Biodiversity Essays (Examples)

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Biological Diversity of Today

Words: 929 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65561239

Biodiversity Defined

Biodiversity is a term which refers to the amount and degree of diversity found within living biology. Biodiversity is likely best measured as the sum total of the number of existent creatures, systems, and variety of creatures found within the world at large (National Geographic, 2016). In order to best understand the significance of this statement, it is necessary to codify biodiversity into three different varieties. There are ecosystems, species, and genes which comprise all of the variety found within the notion of biodiversity (National Wildlife Federation, 2016). Therefore, all that is needed to determine biodiversity is to simply add the number of each ecosystem, species, and gene variation found.

The importance and benefits of biodiversity

Biodiversity is important because of the way that different living systems found within it interact with one another. Oftentimes there is a degree of dependence between those systems. It is worth noting…… [Read More]

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Globalization and the Environment This

Words: 2597 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40046980

Of the top 150 medications that are sold by prescription in the U.S. 118 of these are medications that are either "derived from or modeled on naturally occurring substances." (SEAM Global, 2005) Some of the medications that count on habitat presently being destroyed are "aspirin, morphine, vincristine, taxol, digitalis, and most antibiotics."(SEAM Global, 2005)

VI. Internet/Networking: Role Played in Preservation

Through global and subglobal assessments of the ecosystem and monitoring of data in relation to global changes information may be shared from one region to another and earlier attempts made in changing, slowing or altogether avoidance of more extreme conditions. As stated on the web page of "GreenFacts.org": "Some ecosystem problems have been reduced by innovative local responses...Therefore institutions are needed at multiple levels to strengthen the adaptive capacity and effectiveness of sub-national and local responses. (GreenFacts.org, 2005)

VII. Globalization and Changes in Production

Changes have been seen in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Globalization's Effects "A World Connected" Online available at http://www.aworldconnected.org/article.php/231.html

Shah, Anup (2005) Effects of Consumerism 2005 April 18 Online available at http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/Consumption/Effects.asp

Globalization: Negative Effects of Development (2005) Walon Laboratories Online available at http://whalonlab.msu.edu/Student_Webpages/2003_EC_Projects / Globalization/page_6.html.

Robbins, Richard H. Global Problems and the Culture of Capitalism. Allyn & Bacon. Copyright: 2002.
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Zapatistas the Essence of Zapatista Philosophy and

Words: 1757 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92037103

Zapatistas

The essence of Zapatista philosophy and action is the discovery of a new order of revolution. In the wake of failures of other socialist movements from Lenin to in Russia to the Sandinistas in Nicaragua, the small group of Mayan farmers in southwestern Mexico contend not only with reconstructing revolutionary tactics but also with the massive opposition from dominant governments, including those in Mexico and the United States. Governments that continually uphold the principles of capitalism will find in the Zapatistas an idealistic, hopeless cause of swimming against the tide of globalization. Even before the ratification of the North American Free trade Agreement (NAFTA), Mexicans struggled with political and economic oppression. The indigenous peoples of Mexico, like the Mayan nations of Chiapas, fared worst. Lowest on the scale of economical, social, and political power, these individuals hearkened to the voice of their martyred namesake Zapata, who was murdered on…… [Read More]

Works Cited

De Angelis, Massimo. "Globalization, New Internationalism and the Zapatistas." Capital and Class 70 (2000): 9-35.

Mills, C. Wright. "The Sociological Imagination." The Sociological Imagination. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1959.

Harvey, Neil. "Globalisation and resistance in post-cold war Mexico: difference, citizenship and biodiversity conflicts in Chiapas." Third World Quarterly 22 (2001): 1045-1061.
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World's Oldest Largest and Deepest

Words: 2674 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39017351

134). In addition, ussian authorities have also joined with the international community to protect the lake. In this regard, Hudgins adds that, "Increased awareness of such threats to the unique ecology of Lake Baikal has prompted a number of international organizations -- including the Sierra Club and Baikal Watch in the United States -- to join the ussians in their efforts to protect this natural wonder of the world" (1998, p. 135). According to the Sierra Club, "Lake Baikal, arguably ussia's most significant environmental treasure -- it contains a fifth of the world's unfrozen freshwater and is a UNESCO World Heritage site -- is being polluted by toxic waste from a paper mill that Vladimir Putin ordered reopened for economic reasons" (Pollutin' Putin, 2010, para. 2). In fact, the recently reopened paper mill disposes of toxic wastes directly into Lake Baikal's fragile biological system (Hoare, 2008). While the Sierra Club…… [Read More]

References

Current programs. (2010). Baikal Watch. Retrieved from http://www.earthislandprojects.org / project/campaignPage.cfm?pageID=7&subSiteID=1&CFID=43926225&CFTOKEN=32

975106.

Gladkochub, D.P., Donskaya, T.V., Wingate, M.T., Poller, U., Kroner, a., Fedorovsky, V.S.,

Mazukabzov, a.M., Todt, W. & Pisarevsky, S.A. (2008). Petrology, geochronology and tectonic implications of C. 500 Ma metamorphic and igneous rocks along the northern margin of the Central Asian orogen. Journal of the Geological Society, 165, 235-237.
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Sustainability of Forest Logging in

Words: 3115 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3870346

In this regard, Green and her colleagues emphasize that, "The corporate wealth of logging giant Gunns, Ltd. (which controls over 85% of the state's logging, is the world's largest hardwood woodchip exporter, and is worth over one billion dollars) has not trickled down into the state's economy" (2007, p. 95).

Despite the enormous range of wood products, particularly its valuable hardwoods, that could be produced from Tasmania's forests, more than 90 per cent of the country's hardwood timber is simply processed into woodchips annually, representing 5,000,000 tons of Tasmanian native forest which are then marketed to paper mills in Asia, primarily in Japan but in South Korea and increasingly China as well, accounting for around 70 per cent of Tasmania's total woodchip export production (Green et al., 2007). The sustainment practices used by the forestry industry, though, have been insufficient to replenish what is being extracted.

Forestry Tasmania. The Board…… [Read More]

References

Australia. (2010). CIA world factbook. Retrieved from https://www.cia.gov/library / publications/the-world-factbook/geos/as.html.

Brown, B. (2001). Revelations of a green senator. In H. Gee (ed.), for the forests: A history of the Tasmania Forest Campaigns. Hobart: The Wilderness Society, 2001, p. 334 in Owen

(2003).

Carter, N. (2007). The Politics of the Environment. Ideas. Activism. Policy. 2nd Edn. Cambridge:
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Phenotype Genotype Systematics Sporangium Archegonium Antheridium Sporophyte Gametophyte Amino Acids Cereal Grain

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76367086

Phenotype, Genotype, Systematics, Sporangium, Archegonium, Antheridium, Sporophyte, Gametophyte, Aminoacids, Cereal Grain

IC: phenotype, genotype, systematics, sporangium,

Archegonium, antheridium, sporophyte, gametophyte, amino acids, cereal grain

What can the phenotype tell you about the genotype of an individual?

The genotype describes the genes inherited by an organism. Phenotype refers to an individual's anatomical structure, physiology and behavior. The phenotype refers to everything that can be easily observed and measured about a plant, animal or human being. Our phenotype is the product of Genes inherited from our biological parents,

Our environment

And developmental noise

Phenotype is the constellation of observable traits; genotype is the genetic endowment of the individual. Phenotype = genotype + development (in a given environment). In a narrow "genetic" sense, the genotype defines the phenotype. But how, in and evolutionary sense, does the phenotype "determine" the genotype? Selection acts on phenotypes because differential reproduction and survivorship depend on phenotype. If…… [Read More]

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Biology Systematics Is One of the Main

Words: 934 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3436473

Biology

Systematics is one of the main fields of study in biology wherein the historical relationships of groups of biological organisms are studied. Through systematics, scientists are able to identify organisms existing in this world in accordance to their classification, group, phylum, and other hierarchical positions in the biological strata. Apart from studying the relationship of organisms with each other and in their environment, systematics also aims to determine patterns in the organism population where groups of organisms are most likely to thrive and survive. Systematics as scientific methodology in biology is essential to the establishment and maintenance of biodiversity. This is because through systematics, biodiversity existing in the Earth are identified and documented, converting these information into understandable / comprehensible and thereby useful information to other people. It is also a method and study where the life history of the Earth is documented. Systematics also makes it easier for…… [Read More]

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Social and Cultural Impacts of Establishing an

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23476641

socal and cultural mpacts of establshng an eco-Toursm enterprse n Joao Pessoa, Brazl. The man focus of the dssertaton s on the followng areas:

An analyss of eco-toursm development

An assessment of the opportuntes - regonal, domestc, nternatonal

An evaluaton of the projects feasblty

An examnaton of the socal-cultural mpact of the eco-toursm

Brazl has a sanctuary of the fnest natural resources ("fauna & flora") n the world, and therefore toursm s n ascendence, and demands for md-class hotels are on the ncrease. The development of eco-toursm n specfc areas s antcpated due to partnershp wth local bankng ntutons; local government nterest and regulatons; and a general growth of awareness of the tenson between the tourst dollar, the envronment and local cultures.

Research Methods

Prmary research (ntervews and questonnares) wll be conducted to analyze the feasblty of the project. Secondary research wll be carred out, n the form of a…… [Read More]

i) Adventurers set out to discover other lands (e.g., Captain Cook) ii) People traveled for scientific research (e.g., Darwin) iii) People traveled for business (trade) iv) People traveled in order to visit friends and family (social), v) People traveled for leisure (relaxation) vi) People travel as Eco-Travelers (learners).

The development of tourism has influenced people and society, and has created thousands of organizations, at many levels: national and international, governmental or non- governmental. Tourism has thus led to the creation of million of jobs worldwide, in what is today is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. Tourism has led people to confront different attitudes and to admire eclectic cultures. In addition, to be able to understand these cultures, society at large has had to adapt to the pluralism of cultures by learning languages other than their own, different types of gastronomy and music, and also by adopting a greater tolerance of different religions.

Accordingly to Kaluf (2001), the development of tourism has been worldwide, and has been sustaining a growth of 20% over last five years: 5% in mass tourism and an incredible 15% in
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Ecosystems Invasive Species the

Words: 1022 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73180805

Nevertheless, it is a conceptual change from government-sponsored conservation efforts of the past, which might have focused specifically in the same region on the manatee population, and thus played a pure game of numbers. To regard the Florida manatee instead as part of a larger ecosystem that must be monitored in numerous different ways requires a change in approach which is not always easy for a government agency to implement.

2. The chief conservation implication of introduced invasive species is that the invasive species is often very difficult to eradicate without serious disruption to the host ecosystem. An excellent example of an invasive species is presented by the zebra mussel, a small freshwater species of shellfish originally native to the freshwater lakes of southern ussia. The introduction of zebra mussels into the freshwater habitats of North America has allowed them to spread at astonishingly fast rates: the zebra mussel reproduces…… [Read More]

References

Barnes, C. et al. (2006). "The Ecosystem Goal Team of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: Exploring an Ecosystem Approach to Management." National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved online at:  http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/sars/improvement/pdfs/eam_lit_review.pdf 

CBC News. "Manitoba to Blast Zebra Mussels in Unique Experiment." May 11, 2014. Retrieved online at:  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-to-blast-zebra-mussels-in-unique-experiment-1.2639258
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climate change impacts

Words: 610 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97487118

Part 1: A Closer Look at the Evidence

1. The first graph on the NASA site shows the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, comparing across time. It shows that for all time, there were fluctuations in the level of CO2 in the atmosphere, but that the level always remained below 300 parts per million. The graph takes a sharp uptick in recent years, and by the time we get to the 20th century it is basically a straight upward line, to the present level around 400ppm. The 1950 level was only at around 320, so nearly a quarter of the carbon in the atmosphere has been added in about the last 70 years or so, and that is for all-time.

The UK website explains that the increase in carbon dioxide levels in the environment has occurred since the Industrial Revolution, which brought about many changes in technology, including the…… [Read More]

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Gulf Oil Spill Whether the

Words: 2557 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88015215

So far, this is not the case, and oil companies only pay royalties on production. This is another area under scrutiny in the MMS scandal. There are reports, dating back to 2008, that the royalty offices of the MMS, located in Denver, routinely accepted oil company numbers on the amount of oil they produced, rather than independently auditing the numbers. No one knows how much lost revenue to the government that practice resulted in, and there is no way of finding out now. Clearly, future policy formation on the industry needs to include more oversight, more regulations, and a much less cozy relationship between the regulators and the companies they are regulating.

Future policy formation on other energy sources

The Gulf spill has helped to change public opinion on oil and its production, and on how it is regulated. It seems much clearer after the spill that we are a…… [Read More]

References

Editor. (2010). Update on oiled wildlife and marine life recovered along Louisiana's coastline. Retrieved 16 July 2010 from the Louisiana.gov Web site:  http://emergency.louisiana.gov/Releases/07142010-wildlife.html .

Editors. (2010). Oil dispersants. Retrieved 16 July 2010 from the Prairie View A&M University Web site: http://www.extension.org/pages/Oil_Dispersants.

Falola, T., & Genova, A. (2005). The politics of the global oil industry: An introduction. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Green groups bolster lobby against offshore drilling; Democrats struggle to pacify uneasy voters. (2008, July 16). The Washington Times, p. A06.
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Buongiono J Gilless J 2003

Words: 737 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3092214

, 2003).

The combintion of the complexity of the forest model nd economic needs from forest products results in the need for greter mrrige of ecology, sttistics, economics, nd lnd nd forestry mngement. There re severl connections between forest nd ecosystem mngement. By plnning nd reserching forest growth nd forest stnd tending this industry cn form the bsis for vrious politicl guidelines nd policies to ensure tht timber resources re vilble for future genertions. The forests lso provide hundreds of benefits to mny people living in forested res cross the world. These include thousnds of jobs, lumber, pper products, clen ir, wter filtrtion nd mny recretionl opportunities. In order to ensure tht these benefits will exist for future use, studies of the growth rtes of tended nd untended trees re crried out. For exmple, trees cn be thinned out (removing unwnted or less desirble trees) llowing the best trees to…… [Read More]

and Applications. Burlington, MA: Elsevier Academics.

Buongiono, J., Gilless, J. (2003). Decision Methods for Forest Resource Management.

San Diego: Academic Press.
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Carbon Trading The Writer Examines

Words: 4229 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68918995



But the supply far outstrips demand, Europeans are finding. The climate of this marketplace itself is decidedly cloudy. Advance prices have plunged by half.

At this point, one shouldn't portray it as a liquid, vibrant market," said Atle C. Christiansen of PointCarbon, a Norway-based research firm (Climate, 2004).

More than six years after governments negotiated the historic climate accord in Kyoto, Japan, the world is taking only halting steps _ not always forward, never in unison _ to follow through (Climate, 2004).

In fact, the Kyoto treaty itself is not yet in force, since it hasn't been ratified, as required, by industrial countries emitting a total of 55% of "greenhouse gases," such as carbon dioxide, that trap heat in the atmosphere that Earth otherwise would give off.

ussia's expected accession later this year would clear the 55% hurdle. But even a functioning Kyoto agreement would have little impact: Its limited…… [Read More]

References

Amazon rainforest destruction at 10-year high

By Raymond Colitt in Sao Paulo (accessed 5-19-05)

Published: May 20, 2005 03:00 | Last updated: May 20, 2005 03:00

http://news.ft.com/cms/s/4ea07b74-c8cd-11d9-87c9-00000e2511c8.html rainforest (accessed 5-19-05)
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Significant Sustainable Development Issue

Words: 1800 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44199483

Consumption Sustainability

According to The orld Commission on Environment and Development (CED), "Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." There are many issues related to this important concept that have global implications. The purpose of this essay is to discuss the issue of consumption and how it affects the ability of the environment to continue sustainable living. This essay will first describe the issue and illustrate key points that relate consumption with sustainability. The next part of this argument will discuss the role of businesses and corporations and their relationship with this issue. The essay will conclude with commentary and conclusions about the current trends and future responses to consumption and the potential implications for businesses.

The Issue of Consumption

Consumption is a unique term that relates to the sustainability of any system. It…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baumgartner, R.J., & Ebner, D. 2010. Corporate sustainability strategies: sustainability profiles and maturity levels. Sustainable Development, 18(2), 76-89.

Doppelt, B. & Mcdonough, W. 2010. Leading change toward sustainability: a change- management guide for business, government and civil society, (Updated 2nd ed.), Sheffield: Greenleaf, pp57-74.

Friedman, M. 1970/2009. The Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Profits. In W. Cragg, M.S. Schwartz and D. Weitzner (Eds.), Corporate social responsibility 31-36. Farnham, England; Burlington, VT: Ashgate.

Ihlen, O. & Roper, J. 2011. Corporate Reports on Sustainability and Sustainable Development: We Have Arrived. Sustainable Development, 2 Mar 2011. Retrieved from http://www.academia.edu/1775004/Corporate_reports_on_sustainability_and_sustainable _development_We_have_arrived
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Conservation Biology the Objective of

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42945604

The role of the current in trajectory movements is significant, particularly in species such as the leatherback turtle, as it provides at times unexpected information regarding the animal's sense of direction and purpose in terms of its environment. In the conservation effort, it is therefore very important to consider the influence of current upon animal movement.

3)

Conservation can only be effectively applied when behavior and movement are interpreted to the highest degree of accuracy. The study reveals the importance of current influence on marine life movement. Although larger and faster marine animals will not be as influenced by the current as the leatherback turtle, there will certainly be an impact. While important to study the movements of marine life, the influence of currents on the study of foraging behavior is even more important. This will determine the focus of conservation on specific foraging areas in order to ensure sustainability…… [Read More]

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Chitrid Fungus Chytrid Fungus and

Words: 740 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17718604

aising awareness about the presence of the disease amongst amphibian owners is essential, so they do not dispose of unwanted pets and infect wild populations. It is also essential that hikers and casual outdoor observers do not move frogs from one area to another, for fear of spreading the illness. Signs of the sickness in the frogs include discolored, peeling, or rough skin; lethargy, and lack of appetite. However, people should be aware that many frogs initially show no sign of the illness. Additionally, campers and hikers should "clean and dry all equipment and wet or muddy footwear before and between visiting frog sites. This may include cleaning the tires of your vehicle before visiting known high-risk sites where threatened frog species may live" (Frog, 2008, DECC). Zoos should also be made aware of the need to carefully monitor their amphibians, particularly because captive populations can be treated for the…… [Read More]

References

Borrell, Brian. (2009). Is the frog-killing chytrid fungus fueled by climate fluctuations?

Scientific American. Retrieved July 27, 2010 at http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=frog-killing-chytrid-fungus-climate-fluctuations

Frog Chytrid fungus. (2008). DECC. Retrieved July 27, 2010 at  http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/animals/FrogChytridFungus.htm 

Pessier, Allan. (2010). Chytrid fungus. Amphibian ark. Retrieved July 27, 2010 at http://www.amphibianark.org/chytrid.htm#CanAmphibiansRecover
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Human Population There Are Two Primary Biological

Words: 565 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25464856

Human Population

There are two primary biological mechanisms that determine the growth and suspension of species: natality (birth) on the one hand, and mortality (death), on the other. Amongst humans, other factors may intervene in their natality factor and these include economics, migration, physical upkeep, and social forces of various sorts (Pearl, (1927). This is due to the fact that humans have a rational capacity that other organisms lack, hence humans can, using secondary factors, generally manufacture and design their own rate of growth, as well as engage in reproductive decision-making and in general decisions that lead to sustaining or annihilating their species. To that end, they can decide (which they have done at times) to annihilate one or other subcategories of their species, as well as to destroy themselves. Other animals, on the other hand, act in an instinctive manner, and lacking this rational choice-making ability, follow a more…… [Read More]

Reference

Cunningham, W.P., & Cunningham, M.A.(2009). Principals of Environmental Science: Inquiry & Applications (5th ed.) USA: McGraw Hill.

Pearl, R., (1927). The growth of populations. The Quarterly Review of Biology, 2, 532

Rosen, F. (2003). Classical Utilitarianism from Hume to Mill. USA: Routledge.
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Damns on Wildlife and the Environment Background

Words: 1720 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77674718

Damns on Wildlife and the Environment

Background to Dams and Levees - One of the issues resulting from civilization and urbanization is that most of the places humans chose to locate, for reasons of convenience, agriculture, transportation, and economic independence, have been near water. Dams provide hydroelectric power, help control floods, and make rivers navigable. Levees are quite similar to dams in their purpose, although they are primarily build to restrict water in times of high flow -- and for the majority of time are not under water. Per capita, floods are the most destructive and frequent of Mother Nature's natural disasters. In the last 50-60 years, in fact, the number and severity of flooding has worsened globally. Several reasons have contributed to this: global warming and worsening of storm activity; the deforestation and paving of natural watersheds; and more people living and working on known flood-plains. However, many scholars…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Dams Solution. (2010). U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Retrieved from:  http://www.fws.gov/r5crc/Habitat/damsolutions.html 

Berga, L. (2006). Dams and Reservoirs, Societies and Environment in the 21st Century, Volume 1. New York: Taylor and Francis.

Chiras, D. (2010). Environmental Science. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Drijiver, C. (1986). Taming the Floods: Environmental Aspects of Floodplain Development in Africa. Nature and Resources. 22 (4): Retrieved from:  http://openagricola.nal.usda.gov/Record/IND87078020
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Logging and Slash and Burn

Words: 512 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67097175

I would also like to know the suggested length of the canopy trees and the measurements of this 'partial shade'. (a third variable that I would like to know is what type of cacao they experimented with since there are different kinds).

These three aspects are important for the following reasons:

. The researchers may have studied only 2 rainforests in which case their research is insignificant. The rainforests may have had conditions that may have supported the researcher's conclusions -- we need a diversity of rainforests that contain different conditions in order to more reliably test hypothesis. The researchers may have conducted their research in an ad hoc manner or with certain shortfalls that would invalidate their conclusions. A scientific study needs to be both reliable and valid (in both external and internal way) to be accepted. Certain conditions for both elements need to be addressed. I would like…… [Read More]

1. The researchers may have studied only 2 rainforests in which case their research is insignificant. The rainforests may have had conditions that may have supported the researcher's conclusions -- we need a diversity of rainforests that contain different conditions in order to more reliably test hypothesis. The researchers may have conducted their research in an ad hoc manner or with certain shortfalls that would invalidate their conclusions. A scientific study needs to be both reliable and valid (in both external and internal way) to be accepted. Certain conditions for both elements need to be addressed. I would like to know whether researchers met these in order to know whether to accept study http://news.mongabay.com/2007/0305-sulawesi.html#DR35bKAtoweXgSRq.99

2. The height of the trees as well as diameter of shade is important in order to recreate study

3. Cacao comes in various types. I would like to know whether researchers experimented with just one kind or several in order to know whether to generalize to cacao as a whole.
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Firms Have Been Focused on Social Responsibility

Words: 1878 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57168208

firms have been focused on social responsibility. This is when a company will engage in different practices that take into account the viewpoints of various stakeholders (such as: communities, the environment and the impact on the firm).

In the case of Chevron, they claim that they are committed to protecting the environment at all costs.

Evidence of this can be seen with company's Operational Excellence Management System. Implemented in 2007, this is designed to take into account a number of different viewpoints when starting any kind of new project. The most notable include: possible social, environmental and safety issues. This program is illustrating how the company is focused on addressing issues that will be impacted by their activities.

However, Chevron is also dealing with challenges where they contributed to incidents that harmed the environment, health or interests of other stakeholders (i.e. The Brazilian offshore oil slick). The combination of these…… [Read More]

References

"2010 Corporate Social Responsibility." Chevron. Last modified 2010 http://www.chevron.com/globalissues/corporateresponsibility/2010/documents/Chevron_CR_Report_2010.pdf

"Barrow Island." Government of Western Australia. Last modified November 2009 http://www.dsd.wa.gov.au/7599.aspx

"Brazil to Charge Chevron Executives." BBC. Last modified March 18, 2012  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-17419404 

"China, Angola to Further Deepen Strategic Partnership." Xinhaunet. Last modified March 23, 2011  http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2011-03/23/c_13794266.htm
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Environmental Case Study Solving a Puzzle

Words: 1309 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21639584

Environmental Case Study (Alberta's Oil Sands)

Alberta's Oil Sands represents one of the international environmental problems facing Canada and close to seventy countries across the globe. Albert's Oil Sands proves to be a new course of political conflict within the setting of Canada and at the international level. Oil Sands development is responsible for rapid economic growth of Alberta. This creates ethical or moral dilemma because there is a massive risk in association with the development of Oil Sands within the province. Oil Sands contribute towards ecological harm thus having a negative impact on the living conditions of the individuals in the province and the entire planet. This ethical dilemma leads to mobilization processes by environmental entities to help alleviate the situation. This is because some prominent political outfits such as Peter Lougheed recognize that the rate of the development of the oil sands in Alberta is not socially or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brown, Jordan. "The Pembina Institute: Balancing Environmental Policy with Oil Sands Development in an Industry-Oriented Economy." Undercurrent 6.2 (2009): 7-16. Academic Search Complete. Web. 31 July 2012.

Dunbar, R.B. Existing and Proposed Canadian Commercial Oil Sands Projects. Calgary: Strategy West, April 2008. Available at:

Fairley, Peter. "Alberta's Oil Sands Heat Up." Technology Review 114.6 (2011): 52. MasterFILE Premier. Web. 31 July 2012.

Pasqualetti, Martin J. "The Alberta Oil Sands From Both Sides Of The Border." Geographical Review 99.2 (2009): 248-267. Academic Search Complete. Web. 31 July 2012.
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Saudi Arabian Community Problems and Solutions the

Words: 627 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67186953

Saudi Arabian Community: Problems and Solutions

The Saudi Arabian Community: Current Issues and Proposed Solutions

There are many problems affecting the Saudi Arabian community today. The said problems could be political, cultural, economic, or even environmental. This text concerns itself with a problem of an environmental nature. Two of the animals currently under threat of extinction in Saudi Arabia are the Arabian Oryx and the Saudi gazelle. ecently, pictures posted on the internet depicting slayed gazelles caused an outrage with most commentators branding the act irresponsible and intolerable (Toumi, 2013). If nothing is done to save the Arabian Oryx and the Saudi gazelle, the ecosystem could suffer great (and perhaps irreversible) damage.

I personally believe that we all have a role to play as we seek to save these two endangered species. It is for this reason that I have in the past shown great interest in this particular subject.…… [Read More]

References

Toumi, H. (2013). Saudis Lash Out at Gazelle Poachers. Gulfnews. Retrieved from http://gulfnews.com/news/gulf/saudi-arabia/saudis-lash-out-at-gazelle-poachers-1.1226358

Vincent, P. (2008). Saudi Arabia: An Environmental Overview. AK Leiden: Taylor and Francis.
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Environment There Could Be No

Words: 924 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53145054

In other industrialized countries, however, like Germany, Italy and Japan, the main concern of governments today is that not enough children are being born to even reach the level of the replacement rate. This is almost certainly a mistake since reduction of population should be the main goal in order to save the planet, and additional middle-class consumers in Western nations are the greatest burden on the environment.

Encouragement of voluntary euthanasia will be another method of reducing the excess population. Today many billions of dollars are spent on the last thirty days of life and 65% of physicians and nurses in one survey admitted that had provided unnecessary treatments for the terminally ill. That statistic was mentioned frequently in the debates over health care reform, with the implication that those dollars would be better spent on medical care for younger and healthier people at the start of their productive…… [Read More]

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A Ted Talk About Big Brands and Environment

Words: 707 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12517757

TED talk, Jason Clay talks about how the major buyers in the world like Cargill are the key to creating a sustainable future. Clay started out working on the side of the small farmers, going the traditional route of purchasing products at fair and equitable trade and driving consumer demand for sustainable products like Ben & Jerry's Rainforest Crunch ice cream. Then, Clay and his colleagues realized that they were not going to achieve their goals of massive transformations in the ways goods are produced without working with the big key players -- the organizations responsible for tearing down the rainforests to place cattle pasture or rainforests to plant palm oil plantations. Beef, lumber, soy, and certain types of fishing are among the top fifteen global products that are singularly responsible for much deforestation. ith current consumer-driven demand, there will be insufficient resources on the planet in the near future.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clay, Jason. "How Big Brands Can Help Save Biodiversity." Retrieved online:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcp5vvxtEaU
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Co-Learning for a Sustainable Future

Words: 3064 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84552246



Rutagarama, E. & Martin, a. (2006). Partnerships for protected area conservation in Rwanda.

The Geographical Journal, 172(4), 291-293.

Summary of the content: The authors work at the International Gorilla Conservation Programme, African Wildlife Foundation and School of Development Studies, University of East Anglia, Norwich, respectively, who emphasize the importance of developing networks of partnerships in developing countries that include national, regional and local government agencies as well communities, NGOs and the private sector to promote sustainable biodiversity conservation initiatives. Such partnerships can avoid the tendency to adopt extreme positions with respect to sustainable uses of natural resources such as the "fortress conservation" approach that discourages resource used by human populations on the one hand and the reckless use of natural resources with little regard for future sustainability on the other.

Describe of its potential application to topic: Many of the most valuable biodiverse environments are situated in developing nations, making…… [Read More]

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Wes Sechrest and Thomas M Brooks and

Words: 3038 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18757870

Wes Sechrest and Thomas M. rooks and published in the National Academy of Sciences reveals the results of a study they conducted investigating the varying levels of biodiversity distributed throughout the world. The authors employ a fairly novel approach in their measurements of biodiversity, specifically, relying upon two methods approximating the levels of evolutionary history endemic to twenty-five terrestrial "hotspots." The significance of evolutionary history as a measuring stick is that it is associated with the past importance of particular geographic locations, and implies that future evolution is threatened if these locations are threatened. Additionally, Sechrest and rooks find that their twenty-five defined hotspots house not only disproportionately large amounts of evolutionary history, but are also disproportionately threatened by the activities of man. The article stops short of attempting to identify any possible solutions to this impending problem, however, it does help to illuminate some of the shortcomings of our…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

1. Allaby M. 1999. Biomes of the World. Danbury: Grolier Educational. 64

2. Dodson S, Allen T. 1998. Ecology. New York: Oxford University. 434

3. Gallant R. The Wonders of Biodiversity. 2003. New York: Benchmark. 80

4. Sechrest W, Brooks T. 2002. Hotspots and the Conservation of Evolutionary History. The National Academy of Sciences. 19; 99(4): 2067-2071.
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Heritage Sites in Danger the

Words: 1746 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43209942

Additionally, conservationists suggest increasing patrols to improve overall enforcement of existing laws, better boundary demarcation, and the development of stronger hunting quotas. All of these measures require significant and lasting funding.

Current Status

This Park is in a state of crisis. ith most of its large mammals now extinct from the Park, and illegal users on the rise, Park Rangers are simply outmatched. Poachers can find a thriving market for illegal bushmeat and rare birds. Illegal loggers easily find buyers for rare trees. The Park is under-staffed and under-funded and soon to face new challenges if the upstream dam is built along the Gambia River as planned.

Conclusion

The Galapagos Islands and the Niokola-Koba National Park represent two of Planet Earth's most valuable treasures. They contain biodiversity that not only provides scientific opportunity but may support the health of the entire ecosystem in their respective regions. Both sites are listed…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Novy, Julia W. 2010. Incentive Measures for Conservation of Biodiversity and Sustainability: A Case Study of the Galapagos Islands. United Nations

Environment Program: WWF-USA.

UN Chronicle. 1999. Conservation of Endemic Biodiversity of the Galapagos World

Heritage Site. Available at: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1309/is_3_36/ai_58675442/
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Mekong River Basin Research Review

Words: 1275 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95974589

" (Coates, et al., 2003) Solutions that are know to be effective are "co-management approaches in the fishery sector which are already in use and highly effective on a local basis.

There are 1200 known species of fish and it is thought that there are as many as 1700 living in the Mekong River Basin. High diversity is present due to plant groups and other aquatic animal groups. The Mekong's ecosystem is one of complexity with variations in climate, geology, terrain and water flow." (Coates, et al. 2003) the results of these variations are a rich habitat that is said to 'rival that found on tropical coral reefs. The pictures below show the impact of the flooding of the Mekong.

Figure 2.0 Figure 2.1

Source: (Coates, et al., 2003)

III. Cultural Significance of the River

Diversity is important for the following reasons:

Direct Use Value: biodiversity is used directly as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coates D. et al. (2003) Biodiversity and Fisheries in the Mekong River Basin Mekong River Commission, Mekong Development Series No.2, 2003 June

Coates, D. (2001) Biodiversity and Fisheries Management Opportunities in the Mekong River Basin "Blue millennium-managing global fisheries for biodiversity. GEF-IDRC 3-7 July 2001. World Fisheries Trust, Victoria, Canada CD Rom.

Agreement on the Cooperation for the Sustainable Development of the Mekong River Basin Online available at http://www.mrcmekong.org/pdf/95%20Agreement.pdf

Mekong River Basin
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Artificial Lighting -- Impacts on

Words: 3253 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61636063

The authors explain that "Large-scale habitat loss and fragmentation…" that results from urban sprawl is a major cause of the lack of biodiversity within the insect species (Acharya, 1999, 27). Even the building of a new road, or street lights, in places where previously there were no roads or lights, what the authors call "undisturbed areas," has an impact on insect biodiversity, Acharya explains. Meanwhile, moths, which are known to be drawn to light, have trigger mechanisms that detect the echolocation signals of bats; and on the other hand bats feed "…heavily" on moths, Acharya continues; in fact many bat species use moths as their "main food item" (Acharya, 27).

The point of that information (and of this study) in this peer-reviewed piece is that if "…eared moths" exhibit behaviors that allow them to avoid bat attacks, they would not be caught as often by bats and hence this would…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Acharya, Lilita, and Fenton, Brock M 1999. 'Bat attacks and moth defensive behaviour around street lights.' Canadian Journal of Zoology, vol. 77, 27-32.

Chepesiuk, Ron. 2009. 'Missing the Dark: Health Affects of Light Pollution.' Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 117, 20-27.

Conrad, Kelvin F., Warren, Martin S., Fox, Richard, Parsons, Mark S., and Woiwod, Ian P. 'Rapid declines of common, widespread British moths provide evidence of an insect biodiversity crisis.' Biological Conservation, vol. 132, 279-291

Duverge, Laurent P., Jones, Gareth, Rydell, Jens, and Ransome, Roger D. 2000. 'Functional significance of emergence timing in bats.' Ecography, vol. 23, 32-39.
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Energy Conservation Mitigation Strategies and

Words: 2216 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27204905



Bibliography

Ecological Preservation at the Hart of Dynamic Boca de Iguanas Development (2008) St. Michael Strategies (SMS) Press Release. PR.com online available at http://www.pr.com/press-release/35513

Jeffrey Chow, Raymond J. Kopp, Paul R. Portney. (2003). Energy resources and global development. Science, 302(5650), 1528-31. Retrieved September 5, 2008, from Research Library database. (Document ID: 490116241).

Mattson, K.M., and Angermeier, P.L. (2007) Integrating Human Impacts and Ecological Integrity into a Risk-Based Protocol for Conservation Planning Journal of Environmental Management Vol. 39, No. 1 Jan 2007. Online available at http://www.springerlink.com/content/t13674l78j31jq05/

Maximizing building performance: through environmental strategies (2003) Buildings 1 July 2003. Online available at http://www.allbusiness.com/operations/facilities/601308-1.html

Negative Secondary Impacts from Oil and Gas Development (nd) the Energy & Biodiversity Initiative. Online available at http://www.theebi.org/pdfs/impacts.pdf

Santopietro, George D. (2005) Raising Environmental Consciousness vs. Creating Economic Incentives as Alternative Policies for Environmental Protection Journal; Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 29, 1995. Excerpt online available at http://www.questia.com/googleScholar.qst?docId=5000322449

APPENDIX 'A'…… [Read More]

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Conversation Biology

Words: 882 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 855098

Conservation Biology

Explain what conservation biology is and highlight its goals.

Conservation biology is a branch of biological sciences which is primarily concerned with the preservation of life on earth including organisms which are classified as plants and animals. It examines biodiversity and ways and means in which the biodiversity of life on Earth can best be sustained (Sahney 2008,-page 759). This branch of biological study began as a reaction to the growing concern over extinction of species and disruption of habitats because of natural disasters and/or the actions and behaviors of human beings and industrialization. Interactions between species, particularly the interaction between humans and native populations is of particular interest to conservation biologists, particularly in terms of negative effects of human interaction.

The goals of conversation biologists are to protect various species as well as their habitats and ecosystems. They also want to prevent the extinction of species and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fujikawa, T. & Dougherty, J. (2010). The value of biodiversity and its impact on human health.

David Suzuki Foundation.

Sadava, et al. (2011). Life: the Science of Biology Volume 2. 9th ed. Sinauer: Gordonsville, VA.

Sahney, S. & Benton, M. (2008). Recovery from the most profound mass extinction of all time.
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Forests and Fens

Words: 1363 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23474565

Ecosystems

Exploitation

Forests have long been exploited. They are harvested for their timber, or cleared for agricultural land, both activities being entirely destructive to the ecosystem. The fen exists typically within the forest, and is not usually subject to exploitation until the forest itself is, because the forest acts as a natural barrier for the fen. The destruction of forests for timber is arguably the lesser of the two forms of exploitation, at least in countries with active silviculture programs, as the forests will have the potential to regenerate. However the destruction of forest ecosystems is associated with several negative outcomes. The biodiversity of the forest system is reduced, and this effect is stronger the more forest is cleared. Destruction for agriculture is permanent, which means that the loss of biodiversity is permanent. Endemic and endangered species are rendered extinct, or their numbers reduced (Chediack, 2008).

Fenland is often exploited…… [Read More]

References

Breward, N. (2003). Heavy-metal contaminated soils associated with drained fenland in Lancashire, England, UK, revealed by BGS Soil Geochemical Survey. Applied Geochemistry. Vol. 18 (11) 1663-1670.

Chediack, S. (2008). The effect of forest exploitation on structure, diversity, and floristic composition of palmito-dominated Atlantic forests at Misiones, Argentina. Rev. Bio. Trop. Vol 56 (2) 721-738.

Fredeen, A. (2007) . Climate change and the mountain pine beetle. University of Northern British Columbia. Retrieved April 27, 2015 from http://www.unbc.ca/releases/2007/climate-change-and-mountain-pine-beetle

Sasaki, N. & Putz, F. (2009). Critical need for new definitions of forest and forest degradation in global climate change agreements. Conservation Letters. Vol. 2009, 1-7.
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Bamboo Industry in India Bamboo

Words: 6798 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19886807

S. production value. Exports account for approximately half this amount (Binnquist, Lopez, and Shanley). Figure 2 portrays three views of bamboo. One: A bamboo forrest; Two: A bamboos shoot; Three: A bamboo grove walkway.

Figure 2: Three Views of Bamboo (adapted from Stickman).

As bamboo production levels have risen, the amounts of raw materials needed to facilitate the production have simultaneously increased. The bamboo industry in Anji predominantly harvests bamboo from plantations, as it primarily grows a fast growing and easily cultivated, bamboo species, locally known as "maozhu" or "moso bamboo" (phyllostachys heterocycla) (Binnquist, Lopez, and Shanley). .

Currently in Anji, the cultivation of moso bamboo encompasses 60% of the forest area, with the percentage rising as plantations expand. Along with the hefty production of bamboo, the intense cultivation bamboo industry uses mammoth amounts of fertilizers and pesticides; which contributes to negative environmental effects. In reference to the bamboo production…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Applegate, Ed and Johnsen, Art. Cases in advertising and marketing management: real =

situations for tomorrow's managers Plymouth, United Kingdom: Rowman & Littlefield, 2007. Print.

Adhikary, Nripal. "Treatment Process." Abari Adobe and Bamboo Research Institute. 2009.

Web. Available at: . 09 October 2009.
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Compulsory Licensing of Patents

Words: 4596 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41113305

Compulsory Licensing of Patents

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the causes and affects of the compulsory licensing of pharmaceutical products. Initially, the paper highlights the fundamental positions, attitude, inclination and concerns of the developed world and the under developed world with regard to the intellectual property rights of the pharmaceutical products. The paper also concentrates on the subject of the intellectual property rights of the biotechnology products (plants); this is because plants are the major source of almost all pharmaceutical products being used today. Furthermore, it is a matter of fact that the patentability of plants has been given a lot of attention by the developed world, in particular United States of America, as well as, the developing World. The paper also exposes the priorities of both the developed world and the under developed world, priorities that have been a major hurdle in all previous negotiations on…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bernard Pecoul et al., Access to Essential Drugs in Poor Countries: A Lost Battle? 281 JAMA 361, 365 (1999).

David P. Fidler, International Law and Global Public Health, 48 KAN. L. REV. 1, 29 (1999).

David Benjamin Snyder, Comment, South Africa's Medicines and Related Substances Control Amendment Act: A Spoonful of Sugar or a Bitter Pill to Swallow?, 18 DICK. J. INT'L L. 175, 190 (1999).

David P. Fidler, Symposium on Globalization at the Margins: Perspectives on Globalization from Developing States: Neither Science Nor Shamans: Globalization of Markets and Health in the Developing World, 7 IND. J. GLOBAL LEG. STUD. 191, 212-213 (1999).
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Environmental Assessment Is an Integral

Words: 4249 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9743736

Strategic assessment

2. Project Preparation

3. Project Implementation'

4. Facility Operation

These four assessment tools are to be standalone tools that are applied at specific stages of the Gipsy Lane brickworks road extension and the industrial development project life cycle. The assessment with one of the tools has no link or dependence with earlier stages. The tools of assessment are to be designed in a manner that they are applicable throughout the planning stage up to the point of making decisions in the project life cycle (See figure 1.).

The process of protocol assessment (Source: IHA, 2010).

The tools are to undergo repeated application so as to help in the continuous improvement of the process.

Strategic Assessments section

This section is important for the assessment of the strategic basis of the Gipsy Lane brickworks project. This part is most applicable at the stage when the Gipsy Lane brickworks is still…… [Read More]

References

Gratton, C., & Jones, I. (2003). Research methods for sport studies. New York: Routledge.

Fraenkel, J.R. & Wallen, N.E. (2001). Educational research: A guide to the process. Mahwah,

NJ:

Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Impact of Mass Tourism on the Culture of Ibiza

Words: 2840 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58482876

mass tourism on the culture of Ibiza

Ibiza in Spain is one of the best-preserved medieval islands in Europe. The island is closest of all the Balearic Islands to mainland Spain and has a 200 km coastline. Although it has a reputation as a party island, there is much more to it than nightclubs. There are many small coves and over 50 beaches. One can view other Ibiza attractions, museums, events, festivals and travel. Ibiza has earned the title of "Clubbing Capital" of the world. The temperatures range from 20 degrees Celsius in May to around 27 in August. The population hovers around 110000 while the language spoken is Castilian Spanish. The currency accepted is the Euro. During the 1990's, tourism was boosted in the island when it earned the Guinness ecord as the entertainment industry in the world. Since it has around 300 days of sunshine throughout the year,…… [Read More]

References

Ibiza Information" Retrieved at http://www.ibiza.world-guides.com/. Accessed on 10 May 2004.

Tourism and Environment on the Island of Ibiza" Retrieved at http://www.ecociencia.com/tourism.htm. Accessed on 10 May '2004.

Tourism and Biodiversity" Retrieved at http://www.ukotcf.org/pdf/calpe/calpe125-144.pdf. Accessed on 10 May '2004.

Ibiza Uncovered" Retrieved at http://www.drugtext.org/library/articles/bellis.htm. Accessed on 10 May '2004.
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Effectiveness of ASEAN

Words: 14078 Length: 37 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84307607

ASEAN

The study will be delving into: What ASEAN constitutes and what remains beyond its scope? The aim of this study will be handing out a wide-ranging presentation of the present stance of ASEAN and its accomplishments till date, along with its challenges. The paper is intended as a suggestion for a master-plan that can be employed as a future pathway where ASEAN political-security support must be going towards in the forthcoming years.

To start with let us have a brief introduction of the organization. The creators of the Association of South East Asian Nations - ASEAN, visualized it as ultimately assembling all the nations of the region and managing them to lend a hand in assuring the peace, permanence and growth of the area. While the area was in a state of turmoil, a lot of nations were under pressure for the existence of the nation or autonomy. First…… [Read More]

References

ADBI (2002) "Did East Asian Developing Countries lose Export Competitiveness in the pre- Crisis 1990's?" ADBI Research Paper 34; Tokyo.

Altbach, Eric. (1999) "Growing Pains: ASEAN at 30" Japan Economic Institute Report. No. 23; June 19

Author Unkown. (1999) "Weathering the Storm: Hong Kong and the Asian Financial Crisis" Conference sponsored by the Far Eastern Economic Review. Hong Kong. 11 June.

Baietti Aldo. (2001) "Private Infrastructure in East Asia: Lessons Learned in the Aftermath of the Crisis." Washington, D.C. World Bank.
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Urban Drainage System Sustainable Urban

Words: 3018 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12969064

If there is an aggregate sub-base, these can provide water quality treatment. There should be good compaction and appropriate geo-textiles especially for areas accessible to heavy vehicles.

Permeable pavements reduce the need for deep excavations thereby providing a cost benefit. This system reduces the run-off rates and peak flow. The overall benefit is that it removes pollutants and holds water so that it does enter the main drainage. A lot of water in the main drainage would either need pumping or treating thereby using energy (Wild et al. 2002).

4.5. Swales

They are continuous vegetated drainage systems which convey or store water while allowing filtration when appropriate. Usually, they are the equivalent of roadside gullies or drainage pipes in conventional drainage systems. However, swales have gentle gradient so that water moves at low velocity. The sediments in storm water run-off can, therefore, settle out.

The advantage of swales is that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Apostolaki, S., Jefferies, C., Smith, M. & Woods-Ballard B. 2002, Social Acceptability of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems. Proc. 5th Symposium of the International Planning and Environmental Association. Oxford, September.

Apostolaki, S, Jefferies, C. & Smith, M. 2003, the Perception and Social Acceptability of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems. Proc. 1st International Conference on Sustainable Development & Management of the Subsurface. 5-7 Nov. Utrech, the Netherlands

Construction Industry Research and Information Association (CIRIA) 2000, Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems -- design manual for Scotland and Northern Ireland. Report No. 521

Construction Industry Research and Information Association (CIRIA) 2002, Source Control Using Constructed Pervious Surfaces. Report No. 582
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Sustainable Tourism Does Not Destroy the Environment

Words: 2800 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87777579

Sustainable tourism does not destroy the environment, economy, or cultural aspects of the tourist destination (David Vaughan, 2000). Sustainable tourism is aimed at ensuring that those concerned are not affected in any way and that a positive development is realized through it. Back in the 1980s, ecotourism which consisted of activities such as wildlife exotic cultures and nature, became more common with remarkably few people understanding what the impacts of such tourism are, this led to its pitfall (Erlet, 1993). Therefore, sustainable tourism helps to improve all associated impact of tourism as a whole, and this can steadily be achieved through seeking partnership between various governments, local community and any stakeholder in the tourism industry.

How sustainable tourism can be achieved

esearches done in this field indicate that for sustainable tourism to be achieved all efforts should be channeled towards fostering co-ordination and cooperation between managers of the tourism destination…… [Read More]

References

CEVAT, T. 2001. Challenges of sustainable tourism development in the developing world: the case of Turkey. Tourism Management, 22, 289-303.

COLIN, H. 1997. Sustainable tourism as an adaptive paradigm. Annals of Tourism Research, 24, 850-867.

DAVID A. LERTZMAN & HARRIE VREDENBURG 2005. Indigenous Peoples, Resource Extraction and Sustainable Development: An Ethical Approach. Journal of Business Ethics, 56, 239-254

DAVID VAUGHAN 2000. Tourism and Biodiversity: A Convergence of Interests? International Affairs, 76, 283-297.
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Why Evolution and Extinction Is Essential to Humanity

Words: 1812 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58087893

Extinction Events or Environmental Catastrophes

Many uncertainties exist over the acts and roles of extinction in the world today. Nonetheless, with all these uncertainties, it is possible to formulate reasonable statements that depict the probable role of extinction. The role of extinction can be thought to have some elements, most of which are instrumental in striking the relationship and power seen in evolution and extinction in the earth's history up to the appearance of hominids (8 million years ago) . For any widespread species or any group of a widespread species, extinction needs some bit of environmental shock that comes in the form of physical or biological aspects that normally occur. Such occurrences take place during the geological lifespans of the given species or groups of species. In this case, the shock that is resulting has to be applied with a rapidness that is enough to take place over a…… [Read More]

Reference list

Abe, Takuya, Simon A. Levin, and M. Higashi. 1997. Biodiversity and Ecological Perspective. New York, NY: Springer New York. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-1906-4.

Courtillot, Vincent. 2002. Evolutionary Catastrophes: The Science of Mass Extinction. Cambridge [U.A.]: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Fry, Iris. 2000. The Emergence of Life on Earth: A Historical and Scientific Overview. New Brunswick, NJ [U.A.]: Rutgers University Press.

Kolbert, Elizabeth. 2014. The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History. New York, Routledge.
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Perceptions and Points-Of-View Who Do

Words: 1610 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40584432

2006). According to Branch et al., "Essentially, a public participation program may be deemed effective to the extent that it provides for open disclosure and addresses all four acceptability dimensions in ways that are appropriate and effective for a particular community and situation" (2006, p. 724). Therefore, the EPA's decision-making process in this case would likely have been different had all four of these dimensions being taking into consideration and efforts made to adequately satisfy each of these requirements in the final outcome.

eferences

Arentsen, M.J., Bressers, H. & O'Toole, L.J. 2001 'Institutional and Policy esponses to Uncertainty in Environmental Policy: A Comparison of Dutch and U.S. Styles.' Policy

Studies Journal, vol. 28, no. 3, p. 597.

Benton, . & Funkhouser, G.. 1994 'Environmental Attitudes and Knowledge: An

International Comparison among Business Students.' Journal of Managerial Issues, vol.

6, no. 3, pp. 366-368.

Branch, K.M., Bradbury, J.A. & Malone, E.…… [Read More]

References

Arentsen, M.J., Bressers, H. & O'Toole, L.J. 2001 'Institutional and Policy Responses to Uncertainty in Environmental Policy: A Comparison of Dutch and U.S. Styles.' Policy

Studies Journal, vol. 28, no. 3, p. 597.

Benton, R. & Funkhouser, G.R. 1994 'Environmental Attitudes and Knowledge: An

International Comparison among Business Students.' Journal of Managerial Issues, vol.
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Dinosaurs and Massive Reptiles Are

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31307695

..the giant salamander, 2010, Cryptozooscity).

There are fears that giant salamanders may meet the same fate as dinosaurs, given that modern life has exposed them to quick-moving, larger-brained humans who consider them a delicacy and will hunt them with greater determination than previous predators. The amphibian's size makes them "lucrative prey for hunters, who can sell the flesh for around U.S.$100 per kg (£30 per lb)," a considerable sum when one salamander can grow to over one hundred pounds (Black 2005). "They are protected species; but in China, illegal hunting is bringing them within sight of extinction" (Black 2005). Observed one conservationist: "They are easy to catch, hiding in rock crevasses during the day, and people know where to find them" (Black 2005).

The loss of these giant relics would not merely be a loss of a link to human evolutionary history of the past: the salamanders may also provide…… [Read More]

References

Black, Richard. (2005, September 19). Hunting threat to big amphibians. BBC News. Retrieved July 27, 2010 at  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4259596.stm 

Giant salamanders may help scientists fight extinction threat. (2010, July 21). CNN. Retrieved

July 27, 2010 at http://www.latimes.com/sns-giant-salamander,0,3628440.story

The living fossil...the giant salamander (2010, February). Cryptozooscity. Retrieved July 27, 2010 at  http://cryptozoo-oscity.blogspot.com/2010/02/living-fossilthe-giant-salamander.html
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Global Warming Evidence for Global

Words: 2816 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63822566

S. Department of State). Since them the severity and frequency of bleaching events continues to increase. These bleaching events correlate with rising average sea temperatures on a global basis, rising sea levels, and more frequent tropical storms fueled by increasingly stronger heat masses (U.S. Department of State).

In addition to coral reef bleaching, the geographic ranges of many plants and animals are shifting. Plant and animal ranges are generally limited by climatic factors, with animals able to respond to climate changes faster than plants due to increased mobility (EPA, Ecosystems and Biodiversity). ecently, changes have been noticed in the ranges of several species. Those that cannot adapt to the new climate will quickly become extinct. Currently, nearly 20-30% of all plant and animal species are in danger of becoming extinct in the near future, with many of these extinctions related to climate change (EPA, Ecosystems and Biodiversity). However, climate change…… [Read More]

References

Begley, S. The Truth About Denial. Newsweek. August 13, 2007.

< http://www.newsweek.com/id/32482 > Accessed June 1, 2009.

Canadell, J., Le Quere, C., and Raupach, M., et al. Contributions to accelerating atmospheric

CO2 growth from economic activity, carbon intensity, and efficiency of natural sink.