Bartleby The Scrivener Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Herman Melville Bartelby the Scrivener

Words: 1266 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88312256

Therefore, both characters failed to have positive reviews from their employer; yet, by compensation, they managed to remain employed. The discrepancy between the assignments they were paid to manage and the actual results in fact will weight more by comparison to the amount of work Bartleby would be able to achieve up to a certain point. Therefore, it can be said that one of the first characterizations of the main character is provided through the comparative characterization of the other two important characters.

As per the narrator, "a motionless young man one morning, stood upon my office threshold, the door being open, for it was summer. I can see that figure now -- pallidly neat, pitiably respectable, incurably forlorn! It was Bartleby" (Melville, 2013). Aside from the brief description when introducing the character of Bartleby, the narrator points out that "I engaged him, glad to have among my corps of…… [Read More]

Reference

Melville, Herman. "Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall-Street." 2013. Available online at  http://www.bartleby.com/129/
View Full Essay

Social Contradiction the Contradiction Between

Words: 1066 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57973151

Franklin's autobiography demonstrates a truly American kind of businessman, because he so neatly embodies all of the assumptions and logical fallacies that American capitalism depends on in order to justify its dominance in an ostensibly equitable and representative society.

Where Franklin's autobiography demonstrates the peculiar appeal to divine right that is used to justify the inequity of American capitalism, Herman Melville's Bartleby the Scrivener demonstrates the almost willful obtuseness necessary for any apologists of capitalism who must interact with the exploited lower classes on a regular basis. The narrator of Bartleby the Scrivener is entirely unaware of anything outside the extremely limited range of his own preconceived ideas, which is both why Bartleby's passive resistance stuns him so much and he is ultimately unable to come to terms with Bartleby's death. He practically admits as much when he says "the easiest way of life is the best," because the easiest…… [Read More]

References

Franklin, B. (2008). Autobiography of benjamin franklin. New York: Forgotten Books.

Melville, H. (1856). Bartleby the scrivener. New York: Plain Label Books.
View Full Essay

English Short Story

Words: 1690 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4244884

illa Cather and Herman Melville both explore themes of psychological and social isolation in their short stories. In Cather's "Paul's Case," the title character is a vibrant young man whose passion and creativity is constrained by his pitiful life in Pittsburgh, where his only solace is his work as an usher. Melville's protagonist Bartleby in "Bartleby the Scrivener" lacks the joie du vivre that Paul possesses. However, both of these protagonists plummet toward death as the only foreseeable relief from the terrible injunction of life. Their approaches to death are different, though. Bartleby is wholly unlike the young Paul, who feels regret the instant he realizes the "folly of his haste," (Cather para 65). On the contrary, the senior Bartleby remains fully resigned to self-abnegation throughout his adult life. hereas Paul believes that if he only had money, he could be free from the clutches of his past and embrace…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cather, Willa. "Paul's Case." Retrieved online: http://www.shsu.edu/~eng_wpf/authors/Cather/Pauls-Case.htm

Freud, Sigmund. "Part Two: The Dream." Retrieved online: http://www.bartleby.com/283/10.html

Melville, Herman. "Bartleby the Scrivener." Retrieved online:  http://www.bartleby.com/129/ 

Skelton, John. "Death and Dying in Literature." Advances in Psychiatric Treatment. Vol 9, 2003, pp. 211-217
View Full Essay

Melville and Irving

Words: 2232 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5515439

Melville and rving

The dawn of the American nation brought with it a need for a decidedly American culture, one depicted with careful precision by many of the authors that came to paint the literary landscape of the new magnate across the Atlantic. Washington rving, the first American great, told the story of the nascent, colonial United States through youthful folklore limned with great detail and attention to the inner workings of the human spirit in its new land. Half a century later, Herman Melville entranced the same people with his swashbuckling narration of pirates, whales, and sailors; America's best, who, against all odds, battled sea, spray, and monster to find their way back home. While Melville declared his preference for creative genius over adept imitators like rving, he could not escape rving's influence, from which he learned that realistic details of rural life in American can be worked memorably…… [Read More]

Ibid, p. 23.

Irving, Washington. Rip Van Winkle. New York: Black Dome Press, 2003.

Ibid.
View Full Essay

Assigned Readings

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65022383

American Literature

Listen to Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God preached. Discuss in the discussion group.

Jonathan Edwards gives us a perfect example of the Calvinist beliefs of the Puritan settlers in early New England. Edwards studied theology at Yale University -- where today there is still a dormitory named after him -- but then became a noteworthy preacher in the Great Awakening, which exhorted an entire generation to renew their Christian faith. Edwards' skill in preaching lies in using literary imagery to get across abstract theological concepts. Calvinist theology believes in "total depravity" -- in other words, because of Adam and Eve eating the apple, human beings are fallen, and stained with "original sin." The most memorable image in Edwards' sermon -- the image of the spider being held over a fiery pit -- is meant to be a metaphor to enable the listener to imagine how…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Value of Conflict in Fiction

Words: 1224 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12486344

The narrator becomes repulsed by Bartleby and decides that he must be suffering from some type of mental problem. The less the narrator knows about Bartleby the worse things seem to be for him. He wants to make sense of things. He wants it all to make sense. The conflict arises from his inability to do so. The narrator is simply being human in his desire to control and understand things but Kafka is demonstrating how we cannot always know everything and how we must be at peace with that, lest we become insane. It is also important to point out that some things are simply not meant to be known or completely understood. Kafka does not attempt to explain everything in this story because we often face situations that will never be truly understood.

Marquez demonstrates conflict and how it makes for interesting fiction by allowing the readers to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kafka, Franz. "The Metamorphosis." The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction R.V. Cassill, ed.

New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1981.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez's "Chronicle of a Death Foretold." Collected Novellas. New York:

Harper Perennial. 1990.
View Full Essay

Walt Whitman and Herman Melville

Words: 1389 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95002246



Whitman uses simile effectively ("The glories strung like beads on my smallest sights and hearings") and uses metaphors effectively to link himself with others that have crossed the river in the past ("The dark threw its patches down upon me also…") because he certainly wasn't and isn't perfect at all so he had a metaphor for that ("I too knitted the old knot of contrariety…"). Melville's narrator, whose work is brilliant but a bit tedious, can slip personification, a metaphor and a simile into the same sentence for effect. For example, talking about Turkey, a previous employee ("a temperate young man") the narrator explains that "…nature herself seemed to have been his vintner, and at his birth charged him so thoroughly with an irritable, brandy-like disposition, that all subsequent potations were needless." Melville's narrator seems to have an obsession to either understand Bartleby, or at least be able to rationalize…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Jeffersonian Belief and Fiction Although

Words: 742 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40191192



Herman Melville's "Bartleby the Scrivener" also uses a heightened situation to illustrate a greater human truth. In realistic terms, Bartleby's refusal to work is absurd, at least to the lengths which the title character carries his impulse to "prefer not" to do anything. Also, the level of bureaucratic intransigence of Bartleby's colleagues also seems ridiculous, as they obsess over their fellow worker's refusal to endorse the practices of their offices by toiling away and useless endeavors. But Bartleby's tale illustrates the soul-crushing nature of modern life, and the purposeless of much of the paperwork that human beings are forced to plow through, simply to make a living. Bartleby wants out of the 'rat race,' and by seeing Bartleby's reaction, and the reaction of others to Bartleby's denial of the value of work and government regulation, the reader is able to see the more muted, but still absurd truths of his…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Organizational Behavior What Is the

Words: 606 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36133418

It is recommended that the oss should tell artleby to begin acting more responsibly or he will be forced to leave. (Melville, 2006)

Exactly why does artleby always "prefer not to?" Describe artleby's behavior. Why can't he make friends or communicate? What is at the heart of his rebellion?

artleby does not want to work or doing anything that will allow him to take control of his life. The best way to describe this individual is dysfunctional and it is obvious that he may suffer from some kind of mental disorder. The reason why he refuses to make friends as well as communicate is because; he becomes more withdrawn and delusional in the story. The heart of his rebellion is his desire to do nothing and live off of what others have achieved in their lives. (Melville, 2006)

Are there any ironies in the story that you could point out?…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bartleby the Scrivener. (2011). Spark Notes. Retrieved from:  http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/melvillestories/section1.html 

Melville, H. (2006). Bartleby the Scrivener. Melbourne: Objective Systems.
View Full Essay

Reading Commentary

Words: 2542 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75034196

American Studies - Anthology

American Studies -- Anthology: Freedom vs. Tyranny

America's history includes a number of competing forces. One of the chief struggles has been the clash between Freedom and Tyranny. As Why Freedom Matters shows, our national consciousness is dominated with the idea that our forefathers risked everything so that all people in America can have freedom. However, Public Speaking shows that the dominant or "luckiest" group in America consists of white, gentile, straight males, who form a very powerful and wealthy special interest group. An example of the favoritism enjoyed by a powerful, wealthy special interest group is the Texan oilman group mentioned in Dominion from Sea to Sea. The favorable treatment given to powerful, wealthy special interests groups results in oppression of "others" such as farmers who fought for America's freedom but seemed to trade the tyranny of Great Britain for the tyranny of the wealthy,…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Roundness' of Characters Character Is

Words: 1328 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86206691

'How stupid can you get'" (erman 5).

It's this honest rendering of Cameron's fatal flaw that gives him his shape or his "roundness" as a character. Readers know individuals who are so myopic or self-absorbed that they cannot imagine what it's like to be someone else or they cannot see the error in their own hypocritical behavior. At the end of the day, that's what Cameron is, a hypocrite. And therein lies the message to the reader; the moral of the story, the important stuff, self-reflection and self-criticism are integral to personal growth.

In Noux's story, "Cruelty the Humans Heart," the "round" character isn't the protagonist, (in this case the narrator) rather the "round" character is the delinquent the protagonist arrests and interacts with throughout the story; the problem child, Cristoph Priest.

In a brief but powerful clause, the narrator prefaces an early encounter with Priest: "We met ugly..." he…… [Read More]

German, Norman. "Sportfishing with Cameron." Salt Water Sportsman.

http://www.asavagewisdom.com/author.html

Wood, James. How Fiction Works. New York. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 2008: 288 pages
View Full Essay

Guys by Lefkowitz Response to

Words: 985 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64771060



I was also disgusted by the jocks' inattention to their grades (or anything, for that matter, of serious importance - i.e., do any of these "special" adolescents ever so much as read a book; help a friend (with no "hidden agenda"); or volunteer community service? Of course not: they're all far too busy either indulging themselves; being indulged; and messing up other people's clubs; homes, and lives). Kevin Schertzer and John Maher (as if either needed the money) even steal money, jewelry, and other valuables from their fellow students at the Candy Cane Ball. Meanwhile, in the midst of all this jollity, Leslie is told she must transfer to West Orange High School, where she knows nobody, and receives an official diagnosis of mental retardation.

One aspect of this book that I like and admire a great deal, is that of how the author, very deftly and with apparent seamlessness…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Ichabod Crane

Words: 1822 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38924074

Ichabod Crane

Tim urton's 1999 film adaptation of Washington Irving's 1819 short story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is hardly a faithful or literal adaptation. R.. Palmer, in his introduction to Nineteenth-Century American Literature on Screen, is rather chilly in his dismissal of urton's adaptation; he claims that a simple survey of Hollywood adaptations overall reveals that a number of major figures, most prominently Washington Irving…had never or rarely (and then generally unsatisfactorily) been adapted for the screen. ecause it has been so dedicated to marketing modernity, broadly conceived, Hollywood production offers only a narrow view of nineteenth-century literature. Hollywood's most extensive engagement with nineteenth-century politics and culture is in fact through an essentially twentieth-century form: the western…(Palmer 6).

Of course, Irving's original tale makes a very poor western, despite Irving's own note that the town of Sleepy Hollow was once "infested with…cow-boys" (Irving 288). ut in order to refashion…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Burton, Tim, dir. Sleepy Hollow. Perf. Johnny Depp, Christina Ricci, Christopher Walken. Paramount, 1999. Film.

Crane, Gregg. The Cambridge Introduction to the Nineteenth Century American Novel. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Print.

Franklin, Wayne. "James Fenimore Cooper and the Invention of the American Novel." In Samuels, Shirley (Editor). A Companion to American Fiction 1780-1865. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. Print.

Irving, Washington. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Other Stories. Edited by William L. Hedges. New York and London: Penguin Classics, 1999. Print.
View Full Essay

Classical and Popular Music in 'The Crying

Words: 1720 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76232312

CLASSICAL AND POPULAR MUSIC IN 'THE CRYING OF LOT 49'

Thomas Pynchon is known for his complex storylines and weird characters. For this reason it is not easy to comment on the use of music in his novels as it is the very complexity of his plots that obscure the influence or meaning of classical and popular music in his books. Despite this, he is one of the most influential writers of the postmodern era and many singers have cited his work as an inspiration for their music. In our days for example, since the return of popular music, we notice that Thomas Pynchon has become a source of inspiration for many new pop artists. Larry Swindell (1996) says, "Pynchon is an enduring literary cult figure, sainted by proponents of darkest-hued comedy."

It is important to bear in mind that Pynchon's use of music is not limited to just one…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hans, James S., Emptiness and plenitude in "Bartleby the Scrivener" and 'The Crying of Lot 49.'. Vol. 22, Essays in Literature, 09-22-1995, pp 285(15).

Jamie Diamond, PAGES: THE MYSTERY OF THOMAS PYNCHON LEADS FANS AND SCHOLARS ON A QUEST AS BIZARRE AS HIS PLOTS., People, 01-29-1990, pp 64

Joel Stein, The Case For Thomas Pynchon., Time, 07-09-2001, pp 50.

Joseph Slade, Writers for the 70s: Thomas Pynchon, New York, 1974.
View Full Essay

Family ' Familial Love in Literature

Words: 1239 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68493601

'"

"A Good Man is Hard to Find" ends with the family being executed by the Misfit, a murderous outlaw. Although O'Connor's story is evidently supposed to be humorous, it gives the reader pause to note that the family will die without ever exchanging a kind word. There are different types of family violence: the somewhat positive violence of the Roethke poem that makes the boy adore his father at the expense of his mother vs. The carelessness and cruelty in the O'Connor story, which arises as a result of a lack of respect and the superficiality of the modern family. Family relationships do not necessarily create a state of understanding. In the story, the most transcendent moment of grace occurs between two strangers, before one kills the other, as physical violence makes the grandmother appreciate her time on earth. "His voice seemed about to crack and the grandmother's head…… [Read More]

Works Cited

O'Connor, Flannery. "A Good Man is Hard to Find." UCF. December 8, 2009.

http://pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~surette/goodman.html

Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. MIT Classics: Shakespeare Home Page. December 8, 2009

 http://shakespeare.mit.edu/hamlet/index.html
View Full Essay

Compare and Contrast the Concept

Words: 816 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50704952

nature in American literature, from earliest writings to the Civil War period. It is my purpose to outline the connection between spirituality, freedom and nature and explain how American writers have chosen to reflect and interpret these themes in relation to their historical realities.

At the beginning of the colonization process there were two congruent depictions of nature. Initially, the tribes comprising The Iroquois League lived in close contact with nature and believed in the importance of maintaining a harmonious relationship with it. In this respect, the Iroquois Constitution imposes a devout display of gratitude to all by-human elements of the world before the opening of any council. On the other hand, the early explorers and founders of the United States perceived an immense natural potential in the country. In this sense, Thomas Hariot describes the New World as a land of wealth, his words and images aimed both at…… [Read More]

References

Barna, Mark. (2001, May) Our Romance with Nature. The World and I, Vol.16, No.5

Webb, J. Echoes of Paine: Tracing the Age of Reason through the Writings of Emerson (2006). ATQ (The American Transcendental Quarterly), Vol. 20, No.3

Whicher, G.F. (1945) Walden Revisited: A Centennial Tribute to Henry David Thoreau. Chicago: Packard
View Full Essay

Keats Dickinson Keats and Eliot

Words: 921 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59364683

However, in line with the Paz prompt at the outset of this discussion, Keats merely uses this tradition as a bridge on which to extend toward motivation on behalf of the evolving form. The subject matter is where this work takes a step toward modernity. The manner in which Keats describes the reality of dying is startling for its time primarily because it lacks religiosity. In describing death, the poet tells, "where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies; / here but to think is to be full of sorrow / and leaden-eyed despairs; / here beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes, / or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow."

The notion of discussing death from a decidedly humanistic rather than spiritual perspective is more daring and innovative than perhaps we are won't to give credit for. It is remarkable that the poet would invert a steadfastly traditional form…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Dickinson, E. (1862). #303 (the Soul Selects Her Own Society). Poets.org.

Eliot, T.S. (1917). The Love-Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. University of Virginia. Online at  http://people.virginia.edu/~sfr/enam312/prufrock.html 

Keats, J. (1819). Ode to a Nightingale. Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. 1919. The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250 -- 1900.
View Full Essay

Irony and Symbolism in Poe's

Words: 677 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23868591

Paradoxically, based on the outcome of the story, it can be argued that the snake in the crest is not poisonous or else Fortunato's "bite" would have had more severe consequences on Montressor; however, the story ends with Montressor getting away in Fortunato's murder.

Symbolic foreshadowing can also be seen in the conversation about masons between Montressor and Fortunato. As Fortunato questions Montressor about being a mason, Montressor assures his victim that he is and pulls out a trowel "from beneath the folds of [his] roquelaire" (277). Ironically, Fortunato is asking if Montressor is a Freemason and not a mason by trade. Furthermore, Montressor's assertion that he is a mason also hints at how he will carry out his revenge.

Lastly, symbolism and irony are evident in the characters' names. Montressor's name can be loosely translated into my treasure, which can refer to the type of slight that was committed…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Poe, Edgar a. "The Cask of Amontillado." The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe.

New York: Vintage Books, 1975. pp. 274-279. Print.
View Full Essay

Assigned Readings

Words: 1284 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35584738

Thomas Paine was an earlier conqueror of the special association that was formed between America and France. His part in this association was initiated with his responsibility of the post of American Congress Secretary of Foreign Affairs where he continually used dialogue to make relations between the two better. He retained this post throughout the American evolution. Paine, however, is better noted for his works written throughout the American and French evolutions Eras. In his writings, Paine offered spirited protection of accepted autonomy, human rights, and the republican government. Both Common Sense (1776) ights of Man (1791-1792) stick out as the most broadly read political areas from the era. Paine's distinctive global thought also can serve as the building blocks for liberal cosmopolitanism in worldwide relations. His unrelenting faith in aspects of democratization, free trade, and respect for human rights being the factors that cut back worldwide conflict stands among…… [Read More]

References

Fruchtman, Jack, Jr. "Thomas Paine and the Religion of Nature." Johns Hopkins University Press . 1993.

Fruchtman, Jack, Jr. "Thomas Paine: Apostle of Freedom." Four Walls Eight Windows. 1994.

Keane, John. "Tom Paine: A Political Life." Little, Brown. 1995.