerpt from Data Analysis Chapter :

" It just so happens that the Carnival is in season, what better time to launch such a plot? This dramatic irony allows the audience to perceive something that Fortunato does not -- the relentless pursuit and planning that is occurring as Fortunato enjoys himself celebrating Carnival. Even the name Fortunato (the fortunate) is ironic, since he is anything but fortunate as the intended victim of murder. This theme of irony will present itself again and again, and is Poe's technique for allowing the reader to both follow the story from the murderer's point-of-view, since it is he who is narrating, and to distance oneself and feel the true horror of the approach of death. The web/trap is set when Montresor dangles a rare wine, Amontillado, in front of Fortunato, but is cynical enough about it that he toys with Fortunato's greed and avarice.

It is perhaps the merging of dramatic irony and symbolism that creates the uneasiness of the story. For example, Montresor expresses concern for Fortunato's href='https://www.paperdue.com/topic/health-essays'>health -- several times suggesting they turn back because of Fortunato's cough: "my friend no… but the severe cold which I perceive you are afflicted…" "We will go back, you will be ill and cannot be responsible." The irony becomes palpable while in the middle of the dark catacombs when Fortunato proposes a toast when sipping a curative drink, "I drink," he said, "to the buried that repose around us." and, immediately Montresor replies, "An to your long life," knowing full well that Fortunato's life will neither be happy nor long.

And so Montresor begins to complete the niche containing Fortunato, still awaiting his sip of Amontillado. "For the love of God, Montresor!" screams Fortunato. "Yes," replies Montresor, "For the love of God!" As the last stone moves into the wall. "For the half of a century no mortal has disturbed them." And with a final burst of irony, the prayer, "In pace requiescat!" (Rest in peace).

REFERENCES

Poe, E. (1846). The Cask of Amontillado. Literature.org -- the Online Library.

Cited in: http://www.literature.org/authors/poe-edgar-allan/amontillado.html

Sources Used in Documents:

REFERENCES

Poe, E. (1846). The Cask of Amontillado. Literature.org -- the Online Library.

Cited in: http://www.literature.org/authors/poe-edgar-allan/amontillado.html

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https://www.paperdue.com/essay/trust-the-narrator-montresor-13104