Anthropomorphism Essays (Examples)

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Sophocles Oedipus

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16519282

Sophocles' Oedipus the King

Look up and/or reflect on the meaning of:

Tragedy: A tragedy is any event which causes great suffering and stress, such as the death of a loved one or a natural disaster. In the context of Greek literature, tragedy was the most popular form of theatre, with storytellers relying on the rhetorical technique of tragic irony to create emotionally resonant tales of lost love and territorial conquest.

Philosophy: The overall study of the human condition, reality, metaphysics, and other pursuits of higher intelligence.

Psychology: The scientific study of the human mind, including cognitive function, perception, attention, emotion and behavior.

Logic: The fundamental application of reasoning to the pursuit of problem solving, a function which only the human mind is known to hold the capacity to perform.

Ethics: The branch of philosophy which postulates certain standards which should be used to guide proper human conduct.

Mathematics: The…… [Read More]

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Proof to the Fact That

Words: 3292 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48362439

Previous to Darwin, it has been considered that animals had nothing in connection with humans, since their brutish behavior had been very different from the sociable and civilized one displayed by people. French philosopher Rene Descartes apparently thought of animals to be nothing but machines that acted in conformity to the same laws to which inanimate matter had functioned. Quite the reverse happened when concerning humans, as, in spite of the fact that their bodies reacted similar to those of animals, they possessed a soul given to them by a divine being.

Darwin believed that there had been several similarities between the thinking of an ape and that of man. However, even he accentuated the fact that there had been great differences in cerebral power between the most primitive man and the most intelligent ape. It seems that Bambification firstly appeared as a result of people being inclined to anthropomorphize,…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Berger, John (1980), 'Why Look at Animals?' In About Looking, London: Writers & Readers. (book)

2. De Waal, Frans. (2001). "The Ape and the Sushi Master: Cultural Reflections by a Primatologist." Basic Books. (book)

3. Marks, Johnatan. (2002). "What It Means to Be 98% Chimpanzee: Apes, People, and Their Genes." University of California Press. (book)

4. Mezo, Richard Eugene. (1993). "A study of B. Traven's fiction: the journey to Solipaz." Edwin Mellen Press. (book)
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David Hume Philosophy What Is

Words: 854 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84597415

"that the author of nature is somewhat similar to the mind of man; though possessed of much larger faculties, proportioned to the grandeur of the work, which he has executed," indicating that there is existence of Deity who has similarity to man but us more apportioned to the deeds and the works of His hands.

7. How is anthropomorphism used in relation to the argument?

Anthropomorphism is used in relation to this argument to compare human form and characteristics to God's. For example in the passage Damea imagines that the spirit of God has human ideas or bears resemblance to our spirit hence the Anthropomorphism.

8. How is analogy used in relation to the argument?

Analogy is used to compare human beings with God where in the passage Philo says that we ought not to imagine that the perfection of God and that of man can be compared. This is…… [Read More]

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Environmental Ethical Issues in the

Words: 868 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86819609

On the largest scale, the U.S. population is disproportionately responsible for the depletion of fossil fuels and other natural resources in that Americans consume approximately one-quarter of those valuable energy resources despite constituting less than five percent of the entire global population (Attfield, 2003; Poiman & Poiman, 2007).

Besides consuming such a disproportionate amount of natural resources, another major environmental ethics issue arises in connection with the deliberate export of hazardous waste from wealthy countries to poor countries and the outsourcing of dangerous jobs, such as some of those that are strictly prohibited by domestic environmental laws (Halbert & Ingulli, 2008; Poiman & Poiman, 2007). United States military operations have also contributed to new environmental ethics concerns, such as the contamination of soil and water supplies in Iraq and Central Europe by the millions of depleted uranium shells left by tactical aircraft supporting ground troops in Iraq or engaging hostile…… [Read More]

References

Attfield R. (2003). Environmental Ethics: An Overview for the Twenty-First Century.

Cambridge, UK: Polity.

Halbert T. And Ingulli E. (2008). Law & Ethics in the Business Environment. Cincinnati:

West Legal Studies.
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Precis Tropes Monikers Like The

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54927462



Language has the power to transform reality and especially figurative language. Figurative language can also illuminate areas of life that are taken for granted, ignored, or made invisible. Language can "de-familiarize" the world and encourage viewing reality with a new and potentially paradigm-shifting perspective. Similarly, language can be systematically analyzed, dissected, picked apart, and deconstructed to reveal the deeper layers of meaning behind the words people use. Phrases and turns of speech or single words denote multiple layers of meaning. Those layers are overlooked when language is used flippantly. Nietzsche commented on the "dead" metaphors that pervade common speech: human beings no longer think deeply about the language we use and thus fail to appreciate the power language has over our interpretation of reality. At the most extreme, a misuse of language is referred to with the term "catachresis." Even the word "literal" can be used in a figurative way…… [Read More]

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Masson Jeffrey Moussaieff and Mccarthy

Words: 1698 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79764450

One of the humans working with her used sign language to ask her what she should do for an upset stomach. Koko signed back "stomach you there drink orange," "there" being the refrigerator, which Koko pointed at. Amazingly, ten days later Koko apparently remembered this and used sign language to find out if the woman was feeling better (p. 159). In another remarkable story, a chimpanzee learned to draw and sought the activity out although she was never rewarded for doing so (p. 203). The authors note that the animal may have started drawing to relieve the boredom of being in captivity, but point out that the animal still showed the desire to be creative artistically.

Ultimately the authors plainly state what they have been leading the readers to: "In the end, when we wonder whether to ascribe an emotion to an animal, the question to ask is not, 'Can…… [Read More]

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Pharmacologic Treatment of Fear and

Words: 4199 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2973543

e., they became helpless). Furthermore, other behaviors of the dogs were adversely affected (e.g., the dogs appeared apathetic and had poor appetites) (Hitzemann, 2000). In his essay, "Animal Models of Psychiatric Disorders and Their elevance to Alcoholism," Hitzemann (2000) reports that, "Both fear and anxiety are alerting signals that warn the individual against impending danger and enable the individual to take defensive measures. For animals, the distinctions between fear and anxiety are vague" (p. 149). The distinctions between fear and anxiety are clearly irrelevant for humans who encounter such stressed animals, though.

According to Hodge and Stull (2000), dog bites cause an average of 17 human deaths, 6,000 hospitalizations, and 330,000 emergency room visits every year in the Untied States and a like number of people probably do not seek treatment or report the incident, but may nevertheless experience psychological trauma, anxiety, and missed work or school. Furthermore, dog bites…… [Read More]

References

Becker, M.G., Chew, G.L., Correa, J.C., Hoepner, L.A., Jusino, C.M., Kinney, P.L., Miller, R.L., & Perzanowski, M.S. (2003). Distribution and determinants of mouse allergen exposure in low-income New York City apartments. Environmental Health Perspectives, 111(10), 1348.

Boone, J.S., & Tyler, J.W. (2001). Transferable residues from dog fur and plasma cholinesterase inhibition in dogs treated with a flea control dip containing chlorpyrifos. Environmental Health Perspectives, 109(11), 1109.

Chang, Y., Cohen, J.H., Hennon, D.L., LaPorte, R.E., & McMahon, J.E. (1997). Dog bite incidence in the City of Pittsburgh: A capture-recapture approach. American Journal of Public Health, 87(10), 1703-5.

Duke, M.L., & Swain, J.L. (2001). Recommendations for research on ethics in public policy from a public administration perspective: Barking dogs and more. International Journal of Public Administration, 24(1), 125.
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Concept of God in Judaism and Christianity

Words: 7257 Length: 26 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52966776

Judaism and Christianity both have fairly common as well as totally contrasting religious concepts. In spite of the apparent differences and divisions it has to be understood that both these religions are like different streams of water merging in the ocean of god.

Christianity and Judaism are both religions of abrahamic origin. There are many similarities and differences between the two religions. Since Christianity originated from Judaism, it lends to the thought that both the religions are very closely related. However, in spite of their common origin, they differ considerably in some of the important issues while at the same time exhibit resemblance in many aspects. Even the monotheistic belief, which both these religions stand for, is quantified by entirely different perception of the attributes of godhead. Similarly, in the understanding of the messianic concept there is a significant contradiction giving us a hint of the vastly different nature of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Tracey R. Rich, "Moshiach: The Messiah," Accessed on May 23rd, 2003

http://www.jewfaq.org/moshiach.htm

2) Catholic Encyclopaedia, "original Sin," accessed on May 23rd, 2003  http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11312a.htm 

3) Jono, " Different sects of Judaism," Accessed on May 23rd, 2003, http://members.aol.com/bagelboyj/reports/sects.html
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Myth and Meaning

Words: 5953 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74707849

Constructed Myths and Man's Purpose

Since Nietzsche declared that God was dead, science and mankind have begun a twofold search. Nietzsche's declaration asserted that the need for God in the society's constructed identity no longer existed. The understanding of the times was that the scientific method could break down any problem into is components, and uncover both the purpose and the source of all of mankind's desires, tangible and intangible alike. The accompanying hopes for a utopian society would also be ushered in by modern thought. Modern, logical and rational thought would be able to replace oppressive superstition, religious, and myth of ignorant and uneducated people who used religious beliefs to explain those elements of life which previously could not be understood. Since the publishing of his work, along with Jung, Kant and a myriad of others, the social sciences have searched to identify the purpose of religious life within…… [Read More]

Resources

Barrett, J.L. Anthropomorphism, intentional agents, and conceptualizing God. Ph.D. dissertation, Cornell University. 1996

EC. Keil Conceptualizing a non-natural entity: anthropomorphism in God concepts. Cognitive Psychology 31, 219-47. 1996

Blommaert, J. & J. Verschueren. European concepts of nation-building. In E.N. Wilmsen & P. McAllister (eds) The politics of difference: ethnic premises in a world of power, 104-23. Chicago & London: University of Chicago Press. 1996

Boyer, P. Traditions as Truth and Communication. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1992
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The Problem of Animal Consciousnes

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87572789

Animal Consciousness. Do Horses Gallop in Their Sleep? By Matt Cartmill

The article is an incisive look at the issue of consciousness and the human and animal brain. It attempts to show how the human consciousness is construed by human beings themselves and how the animal lack of the same it argued out. The writer presents a case scenario where the human brain section that deals with conscious memory is numbed out by some special drug that has been discovered such that he will not have a recollection of what they did in the past, then he poses to ask if such will change the human to animal. The article goes on to draw attention to the activities that animals often do like a dog rummaging through the many toys to retrieve a given favorite toy and bringing it to the owner for them to play. The writer then asks…… [Read More]

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Truth One Cannot Simply Define

Words: 3618 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44253527

Two belief systems, then -- true believe, and justified true belief (Hauser, 1992).

Humans, however, according to Pierce, turn justified true beliefs into true beliefs by converting them into axioms. Once we have proven something there is no need to prove it again, and we use the part that was proven before to further extend our study and the inquisition of knowledge. And so it becomes necessary to accept things as the truth without proving them at every single moment. However, does not mean that the belief is an unjustified belief, for it again is the conflictual nature of justified against unjustified that, for scholars like Pierce, outpours a reality he can view as "true" (Ibid).

ene' Descartes' purpose was to make humans analyze the introspective nature of being, and to postulate on the veracity of truth as a nature of thought -- if we think it, it is, and…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ayer, A.J. (2001). David Hume: A Short Introduction .Oxford University Press.

Billington, M. (2007). Harold Pinter. Faber and Faber.

Cottingham, J., ed. (1992). The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. Cambridge Gould, J. And R. Mulvaney. (2008). Classic Philosophical Questions, 13th ed.. Prentice-

Hall.
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Children's Literature to Dispel the

Words: 4810 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86965496

16).

In comparing a number of literary elements in one story, Smith and Wiese (2006) contend that at times, when attempting to transform an old story into a modern multicultural version, cultural meanings of the original story may be lost. In turn, the literature does not subject the reader to another culture. For instance, in the story about the fisherman, that Smith and Wiese access, the plot remains similar plot, however, significant changes transform the reported intent to make the story multicultural. Changes included the fisherman's daughter's stated name, being changed from one common to her culture to Maha. Instead of God, as written in the original version, the reference notes "Allah." Other changes Smith and Wiese point out include:

& #8230;The admonition to retrieve the fish or "be sorry" instead of the threatened curse, the reference to the golden shoe as a sandal instead of a clog;

the proposed…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Anderson, Connie Wilson. (2006). Examining Historical Events through Children's Literature.

Multicultural Education. Caddo Gap Press. 2006. Retrieved May 03, 2009 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1229798181.html

Banned Book Quiz. (2009). Retrieved May 03, 2009 from  http://www.shetland-library.gov.uk/documents/BannedBooksWBD09quiz.pdf 

Bottigheimer, Ruth B. (2008). Stories of heaven and earth: Bible heroes in contemporary
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Eat Mor Chikin Campaign of

Words: 1213 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21108595

By positioning away from chicken restaurants, Chick-Fil -- a avoids direct comparisons with those restaurants but allows for direct comparison against burger joints.

In terms of strategic planning, the objectives of this ad campaign were most likely to raise awareness of Chick-Fil-a, to create interest in the brand and to improve both sales and market share. hen the outputs are concerned, the only reasonable conclusion is that the ads are successful. The ads stick in people's heads more than most fast food ads, and Chick-Fil -- a has become more successful since the campaign began. The campaign has been ongoing since the mid-1990s, indicating that the company's financial and market outcomes in that period have been positive, and that follow-up market research has indicated that the campaign has been part of that success.

Batra and Stayman (1990) note that when advertisements create positive moods, brand attitude change is facilitated. Every…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Batra, R. & Stayman, D. (1990). The role of mood in advertising effectiveness. Journal of Consumer Research. Vol. 17 (1990) 203.

Cao, J. (1999). Evaluation of advertising effectiveness using agent-based modeling and simulation. University of Warwick. Retrieved April 25, 2012 from http://stuff.mit.edu/~caoj/pub/doc/jcao_c_adver.pdf

Daye, D. & VanAuken, B. (2008). Evaluating advertising effectiveness. Branding Strategy. Retrieved April 25, 2012 from  http://www.brandingstrategyinsider.com/2008/05/evaluating-adve.html 

QSR Magazine. (2010). 2010 QSR Top 50. QSR Magazine. Retrieved April 25, 2012 from http://www.qsrmagazine.com/reports/2010-qsr-50?page=2
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Tiger and Me See the

Words: 624 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82583822

Death is food for her cubs.

But I am safe. I am here, behind the mesh. She gets up, and stretches. Except for her enormous size, she might be a house cat stretching after a nice nap on the windowsill. She walks serenely by. I know that muscles ripple under her striped fur, but they do not show the power they must have as she strolls sedately to another spot. She is safe, too. She does not have to hunt for her meals. She does not risk having a jaw or tooth broken from the hoof of fleeing prey. For myself, the wire mesh is a trade-off. It interferes slightly with my view but keeps me safe. What does the tiger think of her trade-off? She is safe, but she will never hunt. Does she know? Does she care?

The keeper comes to feed the tigers in this enclosure. I…… [Read More]

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Binge Eating Animal Models of Addiction Do

Words: 3066 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31876046

Binge Eating

Animal models of addiction do not generalize well to substance dependence in humans as there are different criteria involved. For example, in animals "addiction" has been traditionally defined by a caged laboratory animal's tendency to press a lever for a reinforcing substance, whereas in humans the criteria for dependence (the clinical term for addiction) include a number of behavioral criteria and consequences that could never exist in laboratory animals (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000). These criteria include: tolerance, withdrawal, taking more of a substance than originally intended, a history of unsuccessful attempts to quit, inordinate amounts of time spent in using and seeking the substance, a reduction in activities (occupational, social, or education) due to use, continued usage despite adverse consequences (APA, 2000). Interestingly, only three of these criteria need to be met in a year, so one need not demonstrate significant physical signs such as tolerance and…… [Read More]

References

Adam, T.C. & Epel, E.S. (2007). Stress, eating and the reward system. Physiology and Behavior, 91, 449-458.

Alexander, B.K. (2008). The globalization of addiction: A study in the poverty of the spirit. New York: Oxford University Press.

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV-text revision. Washington, DC: Author.

Bartsch, A.J., Homola, G., Biller, A., Smith, S.M., Weijers, H.G., & Wiesbeck, G.A. (2007). Manifestations of early brain recovery associated with abstinence from alcoholism. Brain, 130(1), 36-47.
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Descartes Argues That the Mind and the

Words: 1636 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41814107

Descartes argues that the mind and the body must be two different things since he knows the mind exists but knows no such thing about the body. Spell out this argument. What's wrong with it, if anything? Give a counterexample to the principle implied here.

Are other philosophers that we have read drawing conclusions about what the mind must be like based on what we know about the mind or how we know it? Is that always a mistake? Can reasoning like this be defended? Maybe even Descartes's reasoning?

Descartes on the dualism of mind and body

Descartes insists that mind and body are each distinct from the other although 'living together' in one 'package. His reasoning for this includes the following:

Mind and body are two different organisms. You see this clearly from the way they are fashioned. Each looks and behaves so different to the other, therefore how…… [Read More]

References

Descartes, Rene, The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, 3 vols., trans. John Cottingham, Robert Stoothoff, Dugald Murdoch and Anthony Kenny, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984-1991

Interent Encyc. Of Phil. Rene Descartes: The Mind-Body Distinction

 http://www.iep.utm.edu/descmind/#H5 

Searle, J. Minds, Brains, and Science Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1984
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History of Judaism From Biblical Origins to the Modern Period

Words: 1274 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66352325

History of Judaism: From biblical origins to the modern period." It discusses Genesis 1-11 and what these texts tell us about the origins of Israelite religion? What do the major episodes in these 11 chapters of the Torah tell us about the differences between classical Mesopotamian paganism and the origins of Israelite thought and religion?

History of Judaism: From biblical origins to the modern period

Genesis is the book of beginnings. That is what the word itself means, and it takes us back into the very dawn of human history. It opens with an awareness of the greatest material fact in all human life; a fact that we are all subconsciously aware of almost every waking moment, that is, that we are living in a universe. Then this galaxy itself is moving at incredible speed through the vastness of space in conjunction with millions of other galaxies like ours. It…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Langer, Ruth, Jewish understandings of the religious other., Theological Studies, 06-01-2003, pp 255.

Clifford, Richard, A History of Israelite Religion in the Old Testament Period, vol. 1: From the Beginnings to the End of the Monarchy.(book reviews). Vol. 56, Theological Studies, 09-01-1995, pp 566(2).

Nahum Sarna, "Understanding Creation in Genesis" in Frye, Is God a Creationist?, pp 155-173.
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Historical View of the Greek Heroic Ideal

Words: 790 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87791054

Greco-oman Tradition

How does the ideal of heroic citizenship change from the Greek mythopoetic tradition through the emergence of Greek tragic drama to the late Stoicism of oman imperialism?

Mythopoeic thought holds that the occurrences of events are the result of an act of will on the part of gods and spirits. A thread of anthropomorphism runs through this mythopoeic thinking as impersonal laws of nature and the deductive generalizations of logic are not a part of the mythopoeic framework: instead, every event is an aspect of some personal being. A mythopoeic orientation is one of the most primitive lenses used by humans to explain and attribute meaning to phenomena. Sensemaking in naive cultures typically involves attribution of human motivation to the inanimate and to otherwise inexplicable events. Indeed, the term mythopoeic means myth-making, from the Greek muthos or myth and poiein which means to make. From the anthropomorphic position…… [Read More]

References

Bowra, C.M. (1957). The Greek Experience. New York: Praeger. In Steven Kreis, History Guide (2006).

Dunkle, R. (1986). The classical origins of western culture. Brooklyn, NY: Brooklyn College, The City University of New York.

[Type text]
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literature and religion annotated bibliography

Words: 852 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20098938

Religion features prominently as a theme in literature. In fact, some of the earliest works of literature are rooted in their religious and cultural traditions, including the ancient literatures of the Middle East and Mesopotamia.

As the role of religion in society changed, so too did the role of religion in literature.

Modern literature, including work by Nathaniel Hawthorne, often offers scathing critiques of religion, whereas postmodern literature allows religion to play a more complex role in shaping individual identity.

Nathaniel Hawthorne's he Scarlett Letter heavily criticizes the role of religion in a patriarchal society, whereas Yann Martel's Life of Pi presents religion more as a subjective phenomenon, revealing an important cultural shift from religion to spirituality.

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's he Scarlett Letter, the author shows how religion becomes a tool of social oppression and political control.

A. Hawthorne shows that religious authorities are hypocritical, and especially fundamentalists, as the…… [Read More]

This article offers some interesting background information on Yann Martel as an author, showing that the author's secular background proves that Life of Pi is making a clear statement about the difference between religion and spirituality. Religion is an outmoded social institution, whereas spirituality remains central to the human experience. The character of Pi illustrates the similarities between faith in God and faith in one's own ability to succeed, and through the motif of the journey also shows that "a journey toward enlightenment" can be stripped of any religious or even cultural context (Stephens 41).

Stratton, Florence. "Hollow at the core": Deconstructing Yann Martel's Life of Pi" SCI/ELC, Vol, 29, No. 2, 2004. Retrieved online:  https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/SCL/article/view/12746/13690 

This article critiques Yann Martel's novel by showing that the protagonist fails to actually show any growth, while also noting that the author takes a firm postmodern stance on the nature of truth or reality. The author points out that Life of Pi in part addresses the question of objective reality and whether a human being can even determine whether there is any objective reality, a core feature of postmodernism in general. This article offers a refreshing counterpoint to the other articles about Life of Pi.
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How much do movies influence us

Words: 1015 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99885805

movies influence us? Do they have the power to alter our perception of reality as Plato suggested? Do movies and television provide us with truth or illusion?

Remarkable advancements in transportation and mass communication in the last half-century have given rise to a true "global village" or "mass society." People everywhere have access to information about all that happens anywhere in the world. Mass media serves to provide us with a torrent of facts whilst simultaneously aiding us in organizing it (Sylwester). These channels of information take advantage of areas of powerful emotional stimulation and help mold one's views and knowledge -- as with society's swift media-powered growth in terrorism-related knowledge. in Laden was earlier an unimportant figure. Further, the 9/11 attack's many thousand fatalities were obscure office-goers until a number of newspapers across the nation printed anecdotal tribulations of them all. Nationwide firefighters and police officers, as well as…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ayala, Alejandro. Rojas. How has movies changed the perception of people about life? Prezi.2007.

Dahl, Gordon., & Dellavigna, Stefano. Does Movie Violence Increase Violent Crime? Oxford Journals, 677-734. 2009.

Lutts, Ralph.. The Trouble with Bambi: Walt Disney's Bambi and the American Vision of Nature. Forest and Conservation History, 160-171. 1992.

Manera, Anne. The "Allegory of the Cave's" Influence on 21st Century Media. Digital Brush Strokes. 2007.
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Capture First Book in the Guardians of GA Hoole Series

Words: 737 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46065828

Capture

In the first book of the Guardians of Ga'Hoole series, the young owl Soren is pushed out of the nest before he knows how to fly. Five anthropomorphic characteristics he and the other owls display in the first book will be recounted in this paper.

Propaganda and brainwashing: clearly the strategies used by the owls of St. Aegolius anthropomorphically mirror those used by human religious cults, fascists, and by communist POW (prisoner of war) camps during the Korean War, in WWII, and in other wars. A very human strategy in wartime -- albeit inhumane -- is to capture or kidnap innocent individuals and tell them, as the St. Aegolius owls told them, "It is here that you will find truth and purpose… When Truth is Found, Purpose is Revealed" (Lasky, 31). asically the owls became slaves through the classic fascist brainwashing technique, with their captors telling those captured that…… [Read More]

Brotherly competition and angst: In human families there is always tension between the children, and brothers have been known to be cruel to each other before they are old enough to know better and to support each other -- and even when they grow into adults brothers can be very cruel to each other, indifferent to each other's feelings. While falling out of the nest onto the ground (only to be kidnapped by the owls of St. Aegolius) was terrible, to later realize it was your own brother owl that shoved you is a nightmare of huge consequences. The St. Aegolius owls were preaching that the "Truth" would reveal purpose. But for the protagonist in this story, "The only truth that Soren knew right now was a deep gizzard-chilling one: His brother had shoved him from the nest" (Lasky, 54). On page 60, Gylfie is trying to get Soren to "pull" himself together and stop fretting about how he misses his family. "What do you mean pull yourself together?" Soren asks. "Do you know what I just figured out about my brother?"

The ruse carried out by Soren and Gylfie: the two captured owls learned to pretend to be marching -- and practiced walking in the "dazed manner" of those that had been moon-blinked -- in order to resist being moon blinked. Yes they were found out, but in the meantime it is very human to devise a strategy to out-think your persecutors, to know in advance what their strategy will be and to conspiratorially plot your escape.

Planning an escape: it took more than just dreaming of being able to fly to prepare Soren and Gylfie for their escape. In a very anthropomorphically thought-out strategy, brought on by a terrible need to go home and the fear of vampire bats sucking their blood, the two "must feel" (and they did) the passion to fly "in their minds" and in their "gizzards" too (Lasky, 138). When 77 British servicemen who had been prisoners in WWII in Poland made their now-famous escape on March 24, 1944 ("The Great Escape"), they got out because they used their best brain-driven tactics. The servicemen had their plans so well rehearsed, they were confident they could slide through the tunnel. In "The Capture," Gylfie and Soren ("I can do it. I can do it!") believed in themselves like humans do when their backs are against the wall. "[Gylfie and Soren] knew that when they escaped, it was essential to find the highest point possible, the point closest to the sky" (Lasky, 140). "Grimble could immediately tell that both owlets were concentrating fiercely" (Lasky, 159).
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Native American Myths the Question

Words: 1632 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55325133

Indeed, the period now spanning the so-called Modern Era and the Industrial Revolution has been dependent upon humanity taming and turning nature to our own ends. This has led to a process whereby we downplay the natural world and of native peoples in general who live in a more harmonious fashion with their surrounding world. hile this process, especially during the Industrial Age, has led to dehumanization process and it has also led to a cheapening of human life in general as well. One can therefore see in New Age approaches to nature (and religion) that there is a hunger to rediscover an intra-natural balance that was lost in the last few centuries. By studying and internalizing these myths and their moral lessons, we can recapture this lost balance. The author compared these other approaches and built upon what we learned in class, especially by comparing and contrasting and them…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brightman, Robert Alain. (2002). "there was just animals before." Grateful Prey: Rock

Cree Human-Animal Relationships (pp. 38-76). Regina, Saskatchawan: Canadian Plains Research Center.

Ibid. (2002). "they come to be like human." Grateful Prey: Rock

Cree Human-Animal Relationships (pp. 38-76). Regina, Saskatchawan: Canadian Plains Research Center.
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Leda and the Swan Rhetorical

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29750502

"The broken wall, the burning roof and tower / and Agamemnon dead." Leda's body is broken through penetration, and Troy's wall also becomes broken. Zeus' desire burns, like the roofs and towers of Troy will burn. And men will die, including the great general Agamemnon. Time rushes forward in an instant.

Leda's pregnancy resulted in Helen, for whom the Trojan ar was waged. Yet the future war is also a kind of synecdoche for the violence done to Leda. The violence of war and the violence of sexuality are intertwined, and become metaphors for one another. The reader is suddenly aware that he or she has been reading an extended metaphor, both for how one sexual act can lead to violence, and also how violence is at the heart of all sexual activity. The poem reaches its climax with the sexual act, which foreshadows the horror to come.

Then, the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Yeats. W.B. "Leda and the Swan." Online Literature Library. 11 Nov 2007. http://www.online-literature.com/yeats/865
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Literature and Environment

Words: 1264 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26871559

ordsworth

Returning to Nature

They looked toward the wilderness, and behold, the glory of the Lord appeared in the cloud.

-Exodus 16-10

The great Romantic bard illiam ordsworth loved nature. To him, nature was a place to return to, not just in a physical sense, as in a sojourn or expedition, but in an emotional and spiritual sense. Returning to nature meant to revitalize an essential part of one's humanity through the cathartic and transformative powers of nature. To help unpack this concept, this essay will analyze two of ordsworth's poems: "Nutting" and "The orld is Too Much ith Us."

"Nutting" is a Conversation poem, in the Coleridge tradition, between the Narrator and his Maiden (Rumens). Over the course of the poem, he's tells his Maiden about a day he spent gathering nuts in the forest and how, after gathering the nuts, he felt a sense of guilt for needlessly…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cronon, William. Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature. New York: W.W. Norton &, 1996. Print.

Rumens, Carol. "The Romantic Poets: Nutting by William Wordsworth." The Guardian.

Guardian News and Media, 28 June 0026. Web. 24 Feb. 2012.

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Religion -- Color and Sound

Words: 1133 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39245349

Like Khan, Huxley focused on the sensations of the person (himself) having the mystical experience. During his experience, Huxley felt he had no impairment in his mind or gaze, an intensity of vision without an outer and imposed substance to induce the hallucination, and had a sense that his impetus of motion or will was impaired into a state of stasis (a direct contrast with Khan's focus on the ability of music to provide motion to parallel the nature of the divine). Above all, Huxley called his sense of harmony through visual means mystical because his visual experience eliminated any sense of division inner/outer divide in perception. As he looked at the flower, and Huxley felt he was becoming the flower.

This stands in direct contrast to Kepler's schema of harmony, which is dependant upon perceptions of distinction from outside, as an observer perceives defined opposites. Kepler's definition of harmony…… [Read More]

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Neo-Confucianism Is a Philosophy Which Was Born TEST1

Words: 6352 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

K-12 Curriculum and Instruction: Changing Paradigms in the 21st Century

This is not your grandfathers' economy or his educational paradigm however; today's curriculum still appears as such and therein lays a very significant and challenging problem that presents to today's educators and leaders. According to Sir Ken Robinson, "We have a system of education that is modeled on the interest of industrialism and in the image of it. Schools are still pretty much organized on factory lines -- ringing bells, separate facilities, specialized into separate subjects. We still educate children by batches." (rain Pickings, 2012) Make no mistake in the opinion of Robinson who believes that divergent thinking most emphatically is not "…the same thing as creativity" because according to Robinson in his work proposing a new educational paradigm. Indeed this is also spoken of in the work of Zeng-tian and Yu-Le in their work "Some Thoughts on Emergent Curriculum"…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, C. (nd) Presenting and Evaluating Qualitative Research: Strengths and Limitations of Qualitative Research. University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom. Medscape. Retrieved from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/731165_3

ASCD 1999, The Human Brain: An ASCD Professional Enquiry Kit. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, Va..

Bailey, J. 2001, 'Technology and change in education', [http://bbh.usd451.k12.ks.us/staff/faculty/chgtech/change.html] (accessed May 2003).

Barrett, R. 1999, 'Middle schooling: A challenge for policy and curriculum', Education Horizons, 5 (3), 6-9.