Assimilation Essays (Examples)

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Arab-Americans Not Fully Assimilated the

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54837126

This is a less frequent occurrence in Arab families, though it does happen, but less among women than men. For the most part, Arab immigrants represent a well educated group, and this, too, contributes to their lack of total assimilation (p. 150).

Another element that has not facilitated the Arab assimilation into American society is that many Arabs continue to use their language from their country of origin as the primary basis for communicating with one another (p. 150). This prolongs the process of assimilation, because the family unit is restricted by their inability to communicate beyond the family, or with others in their immigrant community who speak their language.

Finally, the Arab family culturally and traditionally has been a family that involved blending the extended family with the immediate family in supportive ways (p. 150). Once in America, many Arab immigrants find the break in the family structure which…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=55201015

Naff, a. (1993). Becoming American: The Early Arab Immigrant Experience. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press. Retrieved August 2, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=55201015

Nassar-Mcmillan, S.C., & Hakim-Larson, J. (2003). Counseling Considerations among Arab-Americans. Journal of Counseling and Development, 81(2), 150+. Retrieved August 2, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001936022
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Wanna Be Average Written by Mike Rose

Words: 3292 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14238822

Wanna Be Average," written by Mike Rose. Although each of these writers has a very different writing style, both essays deal with similar issues about the educational experiences of young boys growing into men. Five main areas will be discussed: assimilation; the power of academic reading; identity crisis; self-awareness; and cultural conflict.

Assimilation

Blending into a new and different culture from the one you are accustomed to can be a challenging and frightening process for people of any age. For young people who are still in their formative years, it can be even more confusing and intimidating. They have not yet developed the coping skills that adults have, and they often do not understand the strange, exciting, and sometimes uncomfortable feelings they experience in the process. Writers of both of these essays go through experiences of assimilation in their childhood years. The experiences are similar in that they both are…… [Read More]

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Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Nursing Can Be

Words: 4161 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25325887

Theoretical Foundations of Nursing:

Nursing can be described as a science and practice that enlarges adaptive capabilities and improves the transformation of an individual and the environment. This profession focuses on promoting health, improving the quality of life, and facilitating dying with dignity. The nursing profession has certain theoretical foundations that govern the nurses in promoting adaptation for individuals and groups. These theoretical foundations include theories, theory integration, reflection, research and practice, and assimilation.

Grand Nursing Theory:

There are several grand nursing theories that were developed by various theorists including the Science of Unitary Human Beings by Martha ogers, Sister Callista oy's Adaptation Model, and Systems Model by Betty Neuman. Sister Callista oy's Adaptation Model is based on the consideration of the human being as an open system. She argues that the system reacts to environmental stimuli via cognator and regulator coping techniques for individuals. On the other hand, the…… [Read More]

References:

American Sentinel (2012). 5 Steps for Nurses to Stay Updated with Health Care Changes.

Retrieved September 4, 2013, from http://www.nursetogether.com/5-steps-for-nurses-to-stay-updated-with-health-care-changes

Andershed, B. & Olsson, K. (2009). Review of Research Related to Kristen Swanson's Middle-range Theory of Caring. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 23, 598-610.

"Application of Theory in Nursing Process." (2012, January 28). Nursing Theories: A
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Cultural Characteristics

Words: 1023 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2673515

Immigration

The target family immigrated to the United States of America (USA) in 2001 from Western part of Kenya in East Africa. Composed of two parents and three children, a ten-year-old girl, eight-year-old boy and a five-year-old girl, the family's move to the U.S.A. was not an easy one. The man of the family, Oyot, before immigrating to the U.S., worked as a primary school teacher in a small township of ongo in Nyanza province of Kenya. Life in Kenya was unbearable for him as his monthly salary was insufficient for his family.

Oyot had always wanted to leave Kenya in search of a better life for his family; there were issues that motivated his immigration to The U.S.A. First, in Africa, families are extended and some members of Oyot's family mocked him continually. They claimed that he was cursed and that he would never amount to anything. Oyot belongs…… [Read More]

References

Clegg, L.H. (1997, January). EBONICS:A Serious Analysis of African-American Speech

Patterns. MAAT News .

Kenya and the National Assembly . (2008, Oct 16). Kenya National Assembly Official Record

(Hansard). SACCO in Kenya .
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Race and Ethnic Relations

Words: 553 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53362219

Race and Ethnic Relations

Dimensions of Ethnic Assimilation: Reaction Essay

In their article, "Dimensions of Ethnic Assimilation," Williams and Ortega (1990) attempt to empirically examine Gordon's typology of ethnic assimilation. They attempt to test the "validity of his typology" as well as investigate if "assimilation is, indeed, multidimensional" (698). They felt that in previous research and literature, the seven dimensions of assimilation where taken for granted correct (while, most often, only one was utilized in any one study).

In order to verify the veracity of the seven dimensions, they had to measure both ethnicity and assimilation. They measured ethnicity by asking their respondents to identify where (which country or part of the world) their ancestors came from (and asking which they made felt the closest to if more than one region was mentioned). Measuring assimilation along its various dimensions was more complex, but survey questions were the most common method…… [Read More]

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Shrinking This Concept Is an Oft-Cited One

Words: 950 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16671439

shrinking; this concept is an oft-cited one in discussing international relations, the blinding speed of worldwide communication, and global travel and migration. Ideas like moving to another nation or even another continent are significantly more feasible today than they would have been even half a century ago. This closeness of various linguistic, ethnic, and cultural groups has created an urgent need for a better understanding of assimilation among these varied groups.

Cultural assimilation has a broad definition due to the broad nature of "culture;" it can refer to an actual intermixing of races and "the genetic dissolution" of a certain group; it can also refer solely to more immediately changeable concepts such as language, religious belief, familial relations, and other traditions of a certain ethnic or societal group (Moran 2005, p. 169). In today's globalized society, different groups are encountering one another with increasing frequency, significantly altering the importance of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davidson, B., 1998. "Immigrants Tend to Embrace, not Avoid, English Language" San Francisco Examiner, accessed online at  http://www.onenation.org/0898/082598b.html 

Grow, B., 2004. "Hispanic Nation," in Business Week, March 15, 2004.

Karlson, S., 2004. "Black like Beckham? Moving Beyond Definitions of Ethnicity Based on Skin Colour and Ancestry" Ethnicity and Health 9:2, pp. 107-137.

Moran, A. 2005. "White Australia, Settler Nationalism, and Aboriginal Assimilation," Australian Journal of Politics and History 51:2, pp. 168-193.
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Immigration the United States Is

Words: 1929 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29790676

Advocacy groups, whether private or government-sponsored, ease transition from home to America but being uprooted poses severe psychological and sociological problems that are not easy to fix.

The United States remains one of the only nations to openly welcome immigrants as a national policy; Canada is another. For centuries the United States has relied on immigrant labor to fuel industry and add nuance to the nation's cultural fabric. The United States is no longer viewed as a melting pot because of the increased pride among immigrants in their native cultures and languages. Balancing assimilation with preservation of culture is still the most difficult task for immigrants, many of whom hope for a more stable life in the new world while still retaining the values and lifestyles of their ancestors.

Refugees continue to hold a unique social, economic and political status in the United States. As Tumulty notes, the Hmong assimilated…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Branigin, William. "Immigrants Shunning Idea of Assimilation." The Myth of the Melting Pot. Washington Post. May 25, 1998. Retrieved Jun 14, 2008 at  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/national/longterm/meltingpot/melt0525a.htm 

Clemetson, Lynette. "Bosnians in America: A Two-Sided Saga." The New York Times. April 29, 2007. Retrieved Jun 15, 2008 at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/29/us/29youth.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&adxnnlx=1213585920-/U4w96yxQS4h7/bEHNl%20Ug

Federation for American Immigration Reform. "How Mass Immigration Impedes Assimilation." Retrieved Jun 15, 2008 at http://www.fairus.org/site/PageServer?pagename=iic_immigrationissuecenters641a

The Great Immigration Panic." The New York Times. June 3, 2008. Retrieved June 15, 2008 at http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/03/opinion/03tue1.html
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biculturalism and how to create multiple Identities

Words: 2014 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53421669

A number of studies have been done in recent years to explore the unique effects of a bicultural identity, how a bicultural identity is formed, and what forms a bicultural identity will take. Research integrates assimilation theories as well as social constructionism. The reasons for the emerging literature include improving psychological health and well-being, improving social and cultural health, and also reducing or eliminating racism and negative stereotyping. Elashi, Mills & Grant (2009) point out "83% of Muslim individuals reported an increase in implicit racism and discrimination following September 11th," making the Muslim-American cultural, ethnic, and religious cohort one of the most important populations in America to understand through sociological data (Elashi, Mills & Grant, 2009, p. 379). Discrimination may be related to the dominant or white culture's fear of non-integration of existing or new immigrants and perceived threats to an imaginary cohesiveness of the dominant culture -- something that…… [Read More]

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Race and Ethnic Relations

Words: 862 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36091900

Sociology

Culture of Poverty Theory

The culture of poverty theory as posited by Lewis (1969) asserts the emergency of this particular culture when groups or populations that was economically and socially marginalized and disenfranchised from capitalist society generated behavior patterns to address their low social and economic status. According to Lewis' theory, the behaviors that were exhibited where characterized by helplessness, provincialism, low aspirations, disorganization, and criticism and belittlement of so called middle class White America. Moreover, Lewis ascertains that even if structural remediation was in place, because the coping mechanisms were already in place, the behavior and attitudes would be perpetrated. According to classical assimilation theory, immigrant assimilation was seen as an integral component of successful matriculation into a middle class American way of life as cited in Greenman and Xie (2006) (Warner and Srole, 1945). The adaption of immigrants to the host society was seen as critical to…… [Read More]

References

Chen et al. (1999). Smoking patterns of Asian-American youth in California and their relationship with acculturation. Journal of Adolescent Health, 24, 321-328.

Greenman, E., & Xie, Y. (2006). Is assimilation theory dead? The effect of assimilation on adolescent well being. Population Studies Center Research Report 06-605. Available At  http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/pdf/rr06-605.pdf 

Lewis, O. (1969). A death in the Sanchez family. New York, NY: Random House.

Warner, W., & Srole, L. (1945). The social systems of American ethnic groups. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
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Race Relations and Racism Is

Words: 1907 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8730280



Improving Race Relations Through Education: Teaching Children Diversity

An article in the journal Childhood Today (Swiniarski, 2006) offers numerous helpful and resourceful ideas for teaching children about how to become "citizens of the world." This is not a strategy that specifically teaches about "racism" or "racial prejudice"; but according to the author, teaching children about the responsibilities of being "a world citizen" in fact embraces (in a hands-on environment) the issues of multiculturalism.

Swiniarski asserts that her program ("Global Education") - if implemented properly - affords children (and their families) an opportunity to "learn about their planet, its people, and habitats." Moreover, Global Education (GE) teaches children to "respect the beliefs of others," to "contribute ideas," and to "share a sense of belonging in a climate that is safe, accepting of one another, and inclusive of diverse cultures." The GE classroom respects all cultures and avoids stereotypes ("...not all children…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bernasconi, Robert. Race and Racism in Continental Philosophy. Bloomington, Indiana:

Indiana University Press, 2003.

Feagin, Joe R., & Feagin, Clairece Booher. Racial and Ethnic Relations. Englewood Cliffs, NJ:

Prentice Hall, 1993.
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Pocho by Jose Antonio Villarreal

Words: 1376 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6286734



Both of the men see themselves as Americans, too. They grew up at a time when there were major race issues in the country, but they are both somewhat sheltered from those issues. Thus, they do not see themselves as different, they are simply Americans. ichard tells the fight promoter, "I'm an American" (Villarreal 135). The promoter replies, "All right, you know what I mean. Mexicans don't get too much chance to amount to much'" (Villarreal 135). Neither one sees themselves as Mexican so much as they see themselves as Americans, and that is extremely important in the assimilation process.

However, ichard begins to see things change in his family and does not approve of the assimilation, while Paco does not. Paco does not find it unusual that his family is becoming more Americanized, while it makes ichard sad and a bit confused. He thinks, "The heretofore gradual assimilation of…… [Read More]

References

My Family. Dir. Gregory Nava. Perf. Leon Singer, Bruce Gray, and Susana Campos. New Line Cinema, 1995.

Villarreal, Jose Antonio. Pocho. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, 1959.
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Undocumented Students Equity to In-State Tuition Reducing

Words: 8115 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92893549

Undocumented tudents Equity to in-tate Tuition:

Reducing The Barriers

There exist policy ambiguities and variations at federal, state, and institutional levels related to undocumented student access to and success in higher education and this has created problems for these students. This study investigated specific policies and procedures to provide the resources and capital to assist undocumented students as well as reviewed key elements of showing the correlation of these difficulties with ethnic identity in access and equity to higher education that would help eliminate student's frustration. The study also illustrated that there is no accountability system surrounding the success of undocumented student's postsecondary education divide significant structure. Three research questions guided the study; a) Without the fundamental requirements met how will undocumented students achieve their goal to attain a degree, and seek a rewarding career? b) Is it unjust to extradite an illegal alien who has been living a constructive…… [Read More]

Scott, W.R. (2004). Institutional theory: Contributing to a theoretical research program. Retrieved from http://icos.groups.si.umich.edu/Institutional%20Theory%20Oxford04.pdf

Spickard, P. (2007). Almost all aliens: Immigration, race, and colonialism in American history and identity. New York, NY: Routledge.

Taylor, E. (2009). The foundations of critical race theory in education: An introduction. In E. Taylor, D. Gillborn & G. Ladson-Billings (Eds.), Foundations of critical race theory in education (pp. 1-13). New York, NY: Routledge.
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Nursing Mindfulness and its impact

Words: 1585 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52739138

PICOT Question and its Significance

The PICOT question is: Does mindfulness meditation (I) reduce long-term risk factors and suicidal behaviors (O) among psychiatric patients (P) versus those who do not participate in the meditation programs (C)? This is of great significance to the nursing practice because psychiatric disorders are risk factors that cause an increase in the probability of a suicidal occurrence. As a result, it is imperative for psychiatric nurses to comprehend how to pinpoint such risk factors and institute a clinical practice setting that dissuades suicide. More importantly, nursing practice encompasses the execution of best practices for generating a clinical setting that diminishes risk such as mindfulness meditation.

Summary of Literature Review

The mindfulness meditation theory is deemed to the most prospective one in treating addictive disorder patients. The safety of these models is guaranteed if carried out in the framework of clinical studies. In recent periods, associated…… [Read More]

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Philosophy of Descartes and Its

Words: 4086 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74645269



5. Kant's "Copernican Revolution" in philosophy is in his genius use of the positive aspects of Rationalism (Descartes and so on) and Empiricism (Locke, Berkeley and Hume). How can you argue this out with the help of the "Critique of Pure Reason"?

The human experience of negotiating the universe as it seems to be presented to us is one governed by a great many assumptions. Our education of this process, and in particular our capacity to become adept or even talented in various faculties thereto, is created by experience. In experience, we gain the evolving abilities to relate to objects which we can perceive in our world. However, in order to accomplish this, there are any number of beliefs which must be possessed in us that will create a framework wherein such relating can occur. These beliefs -- and the practical, ideological and physiological experiences which are dependent upon them…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Berkeley, G. (1994). Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous. Arete Press, Claremont, CA.

Hume, D. (1738). A Treatise on the Human Nature. Escuela de Filosofia Universidad ARCIS.

Kidd, S.D. (1988). The Intersubjective Heart. Sorbonne.

Kline, A. (2009). Kierkegaard, Abraham, and the Nature of Faith. Soren Kierkegaard Biography. Online at http://atheism.about.com/od/existentialistphilosophers/a/kierkegaard_2.htm
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Hispanic Culture in America the

Words: 821 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82135777

' The film suggests that assimilation does come at some cost, though, like to the lawyer Memo, who marries an Anglo woman and must play down his Mexican heritage to fit in with his in-laws. But overall the movie suggests that Latino participation in the American dream is both comparable to that of other ethnic groups. Living as a Mexican-American is possible, and the second generation does not have to entirely sacrifice family and heritage to become a part of the American mosaic, contrary to what was suggested in earlier Hollywood images, chronicled in "The Bronze Screen."

The film "Real omen Have Curves" (2002) even more convincingly demonstrates that Latino struggles with American identity are not necessarily always negative. The protagonist Ana must overcome images of the estern media to find a sense of peace and security. She is ambitious professionally, and does not just want to get married, as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Bronze Screen: 100 Years of the Latino Image in Hollywood." (2002). Directed by Alberto Dom'nguez (IV) and Nancy De Los Santos.

Mi Familia." (1995). Directed by Gregory Nava.

Real Women Have Curves." (2002). Directed by Patricia Cardoso.
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Communities Societies and Nations

Words: 872 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13091935

Sociology

Cultural Assimilation and Differentiation in the Experience of Alfred Cruz, Filipino immigrant

American society is best known for its unique characteristic of being a "melting pot" of various cultures in the world, be these cultures Eastern or Western in their orientation. Its role as an economic and political superpower throughout history, especially in the 20th century, wherein immigrants during the First and Second World Wars have been "adopted" by the United States and given a chance to live the American life, popularly termed as the "American dream."

Apart from the world wars, the seemingly prosperous image of American society to countries all over the world that are experiencing either socio-political or economic strife is an enticement for people to aspire to live in the U.S., and be able to realize their dreams as individuals. That is why immigrating in the U.S. has become a common occurrence, and at present,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Schaeffer, R. (1998). Sociology. Chicago: McGraw-Hill Book Co.
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Frontier and American Hero

Words: 1012 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88995615

Old Western Frontier -- the Pervasiveness of the Western Frontier Hero in the American Imagination

The heroic American national character and the search for an ungoverned American frontier are fused in the America national imagination. America envisions itself as a wide-open place, rather than a contained place of tradition like Europe. America is seen in the natural cultural mythos as an area of limitless expansion. Thus, there are little consequences for the environment because of capitalism and industrialism, because national resources are never-ending. Resettlement of natives and immigrants is of little consequence, because there is so much land. And all restrictive laws regarding the use and abuse of land, people, and morality are seen impingements and infringements upon the ability of masculine commerce and the American spirit to realize their fullest potentials.

The frontier is also a place for and of men, where women are encroachers, never at home. The…… [Read More]

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Teaching Properties the Properties of

Words: 1392 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23399341



When students can see and manipulate objects, they can be asked to describe them and put objects in visual and verbal terms that they can relate to, in their current developmental stage. Piaget observed students relate to objects at this age by touching what is concrete, describing objects and an object's location in space.

Question

How well did Jenny follow constructivist guidelines? What could she have done differently to make the lesson more constructivist?

Jenny made use of group activities, and socially engaged forms of learning, although a strict constructivist would have wanted her to begin with such group activities.

Discuss constructivism in terms of the constructs defined and discussed by both Piaget and Vygotsky in the text. What is the basic difference between the approaches of these two theorists?

Piaget believed that biological development drives the movement from one cognitive stage to the next, while Vygotsky stressed the need…… [Read More]

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Multicultural Matrix and Analysis Soc 315 Version Criminal

Words: 1851 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53420687

Multicultural Matrix and Analysis

SOC/315 Version

Criminal Justice

Multicultural Matrix and Analysis Worksheet

Instructions:

Select and identify six groups in the left-hand column. Complete the matrix.

Write a summary.

Format references consistent with APA guidelines.

Matrix

What is the group's history in the United States?

What is the group's population in the United States?

What are some attitudes and customs people of this group may practice?

What is something you admire about this group's people, lifestyle, or society?

Sioux

The Sioux is a group of Native American tribes, related by language, that were based in the Great Plains. In the 1800s, westward expansion and white settlement led the U.S. government to by force remove the Sioux from their native lands onto reservations. Anger over these removals and poor treatment by the federal government ultimately boiled over into armed confrontation, which ended in the Great Sioux War of 1876-77 and the…… [Read More]

References

Sioux. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/sioux

Black History. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.britannica.com/blackhistory

African-American Voices. (2007). Retrieved from http://web.archive.org/web/20080507214116/http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/black_voices/voices_display.cfm?id=23

The Story Of Hispanics In The Americas. (n.d.). Retrieved from  http://history-world.org/hispanics.htm
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Ethnicity Can Be Somewhat Apparent but it

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14272264

Ethnicity can be somewhat apparent, but it is not always apparent. To understand this, it is important to keep in mind that ethnicity is different from race. "Ethnicity refers to selected cultural and sometimes physical characteristics used to classify people into groups or categories considered to be significantly different from others" (O'Neill, 2006). In America, there are several different commonly recognized ethnic identities including American Indians, Latinos, Chinese, African-Americans, and European-Americans, some of which are identifiable by physical characteristics, and others of which are not as readily identifiable by appearance. For example, the combination of dark skin, kinky hair, and prominent facial features may identify a person as African-American, but it is oftentimes more difficult for non-Asians to determine an Asian-American person's specific ethnicity because Asian-Americans share similar skin tone, hair color, and some facial characteristics. Many European-Americans cannot distinguish European ethnic groups based on physical characteristics

Ethnic identity can…… [Read More]

References

Bear, C. (2008, May 12). American Indian boarding schools haunt many. Retrieved January

28, 2012 from NPR website: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=16516865

O'Neill, D. (2006). "Overview." Ethnicity. Retrieved January 27, 2012 from Palomar College

website:  http://anthro.palomar.edu/ethnicity/ethnic_1.htm
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Community Nurse Diabetic Clinic One

Words: 3696 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69636084

hhs-stat.net).

Type I diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and results from the body's failure to produce insulin. Type 1 account for 5% to 10% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes (Centers for Disease Control, National Diabetes Fact Sheet, www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf). The most common form of diabetes is Type II, which accounts for about 90 to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes (Centers for Disease Control, National Diabetes Fact Sheet, www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf). Pre- diabetes is a condition often present prior to the development of Type II diabetes. In pre-diabetes, blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered diabetic.

Pre-diabetes does not have to lead to the development of diabetes if a person diagnosed with this condition: Patients who work to control their weight and increase their physical activity can often prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. There are 41 million Americans…… [Read More]

References

American Diabetics Association. Retrieved 22 March 2010 from http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/

Centers for Disease Control, National Diabetes Fact Sheet.Retrieved 18 March 2010 from www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf

http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf

2010 from http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/released200906.html
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Tibetan Buddhism Qs the Great

Words: 501 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7637579



Lecture 12:

The Kadampas monks were instrumental in spreading Tibetan Buddhism not so much for developing their own strain and teachings of Buddhism, but rather through the creation of programs for advancement towards Enlightenment and progress through Tibetan Buddhist teachings. These monks also develops preaching techniques that proved highly effective and popular. The Gelupkas were similar to the Kadampas in many respects, but placed a greater emphasis on the doctrine of emptiness than the older school.

Lecture 13:

Though the Buddhism that the New Translators found in India was largely the same as what they had left in Tibet, there were significant differences that were observed and developed out of this return to the Indian Sanskrit scriptures. The Sakya lineage was formed from reinterpretations of Sanskrit texts from a Tibetan Buddhist perspective, explaining both the similarities and the differences between the Sakya and the Nyingma schools. One of the unique…… [Read More]

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Multicultural Responses in an Irish

Words: 1099 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91667460



V. Implementation of Multicultural Diversity and Classroom Harmony Creation

Classroom harmony should be relatively easy for the teacher of geography to create since the entire focus of the study of geography are places and locations throughout the world and certainly this is a study subject endlessly graced by potential subjects that have the potential to create understanding and harmony in the classroom.

II. Key Example of How Teaching Subject May be Facilitated

A key example of how teaching geography can be used in facilitation of cultural diversity is the study of world cultures in combination with world locations. For instance, teaching geography on the Western world and specifically on the United States can involve the sharing of knowledge of the many and diverse cultures that together represent the demographics of the United State. Included are African-Americans, native Indians and of many various tribal lineage, as well as the European Caucasian…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Clark, Marie and Drudy, Sheelagh (2006) Teaching for Diversity, Social Justice and Global Awareness. European Journal of Teacher Education. Vol. 28, No.3. 3 Aug 2006.

Abu-Saad, Ismael (2004) Separate and Unequal: The Role of the State Educational System in Maintaining the Subordination of Israel's Palestinian Arab Citizens. Social Identities. Vol. 10. No. 1. Carfax Publishing. Taylor & Francis Group.

Liederman, Molokotos (2009) Religious Diversity in Schools: the Muslim Headscarf Controversy and Beyond. Social Compass, 2000; 47; 367. Sage Publications.

Dehyle, Donna (nd) Navajo Youth and Anglo Racism. Harvard Educational Review.
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Management and Decision Sciences From

Words: 25680 Length: 90 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55501983

76). As automation increasingly assumes the more mundane and routine aspects of work of all types, Drucker was visionary in his assessment of how decisions would be made in the years to come. "In the future," said Drucker, "it was possible that all employment would be managerial in nature, and we would then have progressed from a society of labor to a society of management" (Witzel, p. 76). The first tasks of the manager, then, are to coordinate an organization's resources and provide a viable framework in which they can be used to produce goods and services effectively and efficiently. The second set of tasks concern guidance and control. In Drucker's view, this role is almost entirely proactive: "Economic forces set limits to what a manager can do. They create opportunities for management's action. But they do not by themselves dictate what a business is or what it does" (Drucker,…… [Read More]

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Huckabee Mick Huckabee Has Surprised

Words: 2234 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28298855



Meanwhile, Huckabee supports local political jurisdictions passing laws that punish undocumented immigrants, and he asserts those laws "protect the economic well-being, physical safety, and quality of life" for citizens in those communities. By using "physical safety" Huckabee frames this issue in the context that immigrants are criminals out to harm people. But the Immigration Policy Center (IPC) (Rumbaut, et al., 2007) reports that "Foreign-born Mexicans" had an incarceration rate" of 0.7% in 2000, "more than 8 times lower than the 5.9% of native-born males of Mexican descent." And while the "undocumented population has doubled to 12 million since 1994," violent crime in the U.S. has declined 34.2%, the IPC reports.

Moreover, according to the American Immigration Law Foundation (Esbenshade, 2007) local ordinances such as the ones Huckabee believes in (that make it illegal to rent to undocumented immigrants, for example) - if they conflict with federal immigration law - are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dougherty, Michael Brendan. "The Audacity of Huck: The Religious Right roils the Establishment by backing one of its own." The American Conservative 7.2 (2008): 6-8.

Esbenshade, Jill. "Division and Dislocation: Regulating Immigration through Local Housing

Ordinances." American Immigration Law Foundation. Retrieved 7 February 2008, at http://www.ailf.org/ipc/special_report/sr_sept07.shtml.

Guidelines for Writing a Rhetorical Analysis. "The Guidelines." Retrieved 6 February, 2008 from http://core.ecu.edu/engl/snyderh/1100/raguide.html
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Rabbit in the Moon Along

Words: 3346 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83928762

While America prides herself on her multiculturalism and acceptance of those from all lifestyles and cultures that is not always the case, as the readings and personal experiences clearly indicate.

America has been multicultural or multiethnic for centuries, white Americans still are the majority in most areas, and their ideals, beliefs, and even prejudices dominate all of society. To fit in, immigrants must assimilate to the predominate way of thinking, acting, and feeling, even if it is against their own cultural values and beliefs. Thus, they may actually have to engage in cultural pluralism, or acting one way with their own ethnic members while acting another way in white society. There are numerous examples of this every day in society, such as the encounter the author of "A Different Mirror" had with the cabdriver. onald Takaki's family had probably been in the country longer than the cabdriver's had; yet the…… [Read More]

References

Author "Chapter 10: Japanese-Americans."

Chapter 11: "Chinese, Filipino, Korean, Vietnamese, and Asian-Indian-Americans."

In the White Man's Image. Prod. Christine Lesiak and Matthew Jones. American Experience, 1993.

Ly, Kuong C. "Asian: Just a Simple Word." Human Architecutre: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge. Vol. II, Issue 2, Fall 2003/Spring 2004. 119-124.
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Cultural Diversity Interviewed a Co-Worker

Words: 1099 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49107987



Unlike the culture of my interviewee, African-American isn't really broken into subgroups. I was born and raised in Buffalo, New York, which is very close to the Canadian Border and the "U.S. Peace Bridge." I grew up speaking English, and it is the only language I speak.

My religion is not typical of most African-Americans, who tend to be Baptist, Methodist, or Lutheran. I was raised as a Catholic and still practice that religion today. I'm not the only African-American I know who is Catholic, but it's not common in my subculture.

Like my interviewee, I think the media is generally doing a good job of representing African-Americans in the media. However, I still see instances when African-Americans seem to be portrayed as being ruthless and slovenly, which in my opinion makes all African-Americans appear to be the same way (association assimilation).

I believe that all cultures have something that…… [Read More]

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10-Year-Old Boy Alec The Child Has Had

Words: 2646 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86185381

10-year-old boy, Alec. The child has had pervasive relocations in his life, beginning at age 2 and endured a challenging separation between his parents. Since the separation he first experienced 50% split parenting, living with his mother one week then his father and stepmother the next, until such time as he was school age. He then began to live full time with his mother during the school week and visit his father and stepmother every other weekend, until age 7 when his mother relocated to an area which is a seven hour drive from his father at this point the mother also remarried. From that point to the present he has stayed with his mother and stepfather the majority of the time and traveled to visit his father and stepmother on the Christmas holiday, spring break and through the summer, which usually works out to be about 2 months. Prior…… [Read More]

References

Gardner, H. (2000) Intelligence reframed: Multiple intelligences for the 21st century. New York, NY, USA: Basic Books.

Janssen, A., Diekema, E., van Dolder, R., Kollee, L., Oostendorp, R., & Nijhuis-van der Sanden, M. (2012). Development of a movement quality measurement tool for children. Physical Therapy, 92(4), 574-594.

Light, P. & Littleton, K. (2000) Social processes in children's learning. Port Chester, NY, USA: Cambridge University.

Meadows, S. (1986) Understanding child development. Florence, KY, USA: Routledge.
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Geographies of Home the Immigrant Experience Geographies

Words: 1350 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89254365

Geographies of Home

The immigrant experience: Geographies of Home

The novel Geographies of Home by the Dominican-American writer Loida Maritza both chronicles and debunks what could be called the quintessential 'immigrant' experience. The family in the novel flees the dictatorship in their homeland of the Dominican Republic, and hope to find a respite from their suffering in the promised land of America. However, the family's attitudes about America are highly conflicted. On one hand, America seems to hold great promise to ameliorate the suffering they knew in the Dominican Republic. Even during the darkest hours of the family, the mother, Aurelia, knows that the family left an untenable situation, and does not romanticize the past although "she had been poor even in the Dominican Republic, but something had flourished from within which had enabled her to greet each day rather than cringe from it in dread." The difficulties the family…… [Read More]

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Individuals Take Over the World

Words: 1391 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66974411

The more important someone's rank in society was, the bigger the obligations became and thus, the responsibility increased.

Mesopotamia was a region between the two rivers Tigris and Euphrates where the swing of world's first civilization emerged. Various cultures occupied the region and were brought together solely by their customs and religion. Trade came in as the result of agriculture, it brought prosperity and urbanization. The rise of cities led to economic and political developments, one city being conquered by another until the establishment of the first Mesopotamian empire by Sargon that lasted about 150 years until outside powers such as the Hittites (who raided Babylon) gained control over some areas. During the Middle Bronze Age, the Assyrians conquered much of Mesopotamia and, with the rise of the Babylonian dynasty, trade was once again favoured and brought along warfare.

The Alexandrian Empire was favoured by a number of its king's…… [Read More]

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Immigrating to America Contains a Unique Set

Words: 1910 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19877470

Immigrating to America contains a unique set of circumstances that are individual to each person and their home country of origin. In an effort to better understand these migration patterns it is useful to analyze the specific cases of immigration. The purpose of this essay is to examine the policies regarding immigration on three different countries. The three countries in question are Mexico, China and India. The essay will compare and contrast each country as they are described. In these descriptions the essay will argue for reasons as to why citizens of these countries are motivated to immigrate to America. Also included in this analysis will be the reaction from the collective forces of America and the specific impact that each country's immigrants create and sustain. Finally, a brief overview of how immigration effects the economy of the hosting America and whether it is necessary to enforce or create new…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lahiri, Tripti. "Q&A: Why the U.S. Needs Indian Immigrants." Wall Street Journal. 29 Oct 2012: n. page. Web. 31 Mar. 2013. .

Preston, Julia. "Mexican Immigration to U.S. Slowed Significantly, Report Says. The New York Times, 23 April 2012, Web. 31 Mar 2013. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/24/us/mexican-immigration-to-united-states- slows.html?_r=0

Terrazas, Aaron. "Chinese Immigrants in the United Sates." Migration Information Source. Migration Policy Institute, n.d. Web. 31 Mar 2013. .
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Alexander Set Radical Multiculturalism Holds That Cultural

Words: 1485 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75706550

Alexander Set

Radical multiculturalism holds that cultural groups should be the measure for considerations of justice as a group offers the individual the indispensable good of being rooted in a community. The problem is that groups always set-up unequal in-group out-group relations that are detrimental to society.

The problem is that conservatives claim it undermines cohesiveness, but cohesiveness is exactly what all social movements in the last hundred years have attempted to bring about.

In this context this means that the gains of one group are not balanced by losses of another group.

The civil sphere includes structures of feelings, symbols, psychological identifications, and sympathies determine how resources are allocated in society. The public sphere is more of how this publically stated (the two can be different).

Common identity is malleable depending on the times. The move for woman's voting rights and equal rights into the national identity is an…… [Read More]

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Social Control Integration of Knowledge of the

Words: 2180 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92481927

Social Control

Integration of Knowledge of the Essay 'The City' with the Four Neighborhoods Described in 'There Goes the Neighborhood'

The objective of this study is to integrate the knowledge of the essay entitled "The City" with the four neighborhoods described in "There Goes the Neighborhood." This work will develop an analysis of how and why the features of the area chosen produce or lead to crime and disorder. This work will choose two of the four areas or neighborhoods described and summarize the main features including income, location, population, and race/ethnic composition and will discuss the salient factors in the location that lead to stability and the salient factors that produce change or instability. This work will identify the primary threats perceived or identified by the residents and how these threats are related to ideas such as invasion, succession, or the cycle of conflict, competition, accommodation, and assimilation. This…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Carr, PJ (2003) The New Parochialism: The Implications of the Beltway Case for Arguments Concerning Informal Social Control. AJS Vol. 108. No. 6 May 2003. Pp. 1249-1291.

Pattillo, ME (1998) Sweet Mothers and Gangbangers: Managing Crime in a Black Middle-Class Neighborhood. Social Forces. Vol. 76 No. 3 Mar 1998. Pp.747-774.

Sampson, RJ and Wilson, WJ (1995) Toward Unified Theory of Race, Crime and Urban Inequality. Crime and Inequality. Disparities in the Criminal Justice System. 1995. University Press.
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Awake My People in His 1866 Poem

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20753538

Awake My People

In his 1866 poem "Awake My People!" author Judah Leib Gordon urges every Jewish man in Russia to "Be a man aboard and a Jew in your tent."[footnoteRef:1] Since the publication of the pome, Gordon's work has been treated with controversy. Readers from all dominations of Judaism from the Orthodox to secular Zionists have looked on the piece as encouraging Jewish citizens to hide their heritage in order to avoid conflict. [1: Judah Leib Gordon. "Awake My People!" The Jew in the Modern orld. (New York: Oxford UP, 1995, 27]

At the time that Gordon was writing, there was a heavy Jewish population in Eastern Europe and especially Russia. The Jewish people were allowed to live and to work in the land but they were not fully accepted. Historian Simon Dubnow has stated that "the treatment of the Jews was marked and defined by governmental anti-Semitism."[footnoteRef:2] The…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Immanuel Etkes. "Haskalah." Last Modified 2010.

 http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Haskalah 

Judah Leib Gordon. "Awake My People!" The Jew in the Modern World. (New York: Oxford

UP, 1995),
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Australian Social History

Words: 2540 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43763601

Aboriginal Activism in Australia

The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were the centuries of new exploration; the scientific discoveries had allowed Europeans to build better ships and navigation system and to explore the new worlds. The French, British and panish explorers were more successful in these endeavors. They not only found new lands but were able to exploit the small local population of Natives to control the land. North America is perhaps the most significant example of this. The British first went as explorers, then traders and in the end easily managed to control the lands, building their own colonies. It was the advanced technology of the Europeans that played a significant part in their control of the "New Worlds."

Australia in this respect is no exception. It is said that the Aboriginals came to this part of the earth some 50,000 years ago and they came from the neighboring islands…… [Read More]

Sources:

Reynolds, Henry. 1996. After Mabo, What About Aboriginal Sovereignty?, Australian Humanities Review, at http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au/AHR/archive/Issue-April-1996/Reynolds.html

Paisley, Fiona. 1997. Race and Remembrance: Contesting Aboriginal Child Removal in the Inter-War Years, Australian Humanities Review, at http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au/AHR/archive/Issue-November-1997/paisley.html

Stanton, Sue. 1999. Time for Truth: Speaking the Unspeakable - Genocide and Apartheid in the 'Lucky' Country., Australian Humanities Review, at http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au/AHR/archive/Issue-July-1999/stanton.html

Miller, James. 1985. Koori - A Will to Win: The Heroic Resistance, Survival and Triumph of Black Australia. Angus & Robertson, Sydney.
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What Is a Nation

Words: 607 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40886854

Social Integration, Assimilation, and Differences: The Changing Face of 'Nationhood' in the United States

In the context of political science, a nation is defined as a "cultural entity... A politically conscious and mobilized collectivity... is essentially subjective, a sense of social belonging and ultimate loyalty" (Jackson and Jackson, 2002:35). Analyzing the meaning of this definition, nation can be characterized according to the following criteria: (1) culture; (2) social belonging and cohesiveness; and (3) politically conscious. Nation is a cultural entity primarily because it is comprised with people who share the same values, traditions, and beliefs, not to mention produce and utilize man-made artifacts that are distinct within the culture. Secondly, nation is seen as a form of social cohesiveness, since it order for culture to prevail and proliferate, it is essential that there exists unity and understanding among the members of a culture/society. Lastly, and perhaps, the most vital nature…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Eck, D. (2001). A New Religious America: How a "Christian Country" Has Become the World's Most Religiously Diverse Nation. CA: Harper Collins.

Jackson, R. And D. Jackson. (2002). A Comparative Introduction to Political Science. NJ: Prentice Hall.
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Asian Tigers' Success Nelson and

Words: 2314 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39093381



Accumulation theory does not inherently rule out the role of technological innovation in the growth of these economies. Indeed, if these economies had not brought their technological status up to that of other modern economies, they would not have been able to grow the way they did.

However, in accumulation theory, technology is not responsible for any unusual improvement in efficiency. It is an ancillary to the economic growth, rather than a key driver. Assimilation theory, on the other hand, assumes that technological innovation equates to improvements in productivity. The increase in capital inputs that drives success under accumulation theory works because it was spent on improving technology.

One of the key differences between the two theories is that assimilation theory leads to the conclusion that robust economic growth is both sustainable and replicable, whereas in accumulation theory the growth in only replicable, but not sustainable.

Krugman puts it bluntly…… [Read More]

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Belonging Web 2 0 and International

Words: 20197 Length: 70 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89551579



RESEARCH QUESTIONS

Research questions asked in this present study include the following stated questions:

(1) What role does Internet technology (Web 2.0) play in the international student's development and maintenance of a sense of belonging in a new home country?

(2) What role does length of residence play in the international student's development and maintenance of a 'sense of belonging' in a new home country?

(3) Are there any differences in the adaptation of the international student to the new home country when the individual is a high volume or a low volume user of the Internet?

RATIONALE

This research study has as its aim to discover how it is that international students develop a sense of belonging to a new country, culture, and ultimately a new home. This is little studied in theory that focuses on how it is that individuals maintain a connection to their home country. This…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Adelman, M., Parks, M., & Albrecht, T. (1987). Beyond close relationships: Support in weak ties. In T.L. Albrecht & M.B. Adelman (Eds.), Communicating Social Support (pp.126-147). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Alorunnisola, Anthony A. (2000) African Media, Information Providers and Emigrants as Collaborative Nodes in Virtual Social Networks. African Sociological Review, 4 (2) 2000, pp.46-72. Online available at: http://www.codesria.org/Links/Publications/asr4_2full/olorunnisola.pdf

Bakardjieva, M. (2003). Virtual togetherness: An everyday-life perspective. Media, Culture & Society, 25 (3), 291-313.

Baym, N.K. (2001). Interpersonal life online. In S. Livingston & L. Lievrouw (Eds.), The Handbook of New Media (pp. 62-76). London: Sage Ltd.
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Yiddish Songs About Immigration to

Words: 1581 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73718270



Singer, Barry. "In Yiddish Music, a Reurn o Roos of Tormen and Joy." New York

Times (Augus 16, 1998): 32.

In his aricle, Barry Singer noes he changes Yiddish music underwen as Jews emigraed from Europe o America, and compares he evolving naure of Yiddish folk songs during he nineeenh and wenieh cenuries o more recen developmens in Yiddish music. This aricle is useful because i allows one o race an unbroken line from he earlies Yiddish songs regarding immigraion o America o musical developmens occurring oday, even if whaever was disincly Yiddish abou hese rends seemed o have been los or covered over when Yiddish musicians became he creaors of American popular culure in he 1940s and 50s.

Warnke, Nina. "Immigran Popular Culure as Conesed Sphere: Yiddish Music Halls,

he Yiddish Press, and he Processes of Americanizaion, 1900-1910." Theare

Journal 48, no. 3 (1996): 321-335.

This essay looks a…… [Read More]

the Yiddish Press, and the Processes of Americanization, 1900-1910." Theatre

Journal 48, no. 3 (1996): 321-335.

This essay looks at the Yiddish music hall as a special place of cultural mixing during the early twentieth century, and acts as a companion piece to the Heskes' essay about Yiddish music as social history. Instead of focusing on the music itself, Warnke's essay looks at the contested space of the Yiddish music hall, where the identity of Jewish immigrants was being established by proxy, on the stage through plays and musicals. This resulted in competing Jewish actors' unions and rival critics assailing those music halls deemed "illegitimate." Warnke argues that over a couple decades, however, these distinctions become blurred as the ongoing debate itself becomes absorbed into the Yiddish-American identity and ultimately expressed again through music. This essay is useful because it gives details regarding the history of Yiddish music halls themselves as well as provides an analysis of the changes going on in Yiddish music itself during the same time period.
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Native American Expressive Culture the

Words: 4153 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77872456

Black Elk utilizes his visions to create understanding of nearly all things he is later exposed to. The discussion in closing will further illuminate his utilization of vision, to ask for help for his people in a time of crisis.

To discuss the vertical model of artistic communication it is difficult to narrow the filed to just one example, as Native American literature, and to a lesser degree film have become somewhat prolific as genres. Two authors who build upon this tradition are Scott Momaday and Alexie Sherman as they are significant and prolific writers of Indian tradition. Each has written and published several works, including a variety of genres, that all attempt to translate the oral traditions of their nations into a written form that contains the expression of the oral tradition.

In Alexie Sherman's collection of short stories, the Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven he offers…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Allison, Sherry R., and Christine Begay Vining. "Native American Culture and Language." Bilingual Review (1999): 193.

Bluestein, Gene. Poplore: Folk and Pop in American Culture. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 1994.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104248317

Churchill, Ward. Acts of Rebellion: The Ward Churchill Reader. New York: Routledge, 2003.
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Dutchman Amiri Baraka's Play Dutchman

Words: 1342 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28451542



Gay rights are also an issue of regular discussion. This sector of society is so marginalized that many states by law do not allow them to marry each other. Instead, they are expected to practice their courting and dating rituals in what is described as a "normal" way. Even religion is used as a basis for this type of discrimination.

Indeed, despite many efforts to the contrary, discrimination is still very much a part of life for those who do not assimilate into mainstream society. This is Baraka's focus of rebellion. According to the author, black authors and artists are to unite against such discrimination by offering the world a culture that is unmarred by other influences. Anything else is the beginning of assimilation and ultimate cultural death, as symbolized by Clay. Indeed, his point is not difficult to understand. Certainly, the assimilation of a gay person into mainstream heterosexual…… [Read More]

References

Baraka, Amiri. (1964). Dutchman. New York: William Morrow and Company

Chielozona Eze. (2005, Jan 20). Hate Your Enemy: The Anatomy of Resentment in Africa's Cultural Resistance to the West. Retrieved from eScholarship Repository, University of California. http://repositories.cdlib.org/globalfellows/2005/2
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Connected Immigrant Communities Chaney 2010

Words: 4201 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69242488

Meng and Meurs (2009) examine the effects of intermarriage, language, and economic advantage. They find that immigrants who have some skill in the dominant language of the country to which they immigrate tend to intermarry and earn more income (Meng and Meurs). Marrying outside of one's culture may influence language acquisition due to social and economic needs to advance within the adopted culture.

Moua and Lamborn (2010) note that ethnic socialization practices by parents of immigrant adolescents strengthen the ethnic heritage connection between adolescent, parent, and ethnic community. These include native language use, marriage ties, taking part in cultural events, sharing history, and preparing traditional foods (Moua and Lamborn). As noted previously, immigrant parents tend to congregate in ethnic communities, where they are essentially immersed in the ethnic culture. The native language is often the most utilized if not the exclusive language in the home. However, children are acculturated into…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Akresh, I. "Contexts of English Language Use among Immigrants to the United States." International Migration Review (2007): 930-955.

Bacallao, M and P. Smokowski. "The Costs of Getting Ahead: Mexican Family System Changes After Immigration." Family Relations (2006): 52-66.

Blatchley, L and M. Lau. "Culturally Competent Assessment of English Language Learners for Special Education Services." Communique: Newspaper of National Association of School Psychologists May 2010: 1-8.

Bleakley, H and A. Chin. "Age at Arrival, English Proficiency, and Social Assimilation Among U.S. Immigrants." American Economic Journal of Applied Economics (2010):  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2813069/pdf/nihms-132959.pdf .
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Understanding Human Development From a Piagetian Perspective

Words: 2528 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52130111

Health -- Nursing

Piaget Theoretical Perspective On Human Development

Piaget's Theoretical Perspective on Human Development

Piaget's Theoretical Perspective on Human Development

The theory of cognitive development by Piaget presents a comprehensive approach in evaluating human intelligence development and nature in developmental psychology. Piaget shares that children play active roles in growing of intelligence through learning by doing and by examples. The intellectual development theory involves a focus on believing, reasoning, perceiving and remembering the natural environment. The primary term for this is developmental stage theory dealing with knowledge and how humans gradually acquire, use, and construct nature. Piaget adds that the cognitive development provides progressive mental reorganization for thinking processes resulting from environmental experience and biological maturation. Children construct an appreciation of the real world through experience discrepancies between their knowledge and their discoveries within the environment. According to Zastrow & Kirst-Ashman (2009), the theory insists that the cognitive development…… [Read More]

References

Ashford, J., LeCroy, C. (2009). Human Behavior in the Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. New York: Cengage Learning

Kail, R., Cavanaugh, J. (2012). Human Development: A Life-Span View. New York: Cengage Learning

Kail, R., Cavanaugh, J. (2013). Essentials of Human Development: A Life-Span View. New York: Cengage Learning

Newman, B.M., Newman, P.R. (2010). Theories of Human Development. New York: Psychology Press
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Senghor Cultural Religious and Political

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28346560

" (2009) Oguejiofor states that there is no understanding "exept if there is misunderstanding, a negativity that beomes the originative instane of hermeneutis…" (2009)

Oguejiofor writes that Senghor's onept of negritude is entered on the misunderstanding or misrepresentation of the Afrian and his heritage, a situation that has sine imposed enormous burden on all aspets of his life." (Oguejiofor, 2009) Oguejiofor states that negritude has been desribed "…as a philosophy of soial ation" and states additionally that in the view of Senghor "negritude was 'a weapon of defense and attak and inspiration." (2009) Speifially Senghor sates that negritude is the "sum total of the values of the ivilization of the Afrian world, it is not raialism, it is ulture." (Oguejiofor, 2009)

Oguejiofor writes that negritude as a philosophy "has the advantage of 'reognizing the situatedness of our lived historiity as the proper objet of refletion for Afrian philosophi thought. (Salhi…… [Read More]

cited in Quest, 2005)

When Senghor was imprisoned for the already mentioned two years period he composed poetry, read the work of Goethe and delved into Western philosophical works and as well reestablished his link with his fellow Africans and songs and tales were shared from Africa and this resulted in the "fostering [of] an alternative understanding of humanism and society." (Quest, 2005)

The Quest Journal editorial states that it seems nice to think that the prison experiences of Senghor as well as Senghor's knowledge spanning the intellectual traditions of the Western world and his admiration for values, traditions and cultures of Africa together resulted in a "subjectivity that was transcultural and transnational in it sympathies, accomplishments and aspirations." (Quest, 2005) Senghor set the stage for "a post-anthropological humanism, one that truly points to the possibilities for a democratic and cosmopolitan world." (Quest, 2005)

5. Poetry as 'Key' Outlet for Combating Cultural Alienation in for Africans

The work of Nyathi (2005) states that the work of Senghor influenced many and in fact that poetry "became a key outlet for Africans to combat cultural alienation." The work of Baaz and Palmberg (2001) entitled: "Same and Other: Negotiating African Identity in Cultural Production" relates the writings of Leopold Sedar Senghor "on negritude and the ideas of negritude which are "above all associated with the writings of Senghor and Aime Cesaire, were developed by African, Afro-American and Caribbean intellectuals in Paris in the 1930s." (Baaz and Palmberg, 2001) Negritude was defined by Senghor as "the sum of the cultural values of the black world." (Baaz and Palmberg, 2001)