Assimilation Essays (Examples)

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tronger connections with family and other persons from the same country are also formed (Lee).
Another gain for immigrants can be experienced from partly assimilating with the mainstream of American culture, even while retaining what is best of the original culture. What results is then a combination of the original and the new culture in order to form something new. This new culture then becomes part of the "melting pot" concept (McGuire) that has been part of the ideal of assimilation. Although this is often perceived as negative by those wishing to retain as much as possible of their original culture, it could also reflect positively upon the general culture formed by the variety of elements making up the American culture. The country and culture being lost are replaced not by anonymity, but rather by a new and improved identity.

ources

Lee, Jonathan. "Assimilation? If so, to what degree?" American Immigration, 2004.….

Assimilation, integration and multiculturalism 'Capricornia' Novel written by Xavier Herbert was published on Australia Day in 1938; that created quite a stir in the Australian community. The Novel expressed Australia's exact assimilated conceptual community and described variously as 'an Australian Masterpiece destined to be a classic and as disgusting and repetitive' (Castles, 2012).Herbert's (1938) description of living in Capricornia in mythical Port Zodiac is thinly disguised as Darwin, (Northern Territory) was a bold interpretation of Southern and Northern 'white Australian' Life.
Explain the premises of assimilation, integration and multiculturalism in case of Australia?

The policy was assimilation was in full control in Indigenous affairs from duration of 1930's to 1960's. The basic definition of assimilation is the same which was finalized in 1963 by the aboriginal affairs ministers. The assimilation policy holds that aborigines and half aborigines will continue to live with the same standard of living as rest of the Australians….

French self-interests sublimated all else and crushed African esteem and African way of life in the process. elf-centered, egoistic, intolerant, and bigoted, the French heartlessly subjected Africa to its rule, foisting its culture of assimilation in the meantime.
West African Assimilation has not always been the objective of France. keptical that the African people would ever become 'suitable" French citizens, and anxious at the potential expense of introducing such a system so complex and broad in its approach, the concept of Assimilation was only introduced later, pushed, to a great extent, by African individuals themselves (Crowder, 1991: 77).

Assimilation was achieved by the African nation adopting French ways as superior to their own and endeavoring to become as much French as possible. Frantz Fanon (1990) called this group of "assimilees" the "benis oui" or the "yes men" who regarded Paris as their home, adopted French food, French dress, Christianity as their….

Assimilation is a word which defies the simple as well as definitions that are generally accepted (de Palo, Faini and Venturini,2007).The term is used in classical sociology to imply the occurrence of a progressive change from a behavior which is more diverse to one which is less diverse. Alba and Nee (2003,p.31) however defined assimilation as the process which involves the attenuation of various distinctions on the basis of ethnic origin.An example of assimilation is the complex process through which immigrants from Mexico and other parts of the world get to be fully integrated into America, a new country which is totally new to them.
Integration

Ferguson (2008,p.3) defined social integration as a process of promoting the relations, values as well as institutions that are necessary for enabling all individuals to participate in social, political and economic life based on the foundation and principles of equal rights and opportunity as well as….

Assimilation of Terrorism Perspectives
Terrorism is one of the deadly and powerful activities feared globally. The acts of terrorism are dangerous to the overall existence and stability of a society. In order to be at a formidable ground in the management and assurance of security in the environment, there are certain features of human activities that can be termed as terrorism in their natural occurrences. Terrorism is a negative aspect to the society. In order to have a valuable ground in the general avenues of managing security in the world, many plans, and programs are directed at countering the occurrences of planned crimes in the society. There are the facets of bodies of knowledge that are referred to as counter mechanisms to the general plans and occurrences of terrorism in the world. In its innate format of understanding, terrorism is defined as an organized crime executed in accordance to the paradigms….

Many Jews still adhere to these, as they provide not only a sense of spiritual fulfillment, but also of cultural belonging. While it is true that many Jews have assimilated into other cultures and abandoned many of their own cultural practices, it can also be seen that the Jewish culture is alive and healthy in the general world today.
aving survived for centuries, I therefore believe that there need be no great concern for the danger of assimilation. While such concern may be greater on an individual or familial level, the collective danger of total assimilation into other cultures is minimal. The Jewish nation is simply too large, significant, and advanced in years for this to be likely. If history is any indication, Jewish tradition will last for many centuries to come.

Source

Pearce, Stephen S. Assimilation has always been a challenge for Jews - now more than ever. The Jewish News….

' The hard realization she got from Sherman during their adolescent years, where she had been told that, "You just want to tell everything to your friends. You just want to have a boyfriend to become popular" (21). Saying this, Seth/Sherman made Mona acknowledge that despite her being American, she also seeks to identify herself, in the same way that he tried to assert himself as a Japanese.
Indeed, Seth became Mona's religion, because he helped primarily in shaping her personal philosophy in life. Through Seth, "...she finds that she owns a whole self inside the self that she knows, someone sharing her skin....How common she is! For how else can it be that on early acquaintance, someone can know her so much better than she knows herself?" (109). Through Seth, she realized she can be integrated in her society without trying hard to assimilate herself. In fact, she can easily….

We speak a patois, a forked tongue, a variation of two languages.
Chicano Spanish sprang out of the Chicanos' need to identify ourselves as a distinct people. We needed a language with which we could communicate with ourselves, a secret language. For some of us, language is a homeland closer than the Southwest -- for many Chicanos today live in the Midwest and the East."

The border language becomes a language of its own for Anzladua, and far from abandoning her roots like Rodriguez, she melds her roots successfully with her process of assimilation. She helps create an entirely different culture, born full-blown from her and her compatriots' foreheads, as Athena was from Zeus.

She does not split the two brains; rather she combines them into a wholly separate third brain and assumes control of it. She does not succumb to the white rationality; rather, she helps create a rationality belonging wholly….

GORDON' AIMILATION THEORY
OCIAL WORK

Overview of the theory

Originator and brief history of the theory; historical context, Underlying assumptions

Adopting a seven-pronged framework, Milton Gordon (1964) bridged the gap between enculturation and assimilation talking about 'structural assimilation' that was his nomer for one group totally identifying and 'slipping into' another. Gordon (1964) argued that different cultures merge into the "American dream" via a process that extends by stages from acculturation into assimilation. Acculturation comes first and is inevitable and acculturation extends from external impression, such as changes in dress and food, to changes in internal characteristics such as beliefs and norms which are central to their group identity. The assimilating group gradually gives up all (or most) of its customs except for its religion which it continues to adhere to.

Gordon's original theory has been appended to and modified by other theorists throughout the ages. Although many scholars find Gordon's theory helpful in explaining….

Cultural Assimilation
According to The Mosby Medical Encyclopedia, cultural assimilation is a process by which members of an ethnic minority group lose cultural characteristics that separate them from the main cultural group (Cultural pp).

In the September 22, 2000 issue of Daedalus, Dorothy Steele writes that the assimilation of millions of immigrants into one society is what defines America, however in the shadows, millions of nonimmigrant minorities, such as African-Americans, Native American Indians, and Latinos, struggle within the mainstream of society (Steele pp). The diversity of immigrants reveals America as a haven for religious, cultural, and political difference, yet at the same time there is an ongoing struggle with difference that is not related to religion or cultural values but a difference in social, racial and ethnic status (Steele pp). The societal settings that are central to a group's movement into American mainstream life, such as schools and workplaces, are experienced differently….

2009, p.90).
The composition of the immigrant population could also affect receptivity. For example, length of U.S. residence and cultural and linguistic fluency can make immigrant workers more acceptable, and thus result in higher wages. "In the short run, immigrants earn significantly less than native-born workers…In industrialized countries, there is apparently a tendency for citizens to be less willing to take on certain menial and low-status jobs as economies advance…Thus, immigrants compensate for their lower earnings by putting in more working hours with their strong motivation to work... immigrants generally improve their wage returns to their human capital with increasing length of stay in the host country" (Takei et al. 2009, p.77) However, if prejudices against immigrants continue unabated, it is possible that this cultural legacy of employment may be hard to shake off even for long-time residents, despite the researcher's contention that, regardless of state: "ith increasing time in….

, 1989; Harter et al., 1987; Wigfield et al., 1991).
The subject of transition of students, particularly Latino students to middle school has become one frequently discussed due to the complexity of the issues faced in the phenomena of transitional issues differences among students with diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Over the last three decades the middle school has replaced junior high schools. There are 55% more middle schools that in the beginning of the decade of the seventies and the number is growing. This transition from elementary to middle school is inclusive of outcomes that are demonstrated by "behavioral problems" (Eccles et al., 1989) and "increases in psychological distress"(Chung et al., 1998; Crocket et al., 1989; Eccles et al., 1993).

Speculation for reasons linked to this dramatic transitional period for the student are listed as follows:

Mismatch between developmental needs and school ecology.

Dual timing of personal and ecological transitions.

Since puberty includes a….

Native Speaker
THE EVIL CALLED ASSIMILATION

Assimilation has been one of the most burning questions of debate in the U.S. since immigrants became a dominant part of American population. The question that arose was: to assimilate or not to assimilate? Most immigrants especially the second generation immigrants were given lessons in the evils of assimilation and they were asked to stamp their individuality on American social fabric by staying true to their roots. Chines, Italian, Indians and almost every minority learned that assimilation was somehow akin to being a traitor. If they assimilated, it would mean loss of their own culture, heritage and identity and this would lead to loss of an entire ethnic group. Eric Liu however feels differently. Being a second generation Chinese immigrant, he felt that assimilation was considered evil simply because it was considered synonymous with white power. Those who tried to assimilate were considered poor soul….

immigration concepts of multicultural group assimilation as presented by oger Daniels and Van Den Berghe. It has 2 sources.
With the advent of the 19th century, America became the hub for migrants from all over the world. Although this process had initiated before this time but the concentration of immigrants increased as Europe experienced an increase in population. The pushing effect constituted of the increased in the level of unemployment, sanitation, food supply and disease controls which contributed to the motivation to migrate to the new land. Even though the influx of immigrants to America consisted of peasants and working class but nevertheless they did not anticipate remaining in the new land for a long time.

On the other hand the pull factors like employment, economic prosperity as well as the expansionary measures taken by the U.S. government during this period increased trade thereby attracting migrants from neighboring and far away….

Assimilation Help My Success?
The answer to this paper's overarching question, "Does assimilation help my success?," depends in large part on how success is defined. To the extent that success is defined as the fulfilment of personal and professional goals, then, yes, assimilation can help individuals succeed in a new country. From this perspective, assimilation has to do with a lot more than just ethnicity, language, or culture, though, because these elements come together to create the whole new self. This paper provides a review of the relevant literature together with empirical observations in the form of an exhibit concerning assimilation and its effect on success to support the conclusion that assimilation is necessary for success.

Personal Experience

The exhibit I discuss when addressing this issue is my personal experience as a Chinese-Korean immigrant. There have been three primary factors in my personal experience that support my contention that assimilation is necessary….

Crafting an Impactful Thesis Statement on Transmission of Culture through Education

Introduction:
Education plays a pivotal role in transmitting culture from one generation to the next. It perpetuates societal values, norms, and beliefs, shaping the collective identity of a people. Crafting an impactful thesis statement on this topic requires a comprehensive understanding of the complex relationship between culture and education.

Step 1: Define Culture and its Components
Culture encompasses a vast array of intangible and tangible elements that characterize a society, including values, norms, beliefs, traditions, language, art, and technology. It is a dynamic and constantly evolving phenomenon that is transmitted through various mechanisms,....

I. Introduction
A. Background information on Canada as a land of immigrants
B. Thesis statement: Discrimination has been a significant barrier preventing immigrants from coming to Canada throughout history.

II. Discrimination against Chinese immigrants
A. Head tax imposed on Chinese immigrants in 1885
B. Chinese Exclusion Act of 1923
C. Impact of discrimination on Chinese immigrant populations

III. Discrimination against South Asian immigrants
A. Komagata Maru incident in 1914
B. Continuous journey regulation of 1908
C. Legal barriers preventing South Asian immigrants from coming to Canada

IV. Discrimination against Jewish immigrants
A. Limited entry for Jewish refugees during World War II
B. Anti-Semitic....

1. Understanding the Impact of Immigration on Society

2. The Challenges and Opportunities of Immigration in a Globalized World

3. Exploring the Cultural Diversity Brought by Immigration

4. The Economic Effects of Immigration on Host Countries

5. Addressing the Refugee Crisis: A Global Responsibility

6. Immigration Policies and Their Implications on Communities

7. Immigration and National Identity: Striking a Balance

8. The Role of Immigration in Shaping Modern Cities

9. Integration and Assimilation: The Paths of Immigrants in New Societies

10. The Ethics of Border Control: Balancing Security and Human Rights

11. The Human Stories Behind Immigration: Personal Narratives and Experiences

12. Immigration and Labor Markets: Examining the Impact on Employment

13.....

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1 Pages
Term Paper

Anthropology

Assimilation in the American Culture

Words: 382
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Term Paper

tronger connections with family and other persons from the same country are also formed (Lee). Another gain for immigrants can be experienced from partly assimilating with the mainstream of…

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6 Pages
Essay

Recreation

Assimilation Integration and Multiculturalism in Australia's Immigration Policies

Words: 1763
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Essay

Assimilation, integration and multiculturalism 'Capricornia' Novel written by Xavier Herbert was published on Australia Day in 1938; that created quite a stir in the Australian community. The Novel expressed…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Literature - African

Assimilation and Direct Rule in

Words: 667
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

French self-interests sublimated all else and crushed African esteem and African way of life in the process. elf-centered, egoistic, intolerant, and bigoted, the French heartlessly subjected Africa to…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Race

Assimilation Is a Word Which Defies the

Words: 562
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Assimilation is a word which defies the simple as well as definitions that are generally accepted (de Palo, Faini and Venturini,2007).The term is used in classical sociology to imply…

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5 Pages
Essay

Terrorism

Assimilation of Terrorism Perspectives Terrorism Is One

Words: 1477
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Assimilation of Terrorism Perspectives Terrorism is one of the deadly and powerful activities feared globally. The acts of terrorism are dangerous to the overall existence and stability of a society.…

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1 Pages
Term Paper

History - Israel

Assimilation Threat With the Rise

Words: 366
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Many Jews still adhere to these, as they provide not only a sense of spiritual fulfillment, but also of cultural belonging. While it is true that many Jews…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

Assimilation Through Self-Discovery The Function

Words: 1201
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

' The hard realization she got from Sherman during their adolescent years, where she had been told that, "You just want to tell everything to your friends. You just…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

Teaching

Assimilation Richard Rodriguez and Gloria

Words: 1563
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

We speak a patois, a forked tongue, a variation of two languages. Chicano Spanish sprang out of the Chicanos' need to identify ourselves as a distinct people. We needed…

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5 Pages
Research Paper

Race

Theory of Assimilation Acculturation Bicultural Socialization and Ethnic Minority Identity

Words: 1711
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Research Paper

GORDON' AIMILATION THEORY OCIAL WORK Overview of the theory Originator and brief history of the theory; historical context, Underlying assumptions Adopting a seven-pronged framework, Milton Gordon (1964) bridged the gap between enculturation and…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Race

Cultural Assimilation According to the Mosby Medical

Words: 875
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Cultural Assimilation According to The Mosby Medical Encyclopedia, cultural assimilation is a process by which members of an ethnic minority group lose cultural characteristics that separate them from the main…

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3 Pages
Research Paper

Literature - Latin-American

Immigration and Assimilation Immigration &

Words: 1086
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Research Paper

2009, p.90). The composition of the immigrant population could also affect receptivity. For example, length of U.S. residence and cultural and linguistic fluency can make immigrant workers more acceptable,…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Teaching

Acculturation & Assimilation Focus The

Words: 1318
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

, 1989; Harter et al., 1987; Wigfield et al., 1991). The subject of transition of students, particularly Latino students to middle school has become one frequently discussed due to the…

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3 Pages
Essay

Race

Native Speaker the Evil Called Assimilation Assimilation

Words: 1108
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Native Speaker THE EVIL CALLED ASSIMILATION Assimilation has been one of the most burning questions of debate in the U.S. since immigrants became a dominant part of American population. The…

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5 Pages
Term Paper

Race

Immigration Concepts of Multicultural Group Assimilation as

Words: 1298
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Term Paper

immigration concepts of multicultural group assimilation as presented by oger Daniels and Van Den Berghe. It has 2 sources. With the advent of the 19th century, America became the…

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2 Pages
Essay

Business - International

How Assimilation Affects Success

Words: 661
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Assimilation Help My Success? The answer to this paper's overarching question, "Does assimilation help my success?," depends in large part on how success is defined. To the extent that…

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