Art Therapy Essays (Examples)

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Creative Arts Therapy 1 Discussion

Words: 1473 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5298098

There are many instances of art acting as a means of enabling people back to health. This healing aspect of creativity is, I believe, due to the fact that we are liberated from the restrictions of the world in the process of creativity and because artworks are in a sense the residue of the experience of spiritual and expanded consciousness.

There are numerous clinical studies which show the effective of art therapy. For example, a number or art therapists have studied the affect of art therapy on people who have experienced loss. "Art therapists consistently observe the power and potential of art to help identify, cope with, and heal the pain experienced during the grief process..." (Hill, M.A.)

However, the healing process in creativity can best be explained by the deeper meaning of spontaneity.

Nachmanovitch asks the important question: "How does one learn improvisation?" The answer to this question is…… [Read More]

References

Hill M.A. Healing grief through art: art therapy bereavement group workshops. Retrieved 8 September, 2006, from Malinda Ann, M.A http://www.drawntogether.com/healing.htm

Nachmanovitch, S. (1990) Free play: The Power of Improvisation in Life and the Arts. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher.

Wordsworth W. LINES COMPOSED a FEW MILES ABOVE TINTERN ABBEY,

ON REVISITING the BANKS of the WYE DURING a TOUR. JULY 13, 1798. Retrieved September 7, 2006, at  http://www.bartleby.com/145/ww138.html
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Art in the Classroom to

Words: 998 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21744123

As an example, I may state, "I'm painting while moving the brush in an up-and-down motion, at this easel."

In addition, I would incorporate rebus charts that illustrate the steps needed for the art project, for the students to refer to.

There will be no restrictions on how the materials or the tools could be used. If a child prefers to place their paper on the floor, instead of an easel, while painting, this would be allowed.

If a child would prefer to hold the paintbrush in their mouths as opposed to with their fingers, this would be allowed as well. Part of the instruction period would include demonstration of some alternative uses of materials and tools and encouragement of the children to try different things. And, lastly, the tools that are used will be adaptive for the children. Glue sticks will be used when possible, as opposed to the…… [Read More]

References

Dunlap, Linda. An Introduction to Early Childhood Special Education. MA: Allyn & Bacon, 1997.
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Art for Communities and Families

Words: 3426 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29622419

Competence in AASEC Outcomes

Autobiography

Pesonal Educational Philosophy

AASEC-1 Knowledge Base (CE299-1)

AASEC-2 Child, Family, and Community elationships (CE299-2).

AASEC-3 Observation and Assessment (CE299-3).

AASEC-4 Learning Environments (CE299-4)

AASEC-5 Ethics and Professionalism (CE299-5)

AASEC-6 Individuality and Cultural Diversity (CE299-6).

Autobiography

Use your Unit 1 Project

I am 47-year-old individual who grew up in Brooklyn, New York, in the public school setting. I grew up in the projects and my mother was a teen mother since she was 14-years old when my twin brother and I were born. In addition to loving basketball, my twin brother and I generally grew up in a rough neighborhood or environment.

The educational setting in which I participated was

The educational setting or context in which I participated was similar to normal educational settings. This setting was known as PAL, an afterschool program that assisted me with my school work and playing sports, especially basketball.…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (2014). What Is Art Therapy? Retrieved from about.com: http://psychology.about.com/od/psychotherapy/f/art-therapy.htm

Riley, S. (2001). Art therapy with adolescents. Western Journal of Medicine, 54 -- 57.

sjcshk.com. (2007). What is Art Therapy? Retrieved from sjcshk.com:  http://www.sjcshk.com/Art%20Therapy.html
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Ethnic Cultures' Experience of Art

Words: 2675 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56733059



For example, the ethnic client who paints a huge red heart with an arrow piercing its center is communicating a universally understood message: I have been affected by love/passion/emotion.

Natalie Rogers, founder of the Person Centered Expressive Therapy Institute is a strong proponent of expressive art. In this form of art therapy, the ethnic client is encouraged to "express inner thoughts by creating outer forms."

When treating a client with art therapy, Ms. Rogers uses many techniques of expressive art: drawing, coloring, dancing, musical demonstrations, and the like.

Once these exercises are completed, the participants are encouraged to explore the nuances involved in the interaction: did communication occur? Was it a pleasant experience? Were boundaries an issue? Who led? Who followed?

Despite the fact that this work is not done solely with ethnically displaced clients, the premise remains the same; through expressive creativity, one's self may be realized, recognized, and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Art Therapy, a Guide for Mental Health Professionals. New York: Brunner/Mazel,

Inc.

Burt, H. (1993). Issues in art therapy with the culturally displaced American Indian youth. Arts in Psychotherapy. 20: 143-151.

Cohen, B., Barnes, M., & Rankin, a. (1995). Managing Traumatic Stress Through Art. Maryland: Sidran Press.
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Society Support the Arts Why

Words: 832 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98524518

The production of art should be viewed as a necessity for everyone, the rich or poor, smart or dumb, disturbed or not (Sweet pp). The contemporary tendency to diminish the importance of what used to be referred to as a "liberal arts education," and the downsizing of art and music classes in our grade schools, certainly underscores society's miscomprehension of the "basic need to know ourselves and the best means to exercise that knowledge" (Sweet pp). Joseph Campbell speculated that art and its creation were the only religion left in society, and De Tocqueville's Democracy in America suggests that art embodies the individual's power to combat the tyranny of the majority (Sweet pp).

In June 2005, the International Society for Performing Arts' Board, which is supported by 210 delegates from 28 countries representing Europe, North America, South America, Asia, and Africa, voted to endorse a statement urging the world's government…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Government Support for Cultural Activities. Retrieved August 31, 2005 at http://www.csulb.edu/~jvancamp/freedom2.html

ISPA Urges World's Leaders to Support the Arts. 2005 June 22.

International Society for the Performing Arts Foundation. Retrieved August 31, 2005 at http://www.ispa.org/gateshead/statement.html

Sweet, Robert Burdette. Creatures of the metaphor. (the importance of art and metaphor to society). The Humanist. 1995 November 01. Retrieved August 31, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library Web site.
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Employment Letter Creative Arts Therapist Dear Department

Words: 586 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38266030

Employment Letter

Creative Arts Therapist

Dear Department of Veterans Affairs,

I am writing to apply for the position of Creative Arts Therapist (Music), as advertised on the U.S.A. JOBS database (http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/324855700). I am an American citizen and am compelled to treat those who have fought in the armed services. I also have a valid American driver's license, and would be available to relocate on short notice. It would truly be an honor and a privilege to assist the heroes who fight for our freedom.

I am currently receiving my associate's degree in Creative Arts Therapy. Although I do not possess substantial experience, my familiarity with both psychotherapy and dramatic arts ensures that I will provide outstanding service. I am talented in assembling pre-evaluation data, interpreting medical records, review prescriptions issued by the physician, conducting mental and physical evaluations, and finally, developing treatment plans. I have energy and compassion and will…… [Read More]

References

The New School For Public Engagement. (2012). Creative Arts Therapy. Retrieved from http://www.newschool.edu/continuing-education/creative-arts-therapy-certification/.

USA Jobs. (2012). Creative Arts Therapist (Music). Retrieved from http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/324855700.
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Reality Therapy it Was During

Words: 3568 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60708715

Perceptions are generally based on the present, and therefore, the need to explore the past by delving into it in great detail becomes totally unnecessary. Glasser felt that even if the person exhibited bizarre and extremely strange types of behavior at a particular time, it was because of an innate reason of trying and attempting to find the best solution in order to meet the person's needs at that particular time in his life, and therefore, it was logical and sane to him, if not to others who would sometimes label him as strange or insane. (the Use of eality Therapy in Guidance in second Level Schools) delinquent would make choices based on the best way to meet his basic needs at that time, and therefore, must not be criticized. This, in essence formed the theory of eality Therapy of William Glasser, wherein the concept of 'Choice Theory' was emphasized…… [Read More]

References

Hazelden, Paul. "Reality Therapy" Retrieved at  http://www.hazelden.org.uk/gr01/art_gr003_reality_therapy.htm . Accessed on 30 November, 2004

Historic Overview of Psychiatric Care" Retrieved at http://www.jcjc.cc.ms.us/faculty/adn/jmcmillan/psychcl1.html. Accessed on 30 November, 2004

Lennon, Brian. "From Reality Therapy to Reality Therapy in Action" Retrieved at http://www.socc.ie/~wgii/articlebl.htm. Accessed on 30 November, 2004

Lennon, Brian. "The Use of Reality Therapy in Guidance in second Level Schools" Retrieved at  http://www.ncge.ie/handbook_docs/Section1/Reality_Therapy_Guide_Sch.doc . Accessed on 30 November, 2004
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Applying Lowenfeld S Art Theory

Words: 1988 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89087332

Lowenfeld's Stages Of Artistic Development

The artistic development theory that most pertains to the work I did with my student for this assignment is Lowenfeld's stages of artistic development. One of the things that was most interesting about applying this theory to the student I worked with is that she appeared to be between stages. Subsequently, my observations of her work, my interactions with her, and her expectations for her artistic prowess were different from any of the stages expressly identified by this theory. Nonetheless, by combining different aspects of two of those stages, I was able to influence this student's artistic expectations and understand exactly where she was in her process of artistic development.

Prior to explicating the relevance of Lowenfeld's stages of artistic development, it is necessary to provide some background information about the student with whom I worked. She is 11 years old, and is of both…… [Read More]

References

Blos, P. (1962). On adolescence: A psychoanalytic interpretation. New York: The Free Press.

Derman-Sparks, P.G. & Ramsey, J. (2006). What if all the kids are white? Anti-bias multicultural education with young children and families. New York: Teachers College Press.

Herman, J.L. (1992). Trauma and recovery. New York: Basic Books.

Hurwitz, A. & Day, M. (1995). Children and their art. New York: Harcort Brace.
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Reality Therapy Is a Practical

Words: 3066 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70909525

The therapist, who withholds judgment and criticism, ceases to be perceived in the mind of the prisoner like an adjunct of the guard or police, but as a facilitator of positive changes in the lives of the prisoners (p. 102).

Correctional practitioners often speak of "getting back to basics." eality Therapy and Choice Theory, which is an excellent tool for either classroom or self-study, is about just that. In the mid-1970s as a young juvenile correctional officer, I was trained in reality therapy as it was the cornerstone of treatment at the New Mexico Girls School. Since that time, many new approaches have been implemented, but if one closely examines all the "innovative juvenile treatment approaches," reality therapy is a basic component of each, and to this day, is the cornerstone of the most effective methods of working with youths. This process teaches youths to stop placing blame on others…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27985548

Brown, N.W. (1996). Expressive Processes in Group Counseling: Theory and Practice. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. Retrieved December 10, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27985548 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002544140

Clark, K. (2003). Bringing Back Compassion, Counseling and Mental Health: Featured Presenter Dr. William Glasser Discusses Choice Theory, the New Reality Therapy with Annals. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association, 6(2), 11+. Retrieved December 10, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002544140 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104722137

Hardcastle, D.A., Powers, P.R., & Wenocur, S. (2004). Community Practice: Theories and Skills for Social Workers. New York: Oxford University Press. Retrieved December 10, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104722138 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5007703291
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Resistance Group Therapy for Decades

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82208573



Multiple studies support the use of cognitive behavioral approaches in individual therapy combined with group therapy sessions to support self-care behavior, self-efficacy and positive patient outcomes (Van der Ven, et. al, 2005; Bernard & Goodyear, 1002; Alterkruse & ay, 2000). Altekruse & ay (2000) also support the notion that group therapy may be interchangeable with individual therapy to promote positive outcomes among patients.

Conclusions

esults of the studies reviewed suggest a new approach to group therapy should include individual and group sessions that encourage patients to focus on their successes rather than failures. At this time the evidence supporting group therapy over individual therapy is conflicting. Much of the research suggests that both approaches may be equally effective. egardless many therapists still advocate group therapy as a primary modality for overcoming patient issues.

Pre-group training sessions may help members of the group adopt a new attitudes toward therapy that enables…… [Read More]

References

Altekrsue, M. & Ray, D. (2000). "Effectiveness of group supervision vs. combined group and individual supervision." Counselor Education and Supervision, 40(1):19.

Bernard, J., & Goodyear, R. (1998). Fundamentals of clinical supervision (2nd ed.).

Boston: Allyn & Bacon

Classen, C. (2000). "Group therapy for cancer patients: A research-based handbook of psychosocial care." New York: Basic Books.
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Methods and Materials Used in Teaching Music Art and Physical ED in the Self-Contained Classroom

Words: 1640 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34282674

Teaching in the Self-Contained Classroom

Music, Art and Phys. Ed. In Self-contained classroom

In 1996, the United States Department of Education mandated laws that required school districts to create inclusive programs to integrate students with various disabilities into the general school population.

However, a study conducted by the National Council on disabilities in 2000 showed that most school districts have not transitioned into full mainstream classes. Instead, an estimated 20% of children with disabilities continue to spend their schooldays in self-contained classrooms, apart from the general school population (right and right).

Proponents of the self-contained classroom, however, believe that such settings can be advantageous, particularly for students with hearing impairments, mental retardation and those with physical or learning disabilities.

This paper examines how students in total or semi-self-contained classrooms can benefit from instruction in art, music and physical education. It looks at the challenges of teaching such classes and how…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boyer, Lynn and Christine Lee. "Converting Challenge to Success: Supporting a New Teacher of Students with Autism." The Journal of Special Education, 35(2). Summer 2001. Wilson Database.

MacDonald, Victoria and Deborah L. Speece. "Making Time: A teacher's Report on Her First Year of Teaching Children with Emotional Disabilities." The Journal of Special Education, 35(2). Summer 2001. ProQuest Database.

Shapiro, Deborah R. And L. Kristi Sayers. "Who Does What on the Interdisciplinary Team: Regarding Physical Education for Students With Disabilities?" Teaching Exceptional Children, 35(6). July/August 2003. Wilson Database.

Wexler, Alice. "Painting their Way Out: Profiles of Adolescent Art Practice at the Harlem Hospital Art Studio." Studies in Art Education, 43(4). Summer 2002. ProQuest Databse.
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Counseling and Therapy

Words: 769 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85569529

Person-Centered Therapy

I would imagine that being a co-therapist for W.M. using person-centered or ogerian technique would present some interesting difficulties. The first thought that occurs to me is instinctual: W.M. is a young man who has experienced some traumatic life events, but also uses (in Karen's words) "dark humor and attention-getting language" to express himself. My instinctive response is to wonder how to respond to W.M.'s humor within the context of ogers's famous "unconditional positive regard" shown by therapist to client (Corey 2013).

In some sense, W.M.'s dark humor is a bit of a trap for the ogerian therapist. Outside of a therapy session, humor is an important social mode for a 21-year-old male. Women his age will frequently say they are searching for a great sense of humor in selecting a boyfriend, and group dynamics among late adolescents frequently center around shared jokes. In some sense, not to…… [Read More]

References

Corey, G. (2013). Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy. (Ninth Edition). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.
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Electro Magnetic Therapy

Words: 1000 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95283069

Electromagnetic Therapy

A review of the existing scientific literature

The use of magnets in medicine is long-standing. "Physicians from ancient Greece, China, Japan, and Europe successfully applied natural magnetic materials in their daily practice" (Marko 2007). This is "based on the belief that an imbalance of the electromagnetic frequencies or fields of energy can cause illness. By applying electrical energy to the body, the imbalance can be corrected. Many electrical devices are available on the market to treat a variety of symptoms" (Electromagnetic Therapy, 2012, New York Presbyterian Hospital). "With the advent of the commercial availability of electricity during the last 20 years of the Nineteenth Century with a push by inventors and visionaries like Thomas Edison, an increase in experimentation and applied research by means of electromagnetic fields became more intense during the middle of the twentieth century" (Pretorious et al. 2011). However, the therapy's full incorporation into contemporary…… [Read More]

References

Battisti, E., Albanese, A., Bianciardi, L., Piazza, E., Rigato, M., Vittoria, A., & Giordano, N.

(2007). Efficacy and safety of new TAMMEF (therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields) system in the treatment of chronic low back pain.

Environmentalist, 27(4), 441-445.

Cadossi, R., Setti, S., & Fini, M. (2011). Cartilage chondroprotection and repair with pulsed electromagnetic fields: I-ONE therapy. Environmentalist, 31(2), 149-154
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Sickle Gene Therapies for Sickle

Words: 1128 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95693355

Implications for ongoing research into genetic therapies and side effects/later developments are discussed at length.

Yannaki, E. & Stamatoyannopoulos, G. (2010). Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization strategies for gene therapy of beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1202: 59-63.

Though the clinical trial these two researchers are involved in does not yet have results that are ready for publication, the review of the risks they provide regarding the use of stem cell mobilization with G-CSF in patients with sickle cell is highly useful information. So, too, is the practice of pre-treating patients with hydroxyurea before administering the stem cell treatment, which the authors describe in detail and which forms the basis of the related clinical trial. Potential reduction of risks appears to be quite promising, though final results from the clinical trial and other supporting evidence will of course be required.

Ye, L.,…… [Read More]

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History of Occupational Therapy 1950-1960

Words: 902 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31110152

History Of Occupational Therapy

Frame 1 - Introduction

Occupational therapy is an essential part of the recovery process. It allows the person to engage in meaningful activity that adds structure and purpose to their daily routine. Occupational therapy is now considered an essential part of the treatment process for those with long-term, or severe injuries. The role of the occupational therapist is to help the person we turn to a life where they can be independent and are in there and living, regardless of their condition. Occupational therapy helps a person to adjust to the changes in their lives as result of a severe illness or injury. This presentation will explore the history of occupational therapy with a focus on the changes in paradigm that took place during the 1950s and 1960s.

Frame 2 - Occupational therapy was first conceived in the early part of the 1900s. It was originally…… [Read More]

References

American Occupational Therapy Associaton. (2010). Occupational Therapist. Health Care

Careers Directory 2009-2010. Retrieved from 0 http://www.ama-assn.org/ama1/pub/upload/mm/40/tr01-occup-ther.pdf

Essentials of an acceptable school of occupational therapy. (1950). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 4, 126-128.

Kearney, P. (2004). The Influence of Competing Paradigms on Occupational Therapy Education:
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Examining Online Therapy

Words: 1338 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15630267

Online Therapy Services

The first online therapy site that this paper will examine is the site known as Betterhelp.com. This site assists people in dealing with some of the obstacles and challenges that life presents them with. This site asserts that these issues can be tough for any individual to face alone, and offers support from professional counselors as a means of helping one create bigger changes. One of the ways that the site pitches itself to potential clients is by the fact that help is discreet and affordable.

The professionals involved are all licensed, accredited, and trained professionals in the field of mental health: there are psychologists, marriage and family therapists, social workers and professional counselors. All of them have graduate degrees in their field and are all certified by their state professional boards, having completed all the requirements for practice. In order to work on the site, the…… [Read More]

References

Betterhelp.com. (2014). Meet the Counselors. Retrieved from Betterhelp.com:  https://www.betterhelp.com/about/ 

Breakthrough.com. (2014). Why online therapy? Retrieved from breakthrough.com:  https://www.breakthrough.com/why 

Virtualtherapyconnect.com. (2014). Privacy and Security. Retrieved from virtualtherapyconnect.com:  https://virtualtherapyconnect.com/virtual-therapy/security-and-hipaa
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Personal Theory of Therapy

Words: 1899 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83171191

personal theories about change and therapy as part of developing a personal therapeutic approach and process. The exploration begins with examining personal beliefs regarding health, normalcy, and change. The author also includes a discussion about the theoretical foundations influencing personal style of therapy. A description of a personal therapy process and culturally responsive therapy is also included in the article. The final section provides a theory of therapy diagram based on cognitive behavioral therapy.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Michael White and David Epston have played a crucial part in explaining family therapy for nearly two decades through contributing to the emergence of numerous concepts in textbooks and handbooks of family therapy (amey et. al., 2009, p.262). One of the concepts in family therapy is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which is used to treat people with several problems including mental health issues. The use of such theoretical approaches is based on the fact…… [Read More]

References

Beck, J. (n.d.). Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved April 23, 2015, from http://www.beckinstitute.org/cognitive-behavioral-therapy/#q-n-a-1773

"Cognitive Behavior Therapy." (n.d.). Beck Institute. Retrieved April 23, 2015, from http://www.beckinstituteblog.org/cognitive-behavioral-therapy/

Hays, P.A. (2012). Culturally responsive cognitive-behavioral therapy in practice. Washington,

D.C.: American Psychological Association.
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CBT Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Case Study

Words: 5334 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41705783

Cognitive Behavior Therapy- A Case Study

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) Case Study

Case report

K is a forty-eight-year female who referred to Midlothian's clinical psychology psychosis service. K has a twenty-year history of mental health conditions. She first decided to contact mental health services because of the episodes of paranoia and severe depression she had experienced. During her initial contact with the mental health services she was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder in 1996. When she was first referred to the mental health services department she was a single. She told of having only two close relationships in her past life. She however also said that she found these relationships challenging when it came to intimate contact. She also generally described that she found it somewhat difficult to form friendships or to trust people in her life. Despite the mental health conditions her general physical well-being was good. K was prescribed…… [Read More]

References

Bladek, M. (2014). Against memory: Acts of remembering in Jamaica Kincaid's My Brother. Retrieved from http://criticism.english.illinois.edu/2007%20Fall%20Documents/Affect%20Abstracts/Abstracts.htm

DeJong, P. & . Berg I.K (1998): Interviewing for solutions. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Drisko, J. (2014). Research Evidence and Social Work Practice: The Place of Evidence-Based Practice. Clin Soc Work J. 42:123-133 DOI 10.1007/s10615-013-0459-9

Freud, S. (1924) A general introduction to psychoanalysis. New York: Boni & Liveright.
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Music Therapy

Words: 706 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80647306

Music therapy involves incorporating music into therapist-patient relationship development for promoting the latter's physiological, psychological, emotional and social health. One can consider music therapy to be a part of creative arts treatment, clinical treatment, or supplementary treatment relative to the conventional medical model. It encompasses numerous techniques such as playing a musical instrument, singing a song, listening to music and improvisation (McCaffrey 42). Autism spectrum disorder represents a lasting developmental disability which evolves at different levels of severity. The condition has been marked by the following three key characteristics: challenges when it comes to forging social bonds; intense limited fanatic interests; and issues when communicating verbally and non-verbally (National Autistic Society 1)

The Benefits of Music Therapy for Children with Autism

Autistic kids depict greater sensitivity to anxiety as compared to non-autistic ones, since they cannot effectively filter out any triggering stimulus. Steady rhythmic music or classical songs are considered…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Autism Science Foundation. "Music Therapy May Help Children with Autism." ASF Blog. N.p., 30 Aug. 2013. Web. 27 June 2017.

Manfred, Theodoros. "Music Therapy for Autistic Children." HealthGuidance.org. N.p., 2016. Web. 27 June 2017.

McCaffrey, Triona. "Music Therapy Hits Right Note." Irish Medical Times, vol. 40, no. 49, 2006, pp. 42, Business Premium Collection.

National Autistic Society: National Autism Charities Join Forces to Fight for Autism during the General Election Campaign." M2 Presswire, Apr 18, 2005, pp. 1, Business Premium Collection.
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Complementary and Alternative Therapies the

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88901352



In addition to this situation, a variety of situations exist in which the spirit may influence illness. Asian philosophies often discuss the spirit's relation to the body and illness, suggesting that those who can maintain their spirits also do a service to their bodies. For example, the ancient art of Shiatsu teaches that the body, mind, and spirit are all connected by energy, and that the Hara, located in the abdomen, is the center of the body that connects it to the spiritual world. Thus, by "centering" oneself, illness, pain, and even mental anguish can be overcome. Asian medical and spiritual arts like Shiatsu have come to influence the modern movement based on what is termed the law of attraction. This theory suggests that all living things are made of energy, and so the creation of positive energy through positive thoughts and an open spirit leads to better health.

While…… [Read More]

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African-American Slave Art the African-American

Words: 1585 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25136544

e learn that art can indeed reflect life but it can also inspire it beyond what the human mind can dream.

orks Cited

Bailey, Thomas, et al. The American Pageant. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company, 1994.

Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. New York: Penguin, 1982.

Levernier, James a. "Frederick Douglass: Overview." Reference Guide to American Literature, 3rd ed. 1994. GALE Resource Database. Site Accessed August 3, 2006. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.com

Norton, Mary Beth, et al. A People and a Nation. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1990.

Richard Powell. African-American Art. 2005 Oxford University Press. http://www.aawc.com

Rodriguez, Junius P.. "African-American Experience: Art." African-American Experience. 12 September, 2008. http://aae.greenwood.com

Norton, Mary Beth, et al. A People and a Nation. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, (1990). 278.

Bailey, Thomas, et al. The American Pageant. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company, (1994). 69.

Norton, Mary Beth, et al. A People and a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bailey, Thomas, et al. The American Pageant. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company, 1994.

Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. New York: Penguin, 1982.

Levernier, James a. "Frederick Douglass: Overview." Reference Guide to American Literature, 3rd ed. 1994. GALE Resource Database. Site Accessed August 3, 2006. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.com

Norton, Mary Beth, et al. A People and a Nation. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1990.
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Using Arts and Dance to Treat Mental Illness

Words: 1302 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57334941

Dance and the Treatment of PTSD/Mental Illness

The first key concept of the article is the notion that "arts-based programming" is a positive and helpful way to treat PTSD. This theory aligns with classical psychology/philosophy -- namely, the ideas of the ancient Greeks and Romans, which was that the best way to cure the body and mind was to start by curing the soul. In order to do this, they used music, good environments, art, and other types of "cultural" productions to alleviate the stress in the individual's life and provide a better balance of confidence and ability in the person's psyche. This is the main idea of the study by the researchers ilbur et al. They elaborate on this idea by highlighting the effectiveness of dance as a treatment modality, stating that "dance is one of the most synchronized activities in which humans engage, and its neural substrates are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Wilbur, Sarah, et al. "Dance for Veterans: A complementary health program for veterans with serious mental illness." Arts and Health, vol. 7, no. 2 (2015): 96-108.
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Anti-Psychology Wherefore Art Thou Psychology

Words: 880 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90495728

The discipline or disciplines of various schools of psychology are continually evolving, and contrary to the idea that psychology looks to find excuses for behavior, psychology seeks to find ways to make life, and behaviors better. New therapies like Dialectical-Behavior Therapy (DBT), which stresses the replacement of negative coping mechanisms with positive coping mechanisms demands not extensive excavation of the past, one of the critiques of therapy, but aims to decrease patient behaviors that destroy the quality of their life such as self-harm. It helps the patient not focus on the past and live in the "present moment," with an almost Zen Buddhist like orientation of mindfulness (Sanderson, 1997). But it is also focused on setting practical life goals, and the therapy often has a fixed duration, in contrast to the assumption that psychotherapy is only available to the wealthy who have a great deal of free time. DBT offers…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Goldberg, Carl. (2000). "A Humanistic Psychology for the New Millennium."

Journal of Psychology. 134 (6). 677-682.

Marano, Hana. (2002). "Wrestling with bipolar disorder." Psychology Today.

Last reviewed Jun 2002. Revised 2005. Retrieved 16 Mar 2007 at http://psychologytoday.com/articles/index.php?term=pto-20&page=2
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Preschoolers Drawing Development Artistic Development

Words: 1518 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66484431

To use personal and later, cultural schemas in their most fruitful ways, the crayon and the magic market cannot be abandoned in favor of clicking a mouse, nor can arts education be relegated to second-class status, especially young children. Art teaches students motor skills, about space and depth, about using the world around them in a creative fashion, and helps them see things anew, as well as sharpens their realistic observational skills.

orks Cited

Popular magazine:

Dewan, Shalia. (2007, September 17). Using Crayons to Exorcise Katrina.

The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved March 21, 2009 at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/17/arts/design/17ther.html

Newspaper:

Geracimos, Ann. (2008, August 17). A box of possibilities: Children can learn a lot from colorful world of low-tech crayons. ashington Times, M.14. Retrieved March 21, 2009, from ProQuest Newsstand database. (Document ID: 1533647331).

ebsite:

Toku, Masami. (2002, Summer). Children's artistic and aesthetic development: The influence of pop-culture in children's drawings. Presented…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Popular magazine:

Dewan, Shalia. (2007, September 17). Using Crayons to Exorcise Katrina.

The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved March 21, 2009 at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/17/arts/design/17ther.html

Newspaper:
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Domestic Violence Is a Serious

Words: 2266 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73480796

"

The author further explains that even though there are similarities between heterosexual and homosexual relationships as it pertains to reaction and the victim remaining in the relationship. Again the author explains "homophobia does not allow mainstream service providers to have an adequate conceptualization nor the development of preventive and remedial strategies for the people involved (Toro-Alfonso and Rodriguez-Madera, 2004)."

Therapy for those effected by domestic violence

Both perpetrators, victims and children exposed to domestic violence may require some type of therapy. In many cases anger management is often required and used to assist perpetrators in dealing with anger issues. In addition to anger management some professionals also utilize Art therapy to assist hose effected by domestic violence. Art therapy involves the use of the arts (music, panting writing) to assist people in eliminating violence from the household. According to Panzer et al. (2000) places such as shelters for battered…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"About Art Therapy." American Art Therapy Associationhttp://www.arttherapy.org/aboutart.htm

"Domestic Violence." National Institutes of Health. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/domesticviolence.html

McClennen, J.C.. (2005) Domestic Violence Between

Same-Gender Partners. Journal of Interpersonal violence. 20 (2), 149-154.
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Bruner's Constructivist Theory and the Conceptual Paradigms

Words: 3441 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3905232

Bune's constuctivist theoy and the conceptual paadigms of Kolb's Expeiential Leaning theoy dawing on the associated theoies ae Kinesthetic and Embodied Leaning. As also noted in the intoductoy chapte, the guiding eseach question fo this study was, "What ae the caee paths fo teaching atists seeking to deploy into the field of community at and development?" To develop timely and infomed answes to this eseach question, this chapte povides a eview of the elevant pee-eviewed and scholaly liteatue concening these theoetical famewoks to investigate the diffeent caee paths teaching atists seek to deploy into the field of community at and development, including ceative community building and adult community centes such as woking with Alzheime's Disease and stoke victims.

Adult Leaning Theoies

Kolb's Expeiential Leaning Theoy. Thee ae a wide aay of theoetical models that can be used to identify and bette undestand teaching and leaning pefeences by educatos and students,…… [Read More]

references to improve coaching and athletic performance: Are your players or students kinesthetic learners? The Journal of Physical

Education, Recreation & Dance, 80(3), 30-34.

Fowler, J. (2013, March). Art rescue in a troubled world. Arts & Activities, 153(2), 36-39.

Kerka, S. (2002). Somatic/embodied learning and adult education: Trends and issues alert. ERIC

Kessler, R. (2000). The soul of education: Helping students find connection, compassion, and character at school. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum
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Opportunity to Work at a Nursing Home

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7334185

opportunity to work at a nursing home, offering my support during physical, occupational, and speech therapy sessions. These sessions offered insight into diverse types of therapy. I worked with a range of different health care workers and specialists, lending insight into how each member of the health care team coordinates their efforts and communicates with each other as well as with patients and family. One of the types of therapy sessions that I supported at the nursing home was therapy with animals. We brought in several animals to assist with therapy, including dogs, cats, and exotic creatures. Therapy Dogs International (n.d.) provided the animals and sometimes the trainer.

The seniors responded well to these therapy sessions, and I intend to support such programs in the future by perhaps providing fund raising for organizations that offer animal therapy. I am also interested more in music and art therapy after performing and…… [Read More]

References

Brown, J.G. (1999). Physical and occupational therapy in nursing homes. Retrieved online: http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-09-97-00122.pdf

Therapy Dogs International (n.d.). Retrieved online:  http://www.tdi-dog.org/OurPrograms.aspx?Page=Nursing+Homes
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Enforcement of Psychology Treatment for the Mentally Ill

Words: 8451 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95839705

Psychology Treatment

For most of U.S. history up to the time of the Community Mental Health Act of 1963, the mentally ill were generally warehoused in state and local mental institutions on a long-term basis. Most had been involuntarily committed by orders from courts or physicians, and the discharge rate was very low. Before the 1950s and 1960s, there were few effective treatments for mental illnesses like depression, anxiety disorders and schizophrenia, which were commonly considered incurable. Only with the psycho-pharmacological revolution in recent decades and new anti-depressant and anti-psychotic medications has it been possible for the severely mentally ill to be treated on an outpatient basis through community mental health centers. Of course, as the old state hospitals have emptied many of the mentally ill have ended up homeless, since they are unable to hold maintain regular employment or continue on a medication regimen without supervision. According to present-day…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bacon. H. "Book Review: Jonathan Willows, Moving On after Childhood Sexual Abuse: Understanding the Effects and Preparing for Therapy in Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry. (15)1 January 2010, pp. 141-42.

Bartels, S.J., A.D. van Citters and T. Crenshaw (2010). "Older Adults" in Levin, B.L., J. Petrila and K. Hennessy Mental Health Services: A Public Health Perspective. Oxford University Presss: 261-82.

Behar, E.S. And T.D. Borkovec. (2003). "Psychotherapy Outcome Research" in I.B. Weiner et al., eds. Handbook of Psychology: Research Methods in Psychology. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Carron, V.G. And K. Hull. (2009). "Treatment Manual for Trauma-Exposed Youth: Case Studies." Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry 15(1) 13 November 2009, pp. 27-38.
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CSA Child Sexual Abuse Is

Words: 4327 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61552509

Rankin (2003) affirmed that the purpose of art therapy is to address the major affects of trauma on the child's life. Additionally, Rankin (2003) stated that art interventions begin with self-management, then proceed with safety planning, telling the trauma story, grieving traumatic losses, self-concept and world view revision and finally ends with self and relational development. Treatment progress and outcomes will vary from patient to patient, as therapy is an individualized process.

Although the amount of empirical research regarding art therapy is limited, the use of art therapy has been confirmed as a means for victims to express how they feel and find some closure. Art therapy has also become a type of intervention that is used in combination with other interventions. ith this understood, the preceding section of this discussion will focus on play therapy as an intervention.

Play Therapy

Play therapy is a long-established and highly effective treatment…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arcus, D. (2008). Child abuse, sexual and emotional. Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence.

Brooke, S. (1995) ART THERAPY: AN APPROACH TO WORKING WITH SEXUAL

ABUSE SURVIVORS. The Arts in Psychotherapy, Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 447-466, 1995

Brown, E. (2005). Correlates and treatment of stress disorder in children and adolescents. Psychiatric Annuals. 35 (9).
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Analyzing Articles in One Page Response

Words: 2799 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71577995

Alter-Muri, S. (2002). Viktor Lowenfeld evisited: A eview of Lowenfeld's Pre-schematic, Schematic, and Gang Age Stages. American Journal of Art Therapy. 40:172-190 and Burton, J. (2009). Creative Intelligence, Creative Practice: Lowenfeld edux. Studies in Art Education. 50(4), 323-337

Both of these articles analyze works undertaken by Viktor Lowenfeld. On one hand, Alter-Muri (2002) reviews Lowenfeld's Pre-schematic, Schematic, and Gang Age Stages, and on the other, Burton (2009) reviews Creative Intelligence, Creative Practice: Lowenfeld edux. In both articles, the authors offer an extensive critique on the theory of creative intelligence that was introduced by Lowenfeld. This encompasses the notions of developmental phases, growth elements, and eventual outcomes. I am in agreement that creative activities and practices do offer ways of knowing and constructing the world that liven up understanding and awareness through acts of personal generativity. I do consider that the aspect of creativity is particularly necessary when it comes to…… [Read More]

References

Alter-Muri, S. (2002). Viktor Lowenfeld Revisited: A Review of Lowenfeld's Pre-schematic, Schematic, and Gang Age Stages. American Journal of Art Therapy. 40:172-190.

Bennink, J., Gussak, D. E., & Skowran, M. (2003). The role of the art therapist in a Juvenile Justice setting. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 30(3), 163-173.

Burton, J. (2009). Creative Intelligence, Creative Practice: Lowenfeld Redux. Studies in Art Education. 50(4), 323-337.

Burton, J. (1981). Developing minds: Ideas in search of forms. School Arts. 58-64
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Gestalt Psychology Theory in

Words: 1804 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64580467

"The song was there before me, before I came along" Dylan answered. "I just sorta came down and just sorta took it down with a pencil, but it was all there before I came around…" (www.edlis.org)].

Meanwhile Ginger explains the practical application of Gestalt theory from the perspective of Fritz Perls: a) "we all know that each of us perceives the world from our own personal perspective…" and yet people look in vain for the objectivity that comes from science; b) we also know that the "how" is more important than the "why" and that the "spirit in which something is done is important… but we are still mostly interested in the 'bottom line'" (Ginger).

Conclusion

As alluded to earlier in this paper Gestalt has indeed been controversial and clearly it is misunderstood after years of its myriad applications. However, this paper supports the value that is Gestalt, in its…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Edlis. (1997). Ballad of Donald White. Retrieved September 3, 2011, from  http://www.edlis.org/twice/threads/donald_white.html .

Feldman, Robert. (2009). Psychology and Your Life. New York: McGraw-Hill Companies.

Ginger, Serge, (2007). Gestalt Therapy: The Art of Contact. London, UK: Karmac Books.

Melnick, Joseph, and Fall, Marijane. (2008). A Gestalt Approach to Group Supervision.
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Advocating for a Student

Words: 1704 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37412694

Advocacy Case Study

achel Faybyshev

Professional Issues and Ethics in Counseling

Dr. Aaron Lieberman

Identify the institutional and social barriers that impede access, equity and success for this client

Advocacy is defined as speaking on behalf of someone and helping him or her navigate when they cannot speak for themselves. Changes are driven by an awareness of inequities with intent to move humanity toward "enlightened world society." It is important to try to help those in need who cannot help themselves. Counselor's function as advocates when they use their skills in helping clients challenge institutional barriers that impede their personal, social, academic or career goals (Corey, G., p.471). In the case of Monique, she is a 16-year-old girl that has lost her way recently and is need of guidance.

Before, Monique was bright and driven, excelling in school. This changed four months ago. Over the past four months she has…… [Read More]

References

Corey, G., Corey, S. C, Corey, C., and Callahan, P. Issues and Ethics in the Helping

Professions (9th ed.). Stamford, CT.: Brooks/Cole.
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Loss and Grief the Loss

Words: 3131 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67987332



Art therapy is particularly useful with younger children. With children under the age of eight it can be difficult for them to grasp the concept of death, it can be equally as difficult for them to express the things they are feeling about the loss of a loved one (Shaw, 2000). Through the medium of drawing or painting a counselor may gain a better understanding of their patient's subjective experience of the loss as well as any unresolved emotions or unanswered questions remaining after the fact. Art therapy is also an effective means of determining the relative normality of a child's cognitive function following a traumatic event (Shaw, 2000).

Older children respond more effectively to client centered interviews (Shaw, 2000). A client centered interview is a psychoanalytic approach which encourages the patient to talk extensively guided minimally by questions or suggestions from the therapist. This approach might allow through the…… [Read More]

References

1. Tomita, T., & Kitamura, T. (2002). Clinical and research measures of grief: A reconstruction. Comprehensive psychiatry, 43, 95- 102.

2. Larson, D., & Hoyt, W. (2007). What has become of grief counseling? An evaluation of the empirical foundations of the new pessimism. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 38, 347- 355.

3. Currier, J., Holland, J., & Neimeyer, R. (2007). The effectiveness of bereavement interventions with children: A meta- analytic review of controlled outcome research. Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology, 36, 253- 259.

4. Forte, a., Hill, M., Pazder, R., & Feudtner, C. (2004). Bereavement care interventions: A systematic review. BMC Palliative Care, 1-14.
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Article Analysis and Evaluation

Words: 2110 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91537163

performed by a group of professionals that included: Dr. Xiao-Mei Li (Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing, egistered Nurse), dean and associate professor of the nursing department of Chinese university, Jiao tong University's College of Medicine; Kai-Na Zhou (Master of Science in Nursing, N), assistant researcher in the same department; Professor Dr. Hong Yan (PhD), public health department of same university's College of Medicine; Yin-Ping Zhang (PhD N), Associate Professor at the same department; and Professor Dr. Duo-Lao Wang (PhD) from Medical Statistics department, Faculty of Population Health and Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. The randomized clinical study was titled "Effects of music therapy on anxiety of patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy." The Care, Cure and Core model of Hall was used. A clinical trial of 120 women suffering from breast cancer was conducted between March and November 2009, using randomized controlled research design. Half…… [Read More]

Reference List

Avci, I. A., & Gozum, S. (2009). Comparison of two different educational methods on teachers' knowledge, beliefs and behaviors regarding breast cancer screening. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 13(2), 94-101.

Bruscia, K., Dileo, C., Shultis, C., & Dennery, K. (2009). Expectations of hospitalized cancer and cardiac patients regarding the medical and psychotherapeutic benefits of music therapy. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 36(4), 239-244.

Chen, Y. X., Yang, X. M., Kuang, J. Y., & Han, B. X. (2009). Anxiety and depression status of patients with breast cancer and analysis of the related factors. Journal of Bengbu Medical College, 34(9), 840-842.

Clark, M., Isaacks-Downton, G., Wells, N., Redlin-Frazier, S., Eck, C., Hepworth, J. T., & Chakravarthy, B. (2006). Use of preferred music to reduce emotional distress and symptom activity during radiation therapy. Journal of Music Therapy, 43(3), 247-265.
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Analyzing and Appraising an Article

Words: 1715 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88983450

clinical trial report regarding the effects of music therapy on female breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy. In this review, the article would be examined on the basis of its sampling unit, measurement methods, process of data collection and data analysis, researcher's interpretation of findings, the limitation of the study and its implication in clinical practice, its significance as well as the scope for further investigation.

The present study uses stratified random sampling, also known as proportional random sampling, of probability sampling technique wherein subjects are initially divided in groups on the basis of age, gender, condition etc. A final list or sub-group can then be chosen from the main group (as one hundred and twenty female patients suffering from breast cancer, aged between 25 to 65 years of age, have been chosen randomly here). The sample specifically took account of patients who required radical mastectomy, including modified radical mastectomy…… [Read More]

References

Boehm, K. Cramer, H. Staroszynski, T. & Ostermann, T. (2014). Arts Therapies for Anxiety, Depression, and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Evidence- Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. New York: Hindawi Publishing Corporation.

Bos, J. V. D. (2007). Inclusion / Exclusion Criteria in Clinical Trials. Milliman. Retrieved 27 June 2016 from ***

Explorable.com (Oct 10, 2009). Probability Sampling and Randomization. Retrieved 27 June 2016 from https://explorable.com/probability-sampling?gid=1578

Li, X. M., Zhou, K. N., Yan, H., Wang, D. L. & Zhang, Y. P. (2012). Effects of Music Therapy on Anxiety of Patients with Breast Cancer After Radical Mastectomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 68(5), 1145-1155. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05824.x
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Interview a Person Who Has Mentally Ill

Words: 1135 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99722993

Mental Illness Interview

SWK 354 Midterm Interview Assignment

FACE SHEET

Name Age DOB SS# Religion Sex Race

George Tirebiter 35 Oct 17, 1975 - Roman Catholic M. White

Current Address Phone Permanent Address

1445 Fleming Walloon Blvd. - West Roxbury, Mass.

Education Level

Employment

None currently

Current Important Activities (school, community, etc.)

Wife and family; writing poetry

Financial Sources:

Spousal support

Important Medical Information

In Case of Emergency Notify: Relationship: Worker:

Wife: Ki-Sook Tirebiter

Diagnosed schizophrenic, April 2001

Treatment Plans (Do Not Complete)

Client Identification.

35-year-old adult white male George Tirebiter (see face sheet)

Person, Family and Household, and Community Systems.

Person system. I observed that George is extremely overweight and has difficulty moving around: he ascribes the weight gain to the medications he has been on for the past decade. George describes himself as an "artist" which seems to be his emphatic way of coping with a sense of…… [Read More]

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Critical Incident Stress Management CISM

Words: 1464 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97335938

Cave Paintings

Complementary and Alternative Medicine and CISM in Diverse Populations

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as often referred to as integrated medicine. This term refers to therapies used to enhance health that fall outside the realm of conventional or "western" medical therapies. Southern Medical therapies are often limited to pharmaceutical drugs, surgery, and other interventions that directly affect the body. CAM therapies can simply refer to culturally-based medical practices that are not part of mainstream medicine in the United States. ecently, the trend is toward using CAM therapies along with evidence-based Western medical practices. This research will explore CAM interventions for diverse populations within the scope of the CISM plan.

CAM Interventions for prevention of Stress and esilience

One of the most widely accepted areas for the use of CAM interventions is in the area of stress reduction, depression, anxiety, chronic pain, and other conditions that are common symptoms…… [Read More]

References

Ahn, A., Ngo-Metzger, Q., & Legedza, A. et al. (2006). Complementary and Alternative Medical

Therapy Use Among Chinese and Vietnamese Americans: Prevalence, Associated Factors, and Effects of Patient -- Clinician Communication. American Journal of Public Health. 96 (2), 647-653.

GoodTherapy.org (2011). Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). Retrieved from http://www.goodtherapy.org/complementary-alternative-medicine.html

Kutch, M. (2010). Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Treating Mental Health Disorders. Retrieved from  http://repository.lib.ncsu.edu/ir/bitstream/1840.16/6044/1/etd.pdf
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Stroke Hearing Impaired Stroke Victims Plan Physical

Words: 1087 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75778483

Stroke Hearing Impaired

Stroke Victims

Plan: Physical, Occupational, Speech, and Psychological Therapies

Implementation: Daily regimen, with one of the four core areas (physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and psychological therapy) emphasized or addressed on each day.

Evaluation: After each session, therapist will write a thorough evaluation of the patient including a progress report. After the end of each six-week period, a thorough progress report will be shared among the various members of the health care team in a collaborative setting.

The follow-up will consist of maintenance therapies in each of the four core areas.

Documentation of Actions and Activities: According to the National Stroke Association (2013), the activities and actions should begin immediately after the stroke. The Physical Therapy sessions will include yoga and other systematic movement interventions to improve coordination, balance, strength, and range of motion. Each week, the therapist will implement a unique type of movement therapy,…… [Read More]

References

Hetu, R., Jones, L. & Getty, L. (1993). The Impact of Acquired Hearing Impairment on Intimate Relationships: Implications for Rehabilitation. International Journal of Audiology 32(6).

National Stroke Association (2013). Rehabilitation therapy after stroke. Retrieved online: http://www.stroke.org/site/PageServer?pagename=REHABT

"Stroke Health Center," (2011). WebMD. Retrieved online:  http://www.webmd.com/stroke/tc/stroke-rehabilitation-overview 

Wharton, T. (2013). Utah firm: Loop helps hearing impaired at movies and more. The Salt Lake Tribune. 24 Oct, 2013. Retrieved online:  http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/money/57001349-79/loop-hearing-system-technology.html.csp
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Opportunity to Work With People

Words: 739 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14903500



These experiences strengthened my decision to pursue a career in health-related profession that mainly focused on serving the underserved community.

However it was not until I moved to California seven years ago that I realized that lack of cultural diversity in the field of psychology was actually hurting the victims from other ethnic backgrounds. For the past three years, I have been working with a minority group that helped me better understand the need for cultural diversity in this field. I have come to realize that there are strong traditional and cultural barriers that prevent patients of African-American background to open up and voice their feelings. They usually express their emotions believing that family issues and problems must remain within the family alone. A person from a different ethnic background may not be able to fully comprehend these psychological and cultural barriers and hence the need arises to have more…… [Read More]

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Black's Law Dictionary 1991 Child

Words: 5968 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76815004



Moreover, it is unclear whether Jim has attempted to reestablish any meaningful contact with his children; rather, his entire focus has been on becoming a better person. While there is certainly nothing wrong with that goal in and of itself (it is, after all, a universal human quality), he appears to have pursued this goal to the total exclusion of making any substantive reparations to his family. Finally, it is interesting that Jim somehow feels compelled to tell others -- including potential employers -- about his criminal past and his current status in treatment, as if this ongoing commitment to all-out honesty somehow absolves him from a deceptive and duplicitous history, or at least helps to explain it (which it does if one is interested). According to Jim, "Entering into society again was very difficult. I had lost my business, my friends and was now divorced. After leaving jail, I…… [Read More]

References

Black's law dictionary. (1991). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co.

Bryant, J.K. (2009, June). School counselors and child abuse reporting. Professional School

Counseling, 12(5), 130-132.

Bryant, J. & Milsom, a. (2005, October). Child abuse reporting by school counselors.
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Campus Violence for K-12 Setting

Words: 489 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43381566

Campus Violence for K-12 Setting

What measurable outcome do you choose to explain?

I wish to explain the effect that having martial arts-based classes offered as a regular regiment for students would have on the total number of violent incidents, as well as what the severity of this violence is, occurring on campus among students.

How would you measure the outcome?

School nurses, administrators, and teachers would all be asked to keep record of any witnessed or reported violent acts committed on campus at the school where the program would be implemented. The study would ideally take place over the course of an extended period of time so that the gradual changes and variations in data would be evident. The total number of violent incidents occurring each day, each week, each month, and each semester would be calculated, as well as how often medical attention was necessary for the involved…… [Read More]

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Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychologies Existential-Humanistic

Words: 1357 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69311945



Both Existential and Transpersonal psychologies have this in common, a respect for and utilization of Eastern techniques to reach a state of stress-free maintenance of human psychological health.

But the differences lie in their origins. While Transpersonal psychologies are related to the Eastern or Western indigenous epistemologies, Existential-Humanistic psychologies have a Freudian origin, coming through Freud and his descendents. While Transpersonal psychology is considered to be a "fourth force" in psychology, psychoanalysis, behaviorism and humanistic psychologies are outside of the "transegoic" elements, ignoring insights from the world's contemplative traditions in both Eastern and Western religions. Labeled "Western," Existential and Humanistic psychologies are focused mainly on prepersonal and personal aspects of the psyche.

Existential and humanistic psychologies are based on the writings not only of Freud, but Kierkegaard, Nietzche, Heidigger, Sartre, Camus and other European intellectuals who had experienced European wars and chaos during the twentieth century. Important to them were…… [Read More]

References

Cortright, B. (1997). Psychotherapy and spirit: Theory and practice in transpersonal psychology. New York: State University of New York Press.

Daniels, M. (2005). Shadow, self, spirit: Essays in transpersonal psychology. Charlottesville, VA: Imprint Academic.

May, R. (1969) Love and Will, New York: W.W. Norton & Co., Inc.

Sartre, J.P. (1956). Being and nothingness (H. E. Barnes, Trans.). New York: Washington Square Press.
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Alzheimer's Disease Currently Affects More Than Four

Words: 2553 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61380087

Alzheimer's Disease currently affects more than four million Americans. Alzheimer's is a disease characterized by the progressive degeneration of areas within the brain, resulting in cognitive and physical decline that will eventually lead to death. It is important to emphasize that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not a normal part of aging. Although AD typically appears in those over sixty-five, it is a neurodegenerative disease, quite distinct from any aging-related cognitive decline. ecause Alzheimer's is eventually fatal, and because the decline typical of an Alzheimer's patient is so devastating, much research is currently being done to investigate potential treatments. With the elderly population the fastest growing segment of North American society, Alzheimer's threatens to be an even greater health concern in the future decades.

For patients exhibiting mild cognitive impairment, research is being done on ways to slow the disease's progression. The two main thrusts of Alzheimer's research are biological, which…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cohen-Mansfield J. (2001). "Nonpharmacologic interventions for inappropriate behaviors in dementia: a review, summary, and critique." American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry,

Cummings, J. (2004). "Alzheimer's Disease." New England Journal of Medicine, 351(1),

Gerdner L.A., & Swanson E.A. (1993). Effects of individualized music on confused and agitated elderly patients. Archive of Psychiatric Nursing, 7, 284-291.

Klunk, W. E et al. (2004). "Imaging brain amyloid in Alzheimer's disease using the novel positron emission tomography tracer, Pittsburgh Compound-B." Annals of Neurology,
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Counselor Reasons for Not Seeking

Words: 2432 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11146390



In other words, counselor skill training may cause some counselors-in-training to become more sensitive to the social appropriateness of their counseling behaviors and effects of their presentation style on the counseling relationship. (Judith Crews, et al., 2005)

Functional Transferable Skills

Transferable skills are the skills you have learned by working with information, people, and things. These skills are very versatile and can be used in a variety of jobs and occupations.

Transferable skills are acquired through experience, can be understood using a more universal language, and function across jobs and fields.

Opportunities for counseling skills to be transferred are almost too numerous to list them all.

We'll get into specifics but just a few of the fields that utilize the many skills professional counselors have are: Education, Mental Health, Non-Profit, Law, Government, Health Care, usiness, and the ever-present and popular entrepreneurial arena of starting your own business.

One thing not…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Judith Crews, Michael R. Smith, Marlowe H. Smaby, Cleborne D. Maddux, Edil Torres-Rivera,

John a. Casey, Steve Urbani. (2005). Self-Monitoring and Counseling Skills-Based vs. Interpersonal Process Recall Training. Journal of Counseling and Development, Vol.

Bolles, R. (2009). What Color is Your Parachute? Berkeley, CA.: Ten Speed Press.

CAP. (n.d.). Counseling. Retrieved February 4, 2009, from Civil Air Patrol:
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Self-Injurious Behavior

Words: 5019 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41574937

Deliberate self-harm (DSH) or self-injurious behavior (SI) involves intentional self-poisoning or injury, irrespective of the apparent purpose of the act. (Vela, Harris and Wright, 1983) Self-mutilation is also used interchangeably with self-mutilation, though self-mutilation is one aspect of DSH. Approximately 1% of the United States population uses physical self-injury as a way of dealing with overwhelming feelings or situations, often using it to speak when no words will come. There are different ways in which DSH is manifested: cutting, burning, and abusing drugs, alcohol or other substances. This occurs at times of extreme anger, distress and low self-esteem, in order to either create a physical manifestation of the negative feelings which can then be dealt with, or alternatively to punish yourself. Extremely emotional distress can also cause DSH -- this is sometimes linked with hearing voices, particularly as a way of stopping the voices.

DSH is also often called parasuicide,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Vela, J., Harris, J., and Wright, J.K. "Self-Mutilation." Journal of Trauma 23 (1983): 165-67.

Favazza, A.R. "What Do We Know About Affective Disorders?" Am J. Psychiatry 143.10 (1986): 1328.

Why Patients Mutilate Themselves." Hospital Community Psychiatry 40 (1989): 137-45.

Pies, R.W., and Popli, A.P. "Self-Injurious Behavior: Pathophysiology and Implications for Treatment." J. Clin Psychiatry 56.12 (1995): 580-8.
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Proposal to Address Nursing Fatigue

Words: 1677 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48039746

Grant Proposal to Improve Quality of Care

Nursing fatigue is one of the major factors that affect the quality of care provided by nurses to different patient populations. Studies have demonstrated that nursing fatigue is attributable to various factors including workload, illness, job frustration, and job stress. Nursing fatigue affect the quality of care provided by nurses through generating practice errors that hinder the delivery of high-quality care. Therefore, one of the most important measures to enhance the quality of care for residents living in a nursing facility setting is dealing with nursing fatigue. In this case, this grant proposal is geared towards obtaining funding to improve the quality of care for residents living in a nursing facility setting in relation to nursing fatigue.

Problem Statement

Nurses in this nursing facility setting that serves residents are involved in providing round-the-clock care to patients. These professionals provide a wide range of…… [Read More]

References

Boyle, D.A. (2011, January). Countering Compassion Fatigue: A Requisite Nursing Agenda. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16(1). Retrieved September 21, 2016, from http://www.nursingworld.org/Mainmenucategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/Tableofcontents/Vol-16-2011/No1-Jan-2011/Countering-Compassion-Fatigue.html

Freeman, G. (2015, March 1). Nurse Fatigue a 'Huge' Threat to Patient Safety. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from  https://www.ahcmedia.com/articles/134803-nurse-fatigue-a-huge-threat-to-patient-safety-but-can-be-addressed
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Statement of Intent

Words: 1185 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17773858

Letter of Intent: Personal Statement

To College of ____ Admissions Committee,

I am applying for the Master's degree in the School of Social Work, because I truly believe that it is my life's calling to make people's lives better by helping them with their daily struggles through practical help and techniques for self-empowerment. This is no easy task for either party, but I believe that if both parties are committed to the task of improvement and the task of making things better, then all things are possible. The strengths that I bring to this endeavor are a full commitment, a tremendous amount of empathy, and practical experience and theories under my belt to work for concerted improvements for other people.

Imagine that you have had the social work career of your dreams. Now, you have retired and written an autobiography.

I've been extremely blessed and fortunate to have a long…… [Read More]

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Autonomy Abuse and the Hippocampus

Words: 2602 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67428134

Current brain imaging surveys and other experiments also present evidence that child abuse could permanently damage neural structure and the functioning of the developing brain itself (Carloff).

Cohen (2001) discusses the merits of art therapy with its innate therapeutic qualities, which simultaneously activate the nervous system, the brain, the endocrine and the immune system in a uniquely particular way to support effective clinical management. Psycho-neuroendoimmunology connects an unregulated stress response to health, with stress as the underlying neurological dynamics of psychological and behavioral symptoms. Stress triggers an adaptive sympathetic nervous system response aimed at maintaining an optional state of functioning. This nervous system regulates the fight, flight, or freeze response to stress, which in turn provides the energy for survival and temporarily sharpens memory and brain function. Nature intends the use of this sympathetic adaptive response for survival, but the external reality is that our daily lives or urban environment…… [Read More]

References

1. Al-Kurdi, H. (2006). Messing with Our Minds. Dirty Tricks, Inc. VOXNYC.  http://www.voxfux.com/features/mind_control_child_abuse_cover_up.html 

2. Bower, B. (1996). Small Hippocampus Linked to Higher Risk of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Science News: Science Service, Inc. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1200/is_n20_v149/ai_18319734

3. Brick, N.D. (2005). How Childhood Sexual Abuse Affects Interpersonal Relations. Smart News. http://members.aol.com/smartnews/howchildhoodsa.htm

4. Carloff, A. (2002). Child Abuse and Damage. Punkerslut.  http://www.punkerslut.com/articles/childabuse.html
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Treatments

Words: 986 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46087824

..in an optimum range, between excessive denial and excessive intrusiveness of symptoms" (366); b) "normalizing the abnormal" (let the survivor know that it is perfectly normal to react emotionally to triggers that bring the trauma to mind; there is nothing wrong with the person, and indeed, the recurring symptoms are normal and just part of the healing process); c) "decreasing avoidance" (the person should be allowed to and encouraged to be open

PTSD - Dynamics & Treatments about the trauma, not to try to tuck it away or be in denial); d) "altering the attribution of meaning" (change the mindset of the victim from "passive victim" to "active survivor"); and e) "facilitating integration of the self" (371) (this is used primarily in coordination with hypnosis and "dissociation" in a strategy for "reintegrating" parts of the personality into the "self" - the theory being that PTSD tends to split apart components…… [Read More]

Another scholarly research article - published in the Journal of Counseling and Clinical Psychology (Reed, et al., 2006) weighs in on treatment strategies for spousal psychological abuse. The authors assert that presently there is a dearth of empirical evidence backing up the effectiveness for any existing treatments for the trauma a woman experiences when psychologically abused by her spouse or significant other. That said, the article suggests that "forgiveness therapy" (FT) is a "promising new area" (920) of treatment for this particular form of PTSD. The authors emphasize, however, that forgiveness therapy cannot be confused with "pardoning, forgetting...condoning or excusing" the wrongdoing that led to PTSD. The key concept in presenting FT is to have the woman examine "the injustice of the abuse," then give consideration to forgiveness as one possible option, and through compassion, make a choice to forgive or not to forgive. When a woman embraces FT, it certainly would be in sync with Christian values.

Finally, a recent article published in Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training (Heckman, et al., 2007), presents a literature review of existing empirical studies of treatments for incarcerated persons suffering PTSD. There are over 2 million people in U.S. prisons - 93% of them male and 100,000 juveniles - and of those inmates, some 21% of males are victims of PTSD, 48% of females prisoners are PTSD victims, and up

PTSD - Dynamics & Treatments to 65% of juveniles suffer due to PTSD. The authors believe that "cognitive treatments" (such as relaxation training, psycho education, art therapy, anger management) deserve more study. Also worthy of more research are "exposure and desensitization" treatments (clients simultaneously focus on traumatic material and an "external stimulus using saccadic eye movements of alternating bilateral stimulation"). Among the offshoots of exposure and desensitization treatments - seemingly effective in a correctional institution setting - is "traumatic incident reduction" (TIR); this entails the PTSD survivor / victim being exposed to repetitive "guided imagery" of the event that originally caused the trauma. Seeing that event over and over can reduce the depression, anxiety, avoidance and intrusive thoughts that are associated with PTSD, the authors explain.
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Individual Perceptions of Successful Aging

Words: 773 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40581934



3. Comfortable Shelter and Dignified Accommodations. Although everyone would like to remain in their own homes as long as possible and live an independent lifestyle, age-related diseases and infirmities frequently require placement of the elderly in long-term care facilities that vary drastically in their quality of care. Some progressive facilities employ evidence-based interventions such as pet therapy, art therapy and music therapy that have been shown to be effective in promoting quality of life among the elderly, while others simply allow their residents to wither away, neglected, unnoticed and uncared for by family or friends.

4. Reasonable Assurances of Safety (freedom from crime, terrorist attacks, etc.). In the culture of fear that has emerged in the United States and elsewhere following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, older people, like anyone else, want to be assured of their physical safety as they go about their day-to-day lives.

5. Social…… [Read More]

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Correspondence Bias and Why Might it Occur

Words: 2232 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40719035

correspondence bias and why might it occur? Are there cultural variations in the correspondence bias?

In the practice of social psychology, correspondence bias or also known as the theory of fundamental attribution error will refer to the over-valuing of explanations that are based from personality perspective under circumstantial situations. This process can lead into misunderstanding between one or two parties that include communities, societies, and groups that are living within the same area or different area. This can be considered as a form of stereotyping incidents for the reason that there are false beliefs and perceptions regarding a particular individual or group with respect to their daily routines and practices. There are cultural variations in the correspondence bias for the reason that discrimination regardless of age, race, and gender can be a perfect example for this case according with their demographical orientation and capabilities as pointed out by Bundel (2011).…… [Read More]

References

Aronson, E., Wilson, T.D., and Akert, R.M., (2007). Social Psychology. 6th edition. Uppers Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Brandon, Emeralda (2008). Psychiatric Fundamentals. New York: Academic Press.

Bundel, Maison (2011). Fundamentals of Sociology and Psychology. Detroit: Lavemon Publications, 75, 78, 85-89.

Festinger, L., and Carlsmith, J.M. (1959). Cognitive consequences of forced compliance. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 58,203-210.
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Psychoactive Substance Use and Abuse a Psychoactive

Words: 1656 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66395000

Psychoactive Substance Use and Abuse

A psychoactive substance refers to any chemical which both impacts the central nervous system and the way the brain functions. Psychoactive substances refer to stimulants (cocaine, methamphetamine, dextroamphetamine), sedatives and analgesics (alcohol, heroin), hallucinogens (PCP, psychoactive mushrooms). As stated in the DSM-III "psychoactive substance abuse is given the definition of being "a maladaptive pattern of use indicated by continued use despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent social, occupational, psychological or physical problem that is caused by the use [or by] recurrent use in situations in which it is physically hazardous" (Nordegren, 2002, p.11).

Social Effects

The social impact of psychoactive substance use and abuse on widespread scale is enormously detrimental to society. "In a 2005 report issued by the Department of Health and Human Services indicated that alcohol was associated with 100,000 preventable deaths each year and that it cost taxpayers nearly $185…… [Read More]

References

Aspen. (2011). The Impact of Trauma On Teenage Addiction. Retrieved from Crchealth.com:  http://aspeneducation.crchealth.com/articles/article-trauma/ 

Becvar, D. (2013). Handbook of Family Resilience. New York: Springer Science Publishing.

Dennison, S. (2011). Handbook of the Dually Diagnosed Patient: Psychiatric and Substance Use. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Dick, D., & Agrawai, A. (2008). The Genetics of Alcohol and Other Drug Dependence. Alcohol Research and Health, 111-118.