Abusive Relationships Essays (Examples)

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Women in Abusive Relationship

Words: 1833 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59149144

omen in Abusive Relationships

According to a report in the Public Broadcasting Service, the home is one of the "most dangerous places for a woman" (PBS). That is because of the legacy of domestic abuse that many women have had to go through, and are going through today. Indeed, the U.S. Department of Justice reports that two-thirds of violent attacks against women are perpetrated by someone that woman knows. Every year about 1,500 women are actually killed by boyfriends or husbands, the Justice Department explains. And every year nearly 2 million men "beat their partners," according to the FBI. This paper reviews the statistics, the reasons that women decide to stay in those relationships, and what alternatives there are for her.

The Abuse of omen -- Background Information

The Public Broadcasting Service story indicates that 95% of victims of domestic violence are women, and that women are "7 to 10…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). (2011). Antoine Robert Three Fingers Sentenced in U.S. District Court. Retrieved June 12, 2011, from http://saltlakecity.fbi.gov.

Mayo Clinic. (2010). Domestic Violence Against Women: Recognize Patterns, Seek Help.

Retrieved June 12, 2011, from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/domestic-violence/WO00044/method=print.

Morris, Carrie A. Wachter, Shoffner, Marie F., and Newsome, Deborah W. (2009). Career
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Women Come Out of an Abusive Relationship

Words: 807 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11423493

women come out of an abusive relationship, the negative psychological traumas they feel continue. This study makes a comparison between forgiveness therapy (FT) and alternative therapy (AT)-assertiveness, anger validation and interpersonal skill building for women who have been abused emotionally and had been separated permanently from their romantic partner or spouse for up to two years or more. A total of 20 women in Midwest city who were abused psychologically made up the participants. Psychological abuse from one's spouse characterizes a very agonizing infidelity, which often leads to very serious depressing psychological results for the partner who has been abused. There are reports of both standard deviations and mean scores for every measure at pretest, posttest, as well as follow-up for everyone in the forgiveness therapy group and both pretest and posttest for everyone in the alternative therapy group. This represents the first research for the demonstration of the efficacy…… [Read More]

Reference

Reed, G.L., & Engright, R.D. (2006). The effect of forgiveness therapy on depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress for women after spousal emotional abuse. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 74(5), 920.
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Relationship Dissolution Ecdriesbaugh Relationship Dissolution

Words: 2992 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8620041

Imbalances were most evident in three relational areas: decision-making, emotional involvement, and equity. A higher percentage of both men and women stated that men usually made more of the decisions, were less emotionally involved, and usually experienced "the better deal." Lastly, male dominance -- but not equality of power between genders -- was found to be linked with greater romantic relationship longevity. It seemed that the higher the relative degree given by the respondents to the male (rather than the female partner of the dyad), the lower the consequential rate of relationship dissolution (Felmlee, 1994).

An imbalance of power may promote the actual solidity of a relationship, but this has been much less often researched than other conclusions. The previous findings that inequalities in power are linked to unhappiness, psychological distress, and disagreement mean that power imbalances will raise the likelihood that a relationship would fail; however, no distinctions were…… [Read More]

References

Allensworth, N. (1998). Social penetration: a description, research, and evalutation.

Retrieved on 18 November 2007 at http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/custom/portlets/recordDetails/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED403615&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED403615

Bucher, E. (2006). Relationship dissolution planning (nuptial agreements part 1).

DeVito, J.A. (1995). The Interpersonal Communication Book. New York: Harper Collins College Publishers.
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Abusive Supervision and Moral Exclusion Theory Abusive

Words: 921 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83204082

Abusive Supervision and Moral Exclusion Theory

Abusive Supervision

Abusive Supervision through the Lens of Moral Exclusion Theory

Abusive Supervision through the Lens of Moral Exclusion Theory

Abusive supervisor practices have captured the attention of psychologists interested in understanding what factors determine workplace bias. Such practices can range from simple rudeness to outright criminal acts that violate basic human rights. In their research paper, Tepper and colleagues (2011) examine this issue through the lens of moral exclusion theory as defined by Opotow (1990, 2006). This essay will analyze their research findings and provide a critique on the value of these findings to society.

Moral Exclusion in the Workplace

The boundaries of moral exclusion in the workplace, as in other social situations, define the 'scope of justice' (Opotow, 2006). For example, Jim Crow laws instituted after the end of econstruction in the South defined an 'in' and 'out' group at the expense…… [Read More]

References

Opotow, Susan. (1990). Moral exclusion and injustice: An introduction. Journal of Social Issues, 46(1), 1-20.

Opotow, Susan. (2006). Seeking inclusion and pluralism: Two exploratory studies. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 12(4), 349-366.

Passini, Stefano. (2010). Moral reasoning in a multicultural society: Moral inclusion and moral exclusion. Journal for the Theory of Social Behavior, 40(4), 435-451.

Tepper, Bennett J., Moss, Sherry E., and Duffy, Michelle K. (2011). Predictors of abusive supervision: Supervisor perceptions of deep-level dissimilarity, relationship conflict, and subordinate performance. Academy of Management Journal, 54(2), 279-294.
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Human Relationships - Adolescent Dating

Words: 1161 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56054185

)?

S1 - No

S2 - No

S3 - No

Rational - This question is intended to determine whether other forms of abuse occur within teenage social relationship even more frequently than actual physical abuse or face-to-face verbal abuse. Had any of the subjects answered affirmatively, that would have suggested specific follow-up questions to explore the issues raised.

6. Have any of your friends ever been the victim of stalking-type of behavior? If yes, through what medium (in person, by phone, via Internet, etc.)? Also, how many people do you know personally who have ever been victimized in this way?

S1 - Yes; four

S2 - Yes; two

S3 - Yes; four

Rational - This question provides a comparison to the subjects in the Claiborne study.

It also expands the anecdotal data to include three separate peer groups.

7. Have you ever before (today) discussed the issue of violence or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gerrig, R., Zimbardo, P. (2005)

Psychology and Life 18th edition. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Hsu, C. (2007) Family First: Abuse Is Not Love; Sep 27, 2007. Retrieved October 21, 2008 at http://wcbstv.com/parenttoparent/family.first.abuse.2.292513.html

This resource consists of a transcript of a television news interview conducted on Smith, T. (2008) "Horrors" Found in Tween, Teen Dating: Survey Uncovers Significant Levels of Physical, Verbal Abuse; Sex at Young Ages; Many Parents in the Dark; Jul 8, 2008. Retrieved October 21, 2008, at http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/07//earlyshow/living/relationships/main4240192.shtml
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Relationship Between PTSD and Domestic Violence

Words: 2398 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60808030

Life Scenario -- Decision to Divorce

Lot of Life Scenario

Setting the Scene

Dear Maria,

Because you and I have always been so close, I wanted to let you know about an impending event in our family's lives. Because of our past conversations, you are aware that Mario and I have had many disagreements about how to raise Dominic. The situation has not improved much, although I know that Mario is trying to be a better parent. But I can no longer ignore the impact that Mario's interactions with Nicky are having. Mario continually loses his temper with Nicky and is now swatting Nicky on the head, in addition to smacking him on his bottom. Nicky now flinches whenever Mario comes near him.

Your brother is usually on his best behavior when his family or when friends are around, but I know you have seen Mario lose his temper with…… [Read More]

References

Chang, J.J., Theordore, A.D., Martin, S.L. And Runyan, D.K. (2008 August). Psychological abuse between parents: associations with child maltreatment from a population-based sample. Child Abuse and Neglect, 32(8), 819-929. doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2007.11.003. Retrieved  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18752849 

Gerlock, A.A. (2004). Domestic violence and post-traumatic stress disorder severity for participants of a domestic violence rehabilitation program. Retreived http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3912/is_200406/ai_n

Martin, S.L., Gibbs, D.A., Johnson, R.E., Clinton-Sherrod, M., Walters, J.L., and Sullivan, K. (2009). Male soldier family violence offenders: spouse and child offenders compared to child offenders. Violence and Victims, 24(4), 458-68. Retrieved  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19694351 

Newton, C.J. (2001, April). Child Abuse: An Overview" Mental Health Journal. Find.Counseling.com. Retrieved http://www.findcounseling.com/journal/child-abuse/emotional-abuse.html
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Dual Relationships the Relationship Between a Service

Words: 1259 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39431166

Dual elationships

The relationship between a service provider and their client is particularly sensitive because the circumstances that bring the two individuals into contact are usually necessitated by a state of mental unrest in the client. Accordingly, the issue of whether or not to engage in a dual relationship (when the doctor has a relationship with their patient distinct from the clinical context) with the client must be treated in a very sensitive manner; the therapist has a responsibility to not only operate in their own best interest but also that of the patient they are hired to assist. This paper examines the relationship between a therapist and an unhappily married Latin American female client, determining whether or not the therapist should advocate divorce and pursue a romantic relationship with his client. Although the therapist has decided that they will pursue the relationship and advocate divorce, this is not recommended.…… [Read More]

References

Dewane, C.J. (2010). Respecting boundaries -- the don'ts of dual relationships. Social Work Today, 10, 1, 18.

Freud, S., & Kreug, S. (2002a). Beyond the code of ethics, part II: Dual relationships revisited. Families in Society, 83(5), 483-492.
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Teenage Girls Abuse in Teen Dating Relationships

Words: 1959 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77902667

Teenage Girls Involved in Abusive Dating elationships

Aggression in teenage dating leading to physical, emotional and psychological damage is a social problem not only because of its effects on the teenagers but also because of its prevalence.

Howard and Qi Wang (2003) report figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showing that overall the prevalence of non-sexual courtship violence ranges from 9% to 65%, depending on the definitions and research methods used. Howard and Qi Wang's study reported "almost one in ten of the 9th- through 12th-grade females who participated in the 1999 Youth isk Behavior Survey reported being a victim of physical dating violence (i.e., had been hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose) within the past year." Further studies and figures report that about one in five of adolescent girls has experienced dating violence. Some of the physically abusive behaviors perpetrated in dating include being scratched,…… [Read More]

References.

Bush, Vanessa. (2002). A thin line between love and hate: dating violence strikes one in every five teenage girls. Essence November 2002. Retrieved November 7th,2003, from www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m1264/7_33/96384286/print.jhtml.

Gillies-Bradley & Wagner Tammy L. (2003). When love hurts. Briarpatch, 32(2), 18-19.

Howard, Donna E. & Qi Wang, Min. (2003). Risk profiles of adolescent girls who were victims of dating violence. Adolescence Spring 2003. Retrieved November 7th,2003, from www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m2248/149_38/103381757/print.jhtml.

James, William H., West, Carolyn, Deters, Karla Ezrre, Amigo, Eduardo. (2000). Youth dating violence. Adolescence Fall 2000. Retrieved November 7th, 2003, from www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m2248/139_35/68535843/print.jhtml
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Ulysses Relationships in Ulysses to

Words: 4073 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31567490

For the first several years of one's life, their mother and father are their world. These first relationships occur at a time when the tiny human is learning the basic of their environment and how to respond to it. A child learns much of their early actions by imitating the role models around them. The relationship that exists between a child and each of their parents will set the tone for how they deal with other relationships that they encounter throughout their life.

In Chapter One we discover that our hero has "issues" with his paternal and his maternal relationship. These relationships overshadow almost any other conflict in the story at this time. It is apparent through Stephen's interactions with Mulligan and Haines that he did not have a strong paternal figure to model. He reacts in a rather passive manner. One must remember that this chapter takes place in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Joyce, James. Ulysses. Hans Walter Gabler (ed). Random House. June, 1986.
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Professional Boundaries and Multiple Relationships

Words: 2295 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52975080

Ethics

Ensuring proper professional behavior

The nurse-client relationship is novel. No formula exists for judging the crossing of boundaries as good / bad, in the absence of considering the features of therapeutic relationship for every scenario. The suitable behavior must be measured with respect to professional's intent, respecting confidentiality, patient-client advocacy and corroborating the CAN Code of Ethics for egistered Nurses (Corey anad Callanan, 2007).

Violations of professional boundary

The crossings of boundaries are deemed as insignificant, but with the increase in frequency of such incidents of professional boundary violations, it could be serious. The nurse works on the patient-nurse relationship and fulfils the therapeutic needs of a patient and neglects his own. The professional boundary violation is not acceptable as it can spark other occurrences. The professional boundaries occur when conflict arises between client's needs and professional's needs. ationalization can be used to justify this behavior. The violation of…… [Read More]

References

Bond T, 1997, 'Standards and Ethics for Counselling in Action', pgs Sage Publications Ltd., London

Brammer LM & MacDonald G, 2003, 'The Helping Relationship, Process and Skills', pgs Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data, United States of America

Corey G & MS & Callanan P, 2007, 'Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions', pgs Thomson Brookes/Cole, a part of The Thomson Corporation, United States of America

Egan G, 2007,'The Skilled Helper', pgs * Thomson Brookes/Cole, a part of The Thomson Corporation, United States of America
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Predictors of Abusive Supervision Supervisor Perceptions of

Words: 594 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90777293

Predictors of Abusive Supervision: Supervisor Perceptions of Deep-Level Dissimilarity, elationship Conflict, and Subordinate Performance' by Bennett Tepper, Sherry Moss, and Michelle Duffy

In their article, 'Predictors of Abusive Supervision: Supervisor Perceptions of Deep-Level Dissimilarity, elationship Conflict, and Subordinate Performance', Tepper, Moss and Duffy (2011) explore why employees in different organizations become victims of non-physical hostility and abusive supervision. To explore the predictors of abusive supervision, they invoke concepts described in the moral exclusion literature, which examine subordinate performance, relationship conflicts and supervisor's perceptions of deep level similarities. They assert that there is an indirect relationship between abusive supervision and deep level dissimilarities; and that this relationship operates through supervisor evaluations of subordinate's performance and supervisor's perceptions of relationship conflict. Contrary to the author's opinion, I hold that perceived deep level dissimilarity only fuels abusive supervision, and that embracing diversity in the workplace is the key to reducing distrust and conflict.…… [Read More]

References

Tepper, B.J., Moss, S.E. & Duffy, M.K. (2011). Predictors of Abusive Supervision: Supervisor Perceptions of Deep-Level Dissimilarity, Relationship Conflict, and Subordinate Performance. Academy of Management Journal Vol. (54)2, 279 -- 294.
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Distance Relationships Are Leading to Increased Divorce

Words: 1251 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71118490

distance relationships are leading to increased divorce statistics.

In the past, when a person married, it was a lifelong commitment. This was partly because the laws regarding divorce were very strict and it was nearly impossible to get a divorce without some very strong cause. omen in particular had difficulty filing for divorce from their husbands, even if he were an adulterer or perhaps physically abusive. This has all changed over time, beginning in the United States with the state of Nevada where a short residency could get you a quick divorce with little regard to reasoning. In the present time, getting a divorce is a regular occurrence. At present more than half of all marriages end in divorce. Three-quarters of people who marry for the first time will likely be divorced. Among the most common of divorce reasons is the citing of virtual abandonment by one or more of…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

"Experiencing Difficulties Because of Business Travel" (2011). Retrieved from http://divorce-

insurance.net/2011/05/29/experiencing-difficulties-because-of-business-travel/

Glass, Shirley. (2003). Not 'Just Friends': Rebuilding Trust and Recovering Your Sanity After

Infidelity. Free: New York, NY.
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Poilice Community Strained Relationships

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42075733

Police Community elations

Does it eally Exist?

The policing organizations throughout the United States have been the subject of vast amounts of negative publicity in recent years. Although these relationships have always perceived as tense, especially by minority groups, in recent years many instances of police brutality have been digitally recorded and shared throughout many forms of media, including social media. The advancement of technology has allowed for most people to be able to create their own videos on demand, typically with the use of smart phones, which has created a situation in which many questionable acts by police officers have been documented. Because of this relatively recent development, it is unclear if there is actually a rise in occurrences of issues such as police brutality, or if there are just more examples of such instances that are being documented and shared.

ecently, the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Community…… [Read More]

References

Gest, T. (2015, October 2). DOJ Slams St. Louis County Cops on Community Relations. Retrieved from The Crime Report: http://www.thecrimereport.org/news/inside-criminal-justice/2015-10-cops-on-st-louis-county

Weitzer, R., Tuch, S., & Skogan, W. (2008). Police -- Community Relations in a Majority-Black City. Journal of Research in Crime & Deliquency.
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Women Abuse of Women A

Words: 2083 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47862644

, 1994)." (Salazar, 253) This is not just troubling as a statistical illustrator of the problem's prevalence but it is indicative of a much larger cultural condition predisposing us to violence toward women. ith ties to the patriarchal machinations of the country's monarchical origins and a dependency upon the fortification of such leanings in modern legal, social and even familial structure, the issue of domestic violence is very much a result of a long-standing and still present heritage of sexism. As we contend with the apparent root causes of domestic violence by helping women find ways out of negative relationships, we are yet contending with a more deep-seeded impulse toward misogyny and violence.

The rationale for further study on this subject will be to provide those in social services, outreach programs and other positions of counsel with the understanding of this problem to address and navigate the correlation and cycle…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

An Abuse, Rape and Domestic Violence Aid and Resource Collection (AARDVARC). (2008). Long-Term Effects of Domestic Violence. Aardvarc.org.

Belmonte, J. (2007). Domestic Violence and Abuse. Helpguide.org.

Butter, V. (2006). The Physical and Psychological Effects of Domestic Violence on Women. Inver Hills Community College. Online at http://faculty.inverhills.edu/vbutter/domesticviolenceweb.htm

Goelman, Deborah M. (2004). Shelter from the Storm: Using Jurisdictional Statutes to Protect Victims of Domestic Violence after the Violence against Women Act of 2000. Columbia Journal of Gender and Law.
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Teen Abuse Recognizing the Signs

Words: 1717 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88253660

& Naugle, A. (2008). Intimate partner violence theoretical considerations: Moving towards a contextual framework. Clinical Psychology Review, 28(7), 1096-1107.

Eckhardt, C.; Jamison, T.R. & atts, K. (2002). Anger Experience and Expression Among Male Dating Violence Perpetrators During Anger Arousal. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 17(10), 1102-1114.

Eckhardt, C.; Samper, R. & Murphy, C. (2008). Anger disturbances among perpetrators of intimate partner violence: Clinical characteristics and outcomes of court-mandated treatment. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 23(11), 1600-1617.

Langhinrichsen-Rohling, J. (2010). Controversies Involving Gender and Intimate Partner Violence: Response to Commentators. Sex Roles, 62(3-4), 221-225.

Palo Alto Medical Facilities (PAMF). (2010). Abusive Romantic Relationships. PAMF.org.

Smith, M. & Segal, J.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bell, K. & Naugle, A. (2008). Intimate partner violence theoretical considerations: Moving towards a contextual framework. Clinical Psychology Review, 28(7), 1096-1107.

Eckhardt, C.; Jamison, T.R. & Watts, K. (2002). Anger Experience and Expression Among Male Dating Violence Perpetrators During Anger Arousal. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 17(10), 1102-1114.

Eckhardt, C.; Samper, R. & Murphy, C. (2008). Anger disturbances among perpetrators of intimate partner violence: Clinical characteristics and outcomes of court-mandated treatment. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 23(11), 1600-1617.

Langhinrichsen-Rohling, J. (2010). Controversies Involving Gender and Intimate Partner Violence: Response to Commentators. Sex Roles, 62(3-4), 221-225.
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Abused Women

Words: 2892 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62180856

abuse of women has grown to near epidemic levels. Some professionals think this may be because women are finally reporting the abuse that has always been. Abuse can start out as actions as seemingly harmless as name-calling or pushing, but over time may turn into something far more dangerous. There are many emotional dynamics at play in an abusive relationship. These emotions propel the abused toward staying in a relationship that she knows is unhealthy. In her heart, however, the abused feels it almost impossible to break free. Over time she forgets about her wants and needs, and learns only to react to the abuser's feelings and emotions. Her very survival may depend on how well she reacts to the demands of her abuser. Abused women often learn at a very early age how to feel normal and adjust to an abusive environment. They stay with their abuser because it…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Doyle, Roddy. The Women Who Walked into Doors. London: Viking, 1995.

Quindlen, Anna. Black and Blue. New York, New York: Dell Publishing Company, 1999.
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Unfinished Life America Is a Diverse Country

Words: 1799 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6117448

Unfinished Life

America is a diverse country with a diverse past, and therefore it myths are as diverse as the nation. One of the most prevalent types of myths in American history has been the western, and in a western setting, the most complicated personal, emotional, and social issues can be explored. One example of such a case is Lasse Hallstrom's An Unfinished Life, which looks at a number of different issues involved in a number of different types of characters lives all while taking place in a western location. Set on a ranch just outside a small western town, this western has a twist: the story takes place in the present. It is not the typical "old west" style of western, but still retains much of the western's character and themes while also incorporating modern issues and problems. This film tackles age old issues such as the loss of…… [Read More]

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Consequences of the Human Condition Is the

Words: 5357 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68362714

consequences of the human condition is the abusive manner in which people can treat each other, sometimes without even consciously realizing it. Although even otherwise-loving and happy couples who appear to "have it all" may experience emotionally abusive behaviors from time to time, when these patterns of behaviors persist, they can work an enormous toll on their victims as well as their perpetrators. Unfortunately, studies have shown time and again that emotional abuse tends to perpetuate itself from one generation to the next, making the need for timely and effective interventions essential. The implications of emotional abuse are profound and include both social as well as economic costs that demand more attention from the healthcare community to break the vicious cycle of intergenerational emotional abuse. To this end, the reason for writing this study included identifying current approaches and best practices for emotionally abusive situations.

Overview of Sources

A preliminary…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Austenfeld, Anne Marie. The Revelatory Narrative Circle in Barbara Kingsolver's the Poisonwood Bible. Journal of Narrative Theory 36(2): 293-295.

Although the author does not provide any credentials in this article, a search of the Internet revealed that she is a professor at North Georgia College and State University in Georgia. The author provides a narrative companion to Kingsolver' novel, The Poisonwood Bible, and describes the book in terms of its departure from traditional social views as well as traditional literary forms. Author uses five character-narrators to describe a picture of everyday life in the fictional village in a Congolese village to highlight the marginalization of women in various settings using a narrative approach.

Bifulco, A., Moran, P.M., Baines, R., Bunn, A. And Stanford, K. (2002). Exploring psychological abuse in childhood. Bulletin of the Menninger Institute 66(3): 240-258.

The authors present a retrospective interview assessment of childhood psychological abuse as an extension to the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse (CECA) instrument. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship of emotional abuse in childhood to other adverse childhood experiences and to major depression and suicidal behavior in adult life using a sample of 204 London, UK women. The authors conclude that, "Maternal poor psychosocial functioning needs to be identified as a factor requiring intervention in order to stem escalation of risk across generations" (258).
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Biopsychosocial Analysis of Nina Sayers

Words: 1400 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18992263

Nina Sayers

Biopsychosocial Analysis of Nina Sayers

Academic Institution

Nina Sayers, the protagonist in the film the Black Swan, displays a plethora of dysfunctional symptoms and a dissent in the psychosis in the film. The following is a biopsychosocial analysis of the character as she is betrayed in the film.

Biological. The film offers very little in the way of direct biological evidence to build a case that there is a significant biological component to Nina's difficulties; however, biological factors can be inferred based on the symptoms she displays. Perhaps the strongest indicator of biological contributions to Nina's problems is the film's portrayal of Nina's mother, Erica. Erica presents as being a borderline psychotic herself. In order to ward off her own anxieties, insecurities, and the loneliness of age she identifies with her daughter's youth, beauty, and drive. Erica's sense of herself and daughter is fused into a single entity…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

Disorders -- V. Washington, DC: Author.

Sadock, B.J. & Sadock, V.A., (2007). Kaplan and Sadock's Synopsis of Psychiatry:

Behavioral Sciences/Clinical Psychiatry (10th edition). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams.
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Tori J Is a 12-Year-Old Girl Who

Words: 3375 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77838926

Tori J. is a 12-year-old girl who was removed from her family at the age of 8, when she was placed with a foster family. Although her foster mother discussed some episodes of violence and defiance in the home, Tori was not initially violent or defiant in school. However, she frequently failed to complete her assignments, instead spending hours simply looking into space. She also spoke frequently to social workers and school counselors about problems in her foster home including allegations that she was not being fed sufficiently, that they would not purchase school supplies for her, and that there was emotional and physical abuse in their current home. These allegations were reported and determined to be unsubstantiated, but allegations of emotional and physical abuse and neglect in her family home were substantiated. The children were removed because of physical abuse and neglect. Interviews with Tori J.'s older brother reported…… [Read More]

References

AllPsych. (2011). Antisocial personality disorder. Retrieved July 2, 2013 from:

http://allpsych.com/disorders/personality/antisocial.html

AllPsych. (2013). Borderline personality disorder. Retrieved July 2, 2013 from:

http://allpsych.com/disorders/personality/borderline.html
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Self-Improvement Spiritual Guru Deepak Chopra

Words: 2146 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80748940

..then put down four qualities for each that you find most offensive" (Chopra 121). He now says to look at the list and for each trait say, "I acted like this when I..." And cautions that this is not to wallow in self-criticism but to reclaim feelings rather than projecting them onto others (Chopra 122). Says Chopra, "when you are able to see yourself in what you hate, you come closer to realizing that you contain everything, as befits a child of spirit" (Chopra 122).

This is certainly easier said than done. hat of an abusive parent, an abusive mate, an arrogant boss, or Hitler? Are we to list the qualities that we despise in Hitler and then compare ourselves to that list? True, most self-help books and psychology do claim that people most often project their own flaws and fears onto the people around them, however, it seems that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chopra, Deepak. The Path to Love. Harmony Books. 1997; 1. 2. 3. 4, 64, 65, 67, 121, 122, 193, 194, 195, 328.
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Treating Codependency the Current Diagnostic and Statistical

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12810155

Treating Codependency

Codependency

The current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (2000) does not contain a section describing the symptoms of codependency. The closest in terms of symptoms is dependent personality disorder (301.6); however, a diagnosis with this disorder implies the symptoms are interfering with the person's ability to function in a way that would be consistent with cultural norms and realistic expectations. Despite this caveat, the symptoms associated with dependent personality disorder can be instructive.

A person with dependent personality disorder may (1) need the assistance of others to help them make decisions, (2) will prefer to let other take responsibility for their own lives, (3) tend to go along with what others decide to avoid loss of support, (4) lack sufficient self-confidence to initiate their own activities, (5) are capable of engaging in demeaning tasks in order to gain or retain the support and nurturance of others,…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.

Ballis, Tab. (n.d.). Codependency: The most basic addiction. CapeFearHealthyMinds.org. Retrieved 22 Jun. 2013 from  http://www.capefearhealthyminds.org/library.cgi?article=1118181493 .

Dear, Greg. (1996). Blaming the victim: Domestic violence and the codependency model. In C. Sumner, M. Israel, M. O'Connell, and R. Sarre (Eds.), International Victimology: Selected Papers from the 8th International Symposium (pp. 285-290). Canberra, Australia: Australian Institute of Criminology.

GoodTherapy.org. (2013). Issues treated in therapy: Codependency. GoodTherapy.org. Retrieved 22 Jun. 2013 from http://www.goodtherapy.org/therapy-for-codependency.html.
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Domestic Violence in Pregnancy and

Words: 6040 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3380201

In light of the evidence in this literature review then it is of great import that monitoring of the health of pregnant women is vital in reference to LW infants not only in the sense of present terms but as well to lifelong health considerations for the LW infant which is probably why stated further is: "Given the relative neglect that mothers and newborns have suffered, their centrality to the Millennium Development Goals, and the cost-effectiveness of maternal and newborn health interventions, a greater emphasis on safe motherhood and newborn health is clearly needed within many health sectors." (JHPIEGO, 2003)

Literature Review

Stated in the publication "Shaping Policy for Maternal and Newborn Health: A Compendium of Case Studies (2003) is that: "The health of a newborn is inextricably linked to the health of the mother; the majority of newborn deaths are caused by the poor health of the mother during…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Krieger N. & Smith, G.(2004) Bodies County and body counts: Epidemiology and embodying inequality. Epidemiological Review Journal 200:26:92-103

Coker, AL et al. (2004) Partner Violence During Pregnancy and Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes. Pediatrics Perinatal Epidemiology 2004 Jul; 18 (4): 260-9. University of Texas School of Public Health.

Bohn, D.K. et al. (2004) Influences of Income, Education, Age, and Ethnicity on Physical Abuse before and During Pregnancy. Journal Obstetrics Gynecology Neonatal Nursing 2004 Sep-Oct; 33(5): 561-71.

Salihu, Boy a. (2004) Intimate Partner Violence and Birth Outcomes: A Systematic Review International Journal of Fertility Women's Medicine 2004 Jul-Aug; 49(4): 159-64. Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama.
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Jane Psychological Psychoanalytic Perspective According

Words: 558 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44452531

From Skinner's perspective, Jane's abusive relationships with men are the result of being 'rewarded' for being stereotypically vulnerable or flirtatious in a feminine fashion: only by acting this way is she not beaten and rewarded with compliance from men. The causes of Jane's behavior are positive reinforcement for sexual behaviors and negative reinforcement for independence in the form of physical punishment. This pattern will continue throughout Jane's life, unless she is de-conditioned from such a behavior pattern. A therapist would try to find a new, alternative system of rewards for Jane, such as encouraging her to seek out an education, where she would be rewarded for qualities other than submissiveness and sexuality.

Neuroscience & biology

From a more physiologically-driven perspective, a therapist might see Jane's and her father's behaviors as a result of a chemical imbalance, such as a deficit or excess of certain neurotransmitters, like dopamine or serotonin. The…… [Read More]

Reference

Huffman, Karen. (2009). Psychology in action. New York: Wiley & Sons.
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Erikson According to Erik Erickson's Theory of

Words: 831 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24732687

Erikson

According to Erik Erickson's theory of psychosocial development, there are eight stages through which an individual should pass in the development from infancy through adulthood. If someone does not achieve the goal of a particular stage, s/he will be unable to move past it and will suffer the consequences for life. The goal of a stage is considered a personality trait; failure to reach the goal is considered to be the lack of a trait. For example, the final stage in Erikson's construct is "integrity vs. despair." A person who reaches that stage successfully is said to have integrity, while one who is not successful does not. Erikson referred to each stage as a "crisis." He did not use the word in the pejorative sense, but rather to express the idea of a turning point in one's life (Atalay, 2007, p. 16). In the sad case study of the…… [Read More]

References

Atalay, M. (2007). Psychology of crisis: An overall account of the psychology of Erikson.

Ekev Academic Review 11(33), pp. 15-34.

Erikson Institute: Erik H. Erikson. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.erikson.edu/default

/aboutei/history/erikerikson.aspx
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Psychology Journal My Results Showed

Words: 1236 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65238647

I am motivated to continue with my volunteering experience because of a caller I had one night when I had hotline duty.

The caller had been raped several years before and was a repeat caller, who just needed to talk when the nightmares came. In the morning, at the end of my volunteer shift, she phoned me back to thank me and to tell me that, after talking to me, she had been able to sleep through the night for the first time in years.

Journal Entry 5: Partner Abuse

Take the Domestic Violence Screening Quiz at http://psychcentral.com/dvquiz.htm. andshare your thoughts on living with domestic violence. How could you help, and what would you say to a friend who was experiencing domestic abuse?

My domestic violence screening score was a 3. I am not in an abusive relationship and have committed myself to never being a victim or perpetrator of…… [Read More]

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Pursue My Degree in Social

Words: 1415 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98915128



I also support the rights of grandparents to see their grandchildren, regardless of the relationship that is held between the child's parents. It can be difficult for a mother or father who is clearly estranged from the other parent to allow his or her child to see that other parent's parents. However, many times the grandparents have had nothing to do with the breakup of the family, and they have a good relationship with their grandchildren. Because of that, they should not be cut from the lives of their grandchildren just because the parents were not able to remain together. There can be extenuating circumstances, of course, but each case should be weighed on its own merits, instead of automatically cutting grandparents out of the lives of grandchildren and not providing them with any legal recourse for that when the parents of their grandchild decide not to remain together.

Long-term,…… [Read More]

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How a Genogram Can Help in Therapy

Words: 431 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81869165

Genogram: Hernandez Family

The Hernandez case based on the genogram below indicates that Elena suffers from diabetes and Juan from back issues related to work. Money is tight because of the socio-economic conditions of the family. Juan drinks on the weekends but is not alcoholic. His weekend drinking is described as "blowing off steam." The parents have been referred because of the nature of their disciplining of their children. Their own childhoods have been fraught with abuse and physical violence from their parents which is depicted in the genogram below. The hostility that Juan and Elena show towards their children may originate in their own childhood experiences; however, the two have not been physically violent. The disciplinary methods used by the two may be the result of a lack of patience on their part in dealing with their children's developmental issues. The main issue that may be leading to the…… [Read More]

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Psychology in Women Depression in

Words: 2562 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3417824



Silence and Withdrawal - where the man "punishes" the woman for her "behavior" by becoming silent and withdrawn.

Lack of Emotional Connection - where the woman reaches out for support and empathy, and the man withholds it (Chang 73-81).

It is easy to see how these conditions of verbal and mental abuse could lead to feelings of low self-esteem and depression in women. Author Chang quotes a woman stuck in a mentally abusive relationship as saying, "He complained I never communicated with him, but whenever I tried to communicate with him, he would always tell me why I was wrong to think that way. And so it finally reached a point of why bother. You know, I got tired of listening to him criticize me'" (37-year-old nurse) (Chang 73). Studies indicate that abuse in a relationship, no matter what type of abuse, can lead to long-term depression, especially when the…… [Read More]

References

Ainsworth, Patricia. Understanding Depression. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2000.

Chang, Valerie Nash. I Just Lost Myself. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1996.

D'Mello, Dale a. "1 Epidemiology of Late-Life Depression." Depression in Later Life: A Multidisciplinary Psychiatric Approach. Ed. James M. Ellison and Sumer Verma. New York: Marcel Dekker, 2003. 1-26.

Editors. "Depression: What Every Woman Should Know." National Institute for Mental Health. 2007. 30 Nov. 2007. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression-what-every-woman-should-know/summary.shtml
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Understanding the Connection Between Child Abuse and Anti-Social Behavior

Words: 6698 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75798499

Abused children develop antisocial behavior that persists through three continuous generations. Such behavior grows out of angry, aggressive parenting and an overall negative home environment, perpetuated by sibling collusion, economic and biological factors. These children exhibit this in preschool by committing at least one antisocial behavior each day in class. As dysfunctional adolescents, their romantic lives and eventual marriages also fail. African-American children suffer from the affliction than Caucasian children. The current level of knowledge and efforts requires effective and efficient mechanisms at home, in school and the community in the crucial formative childhood years.

Understanding the Connection between Child Abuse and the Development of Antisocial Behavior

Abused children eventually become problem adults who are a burden to society.

ecent studies reveal the significance of parenting in the cross-generational transmission of aggressive or problem behavior up to three continuous generations. Stable evidence has long recognized and documented the negative effects…… [Read More]

References

Ary, D.V., Duncan, T.E., Biglan, A., Mitzler, C., & Smolkowski, K (April

1999). Development of Adolescent Problem Behavior. Journal of Abnormal

Child Psychology. New York: Plenum Publishing Corporation. Retrieved from the Web July 17, 2004. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0902/is_2_27/ai_55208541

2. Ballard, S. (August 18, 2003).How Your Relationships Affect Your Child. Jet.
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Domestic Violence

Words: 2163 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17090431

Daughter directed by Brian Gilbert. Specifically it will discuss all aspects of domestic violence in the film. This film illustrates many aspects of domestic violence, indicating that violence and abuse take many different forms, and can exist in even the "happiest" of homes. Domestic violence is a threat facing many families, and this film shows that violence is not the only form of abuse; there are many different types of emotional and mental abuse that still can leave lasting scars on the victims.

The film opens in 1984 with the seemingly happy family of Moody, Betty and Mahtob Mahmoody, a family living in Michigan. Moody is an Iranian doctor, and Betty is his wife. Mahtob is their young daughter. They seem extremely happy and well-adjusted -- not the kind of family that would endure any kind of domestic violence or abuse, but that begins to unravel as the film continues.…… [Read More]

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Bws in the Late 1970s

Words: 1585 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14563827



The Macy et al. (nd) research, coupled with the lack of federal support for a nationwide network of services, point to one of the root causes of domestic violence: gender inequity. Gender equality remains elusive in a society that claims otherwise. Learned helplessness and financial dependence are both linked to traditional gender roles and norms for behavior. Domestic abuse has long been considered a "private" issue: one that rarely surfaces until the problem escalates into ancillary issues including alcohol and drug abuse that demand help seeking (Macy et al. nd). Because of the stigma surrounding victims of domestic violence and because of the lack of sufficient social censuring of domestic violence, women who seek counseling for a substance abuse problems are unlikely to bring up their domestic violence issues. In extreme cases, battered women syndrome leads to what should be a preventable murder. atifying initiatives like CEDAW sends a clear…… [Read More]

References

American Bar Association. Convention to Eliminate All Forms of Discrimination Against Women. Retrieved Oct 12, 2008 at http://www.abanet.org/irr/cedaw/violagwomen.html

Chapter 3: Profiles and Syndromes.

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). Full text retrieved Oct 12, 2008 at  http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/cedaw/cedaw.htm 

Macy, R., Nurius, P.S., Kernic, M.A., & Holt, V.L. (nd). Battered Women's Profiles Associated with Service Help-Seeking Efforts: Illuminating Opportunities for Intervention.
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Domestic Violence No Place Like

Words: 4223 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98385581

What appears to explain their shared high rates of violent behavior is their increased interpersonal dependency. They are socially withdrawn and entertain a negative view of themselves. These difficulties with trust are common in the two disorders. They are thus more personally dependent on their partners. Furthermore, veterans with a major physical health problem are likelier to commit domestic violence than the other veterans surveyed. The physical problem tends to increase their irritability and dependence on their partners. Other studies found this characteristic high partner-specific dependency among physically abusive men who exhibit personal inadequacy, low social self-confidence and increased reliance on those nearest them. Many of these physically abusive men greatly fear abandonment and are anxiously attached. They are thus hypersensitive to rejection and often show anger in their intimate relationships. Veterans often display excessive coercion to which the partners respond by distancing themselves. The veterans' fear and dependencies can…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Blasko, K. et al. (2007). Therapists' prototypical assessment of domestic violence Situations. 13 pages. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy: Blackwell Publishing

Brammer, a. (2006). Domestic violence crime and victims act 2004. 4 pages. Journal of Adult Protection: Pavilion Publishing (Brighton) Ltd.

De la Hey, M. (2006). Gender differences seen in consequences of domestic violence. 2 pages. Cross Currents - the Journal of Addiction and Mental Health: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Kelly, K.a. (2004). Working together to stop domestic violence. 14 pages. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
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Diagnostic Assessment

Words: 5224 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64538441

real problems faced by real people in the world, it might seem foolish to analyze a fictitious character. But sometimes it is easier to understand human nature when we look to art or fiction, in part because art provides us with some needed distance at times and in part because fictitious characters are often relatively pure distillations of character types. This is the case with the character of Grace from the television show "Grace Under Pressure." This paper provides an analysis of this character using first the Adlerian therapy model, then analyzing her through a behavior model and then finally suggesting a treatment plan for a person with the profile of Grace.

Grace's character - to begin with a thumbnail of her - is presented in the series as a no-nonsense, take-no-guff survivor of a bad marriage that was often abusive (at least in psychological terms). After eight years of…… [Read More]

References

Amen, D. (2000). Change your brain, change your life. New York: Times Books.

Corsini, R. & Wedding, D. (2000). Current Psychotherapies. New York: FE

Fernandez, E. (2002). Anxiety, depression, and anger in pain: research findings and clinical options. New York: Advanced Psychological Resources.

Foster, R.P., Moskowtiz, M. & Javier R.A. (Eds.) (1996). Reaching across boundaries of culture and class: Widening the scope of psychotherapy. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.
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Causes Discernment and Treatment of Spiritual Abuse

Words: 1900 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24471625

Ma Pastoral Theology -- Spiritual Abuse

HEN THE SYSTEM BECOMES THE PERSECUTOR

Veenhuizen's dissertation explores spiritual abuse, using Relational Theology to understand a healthy spiritual relationship vs. spiritual abuse. In Relational Theology, God offers a bilateral covenant with Him and with others of unreserved love and commitment with the gifts of blessing to anyone accepting His offer. Spiritual abuse sharply contrasts with God's covenant. Spiritual abuse has existed for quite some time; consequently, theological writers such as Veenhuizen and mental health professionals have all addressed the causes, discernment and treatment of spiritual abuse.

Foundation of Relational Theology

Veenhuizen's dissertation correctly shows that there are various definitions of Spiritual Abuse (Veenhuizen, 2011). The most inclusive one found in my research is from Lisa Oakley's "Developing safeguarding policy and practice for Spiritual Abuse" (Oakley & Kinmond, 2014). After studies and interviews with numerous survivors of Spiritual Abuse, Oakley and her team concluded…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anonymous, 2012. Spiritual abuse rising in many places, it seems. [Online]

Available at: http://the-end-time.blogspot.com/2012/04/spiritual-abuse-rising-in-many-places.html

[Accessed 19 May 2016].

Berry, B. O., 2010. Spiritual abuse in the Christian community. Orlando, FL: Asbury Theological Seminary.
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Women's Issues Women Elderly Abuse

Words: 3092 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25988572

In a study of the prevalence of elder abuse in the United States, financial difficulties on the part of the abuser did appear to be an important risk factor (Krug, 2002, pp. 130-131).

elationship factors - in the early theoretical models, the level of stress of caregivers was seen as a risk factor that linked elder abuse with care of an elderly relative. While the accepted image of abuse depicts a dependent victim and an overstressed caregiver, there is growing evidence that neither of these factors properly accounts for cases of abuse. Although researchers do not deny the component of stress, they tend now to look at it in a wider context in which the quality of the overall relationship is a causal factor. Today, the belief is that stress may be a contributing factor in cases of abuse but does not by itself account for the entire phenomenon.

Living…… [Read More]

References

Brandl, Bonnie. (2000). Power and Control: Understanding Domestic Abuse in Later Life.

Generations. 24(2), p. 39-45.

Elder Abuse and Neglect. (2009). Retrieved February 11, 2010, from Helpguide.org Web site:

http://www.helpguide.org/mental/elder_abuse_physical_emotional_sexual_neglect.htm
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Domestic Violence Related to Alternating Shifts in Policing

Words: 1318 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92966959

Domestic violence is a multifaceted idea but can roughly be referred to as exhibition of abusive behaviors towards a mate in an intimate relationship such as family setting, dating instances, marriage, cohabitation and even friendship. These abuses are usually used to control the other partner in a relationship (Domesticviolence.org, 2009). This paper therefore sets out to look at the possibility of the work schedule being a contributing factor to the ever rising domestic violence among the policing families. It also seeks to expand on the responses that have been made to mitigate the effects of the shift working system on the violence in homes.

Depending on the context and region of use, domestic violence can be called domestic abuse, intimate partner violence, spousal abuse or even family violence. However, all these manifest themselves in various forms including but not limited to: Physical violence/attack (like shoving, kicking, slapping, hitting, restraining etc.),…… [Read More]

References

Beverly J.A., (2002). The Echoes of Violence in the Police Family. Retrieved September 4, 2011

from  http://www.giftfromwithin.org/html/Police-Stress-Management.html 

CBS Interactive. (2010). The Effects of Sleep Deprivation. Retrieved September 4, 2011

from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2194/is_7_70/ai_77417463/
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Domestic Violence and the Victimization of Men

Words: 2259 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37880148

Domestic Violence Against Men

Domestic violence, domestic abuse, dating abuse, intimate partner violence (IPV) or battering refers to a behavioral pattern in which one partner abuses another in an intimate relationship such as marriage, dating, cohabitation or within a family setup. Domestic violence takes different forms, the most common being physical assault i.e. hitting, shoving, kicking, biting, slapping, shoving objects and general physical violence. It can also take the form of threats including sexual and emotional abuse, intimidation, controlling or domineering, stalking, covert abuses as well as economic deprivation (Siemineiuk et al. 2010). It can be inflicted on or by both men and women (Adebayo, 2014).

Male domestic violence targets men inflicted by their partners. Though rare and hardly vocalized like its counterpart, violence against women, domestic violence against men is real. It occurs in every society though at varied degrees. The challenges faced when trying to collect statistics is…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Adebayo Anthony A. 2014. "Domestic Violence against Men: Balancing the Gender Issues in Nigeria." American Journal of Sociological Research, 4(1): 14-19

Chan, Ko Ling. 2011. "Gender Differences in Self-Reports of Intimate Partner Violence: A Review." Aggression and Violent Behavior (Elsevier) 16 (2): 167 -- 175.

Cook, P.W. 2009. Abused Men -- The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence (Preager second edition 2009).

Kevin Smith (Ed.), Kathryn Coleman, Simon Eder and Philip Hall 2011. "Homicides, Firearm Offences and Intimate Violence 2009/10." Home Office.
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Spousal Abuse on Family Members

Words: 1739 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41288979

Sexual jealousy may be the main factor for couples aged 18 to 30, but couples in their 50s have established hitting and getting hit as habits, their way of dealing with stress and problems, their bond itself. People wonder and ask why the victim does not leave the abusive relationship. Experts say that it is never easy to do so because leaving costs a lot of money and the victim, often the woman, has no money of her own and has never worked. She does not feel she has much choice until she reaches the brink (The Daily).

ibliography

Alksnis, C. And Taylor, J. (2003). Aggressive ehavior by Witnesses and/or Victims in Adulthood. Correctional Service of Canada. http://www.csc-scs.ca/text/pblct/fv/fv04/fv04/fv04e04_e.shtml

Cwik, MS. (1996). Why Does Wife Abuse Occur? MSA Review. http://users.aol.com/agunah/review.htm

Daily, The (2002). Impacts and Consequences of Spousal Violence. Statistics Canada. http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020626/d02060.htm

Focus on the Family. (2004). The Impact of Family…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alksnis, C. And Taylor, J. (2003). Aggressive Behavior by Witnesses and/or Victims in Adulthood. Correctional Service of Canada. http://www.csc-scs.ca/text/pblct/fv/fv04/fv04/fv04e04_e.shtml

Cwik, MS. (1996). Why Does Wife Abuse Occur? MSA Review. http://users.aol.com/agunah/review.htm

Daily, The (2002). Impacts and Consequences of Spousal Violence. Statistics Canada. http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020626/d02060.htm

Focus on the Family. (2004). The Impact of Family Violence on Children. Focus Ministries, Inc. http://www.family.org/fmedia/misc/a0034023.cfm
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Irenes Story the Case of Adult Abuse

Words: 1012 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98972157

Irene

Elder abuse is the common term that refers to the action that leads to the interruption of the healthy well being of an elderly person, or simply jeopardizing the chances of such an elderly person from enjoying full mental and physical health. Elder abuse is about what people do, as much as it is about what they do not do, to the elderly people within their care. Such people may be close and trusted family members and friends, or people in positions of responsibility. The problem of elder abuse is often viewed from various angles. The matter suffices as an economic, justice, social, health and even gender concern. The latter arises because women constitute the greater percentage of the elderly population across the globe. Therefore, the issue of elderly abuse must come at the fore of any plans in order to take care of the elderly. Indications show that…… [Read More]

References

Alberta Council of Women's Shelters. (2011). Abuse Of Older Adults: Guidelines For Developing Coordinated Community Response Models. Edmonton, AB: Alberta Council of Women's Shelters.

Irene's Journey: Examining the Issues of Domestic Violence in Later Life. (2015, October 22). Retrieved from National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women: http://www.globalvp.umn.edu/cgi-bin/client.pl

Walker, L. E. (1979). The Battered Woman. New York: Harper and Row.
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Role of Prostitution Laws in Criminalizing Women

Words: 2271 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67003903

Criminalization occurs when women are treated like offenders rather than victims when they defend themselves against abusive males. Criminalized women are made to feel like they are the ones responsible for situations such as damage to property, child exposure to violence, immigration status issues, reputational damage, homelessness, and poverty occurring as a direct result of male violence. We have heard of numerous cases -- for instance, where women living with abusive partners are accused of failing to protect their children, and are held responsible in the unfortunate event that the children fall victim to, or witness disturbing episodes of domestic violence. The situation is no different in the prison system, where these women are incarcerated upon conviction. ather than strive to address the social injustices such as poverty, sexual and domestic abuse, and psychological issues that drive such women to commit crime, we dedicate our attention to making their lives…… [Read More]

References

Balfour, G. (2006). Introduction to Part III. In E. Comack & G. Balfour (Eds.), Criminalizing Women: Gender and (In)Justice in Neo-Liberal Times (pp. 157-76). Black Point, NS: Fernwood Publishing

Canadian Prostitution Related Laws as of December, 2014 ( URL Link XXX)

Casavant, L. & Valiquet, D. (2014). Bill C-36: An Act to Amend the Criminal Code in Response to the Supreme Court of Canada Decision in Attorney General of Canada vs. Benford and to make Consequential Amendments to Other Acts. Library of Parliament. (URL Link XXX)

Dell, C.A., Gardipy, J., Kirlin, N., Naytowhow, V. & Nicol, J.J. (2006). Enhancing the Well-Being of Criminalized, Indigenous Women. In E. Comack & G. Balfour (Eds.), Criminalizing Women: Gender and (In)Justice in Neo-Liberal Times (pp. 314 -329). Black Point, NS: Fernwood Publishing
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Domestic Violence -- How it

Words: 1260 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81386429



From a national fiscal point-of-view, after the Clinton's Personal esponsibility and Work Opportunity reconciliation Act gave welfare control back to the states, there was a 60 per cent overall drop in welfare recipients, but critics point out that much of this was part of a reclassification from welfare to workfare during an unusually strong economic time (the late 1990s) (DeParle, 2009). Into the 21st century, the $16.5 billion that the states received as welfare rolls dropped were spent on block grants or other types of assistance, rather than saving for economic downturns or recessionary times (Goldstein, 2008).

Scholars point out that the perceptions of welfare also contribute to the cycle of underfunding. In America, one Political Science professor noted, "while Americans with the most exaggerated misunderstandings of the racial composition of the poor are the most likely to oppose welfare," which, in turn, perpetuates racial stereotypes and could increase Americans'…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

The Burning Bed. (1984). Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved from:  http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/24570/Burning-Bed-The/ 

DeParle, J. (February 1, 2009). Welfare Aid Isn't Growing as Economy Drops Off. The New York Times. Retrieved from:  http://www.nytimes.com/ 2009/02/02/us/02welfare.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&pagewanted=all Dutton, D. (1994). Patriarchy and Wife Assault: The Ecological Fallacy. Violence and Victims. 9 (2): 167-82. Retrieved from: http://lab.drdondutton.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/DUTTON.-1994.-PATRIARCHY-AND-WIFE-ASSAULT-THE-ECOLOGICAL-FALLACY..pdf

Giles, M. (1996). Race and Poverty in America: Public Misperceptions and the American New Media. Public Opinion Quarterly. 60 (4): 515-41.

Goldstein, A. (December 17, 2008). Welfare Rolls See First Increase in Years. The Washington Post. Retrieved from:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/16/AR2008121602978.html
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Spousal Abuse

Words: 1362 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8838493

Spousal Abuse

Causes of Spousal Abuse

Our society has made great strides in the last fifty years in terms of empowering women, granting them greater access to opportunities, income, self-realization, and the overall level of equality. Old patriarchal views which suggest that women should sit at home, be obedient, and know their "place" at home and in the society today are generally shunned. Yet stereotyping about women, sexism, and even misogyny in our society have not been eradicated. Violence against women remains at a frighteningly high levels. And most of the violence against women takes place at home.

Although there are families where women abuse men, overwhelming majority of spousal abuse cases involve abusive men who use violence against their wives. What are the causes of these abusive relationships? This paper tries to answer this question by utilizing conflict theory and reviewing literature on the topic. The conflict theory is…… [Read More]

References

Atkinson, M.P., Greenstein, T.N., & Lang, M. (2005). For Women, Breadwinning Can Be Dangerous: Gendered Resource Theory and Wife Abuse. Journal Of Marriage And Family, 67(5), 1137-1148.

Farmer, A., & Tiefenthaler, J. (1997). An Economic Analysis of Domestic Violence. Review Of Social Economy, 55(3), 337-358.

Macionis, J.J. (2008) Social Problems. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

McCloskey, L. (1996). SOCIOECONOMIC AND COERCIVE POWER WITHIN THE FAMILY. Gender & Society, 10(4), 449-463.
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Spousal Violence and Abuse Effects on Children

Words: 1497 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68247745

Spousal and Child Abuse

Child and spousal abuse is an intentional act that results in physical and/or emotional or psychological injury on a child or spouse (or partner) by a parent or a mate, respectively (Gelles 2004). In a child, abuse more often takes the form of neglect. Child and spousal abuse and violence are major social concerns today.

The extent that children are abused by their parents or adult caretakers is difficult to measure, although it appears to occur most frequently among lower-income communities and certain ethnic and religious minorities. Abuse of children ranges from physical and emotional abuse and sexual abuse to physical and emotional neglect (Gelles). Effects of physical abuse are varied and visible: unexplained bruises, fractures and burn marks. Emotional abuse destroys the child's sense of security and self-esteem. Sexual abuse includes all acts that expose them to the sexual satisfaction of the parent or adult…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boudreau, Diane. Damage: the Health Effects of Abuse. ASU Research: Arizona:

State University, 2002. http://researchmag.asu.edu/stories/abuse.html childabuse.org. Child Abuse and Child Sexual Abuse. For the Love of Our Children, 2002. http://www.fortheloveofourchildren.org/statistics.html childabuse.com. Why Child Abuse Occurs and the Common Criminal Background of the Abuser. Arctic Originals, 2002.  http://www.childabuse.com 

Gelles, Richard. Child Abuse. MSN Encarta. Microsoft Corporation. http://encarta.msn.com

Hopper, Jim. UChild AbuseU, 2004. http://www.jimhopper.com/abstats
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Object Relation Attachment Theories and

Words: 26278 Length: 55 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34405449

During the next chapter of this clinical case study dissertation, the Literature eview section, this researcher relates accessed information that contributes a sampling of previous research to begin to enhance the understanding needed to help a patient "grow" not only in therapy, but also in life.

CHAPTE II

LITEATUE EVIEW

The theories and techniques used in psychoanalysis are very diverse; Freudian analysis is only one approach."

Thomas and McGinnis, 1991, ¶ 1)

Diverse Contentions

One recent University of New Hampshire study indicated that 63% of more than 3,000 surveyed American parents surveyed reported experiences of one or more instances of verbal aggression toward children in their homes. A Child Protective Services study, albeit reported that only 6% of child abuse cases involved "emotional maltreatment," form of abuse in which verbal abuse constitutes the most common form of maltreatment. The apparent low number of "official" verbal abuse cases likely relates to…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association, (2004). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Test Revised. Washington DC.

Blatt, S. (1974). Levels of object representation in anaclytic and introjective depression. New York: International University Press.

Bowlby, J. (1969) Attachment. Volume One of Attachment and Loss, New York: Basic

Books.
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Divorce on American Culture Divorce

Words: 2986 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53470039

5). While divorce can lead to safety for children and adults caught in violent and abusive relationships, it can also lead to increased violence down the line. Studies indicate that children who grow up in abusive situations often tend to become abusive themselves as adults, and this means that abuse and violence could continue to grow in our culture as these children grow up and continue the ongoing cycle of abuse and violence.

eligion

Another bedrock of American culture is religion, and divorce goes against many religious teachings. The freedom to worship any religion we please is a foundation of the country and our culture, and religious worship tends to go down in divorced families. Fagan and ector continue, "eligious worship, which has been linked to health and happiness as well as longer marriages and better family life, is less prevalent in divorced families" (Fagan, and ector). This means that…… [Read More]

References

Butler, Ian, et al. Divorcing Children: Children's Experience of Their Parents' Divorce. London: Jessica Kingsley, 2003.

Cozort, Larry a. "Is the Tax Court Becoming a Divorce Court? The Answer Could Change How the Innocent Spouse Rules Are Interpreted." Journal of Accountancy 195.2 (2003): 35+.

Doherty, William J., et al. "Why Marriage Matters: Twenty-One Conclusions from the Social Sciences." New York: Institute for American Values, 2002.

Editors. "Divorce Statistics." Divorce Magazine. 2005. 5 Nov. 2008. http://www.divorcemag.com/statistics/statsUS.shtml
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Colleagues' Postings Respond to a Colleague

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99802642

colleagues' postings . Respond to a colleague who discussed a leadership behavior that you did not. Respond in one or more of the following ways:

• Ask a probing question.

• Share an insight from having read your colleague's posting.

• Offer and support an opinion.

• Validate an idea with your own experience.

• Make a suggestion.

• Expand on your colleague's posting.

escribe your specific area of interest within human services, including three reasons for your interest. Finally, describe one human services organization within your area of interest. Include a brief history of the organization's evolution.

OMESTIC VIOLENCE

omestic violence, also known as domestic abuse, battering or intimate partner violence takes place among people who are in an intimate relationship. omestic violence can present itself in numerous forms, including emotional, sexual and physical abuse and threats of abuse. omestic violence is most frequently directed toward women, although men…… [Read More]

Domestic violence, also known as domestic abuse, battering or intimate partner violence takes place among people who are in an intimate relationship. Domestic violence can present itself in numerous forms, including emotional, sexual and physical abuse and threats of abuse. Domestic violence is most frequently directed toward women, although men are occasionally abused by partners. Domestic violence can take place in both heterosexual and same sex relationships, as it does not discriminate (Domestic violence against women: Recognize patterns, seek help, 2011).

It is sometimes hard to recognize domestic violence in the beginning. While some relations are obviously abusive from the beginning, abuse frequently starts subtly and gets worse over time. Normally, the violence becomes more recurrent and severe as time goes by. The longer that one stays in an abusive relationship, the greater toll it takes on their self-esteem. A person often becomes depressed and anxious. They sometimes begin to question their ability to take care of themselves or speculate if the abuse is their fault. Victims often feel powerless or paralyzed. Sometimes older people, who have health problems, often feel reliant upon an abusive partner. People in same sex relationships, might be less likely to get help after an assault if they don't want to reveal their sexual orientation. The only way to stop the cycle of domestic violence is to take action and the earlier one does the better. Victims need to start by confiding in someone about what is going on, whether it's a friend, loved one, a health care provider or other close contact. In the beginning they might find it hard to talk about the abuse, but in the end they feel relief and get the support that they desperately need (Domestic violence against women: Recognize patterns, seek help, 2011).

Domestic abuse is a problem that you hear about all the time. It seems that it is becoming more and more prevalent every day. I am sure that this is not really the case because this is a problem that has been in existence for a very long time. The difference is that people are becoming more aware that it goes on and things are being done to help those who find themselves in a bad situation. The only way to stop the domestic abuse cycle is to educate everyone so that they know what the problem entails, how to get help and how to help others get help. I would like to be part of the solution to this problem and help end it across the country. The more people that are talking about the problem the more people will become aware of it and do something to end it. No one should have to live their life in fear of another person. Life throws enough curve balls at people everyday this is not one that should have to be endured by
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Learned Helplessness Domestic Violence

Words: 337 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33579776

Helplessness (Domestic Violence)

Domestic violence is a social problem of epidemic proportions in the United States. This is evident by the fact that it is estimated that anywhere between two to four million women are battered each year. Often, the battering results in severe physical injury requiring hospitalization and emergency care (NOW, para 2). The magnitude of the problem has led to societal help and interventional measures being made available to help women who are victimized by domestic violence. Yet, there are many women who choose to stay in abusive relationships primarily due to a psychological condition, which is termed as the "battered woman syndrome." Viewed as a subcategory of post traumatic stress disorder (PSTD), the "battered woman syndrome" hypothesizes that the ongoing trauma suffered by battered women leads to development of coping mechanisms, which make her unable to predict the results of her actions, and so, she acts in…… [Read More]

References

Dewdney, P., & Harris, R.M. Barriers to Information: How Formal Help Systems Fail

Battered Women. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

NOW. Violence Against Women in the United States. National Organization for Women

Web site. Retrieved July 9, 2004: http://www.now.org/issues/violence/stats.html
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Domestic Violence Has Been Around for as

Words: 871 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13689685

Domestic violence has been around for as long as many cultures can remember, however, that's not an excuse for its continuance. Although some see women and children as mere property, their rights and safety should be protected. Whether they suffer from physical, sexual or emotional abuse, thankfully there are an increasing number of programs for these victims to turn to. These programs work hard to take the steps necessary for America to become a domestic violence-free society.

Stopping Domestic Violence in America

Although domestic violence is often thought of in terms of physical violence or even sexual violence, it goes beyond that, beyond the cuts, the bruises, the scrapes, the broken bones; it's a control issue. "Domestic violence is a pattern of coercive control that one person exercises over another in order to dominate and get their way." ("Voices Set Free," n.d.) In addition to physical and sexual abuse, it…… [Read More]

References

Get the Facts - Domestic Violence in the United States. (2003). Retrieved June 17, 2003, at http://endabuse.org/resources/facts/

Victim Support. (n.d.). Retrieved June 17, 2003, at http://www.awoscentral.com/victim_support/victim_support.html

Voices Set Free. (n.d.). Retrieved June 17, 2003, at http://www.awoscentral.com/domestic_violence/domestic_violence.html

Stopping Domestic Violence in America
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Domestic Violence on Children Studies

Words: 1348 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2586369

Each day, thousands of New Yorkers experience violence at the hands of someone they love. But only a fraction of victims know where to get help" (p. 3).

Moreover, many domestic violence victims are coerced by the perpetrators into not testifying against them. In this regard, Glaberson (2011) reports that, "The defendants in domestic violence cases are in constant contact with their victims, and they use various means and methods to try to have the case dropped. Many of them cannot seem to stop themselves from sweet-talking, confessing to, berating and threatening . . . The women they were charged with abusing" (p. 3). Because even abusive relationships can be strong, some women who have experienced domestic violence -- even many times -- may be reluctant to prosecute their spouses or partners. In some cases, domestic violence shelters encourage abused partners to seek formal divorces in order to facilitate the…… [Read More]

References

Duchon-Voyles, a. (2010, October 21). From dangerous home to safe house. The New York

Times. [online] available:  http://www.nytimes.com/ 2010/10/24/magazine/24lives-t.html?ref=domesticviolence.

Glaberson, W. (2011, February 25). Abuse suspects, your calls are taped. Speak up. The New

York Times. [online] available:
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Community Outreach Program Volunteer Domestic Violence Shelter

Words: 1192 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98026605

male entering a domestic violence/battered women's shelter, I was not immediately made to feel welcome. No one embraced me warmly, and more than a few faces revealed not a little bit of suspicion as to what my motives were for being there. However, I was given the opportunity to explain myself. After I registered, received my guest pass, and received a short tour with one of the volunteers, I was able to share why I wanted to observe the shelter for a few hours as a component of this school assignment. I told the volunteer assigned to me that I was no stranger to abuse, as I witnessed my mother being abused by men she trusted. Sharing my story with the women at the shelter helped them to trust and understand me. After a short while, the people in the shelter opened up and warmed up to me.

The shelter…… [Read More]

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Domestic Violence Prevention as it

Words: 2314 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33807469



Domestic violence poses serious mental and physical health risks. In fact, it is estimated that" more than 1.5 million women nationwide seek medical treatment for injuries related to abuse each year" (Stark, 2001, p. 347(Tomison, 2003)). Those who are abused can experience mental health issues, such as anxiety attacks, posttraumatic stress disorder, chronic depression, acute stress disorder, and suicidal thoughts and ideation (Tomison, 2003)."

Domestic violence in America comes with an annual $44 million price tag with more than 20,000 hospital stays and 40,000 doctor visits each year (Tomison, 2003).

One of the issues that literature has uncovered is a lack of services or resources for women who are the victim of abuse by their domestic partner.

Shelters and batterer's intervention programs are often geographically inaccessible and not community based (Asbury, 1987; Williams & Becker, 1994; Williams-Campbell, 1993). Inaccessible services are less likely to be used despite the need. Transportation…… [Read More]

References

Bent-Goodley, Tricia B.(2004) Perceptions of domestic violence: a dialogue with African-American women. Health and Social Work

Tomison, Adam M (2003)an analysis of current Australian program initiatives for children exposed to domestic violence. Australian Journal of Social Issues

Sharron M. (2005) Dating violence prevention in middle school and high school youth.

Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing
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Nan Goldin

Words: 4021 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18522332

Nan Goldin Photography

Nan Goldin -- Empathy and Obsession

Nan Goldin is a famous American photographer who was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1953 (Williams 26). From an early age, she demonstrated a passion for photography, often using it in her teens to document the gay and transsexual communities she frequented with friends. Her earliest works are considered provocative, voyeuristic, and controversial and noted for their depiction of sex, desire, obsession and empathy (O'Brien 151). Although her current work is much more subdued (i.e., landscapes, etc.), she still continues to create powerful motifs involving couples, intimacy, addiction, HIV / AIDS, prostitution, and homosexuality.

Goldin attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. There she created The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, arguably her most noteworthy body of work (Danto 33). The 700 image collection set to music presented friends in intimate scenarios in slide show format. It is…… [Read More]

References

Danto, Arthur C. "Nan Goldin's World." The Nation Dec 02, 1996: 32-5. ProQuest. Web. 19 Oct. 2013.

Eade, Michael. "Michael Eade Talks with a Postmodern Photographer: "Nobody Symbolizes Anything." Nan Goldin." The Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review 4.3 (1997): 16. ProQuest. Web. 19 Oct. 2013.

Chrisafis, Angelique. "My Camera Has Saved My Life." The Guardian, Wednesday 21 May 2008. Web.  http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2008/may/22/photography.art 

Kois, Dan. "Amazing Adventures in Empathy." New York Times Magazine Oct 07, 2012: 52-3. ProQuest. Web. 22 Oct. 2013.
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Children in Dysfunctional Families the

Words: 1730 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67754779

We are essentially powerless to prevent all dysfunctions - but, the mental health and social support structures within communities have the responsibility to do as much as they possibly can to promote healthy family life for all. This support often involves early identification of dysfunctional families, counseling, disruption of negative patterns. The schools, churches, hospitals and any other institution both public and private have a responsibility to reach out and try to help those who are suffering - and often that suffering must be alleviated at the source, the dysfunctional family.

ibliography

Abell, Troy D., et al. "The Effects of Family Functioning on Infant irthweight." Journal of Family Pratice 32.1 (1991): 37(8).

Hamamci, Zeynep. "Dysfunctional relationship beliefs in parent-late adolescent relationship and conflict resolution behaviors." College Student Journal 41.1 (2007): 122(16).

Hillis, Susan D., et al. "Adverse Childhood Experiences and Sexual Risk ehaviors in Women: A Retrospective Study." Family Planning…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abell, Troy D., et al. "The Effects of Family Functioning on Infant Birthweight." Journal of Family Pratice 32.1 (1991): 37(8).

Hamamci, Zeynep. "Dysfunctional relationship beliefs in parent-late adolescent relationship and conflict resolution behaviors." College Student Journal 41.1 (2007): 122(16).

Hillis, Susan D., et al. "Adverse Childhood Experiences and Sexual Risk Behaviors in Women: A Retrospective Study." Family Planning Perspectivesq 33.5 (2001): 206(5).

Martin, Don and Maggie Martin. "Understanding Dysfunctional and Functional Family Behaviors for the at-Risk Adolescent." Adolescence 35.140 (2000): 785(4).
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Dead Jones Ann 2000 Next

Words: 2766 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68446367

" Media can also learn and report on what happens to men convicted of domestic assault, what local schools are doing about battered women and domestic violence, and what grants might be available from the federal Violence Against Women Act.

The help for women - in the context of educating people on the issues whether they come into contact with domestic assault or not - should also be planned for and provided in the workplace, Jones write on pages 240-242. Employers can and should sponsor workshops and seminars about violence in the home, and also they should be encouraged to make donations to local shelters or other groups that support women who have been abused.

FIVE: Critique of the book. This is an effective book in terms of its overall tone and theme and the factual, investigative narrative strategy. Its blunt, sometimes shocking stories of abuse and injustice done to…… [Read More]