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Tools for Organization Development and Change
Words: 928 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77710992
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The purpose of organizational development and change is to provide sustainable pathways to achievement and success by helping the organization to be more effective at all worker levels as well as at systematic and infrastructural levels. The tools required to enable organization development and change are numerous: they include the relationship-building tools, communication tools, culture-promoting tools, leadership tools, and so on. This paper will describe and discuss the tools needed to make organization development and change possible.

Theory and strategy are two primary tools needed for organization development and change. Theory and strategy provide the support and framework for the change management and culture building process, and they can consist of various approaches to the issue: there theories like appreciative inquiry, experiential learning theory, intentional change theory, and more; there are strategy development techniques that strategic swarming and Three Horizons (Camp, 2012). Theory helps to give a basis of understanding…

Tool Development and Testing
Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87169631
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Testing

Developing and Testing Data Collection Tools

In research and planning, data collections tools are essential because they are the media that bridges the researcher to the target respondents or groups of the study. These tools serve as "building-blocks" that enables the researcher to visualize the outcome of his/her study: how the tool aligns with the study's objectives and how it generates data and information that will be used for analysis later. It is critical, then, to establish how faithful and appropriate the tools are to the objectives of the research at hand. To achieve this goal, it is therefore imperative for a researcher to develop and test data collection tools that will be used in the study.

While developing a data collection tool, the goal is to maintain fidelity of the research objectives. Questions that will be asked should answer the objectives, but they must be also organized coherently…

References

"Poverty assessment tools." 2014. Poverty Tools Website. Accessed from:  http://www.povertytools.org/index.html 

Reisman, J., Gienapp, A. And S. Stachowiak. 2007. A Handbook of Data Collection Tools: Companion to "A Guide to Measuring Advocacy and Policy." Organizational Research Services.

Assessment and Screening of Adolescents with Suicide Ideations
Words: 2233 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 40872454
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Adolescents at isk of Suicide

Today, alarming numbers of young people are contemplating taking their own lives, and many follow through on their suicide ideations to actually kill themselves or to make an attempt. In sum, suicide represents the second-leading cause of death for people aged 15 to 34 years and is the third-leading cause of death among young people aged 10 to 14 years (Suicide facts at a glance, 2015). To gain some additional insights into these issues, this case study provides a description of hypothetical 14-year-old runaway Caucasian adolescent, "Jane," who as referred from a homeless shelter with suicide ideations to determine what screening and testing should be performed, a discussion concerning current recommended treatment protocol, drugs and non-pharmacological interventions, and a description of expected treatment outcomes including a corresponding time frame and follow-up plan. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings concerning adolescents such as…

References

Horwitz, A. V. & Wakefield, J. C. (2007). The loss of sadness: How psychiatry transformed normal sorrow into depressive disorder. New York: Oxford University Press.

Interventions for suicide risk. (2017). Zero Suicide. Retrieved from  http://zerosuicide.sprc.org/  toolkit/treat/interventions-suicide-risk.

King, K. A. & Price, J. H. (2009, April). Preventing adolescent suicide: Do high school counselors know the risk factors? Professional School Counseling, 3(4), 255-257.

Maris, R. W. & Berman, A. L (2000). Comprehensive textbook of suicidology. New York: Guilford Press.

Heritage Assessment
Words: 1270 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10789829
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Heritage Assessment

Click http://wps.prenhall./wps/media/objects/663/679611/box_6_1.pdf order access "Heritage Assessment Tool." Assess Heritage Assessment Tool answering questions. In 1,000-1,500 words discuss usefulness applying a heritage assessment evaluating person, summarize learned Heritage Assessment Tool.

Heritage assessment tool

The heritage assessment tool acknowledges the different degrees of impact an individual's ethnic heritage may have upon his or her worldview. For some individuals who are very emotionally connected to their family and extended family, their sense of self is defined by their religion, customs and beliefs as they relate to a larger tradition. For example, someone who is Hispanic-American may spend a great deal of time not only with his or her nuclear family, but also with an extended network of cousins, grandparents, and even friends of the family. Even if not particularly religious, the rituals of the Catholic Church might provide a source of joy during traditional holidays and a source of comfort during…

References

Heritage assessment tool. (2013). Prentice Hall. Retrieved:

http://wps.prenhall./wps/media/objects/663/679611/box_6_1.pdf

Spiritual Needs Assessment of a Patient for
Words: 1193 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63363915
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Spiritual Needs Assessment of a Patient

For the recovery of any patient, especially those with terminal illnesses, there is a need to have a wholesome recovery which does not only dwell on the medicinal administration but also of the soul through spiritual nourishment. This will ensure they get out of the hospital with renewed strength and faith and hope for a better life in the future. This can only be achieved through having a thorough spiritual assessment of the patient and knowing exactly what to prepare to touch on spiritually about the patient. The following questionnaire is instrumental in ensuring this.

Please answer the following questions with voluntary information, as comprehensively as possible.

What is the pillar of your faith that helps you have meaning in life?

How significant is your faith in the above to your life in general?

Do you belong to some religious or spiritual group? Which…

Reference

Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, (2012). Assessing Spiritual Needs: The H.O.P.E. Assessment Tool. Retrieved June 29, 2012 from http://www.centrallancashire.nhs.uk/Library/Documents/clinician-zone/Palliative_care/Assessing%20Spiritual%20Needs%20-%20HOPE.pdf

Nursing Heritage Assessment
Words: 1379 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11397680
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Nursing Heritage Assessment

The Heritage Assessment Tool is a useful way of examining how strongly a person identifies with his or her heritage. It asks questions that can give a healthcare provider information about how long the family has been in the United States, how many generations of the family have been in the United States, how close the family is with other family members, whether the person lives in an ethnically-identified community, and whether the person married someone from the same cultural background (Spector, 2000). Furthermore, the questions in the assessment tool also seem aimed at helping determine whether the person is from a minority ethnic community. While it is not always the case, people who belong to minority groups may be more likely to identify with ethnic sub-communities. This can have a tremendous impact on the healthcare choices made by the individual patient, so that understanding a patient's…

References

My Jewish Learning. (Unk.). Jewish health & healing practices. Retrieved September 28, 2013

from  http://www.myjewishlearning.com/practices/Ethics/Our_Bodies/Health_and_Healing.shtml?p=1 

The Office of Minority Health. (2013, May 9). What is cultural competency? Retrieved

September 28, 2013 from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlID=11

Heritage Assessment Indian Chinese and American Cultures
Words: 1045 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29423217
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Heitage Assessment: Indian, Chinese and Ameican Cultues

In using the heitage assessment tool, thee (3) cultues wee consideed and compaed: Indian (autho's cultue), Chinese and Ameican.

Indian

The autho's cultue is highly influenced by ual Indian cultue, as s/he was aised in India until s/he was 25 yeas old. Because of this late influence of Ameican cultue, my Indian cultue has emained stonge within me. This is eflected in the autho's lifestyle, which stictly adheed to taditions and values held impotant by the Indians. Raised a Catholic, the autho is actively involved in the Chuch and paticipates in activities like Bible eading and celebating eligious holidays. The autho's stong Catholic Indian identity is also eflected in he social cicle, which pimaily consisted of Indians shaing the same cultual identity as he and pacticing Catholics.

Howeve, when talking about health maintenance, the autho mixes the influence of Indian cultue with the…

references to documents in history." ICCROM Working Group 'Heritage and Society.' Available at:  http://cif.icomos.org/pdf_docs/Documents%20on%20line/Heritage%20definitions.pdf

Transition Assessment Planning Justin Is
Words: 2052 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86308447
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Several assessment tools are available, often using data collection sheets that include items such as direct observation and interviews with adults who closely interact with the student. In Justin's case, this group could include Carrie, the paraprofessional who works directly with Justin, in addition to the special education teacher, the speech and language specialist, other teachers who regularly interact with Justin (e.g., art, physical education, music and media), and Justin's parents.

Justin's tantrums are a cause of concern for their negative effects not just on Justin but on the classroom as a whole. An FBA can be done on Justin; managing these outbursts is the main goal for the kindergarten year so that more learning can take place. It is important that the target behavior descriptions are as specific as possible. For example, "has outbursts" does not provide as much information as "screams, cries, kicks and throws items when upset."…

References

Blair, K.C., Umbreit, J., Dunlap, G., and Gilsoon, J. (2007). Promoting inclusion and peer participation through assessment-based intervention. Topics in Early Childhood

Special Education 27(3), pp. 134-147.

Functional behavior assessment. (2010). Autism Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.autismclassroom.com/strategies/teachers/behavior-interventions/functional-behavior-assessments/

Kivi, R. (2011). Teacher tips -- Teaching autistic students. Bright Hub Education 11/24/2011.

Clinical Assessment of Learners Clinical Assessment Involves
Words: 2688 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35872340
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Clinical Assessment of Learners

Clinical assessment involves the evaluation of technical skills, communication skills, professionalism, knowledge base, and teaching skills, where applicable, of students who are about to enter independent practice. Technological changes have made it possible to assess clinical performance in ways that are far more advanced than pencil and paper tests relied on in the past (Dauphinee, 1995). In the late 1970s, clinical training programs utilized continuous practical assessments to evaluate learner competencies and as means of providing formative assessment feedback. These continuous practical assessments were considered to be "a much more valid, reliable, and realistic method of assessment" (Quinn, 1989). As clinical placements grew shorter and the number of staff, including those with "supernumerary status" grew larger, the quality of continuous practical assessments was substantively impaired (Girot, 1993). The goal of assessment has always been to identify a "competent practitioner" and to support the educational efforts required…

References

Andrews, M. And Chilton, F. (2000) Student and mentor perceptions of mentoring effectiveness, Nurse Education Today, 20 (7), 555-562.

Atkins, S. And Williams, A. (1995) Registered nurses' experiences of mentoring undergraduate nursing students, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 21, 1006-1015.

Cahill, H.A. (1996) A qualitative analysis of student nurses' experiences of mentorship,

Journal of Advanced Nursing, 24(4), 791-799.

Psychomotor Assessment 1st Method Psychomotor Assessment Neurological
Words: 1120 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46417807
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Psychomotor Assessment

1st Method Psychomotor Assessment

Neurological observation as relating to psychomotor Assessment framework revolves around collecting data about the CNS or brain and spinal cord of a patient. Some of the areas that are assessed include Level of Conscious, Alertness, Pupillary esponse, Vitals, and Motor esponse (Mooney and Comerford, 2003).

In categorizing the level of consciousness some of the observations include alertness, being aware of surrounding environment, in contrast to drowsiness or slower responses. As stimuli is applied, it is important to record not only if there is a response, but the rate or speed of the response could indicate there is an uncharacteristic condition. If a patient is not conscious, there is no response even to a pain induced stimuli such as heat, pressure, or light. A problem could exist when there is pressure on the brain caused by excess fluid or a head trauma of some type.…

References

Mooney, G.P., Comerford, D., M. (2003). Neurological observations. Nursing Times Volume 99. Iss. 17.

Rhoads, J. (2006). Advanced health assessment and diagnostic reasoning. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Tellefson, J. (2010) Clinical psychomotor skills: assessment tools for nursing students. (4th ed).

Spiritual Need Assessment Spirituality Can
Words: 1161 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77904475
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Significant Discoveries

The discoveries I made about my friend were enlightening. I already knew she did not attend religious services and that she was agnostic, as this had been information that was the basis for many friendly debates in our social circle. I understood her sense of hope and her ability to find joy in her children's joy and learning. I was however not aware that all of her family was distant in either place or spirit and that she therefore had to rely heavily on her husband's family for support, and this she finds troubling as she does not wish to be a burden and she feels like a bit of an outsider. Her illness also seems to have added stress to the situation because she has had to rely heavily on her husband and his family to care for their young children. I also thought the information about…

References

Edlin, G. Golanty, E. McCormack Brown, K. (2000) Essentials for health and wellness. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Joint Commission (2008) Standards FAQ details: spiritual assessment. Retrieved from  http://www.jointcommission.org/standards_information/jcfaqdetails.aspx?StandardsFaqId=290&ProgramId=1 

Phillip, R. (2006) Reflections on spirituality and health. By Stephen G. Wright. (book review) Occupational Medicine 56 (8): 585. doi: 10.1093/occmed/kql093

Purposes and Methods of Classroom-Based Literacy Assessment
Words: 1257 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 96083561
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Classroom-based reading assessment is the measurement of children's progress in learning reading by using both formal and informal measurement tools.

Classroom Assessments

Classroom assessment collects useful information about what students do and do not know about reading. Teachers can use four different types of assessments to accomplish this.

Leveled Books

Leveled books can be used to figure out where exactly a student is in terms of reading level.

Informal procedures

Rough observation and measurement can be used to figure out where exactly students are in terms of reading level.

Tests

Tests can be administered to find out where students' strengths and weaknesses are.

Work Samples

Collecting samples of a student's work can be instructive in figuring out where a student is in terms of reading level

Determining Student's Reading Level

Teachers must figure out where students are in terms of reading level so that they can progress in their learning…

Evidence-Based Assessment Framework Evidence Based
Words: 897 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 618208
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The abnormal activities observed can point out at many different issues such as anxiety or heart failure.

The interview of the patient is a very vital and essential assessment tool in the hands of the nurse. The nurse can conduct a thorough interview to have the complete and big picture of patient (the nurse can assess the patient both physically and mentally much more efficiently by just asking what is wrong and where are the problems).

The observation is also a very important tool, nurses can make avail of the interactions they made with patients by observing their responses to different kinds of stimuli. This practice assists the nurses in recognizing the overall pain, any sort of emotional disturbances and the patient's reaction towards the treatment applied.

This observation factor is very important especially for those patients who have any sort of difficulty in communicating with the nurses or medical…

Differentiated Learning & Assessment -- PLC Presentation
Words: 1743 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47845156
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Differentiated Learning & Assessment -- PLC Presentation

Differentiated instruction and assessment recognizes that the individual needs, strengths and weaknesses of students must drive learning (Wormeli, 2007). Changing the outcomes of traditional lesson plans to account for differentiated learning is a fundamental part of ensuring student success. Each student's readiness, interest and learning profile is at the core of this approach. Students are diverse; therefore, instructional and assessment practices should be as well, to improve student outcomes in all content areas.

Many teachers design lessons that have a set of specific learning objectives and standardized assessments for students. However, today's learning models ask teachers to adopt multiple objectives and use different levels of assessment for more individualized learning (Dobbertin, 2012). Differentiation of process, then, refers to the way in which a student accesses material (i.e., one student may explore a learning center, while another may conduct an online search for information).…

References

Dobbertin, C. (2012). Just How I Need to Learn It. Educational Leadership, 69(5), 66-70

Forsten, Char, Grant, J., & Hollas, B. (2003). Differentiating Textbooks: Strategies to Improve Student Comprehension & Motivation. New Hampshire: Crystal Springs Books.

Heacox, Diane. (2002). Differentiating Instruction in the Regular Classroom: How to Reach and Teach All Learners, Grades 3-12. Minnesota: Free Spirit Publishing.

Painter, D.D. (2009). Providing Differentiated Learning Experiences Through Multigenre Projects. Intervention in School & Clinic, 44(5), 288-293.

Risk Assessments for Falls Risk
Words: 1509 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81536115
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As the percentage of older Americans continues to increase, the need for timely and accurate assessment screens and the formulation of effective clinical interventions will become even more pronounced. Fortunately, the research also showed that there are a number of assessment tools that are available to facilitate the process, including sophisticated multifactor instruments with proven validity and reliability. One of the more important issues to emerge from the research concerned the need for individualized interventions that draw on strengths and interests in order to minimize the risk factors that are involved.

eferences

Faber, M., Bosscher, .J. & Van Wieringen, P.C. (2006). Clinimetric properties of the performance-oriented mobility assessment. Physical Therapy, 86(7), 944-954.

Functional assessment. (2012). NursingLink. etrieved from http://nursinglink.monster.com / training/articles/331-functional-assessment-the-key-to-geriatric-care-in-the-21st-

century.

Gates, S. & Smith, L., Fisher, J.D. & Lamb, S.E. (2008, October 1). Systematic review of accuracy of screening instruments for predicting fall risk among independently living older…

References

Faber, M., Bosscher, R.J. & Van Wieringen, P.C. (2006). Clinimetric properties of the performance-oriented mobility assessment. Physical Therapy, 86(7), 944-954.

Functional assessment. (2012). NursingLink. Retrieved from  http://nursinglink.monster.com  / training/articles/331-functional-assessment-the-key-to-geriatric-care-in-the-21st-

century.

Gates, S. & Smith, L., Fisher, J.D. & Lamb, S.E. (2008, October 1). Systematic review of accuracy of screening instruments for predicting fall risk among independently living older adults. Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, 45(8), 1105-1113.

Personality Assessment Inventory PAI Personality
Words: 1199 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1198736
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The two interpersonal scales are Dominance and Warmth. Many of the clinical scales, as well as the aggression scale, also have a number of subscales to provide more nuanced information bout each of the clinical conditions. For example, the Borderline Features scale has four subscales: Affective Instability, Identity Problems, Negative elationships and Self-Harm.

The resulting score profiles can be compared to either normative or clinical populations. aw scores are converted to T-scores using tables provided in the scoring manual. These tables were generated using either normative or clinical samples that were census matched and standardized (Morey, 2007). The manual provides average scores for each of the subscales, for example, the average T score for Borderline Traits is 59, indicating that individuals falling below this number are emotionally stable and do not reflect borderline traits. The individual mean scores for each scale vary and are presented within the testing manual (Morey,…

References

Blais, M.A., Baity, M.R., & Hopwood, C.J. (2010). Clinical applications of the Personality Assessment Inventory. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis Group.

Butchner, J.N. (2010). Personality assessment from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first century: Past achievements and contemporary challenges. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 6, 1-20.

Morey, L.C. (2007). The Personality Assessment Inventory: Professional manual 2nd Edition. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

Morey, L.C. & Hopwood, C.J. (2007). Casebook for the Personality Assessment Inventory: A Structured Summary Approach. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

Annotated Bibliography for Performing Need Assessment on Adult Learners
Words: 1672 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 63623452
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obert, T.E., Pomarico, C.A. & Nolan, M. (2011). Assessing Faculty Integration of Adult learning needs in second-degree nursing education. Nursing education perspectives, 32(1), 14-17.

obert, Pomarico and Nolan (2011) have presented a model for assessing the learning needs of second-degree nursing education. The study was essentially designed In a way that assessment of interactive teaching model was made possible. The second-degree BSN students were taken as the sample of study. The main research question being investigated was that whether or not the teaching strategies being used at the second-degree nursing education level met the needs of nursing students. The literature review being conducted by the authors is somewhat precise and short and identifies the existing gap that exists in the learning need assessment of nursing students. It was identified in the start of study that for program development for this student segment in nursing, it is essential to evaluate the…

References

Cabaniss, D.L. (2008). Becoming a school: Developing learning objectives for psychoanalytic education. Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 28(3), 262-277.

Dhara, R. (2002). Advancing public health through the assessment initiative. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 8(4), 1-8.

Jo Brixey, M., & Mahon, S.M. (2010). A Self-Assessment Tool for Oncology Nurses: Preliminary Implementation and Evaluation. Clinical journal of oncology nursing, 14(4), 474-480.

Jones, S., & Watty, K. (2010). Vignette 6 Pluri-disciplinary learning and assessment: Reflections on practice. International Perspectives on Higher Education Research, 5, 195-207.

Nursing Tools and Strategies to
Words: 1148 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 1924960
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Pat Barker used the serving of afternoon tee in much the same manner. As new patients went about the process of making their cup of tea, many neurological functions could be assessed without formal testing.

The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is one of the most widely used and best known neurological assessment tools. Introduced in 1974, GCS provides a simple and uniform assessment of a patient's level of consciousness. Aird and McIntosh (2004) cite Teasdale as stating the GCS is superior to technological monitoring. It measures three modes of behavior: verbal response, eye opening, and motor response, with each graded on a scale of increasing dysfunction. These scores are then combined to determine a consciousness level. However, Aird and McIntosh cite Segatore and Way as considering the psychometric properties of GCS to be weak, because it lacks the subtleties needed to appropriately detail patients who have discrete disturbances of intellectual…

References

Aird, T. & McIntosh, M. (27 May -- 9 Jun, 2004). "Nursing tools and strategies to assess cognition and confusion." British Journal of Nursing, 13.10. p. 621-626,

Environmental Assessment Is an Integral
Words: 4249 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 9743736
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Strategic assessment

2. Project Preparation

3. Project Implementation'

4. Facility Operation

These four assessment tools are to be standalone tools that are applied at specific stages of the Gipsy Lane brickworks road extension and the industrial development project life cycle. The assessment with one of the tools has no link or dependence with earlier stages. The tools of assessment are to be designed in a manner that they are applicable throughout the planning stage up to the point of making decisions in the project life cycle (See figure 1.).

The process of protocol assessment (Source: IHA, 2010).

The tools are to undergo repeated application so as to help in the continuous improvement of the process.

Strategic Assessments section

This section is important for the assessment of the strategic basis of the Gipsy Lane brickworks project. This part is most applicable at the stage when the Gipsy Lane brickworks is still…

References

Gratton, C., & Jones, I. (2003). Research methods for sport studies. New York: Routledge.

Fraenkel, J.R. & Wallen, N.E. (2001). Educational research: A guide to the process. Mahwah,

NJ:

Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Online Pediatric Pain Assessment Pain
Words: 2462 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 31301863
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Combining these two methods is one effective strategy in mitigating pain in children (Cohen).

Additional strategies that involve both the patient and family are evident, particularly when dealing with chronic pain. Children sometimes internalize pain, believing that they must restrict their activity, particularly when parents worry and hesitate to allow them to be active. Parents see play as worsening of the situation or a relapse, contributing to an overprotectivness. This, in turn, reflects on the self-image of the child. In any case, experts recommend that parents not react in a negative way -- either by thinking the child is faking pain or becoming so overprotective that the child is a virtual prisoner. Instead, the psychological strategy should be to set realistic and evolving strategies so that there is not a continue pessimism regarding future health outcomes. This, for adolescents, is critical since there is also a self-esteem issue that goes…

REFERENCES

The Handbook of Chronic Pain. (2007). New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Handbook of Pediatric Chronic Pain. (2011). New York: Springer.

Carter, B., & Threlkeld, M. (2012). Psychosocial perspectives in the treatment of pediatric chronic pain. Pediatric Rheumatology, 10(15), 1-11. Retrieved January 2013, from Pediatric Rheumatology:  http://www.ped-rheum.com/content/pdf/1546-0096-10-15.pdf 

Christie, D., & Wilson, C. (2005). CBT in Pediatric and Adolescent Health. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 8(4), 241-47.

Mathematics Assessment
Words: 1864 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35582929
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Mathematics is closely connected to economics, commerce and business modelling, as well as systems for military weapons. Due to the widespread of its use, it was noted that students in the U.S. were beginning to perform a little worse in mathematics than children from other countries worldwide. Mathematical knowledge among citizens was considered a very important factor for a country to be a leading world power. Assessment activities have been a continuing focus of academic research for more than twenty-five years. In that period, there have been new tools developed. In addition, the curriculum has shifted its focus to the results of learning. The shift of focus in the theory of learning to constructivism from behaviourism has greatly influenced the learning and teaching of mathematics. Conventional tests are only centred on the mathematical procedures and skills of students. Thus, application of authentic tools for assessment to measure the learning of…

Alternative Assessment Educational Reforms Are
Words: 1750 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42255251
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As with most assessments, there are disadvantages in using criterion-referenced tests. The most obvious limit to this type of assessment is its susceptibility to inadequately reflect the curriculum. This is particularly true with state mandated criterion-referenced tests. State-level test makers are far removed from classrooms; they do not witness the goings-on of individual schools and classrooms. Due to this distance, state-created criterion-referenced tests may assess knowledge and skills that may not have been taught. They certainly do not allow for local needs, interests, and abilities. Another serious limitation to criterion-referenced tests is their tendency to inadequately evaluate students' abilities. These assessment tools may not provide a holistic and complete illustration of students' knowledge and skills. This, by nature, reduces the purpose and effectiveness of assessment.

As pointed out, criterion-referenced tests contain some respectable characteristics. However, its flaws, if serious enough, may outweigh the potential benefits. For this reason, it seems…

References

Clark, Robin E. "Performance Assessment in the Arts." Kappa Delta Pi Record. 39.1 (2003):

Ediger, Marlow. "Philosophy and Measurement of School Achievement." Journal of Instructional Psychology. 30.9 (2003):1-6.

Moon, Tonya R., Brighton Catherine M., & Callahan, Carolyn M. "Development of Authentic

Assessments for the Middle School Classroom." The Journal of Secondary Gifted

Student Assessment The Superiority of
Words: 2542 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 37255157
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This helps them deal with administrative tasks such as applying for grants, reporting their progress, appeasing parents, etc. In addition, teacher-based methods of assessment have at least one positive implication for students. According to Flood et al., teacher-based assessments allow teachers to enter the process of scaffolding with significant foreknowledge. Flood et al. (2003). suggests that all good assessment includes a component in which a teacher plans and sets goals, and then collecting data and interpreting it. This can be done in the classroom or at the macro level -- applicable to either the school itself or the state. Teachers can use the data gleaned from teacher-centered assessment as a means by which to identify areas of weakness and address them (Kearns, 2009). Standardized testing and teacher-based testing in classrooms allows teachers to determine where most students are having problems and use scaffolding techniques to intervene on the student's behalf…

References

Chall, J.S. & Adams, M.J. (2002). The Academic Achievement Challenge: What Really

Works in the Classroom. New York: Guilford.

Flood, J. et al. (2003). The Handbook of Research on Teaching the English Language

Arts 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Standards-Based Assessment Across the Nation States Are
Words: 1249 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24162687
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Standards-Based Assessment

Across the nation, states are setting tough new education standards, defining what students should know and be able to do. To help students meet these standards -- and to measure their progress in doing so -- states are also designing and implementing new standards-based assessment systems.States and districts use two types of interrelated standards: those that specify the content (what students should know or be able to do at different points in their education), and those that specify the academic achievement standards (how well they should be able to do it). Ideally, academic achievement standards indicate what is required to meet content standards (for example, essay, mathematical proof, scientific experiment, project or exam), as well as the quality of achievement that is deemed acceptable (for example, achieving a certain level of proficiency). This report will discusses standards-based assessments, along with the grading criteria, reporting tools, and report forms…

References

No Child Left Behind Issue Brief: A Guide to Standards-Based Assessment. Retrived July 15, 2005 from

Reliability and Validity of Standardized Assessments in Adult Education
Words: 606 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10486034
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Adult Learning Assessment

Adult learners comprise one of the fastest-growing segments of students today, and adult learners typically have needs that differentiate them from the younger learner. There is already much scholarship devoted to how the adult student learns new information. This understanding of the different learning styles has been taken into consideration in the design of courses and curricula for adult learners.

However, teaching tools are only part of the equation. Educators must also be able to assess if the adult learner is indeed retaining the information at both a critical and analytical level. Thus, in addition to the development of curricula, Cooledge et al. (2000) discussed the need to develop proper assessment tools for adult learners. In particular, Cooledge et al. (2000) focuses on the validity and reliability of portfolio assessment, one of the most popular tools in adult education.

The first part of this article is a…

Works Cited

Coolege, N.., Coolege J., Weihe K.. (2000). Thorny issues of reliability, validity and fairness when evaluating portfolio assessment. Retrieved Oct 30, 2004, at  http://www.ahea.org/Thorny_Issues.htm .

Reducing Risk in a Community through Assessment
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Community Inventory and Needs Assessment

When it comes to community risk reduction, taking community inventory can help neighborhoods identify their needs and put themselves in a better position to create a stable environment. As the Compassion Capital Fund National Resource Center (2015) states, “In order to effectively serve a community, it is important to understand the community” (p. 4). The problem is that understanding a community and identifying its needs can difficult, as there are often so many of them to remember. That is why using a strategic approach like the community inventory and needs assessment can help organizers better track the state of a community and provide the basis for adequate understanding.

The value of conducting and utilizing a community inventory and needs assessment lies in the work that it enables organizers to do: “The findings from an assessment will define the extent of the needs that exist in…

Primary and Secondary Assessment
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Secondary Assessment

Tracy Folsom is a 28-year-old female who was brought to the Emergency Department by her neighbor. The neighbor stated that Miss Folsom was found lying semi-conscious in the shower. The patient was received in the ED by the on call nurse. The nurse's performance with Miss Folsom's management is reviewed in this article.

Emergency evaluation of a patient is supposed be in a systematic manner. A systemic approach prevents the examiner from missing out important clues that may point to a patient's diagnosis. This approach is divided into primary and secondary.

As part of the Primary Assessment, the patient's Airway, Breathing, Circulation and degree of Disability was evaluated, as per protocol. Miss. Folsom's airway was patent, breathing was shallow, and her skin color was pink, indicating good perfusion. She was obeying commands and pupils were equal in size and reactive to light. It is also helpful to state…

REFERENCES

Canadian Medical Association. (2007, July). Putting patients first ®: patient-centred collaborative care a discussion paper. Retrieved from http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/surgery/documents/CollaborativeCareBackgrounderRevised.pdf

Dean, R & Mulligan, J, 2009, 'Initial management of patients in an emergency situation', Nursing Standard, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 35-41, (Academic Search Complete).

Gilbert, G., Souza, P., & Pletz, B. (2009). Patient assessment routine medical care primary and secondary survey. San Mateo County EMS Agency, 1-5. Retrieved from  http://smchealth.org/sites/default/files/docs/243322118Patient_Assessment.pdf 

Institute of Medicine. (2001) Crossing the quality chasm. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Informal and Formal Reading Assessments
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standardized tests and there is math association with the results. On the other hand informal reading assessments do not have the same formal data requirements and is based more on performance. These two kinds of assessments will be critiqued in this paper.

Formal Reading Assessments

Parents should know and understand not only why their children are being accessed, but through which process the assessment is being conducted. The more parents are involved in the education of their children, the closer parents will be to opportunities to participate and contribute to those important years of education. Brenda eaver writes in Scholastic magazine that first of all, whether it is informal or formal, assessments need to match up with the purpose of assessing any particular student. Formal assessments are generally used to assess "overall achievement" and to "compare a student's performance with others at their age or grade."

Parents should be informed…

Works Cited

Nilsson, Nina L. (2008). A Critical Analysis of Eight Informal Reading Inventories. The Reading Teacher, 61(7), 526-536.

Ogle, Laurence T. (2007). The Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS): a description. Center for Public Education. Retrieved June 13, 2012, from http://www.centerforpubliceducation.org.

Rosado, Luis A. (2006). TExES (103) Bilingual Generalist, EC-4 (REA) -- The Best Test Prep /

Best Test Preparation and Review Course Series. Piscataway, NJ: Research & Education

Knowledge Survey Assessment Ksa Is
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By the same token to evaluate application would require if the employment of "critical thinking" is evident in a writing example (Wirth, 2004). This data is then used to make decisions regarding the effectiveness of teaching managerial material used to train students in how to analyze a case study example.

Though Bloom's taxonomy offers a guideline for measuring the success of a Knowledge Assessment there are other evaluations that may be more effective depending on the type of discipline.

The Function or value of a Knowledge Assessment is to appraise the student's ability to answer test questions. It is not to actually test the student. It is primarily a survey. Usually the KA is done at the beginning or end of the course to judge how well teachers were able to teach course content (Wirth, 2004). Much like a course evaluation.

This assessment was chosen because it allows the teacher…

References

Bloom, B. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals. Handbook 1. Cognitive domain.

NY: McKay.

Nuhfer, E.B. (1996). The place of forming evaluations in assessment and ways to reap their benefits. Geoscience Education Journal. Vol. 44. Pp 385-393.

Nuhfer, E.B. & Knipp, D. (2003). The knowledge survey, a tool for all reasons: to improve the academy. Vol. 21. Pp. 59-79. Retrieved March 3, 2011 from  http://www.isu.edu./ctl/facultydev/KnowS_files/KnowS.htm

Hazard Assessment Development
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Geographic Information System (GIS) is a system that digitally creates and manipulates spatial areas. The system stores, edits analyses and shows topographic information that is critical in decision-making. GIS applications enable creation of interactive queries, analysis and editing and then present results. This is beneficial in management of disasters.

Disaster management signifies preparedness involving a chain of measures incorporating disaster prevention, emergency response as well as reconstruction. Many organizations federal, state and non-governmental as well as businesses, public health benefit from GIS technology. Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is actively involved in improving and publicly availing geo-processing specifications using Web Map Service and Web Feature Service protocols. OGC divides GIS products or software into two categories, compliant and implementing products, based on their level of compatibility with OGC specifications, which aid them in communication. In recent times, an explosion of online mapping applications has given the public enormous geographic information. The…

Reference

Battista, C. (1994). Chernobyl: GIS model aids nuclear disaster relief. GIS World, 32 -- 5.

Cova, T.J. (1999). GIS in emergency management. In P.A. Longley, & D.J. Goodchild, Geographical Information Systems: Principles, Techniques, Applications, and Management (pp. 845-858). New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Grif-th, D.A. (1986). Hurricane emergency management applications of the SLOSH numerical storm surge prediction model. In S.A. Marston, Terminal disasters: computer applications in emergency management. Boulder: Boulder Institute of Behavioral Science.

Self-Assessments Title of the Assessment
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I need to acknowledge that I can only control how I react with an environment, but that I cannot control the environment itself, and I can try to ensure that my reactions are consistent across time and space. Finally, I need to make some changes to how I deal with stress in general, which may make me more resilient in my professional life. I need to learn to laugh at myself, and I need to embrace a more optimistic outlook. Finally, because resiliency is linked to personal stress levels, I need to engage in healthy behaviors, such as eating right and exercising.

Title of the Assessment: Assessing Your Creative Personality

Purpose of the Assessment: The purpose of the assessing your creative personality assessment is to estimate the subject's creative potential.

Actual Score: +1

Interpretation of Score: I have an average creative personality.

Improving Effectiveness / Efficiency: With all of the…

Organizational Assessment Plan
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Organizational Assessment as Impetus for Change at a Vet Center

Organizational Assessment as an Impetus for Change at a Vet Center

Organizational Context. Every type of organization has, or should have, as a major goal, the need to optimize the productivity of its human resources (Farr, Schuler & Smith, 1993). One organization that has recently assumed critical importance in the U.S. is the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Today, the VA is responsible for administering an enormous healthcare and benefits network for its active duty and retired service members and their families at U.S. taxpayer expense.

Among the most prominent of such government-administered programs is the healthcare systems comprised of VA medical centers (VAMCs), outpatient clinics (VAOPCs), community and outreach clinics, and numerous Vet Centers. In fact, taken together, almost one-third of the American population (around 70 million persons who are veterans, dependents and survivors of deceased veterans) are eligible…

References

Alioth, A., Duell, W., Frei, F., Hugentobler, M., & Schurman, S. (1993). Work design for the competent organization. Westport, CT: Quorum Books.

Becker-Reems, E., & Garrett, D. (1998). Testing the limits of teams: How to implement self- management in health care. Chicago: American Hospital Publishing.

Coopman, S.J. (2001). Democracy, performance and outcomes in interdisciplinary health care teams. The Journal of Business Communication, 38(3), 261.

Dallimore, E.J. & Souza, T.J. (2002). Consulting course design: Theoretical frameworks and pedagogical strategies. Business Communication Quarterly, 65(4), 86.

Health Self-Assessment Identify Which Three of the
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Health Self-Assessment

Identify which three of the six dimensions of health you are strongest in.

According to this self-assessment instrument, my three strongest health dimensions are Social Health, Spiritual Health, and Intellectual Health. I scored a 4 out of 5 in each of those areas. By comparison, I scored a 3 in each of the other three measures (Physical Health, Emotional Health, and Environmental Health.

Describe why you think the identified three dimensions are your strongest.

I scored well in Social Health because I am comfortable with the impressions that I make on people and because I tend to get along well with others. I also participate in various social activities and genuinely enjoy interacting with others, including those who are different from me. My family relationships are healthy and fulfilling, I am fully present and available in my personal relationships, I am considerate of others, I contribute positively to…

Public Accountability Work An Assessment
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232).

In the final purpose of accountability, where the goal is to enhance the learning capacity and effectiveness of the executive branch, we should realize that what needs to happen in this situation is that public authorities act on feedback about their own performance (Deutsch, 1963; Luhmann, 1966; Behn, 2001 as cited in Bovens et al., 2008). Thus, a good accountability mechanism, from this angle, is one that illustrates how the actor in question is learning and becoming more efficient as a result of the mechanism itself.

eferences

Anechiarico, F. & Jacobs, F.B. (1996). The Pursuit of Absolute Integrity: How Corruption

Control Makes Government Ineffective. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Aucoin, P. & Heintzman, . (2000). "The Dialectics of Accountability for Performance in Public

Management eform." International eview of Administrative Sciences, 66, 45-55.

Arnull, a. And D. Wincott. (2001). Accountability and Legitimacy in the European Union.

Oxford: Oxford University…

References

Anechiarico, F. & Jacobs, F.B. (1996). The Pursuit of Absolute Integrity: How Corruption

Control Makes Government Ineffective. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Aucoin, P. & Heintzman, R. (2000). "The Dialectics of Accountability for Performance in Public

Management Reform." International Review of Administrative Sciences, 66, 45-55.

Personality Assessment Instruments Millon Rorschach
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This 14-year-old male is currently in the ninth grade. In the demographic portion of the test, he identifies "restless/bored" as the problem that is troubling him the most. A tendency toward avoiding self-disclosure is evident in this adolescent's response style. This nondisclosure may signify characterological evasiveness or an unwillingness to divulge matters of a personal nature, problematic or not. Also possible are broad deficits in introspectiveness and psychological-mindedness, owing to either emotional impoverishment or thought vagueness" (Millon 2005).

Comprehensiveness

As evidenced in the above, sample assessment, the Millon devices are all-encompassing, giving a diagnosis and analysis of a multitude of different factors relating to an individual's state of mental health. A statistical recording of all responses and how they correlate to different mental health conditions is included and incorporated into the assessment. The assessment can make judgments about an adolescent's developmental state, as for example the above 9th grader's lack…

Works Cited

Dana, Richard Henry. (2005). Multicultural assessment. New York: Routledge.

Millon, Theodore, Carrie Millon, Roger Davis, & Seth Grossman. (2008). MACI:

Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory. Pearson Assessments. Retrieved 11 Nov 2008 at  http://www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/maci.htm 

Millon, Theodore, Carrie Millon, Roger Davis, & Seth Grossman. (2008). MCMI-III:

Psychometric Assessment of Autism
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Psychometric Assessment Autism

Background of Autism

What is autism? Autism is a disease, which poses tons of questions, while providing least of answers. This being said, autism is one of the five diseases coming under Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). It shows in early years of a human and effects the brain's functioning. An autism website states that, 'it's a result of a neurological disorder, which hampers the proper operations of a brain, hindering the social interactions and communications' (Autism Society of America website). Autism asks us millions questions, its origins, its solutions, its causes and symptoms; none of which are answered. The diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (American Psychiatric Association (APA), 2013), states that, autism is basically pervasive developmental disorder otherwise called Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). It is described as a condition where the person faces severe problem in social communication, interactions, perception and communication. APA (2013) shows…

References

Alpern, G.D. (2007). Developmental Profile 3. Lutz, FL: Western Psychological Services.

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Arlington, VA, American Psychiatric Association, 2013.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2010.  http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/index.html 

Cohen, D., Pichard, N., Tordjman, S., Baumann, C., Burglen, L., & Excoffier, E. (2005). Specific genetic disorders and autism: Clinical contribution towards their identification. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 35, 103 -- 116.

Transition Services Transition Education Assessment
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In the 2004 reauthorization of the IDEA, Congress wrote: "The federal government has an ongoing obligation to support activities that contribute to positive results for children with disabilities, allowing those children to lead productive and independent adult lives" (PL 108-446). This requirement went into effect July 1, 2005. (Transition Services, NDI).

Assessments

Transitional assessments address the preferences, strengths, interests and course of study based on the student's present levels of performance and age appropriateness. These assessments include an evaluation of the student's skills and interests related to education, employment, training, and independent living skills and should be conducted in conjunction with the development of the transition components. The initial transition assessment may be prior to the eighth grade and could occur when a re-evaluation consideration is conducted. Furthermore, assessment should be ongoing and fluid.

Assessment tools must be used that clearly describe a child's strengths and weaknesses and document a…

References

Cox, K. (2010, January 8). Transition service plan. Georgia department of education. Retrieved January 16, 2012, from  http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/DMGetDocument.aspx/Transition_Service_Plan_Directions.pdf?p=6CC6799F8C1371F6E4AB9602200DF4917DEBFEA08CF1DC1C198F7F1DF08E60DE&Type=D 

Transition services. (NDI). Advocacy on call. Retrieved January 16, 2012, from http://www.advocacyoncall.org/special_needs/idea/

Phonemics and Its Assessment
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employed in case of a phonemic lesson plan, are discussed. Each assessment's suitability, pros as well as cons are discussed. Charting and data capture are also dealt with.

Assessment of lesson plan

Phonemic Awareness Assessment (Professional Development-Phonemic Awareness Assessment)

Stage of Literacy Development

Characteristics of This Stage

Phonological Focus Areas

Emergent

eader

Has partial knowledge of the alphabet

Inability to match voice with print (word concept)

No connection between sound and symbol in spelling (later in this step, may start with beginning or salient sounds)

Learned eadiness-nursery rhymes, preprimary 1 text

Beginning

Sounds

hyme

Awareness of Word

Awareness of Syllable

Beginning

eader

Can accurately track print

Employs knowledge of letter-sound for word deciphering

Development of sight vocabulary

Consistent use of starting and ending sounds while spelling words; also, learning digraphs, and medial vowels

Learned Preprimary-Primer text

Combining, manipulating and segmenting:

Individual

phonemes

Onset-rimes

Early Instructional

eader

Has large sight vocabulary…

References

(n.d.). Bright Hub Education Provides Teaching Tips & Lesson Plans, Homework Help & Study Guides, Homeschooling Advice & Much More. Pros and Cons of Dibels Reading Assessment. Retrieved June 25, 2015, from  http://www.brighthubeducation.com/student-assessment-tools/99771-dibels-reading-assessment-pros-and-cons/ 

(n.d.). Emat634languageandliteracy [licensed for non-commercial use only] / EMAT634-LANGUAGE and LITERACY. Yopp - Singer Test of Phoneme Segmentation. Retrieved June 25, 2015, from  http://emat634languageandliteracy.pbworks.com/f/Yopp-Singer+Test+%26+Directions+2.pdf 

(n.d.). Homepage - ReadWriteThink. Building Phonemic Awareness With Phoneme Isolation - ReadWriteThink. Retrieved June 25, 2015, from  http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/building-phonemic-awareness-with-120.html 

(n.d.). Official DIBELS Home Page: UO DIBELS Data System. Training: UO DIBELS Data System. Retrieved June 25, 2015, from  http://dibels.uoregon.edu/training/bir/phonemic-awareness.php

Cognitive Testing Tool
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Cognitive Ability Testing

Psychological testing or psychological assessment is the strategy that psychologists use to determine the core component of individual personality, cognitive ability and IQ (intelligence quotient). It is the process of identifying individual strengths and weakness. In essence, cognitive ability is one of the important strategies for the psychological assessment. Traditionally, cognitive ability assessment primarily involves the use of pencil and paper to determine a wide range of individual abilities that include problem solving, intellectual functioning, language skills, and memory. With the advanced development of information technology, there is an increase in the use of computer technology to carry out the assessment. The cognitive testing uses both qualitative and quantitative approach to determine individual cognitive ability, and the results are interpreted based on the normative data collected.

Objective of this study is to carry out the assessment of cognitive ability of students and non-students using the Cognitive Abilities…

Reference

Aiken, L.R. & Groth-Marnat, G. (2006). Psychological assessment and Psychological testing, (12th ed.).Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. ISBN: 0205457428.

Bermingham D, Hill RD, Woltz D, Gardner MK (2013) Cognitive Strategy Use and Measured Numeric Ability in Immediate- and Long-Term Recall of Everyday Numeric Information. PLoS ONE 8(3).

Lakin, J.M. (2012).Multidimensional ability tests in the linguistically and culturally diverse students: The Evidence of the measurement invariance. Learning and Individual Differences. 22(3):397-403.

Lohman, D.F. (2006). The Woodcock-Johnson III and the Cognitive Abilities Test (Form 6): A Concurrent Valid Study. University of Iowa.

Finanace

The Importance of Organizational Performance Assessments

Financial management is a key issue for all organizations. For commercial organizations the primary purpose of the firm is usually to create profit for the shareholders; most businesses were set up with the aim of making money rather than altruistic purposes. Therefore, financial assessments of the firm are a primary measure of its performance, and can give great insights into the efficiency and effectiveness of the firm, especially when compared to other organizations in the same sector. Even non-profit making organizations, such as charities and government departments, require some type of financial assessments take place in order to determine whether or not they are reaching the goals, and assess the way resources are utilized. The aim of this paper is to consider how and why organizational performance assessments are important, and consider how they may be utilized, focusing on financial assessments, but also…

References

Cook Sarah, (2008), The Essential Guide to Employee Engagement: Better Business Performance Through Staff Satisfaction, Kogan Page Publishers

Elliott B, Elliott J, (2011), Financial Accounting and Reporting, London, Prentice Hall.

Revsine, Lawrence; Collins, Daniel; Johnson, Bruce; Mittelstaedt, Fred, (2011), Financial Reporting and Analysis, McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Why Are Portfolio Assessments the Best Tools to Use in Education
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performance assessments. There will be a determination concerning how it assists in attaining educational goals. Educational assessment background will be presented and information on the way performance assessments are made use of in achieving goals will be analyzed.

Assessing Student Performance

The effect professional development has on improving mathematics instruction was examined in a few studies. The first study was carried out and involved thirty-six teachers who took up professional development for 3 years. The fidelity in learning the professional development hugely affected judgment accuracy (Thieda, et al., 2015). The second study was done with sixty-four teachers drawn from eight schools that had been randomly selected to serve as controls or get professional development. Judgment accuracy was higher in teachers who received professional development and those with better ability to perceive computational skills of students than those teachers who didn't.

For instance, field education is widely appreciated as a key…

References"

1) New Hampshire Physical Education K-12 Assessment Document. (2007, January 1). Retrieved April 7, 2015, from

2) 2015 Educator's Manual for MCAS - Alt. (2014, January 1). Retrieved April 7, 2015, from

3) Thiedea, K., Jesse, D., Brendefura, J., Osguthorpea, R., Carneya, M., Bremner, A., Sutter, J. (2015). Can teachers accurately predict student performance? Teaching and Teacher Education, 49, 36-44. Retrieved April 7, 2015, from

4) Tapp, K., Macke, C., & McLendon, T. (2012). Assessing Student Performance in Field Education. Field Scholar, 2.2. Retrieved April 7, 2015, from

Clinician's Mirror Cultural Self-Assessment in
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He looks at the methodological and practical problems that can impact assessment research in correctional settings, including the distinctive culture in correctional institutes. Megargee's reason for doing the research is today's huge population of incarcerated persons and the fact that psychological research that has been conducted on people outside of the incarceration setting may not be applicable to people who are incarcerated. He recognizes that there is a need for research in this area to determine whether tools developed elsewhere are applicable. He points out the irony of this lack of applicable research because clinical psychology was developed in the criminal justice setting. He does not really conduct any individual research, therefore the methodology is most akin to a literature review in which he assesses the information available about correctional institutions and draws conclusions from that information to determine why there is a lack of research on assessment in correctional…

References

Author Last Name, First Initial. (Year). Chapter 3: Looking into the clinician's mirror: cultural self-assessment. In Editor's Last Name, First Initial (Ed). Book Title. Place of Publication, Publisher.

Megargee, E. (1995). Assessment research in correctional settings: Methodological issues and practical problems. Psychological Assessment, 7(3), 359-366.

Portfolio Assessment
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teaching profession in order to help students achieve various things.

Goals for students are for example assessed in terms of problem solving, critical thinking, lifelong learning, and thinking independently. Further goals may include personal traits such as persistence, flexibility, motivation, and self-confidence. Portfolios are also helpful to reveal the work processes of students. Teachers can then help students to develop processes through which to monitoring their own learning, and be able to perceive when there is a need to adjust.

Portfolio assessment is also valuable to the teacher in communicating value to the students. Classroom values are those things that are important to the teacher, and the teacher should communicate this adequately to the students. Through portfolio assessment then, both teachers and students receive information from each other about the situation in class and about what can realistically be expected.

Assessment should be integrated with instructions to reflect current instruction…

Bibliography

Adams, Dennis, and Mary E. Hamm.(1992). "Portfolio Assessment and Social Studies: Collecting, Selecting, and Reflecting on What Is Significant." Social Education 56.2,103-105.

Arter, J.A. (1995). "Portfolios for Assessment and Instruction." ERIC Digest. http://www.ericfacility.net/databases/ERIC_Digests/ed388890.html

Broad, Bob. "Reciprocal Authorities in Communal Writing Assessment: Constructing Textual Value within a'New Politics of Inquiry.'"(1997). Assessing Writing 4.2,133-167.

Yancey, K.B. (1992). Portfolios in the writing classroom. Urbana, Illinois: National Council of Teachers of English.

The Differences Between Assessments and Testing in Education
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Education -- Multimedia Questions

Reflections on Videos and eb Sites

Open Society Foundations: Early Childhood Intervention: The Power of Family

I was surprised by: the comment that the first 3 years of knowledgeable family involvement are especially important and that plasticity (the ability to change) is mostly in the first 3 years; and that waiting for diagnosis and conscious family involvement in helping the "delayed" child could mean loss of the critical first few months, which could mean actually waiting too long to most effectively help children (Open Society Foundations, 2013). The web site featuring this video is at https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/videos/early-childhood-intervention-and-power-family.

Center for Parent Information and Resources website on Parent Participation in the Early Years

In reviewing this web site, I was surprised that seeking an evaluation for possible early intervention is readily available in the community and can sought through contact with several sources, including: the local hospital's pediatrics branch…

Works Cited

CEN Videos. (n.d.). Early Years and Parent Involvement. Retrieved from vimeo.com: https://vimeo.com/25770266

Center for Parent Information and Resources. (2014, March). Overview of Early Intervention. Retrieved from www.parentcenterhub.org:  http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/ei-overview/ 

Colorin colorado. (n.d.). Assessment of English Language Learners. Retrieved from www.colorincolorado.org:  http://www.colorincolorado.org/webcast/assessment-english-language-learners 

Corwin. (2009, September 14). Morgo Gottlieb - Assessing English Language Learners. Retrieved from www.youtube.com:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSJcRd1cDoA

Screening and Assessment Techniques
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Screening and Assessment Methods

Drug or substance abuse and other addictive disorders have become a major issue in the United States given their prevalence among adult members across various occupations and workforce. Actually, recent statistics and trends have indicated that working adults account for a huge portion of illicit drug users. Notably, the substance abuse and other addictive disorders not only involve the use of illicit drugs but also entail misuse of prescription drugs like stimulants, tranquilizers, sedatives, and analgesics (Hersch, McPherson & Cook, 2002, p.1332). As drug abuse has increased tremendously, the negative impacts of addictive behaviors have become prevalent in the society such as increased health care costs and high rates of accidents. Consequently, several measures have been developed in an attempt to deal with these disorders including cognitive behavioral therapies.

The use of the various measures and therapies usually involves assessing and diagnosing clients for drug abuse…

References

Copersino et. al. (2012). Effects of Cognitive Impairment on Substance Abuse Treatment

Attendance: Predictive Validation of a Brief Cognitive Screening Measure. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 38(3), 246-250.

Hersch, R.K., McPherson, T.L. & Cook, R.F. (2002). Substance Use in the Construction

Industry: A Comparison of Assessment Methods. Substance Use & Misuse, 37(11), 1331-1358.

Social Worker Spiritual Assessments
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Social Work: Spiritual Assessment
Instruments for Spiritual Assessment
One of the five instruments for spiritual assessment is the spiritual history. This is the only verbal instrument. A practitioner using spiritual history obtains a client’s spiritual information using two sets of questions. The first set of questions seeks to help the client tell their story from childhood to the present. The second set helps the practitioner elicit spiritual information from the client by assessing the dimensions of the soul (cognition, will, and affect) and the spirit (intuition, conscience, and communion).
The second instrument is the spiritual life map, which is a diagrammatic or pictorial account of a client’s relationship with God. It shows where the client is coming from, where they are, and where they are going in regard to their relationship with God. The client sketches their spiritual journey from birth to the present, and continuing to death and the…

References
Hodge, D. R. (2005). Developing a Spiritual Assessment Toolbox: A Discussion of the Strengths and Limitations of Five Different Assessment Methods. Health and Social Work, 30(4), 314-24.

Reviewing a Vocational Assessment
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Vocational Assessment Test eview: Myers Briggs Type Indicator

The Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a personality assessment that can help guide people to suitable vocations, but which is also useful in other scenarios. It was developed by Isabel Briggs Myers and Katharine Cooks Briggs, from a Jungian psychology perspective. Although they began working on it in the early 1940s, it was first published in 1962. It is a self-report questionnaire, which examines the individual's preferences along different components of personality. It was created for a normal population distribution and can be used for members of any demographics that can process the test, though it is probably most appropriate for late teens and beyond; perhaps ages 14 and up. The MBTI is a multiple-choice test and is written at a 7th grade reading level. It takes approximately 20-30 minutes to administer the test, but the test is not timed and…

References

Carlyn, M. (1977). An assessment of the Myers Briggs type indicator. Journal of Personality

Assessment, 41(5), 461-473.

Fretwell, C., Lewis, C., & Hannay, M. (2013). Myers-Briggs type indicator, A/B types, and locus of control: where do they intersect? American Journal of Management, 13(3), 57-66.

Lok, C. (2012). Career development: what's your type? Nature, 488, 545-547.

Forms of Authentic Assessment
Words: 1222 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 98888598
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Authentic Assessment

By authentic assessment, we mean all the different forms of assessments/evaluations that show students achievement, learning, attitudes, and motivation on all instructionally applicable classroom works. In this era of accountability, different assessment methods are being launched in classrooms as ways of determining the quality of the works students do. Student assessments require students to partake in assignments that necessitate the application of skills and knowledge in real-life conditions. These alternative techniques are real-world frameworks and challenges, such as audiences for the demonstration of strategies and concepts that students have managed to learn. Authentic assessments, ingrained in classroom lessons, address groups of learning objectives and educational goals. These practices place greater emphasis on problem solving, comprehension, critical thinking, metacognition and reasoning, self-reflection, and personal skills as compared with conventional assessment techniques. Concluding student products (e.g., for end of term assessments) include exhibition, portfolios, investigation, performances, journals, experiments, presentations, and…

References

Frey, B. B., Schmitt, V. L., & Allen, J. P. (2012). Defining authentic classroom assessment. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 17(2), 2.

Herrington, J., & Oliver, R. (2000). An instructional design framework for authentic learning environments. Educational Technology Research and Development, 48(3), 23-48.

Janesick, V. J. (2006). Authentic assessment: Primer. New York: Lang.

Luongo-Orlando, K. (2003). Authentic assessment: Designing performance-based tasks for achieving language arts outcomes. Markham, Ont: Pembroke Publishers.

Minimizing Bias and Student Diversity in Assessment
Words: 1458 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19434182
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Abstract

No teacher can entirely avoid the realities of student standardized assessment. But teachers must make informed choices in the classroom in regards to how students are instructed, based upon individual student needs and awareness of student diversity. There are significant questions regarding the potential biases of many standardized tests, particularly in regards to historically discriminated-against racial, ethnic, and socio-economic groups. Teachers must be aware of these questions and biases and act as advocates for their students on a schoolwide and statewide level to ensure fairness.

Ethical Standards in Assessment:
Minimizing Bias and Student Diversity in Assessment

Education is supposed to be a great social leveler. Unfortunately, many concerns have been raised regarding the ability of commonly-used educational assessment tools to provide unbiased information about all students, regardless of students’ demographic characteristics. Teachers must balance the need to prepare students for these highly pressured exam environments with the need for…

Patient Specific Assessment and Alarm Fatigue
Words: 2771 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 17727235
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Alarm Fatigue

Theories in nursing generally center on the relationship of four concepts -- nursing, environment, person and health. These concepts are interrelated and impact one another in diverse ways, often seen in issues of nursing when problems arise that require analysis. The issue of alarm fatigue is one problem in nursing that touches on each of these four concepts. Alarm fatigue can be defined as exhaustion that occurs for nurses when they are exposed to many alarms throughout their shift, which causes "sensory overload" and the nurses to develop a "non-existent response to alarms" (Horkan, 2014, p. 83). Complacency and dissension can follow in the nursing workplace as too many alarms for nurses can render them unresponsive.

Alarms are needed in nursing because they alert nurses and care providers to emergency situations that require immediate action and intervention, especially in the intensive care unit. However, nurses and staff work…

References

Despins, L., Scott-Cawiezell, J., Rouder, J. (2010). Detection of patient risk by nurses:

a theoretical framework. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(2): 465-474.

Horkan, A. M. (2014). Alarm fatigue and patient safety. Nephrology Nursing Journal,

47(1): 83-85.