Biomechanics Essays (Examples)

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Biomechanical Principles

Words: 1555 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68633730

Biomechanical Priciples

Biomechanical Principles

Biomechanics is the study of mechanical and physics principles in relation to motion in sports. Every sport has its biomechanical theories and each one is specialized to that particular skill with equations derived from Newtonian physics and knowledge of the human body and its capabilities. When combined and properly practiced, biomechanics can improve an athletes overall performance, making the athlete superior to their competitors.

The freestyle arm-pull in swimming is a precise study in the art of biomechanics introduced for an efficient result. It is an established fact that water is 773 times as dense as air and 55 times as viscous (Miller, 1975). What this means is that planning an efficient stroke in water is going to require greater strategy than planning an efficient stroke in air. The primary factors that go into creating the ideal stroke in swimming are vectors, motion, force, work, and…… [Read More]

References

Boone, Tommy; Birnbaum, Larry (2005). Exercise Physiology: Professional Issues, Organizational Concerns, and Ethical Trends. Edward Mellen Pr.

Burkett, Brendan (2012). Basic principles for understanding sport mechanics. Human Kinetics. Accessed 14 March 2012 from  http://www.humankinetics.com/excerpts/excerpts/basic-mechanical-principles 

Miller, Doris (1975). Biomechanics of Swimming. Exercise and Sport Sciences. Vol. 3.1, 219-248.

Richardson, AR (1986). The Biomechanics of Swimming: The Shoulder and Knee. Clin Sports Med. Vol 5.1, 103-13.
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Shin Splints From Ecs Conditions

Words: 4210 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40062881



Practical esearch Finding Implementation and Experimentation Stage -- Phase I

The experimenter did not set out to determine specifically which of the various contributing factors (or combinations of factors) identified by the empirical research of medial tibial stress syndrome was most responsible for the experimenter's symptoms. However, since the initial attempts to resolve the symptoms incorporated changes to all of the external variables except a change in running surface, the experimenter immediately sought a softer running surface and temporarily abandoned running on any hard surface that magnified instead of minimized the physiological trauma associated with running on harder surfaces.

Because the empirical research also implicated poor running stride mechanics and excessive vertical elevation, the experimenter devoted considerable attention to making the following specific changes to the running stride: (1) shorter strides to minimize travel of the body while neither foot is in contact with the running surface; (2) conscious attempts…… [Read More]

References

AOS. (2007). Shin Splints. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Retrieved October 20, 2009, from:  http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00407 .

Braver, R. "How to Test and Treat Exertional Compartment Syndrome: Why the ECS

Diagnosis Is Often Missed" Podiatry Today; Vol. 15 (May 1, 2002). Retrieved

October 20, 2009, from: http://www.podiatrytoday.com/article/382
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Anterior Cruciate Ligament or ACL

Words: 2193 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30046943

esearchers believe that incorporating evidence-based prevention methods can decrease the incidence of ACL ruptures, but an understanding of the etiology and mechanisms of sports injury are a necessary to do this (Posthumus, 2009).

The highest prevalence of extrinsic ACL injuries tends to occur in organized sports especially adolescents participating in pivoting type sports such as football, basketball, and team handball (Bahr & Krosshaug, 2005). In addition to any intrinsic factors and adolescent may have, or predisposing factors, environmental factors surrounding organized sports can also play a role in injury. For example, weather conditions (slippery surface), type of surface sport is played on (grass vs. pavement), proper footwear, and protective bracing (Posthumus, 2009).

A growing concern regarding these injuries and the populations that incur them is that these injuries increase the risk of osteoarthritis (Bahr & Krosshaug, 2005). In fact, after ten years, around half of all people that have suffered…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ageberg, E., Thombe, R., Neeter, C., Gravare Silbernagel, K., Roos, EM. Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Treated With Training and Surgical Reconstruction or Training Only: A Two to Five-Year Followup. Arthritis Care & Research. 2008; 59(12):1773-79.

Bahr, R., Krosshaug, T. Understanding injury mechanisms: a key component of preventing injuries in sport. Br J. Sports Med. 2005; 39:324 -- 329.

Grindstaff, TL., Hammill, RR., Tuzson, AE., Hertel, J. Neuromuscular Control Training Programs and Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Rates in Female Athletes: A Numbers-Needed-to-Treat Analysis. Journal of Athletic Training. 2006; 41(4):450 -- 456.

Health Information Publications (2011). What is the anterior cruciate ligament? eHealthMD retrieved from  http://ehealthmd.com
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Man With a Movie Camera

Words: 2460 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57736521



A perfect example of this is located in Chapter three. Chapter three opens with the camera zooming steadily in on a window. The shot then cuts to a shot of streetlights, establishing the time of day as early morning. Even though simply not enough of the room is exhibited to demonstrate what exactly exists within it, the shot following the streetlight is of a woman in bed, strongly suggesting it was her bedroom that the camera was stealthily creeping up to in order to peep through the lace curtains unbeknownst to the sleeping woman.

This voyeurism keeps going even as the aforementioned woman gets up, washes and dresses in various sequences interspersed in chapter three. Vertov's camera cuts from the sleeping woman to the painting on the wall of an old man, located and leering as if he too were watching her sleep.

This voyeurism is further emphasized by the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barnouw, Erik (1993) Documentary: A History of the Non-Fiction Film. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press.

Barsam, Richard M (1973) Nonfiction Film: A Critical History. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Beller, Jonathan L (1999) Dziga Vertov and the Film of Money, Boundary 2: An International Journal of Literature and Culture. 26 (3). Duke University Press.

Guynn, William (1990) A Cinema of Nonfiction. Rutherford: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
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Env Design the Field of Ergonomics Takes

Words: 440 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78698230

Env Design

The field of ergonomics takes into account the following:

Anthropometrics (body measurements)

Biomechanics and physiology

Environmental Ergonomics.

Cognitive ergonomics

Ergonomics design and evaluation

Ergonomics specific needs

Ergonomics law

Three Components of Ergonomics and Environmental / Interior Design

• Anthropometry: body size, strength, shape, and work capacity.

• Ergonomics: study of behavior and activities of people; adapting systems and workstations to the needs of users; different applications in various fields such as biomechanics, environmental, cognitive science

• Relation to Environmental / Interior Design: "Anthropometric data are used to design workspaces, safety equipment and personal protection tools considering the differences between the characteristics, abilities, and physical limits of any particular human body," (p 3)

Key Points of Ergonomic Design

Appropriate for the end user (age, gender)

Do not rely on "average man" theory, which rarely works

Keep in mind reach, clearance, and adjustability factors

Time and funding are considerations in…… [Read More]

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Management of Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Patient

Words: 3435 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7686776

Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Patient

Management OF OSTEOMYELITIS IN THE DIABETIC PATIENT

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone or bone marrow which is typically categorized as acute, subacute or chronic.1 It is characteristically defined according to the basis of the causative organism (pyogenic bacteria or mycobacteria) and the route, duration and physical location of the infection site.2 Infection modes usually take one of three forms: direct bone contamination from an open fracture, puncture wound, bone surgery, total joint replacement, or traumatic injury; extension of a soft tissue infection such as a vascular ulcer; or hematogenous (blood borne) spread from other infected areas of the body such as the tonsils, teeth or the upper respiratory system.2(p807) Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli are the most common causative agents of the disease, although viruses, parasites and fungi may also lead to the development of osteomyelitis.3

Patients…… [Read More]

References

1. Stedman's Medical Dictionary. 27th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2000.

2. Butalia S, Palda V, Sargeant R, Detsky A, Mourad O. Does This Patient With Diabetes Have Osteomyelitis of the Lower Extremity?. JAMA: Journal of The American Medical Association [serial online]. February 20, 2008; 299(7):806-813. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.

3. Lavery L, Peters E, Armstrong D, Wendel C, Murdoch D, Lipsky B. Risk factors for developing osteomyelitis in patients with diabetic foot wounds. Diabetes Research & Clinical Practice [serial online]. March 2009; 83(3):347-352. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.

4. Turns M. The diabetic foot: an overview of assessment and complications. British Journal of Nursing [serial online]. August 12, 2011;:S19-S25. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.
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Motor Control and Motor Learning

Words: 888 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39263005

new branch of science called Sports Science that respectively makes use of motor learning and motor control in the sports industry.

Sports Science

Motor learning and motor control is a field of science that is being studied from a sports point-of-view. Motor learning is connected to all the processes and conditions that affect one's ability to acquire skills, while motor control ascertains neuromuscular performance of individuals. Many people are taking great interest in the learning of motor skills and expertise, and the development of coordination. This new field of sports is based on the use of the knowledge base in the movement and sport sciences, cognitive sciences, and also physical therapy.

Sports science is a new area of study that is forcing people to explore the scientific explanation for David Beckham's superb soccer skills, and even wondering what would Wimbledon be like if say Pete Sampras had to use an…… [Read More]

References

Computational Learning and Motor Control Lab, available at http://www-slab.usc.edu/,accessed on: November 20, 2003

Graduate Programs: Masters in Motor Control, available at http://www.indiana.edu/~kines/ms_motor.html, accessed on: November 20, 2003

JCU - Motor Learning and Motor Control, available at: www.jcu.edu.au/school/phtm/ises/lev3sub/sp34hbk.html, accessed on: November 20, 2003

Motor Behavior Specialization - Doctoral Degree Program, available at http://www.hhp.ufl.edu/ess/grad/motrbeh1.htm, accessed on: November 20, 2003
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Diagnosis of Injures and Development

Words: 1994 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55529556

Next, arch your back in the opposite direction, contracting your abs and pushing your lower back toward the ceiling while lowering the top of your head toward the floor. Make sure that all movement is initiated and controlled by your lower back. Repeat three times in each direction.

Tail wag- Get down on all fours and look down at the floor. Keeping your shoulders still, slowly push your right hip as far as you can toward your right shoulder. Then, slowly return to the starting position and repeat the exercise on the other side, pushing your left hip toward your right shoulder. Repeat three times on each side.

Upper back stretch- Sit on a stool with your head and back flat against a wall. Lift your arms over your head and hold for five seconds. Try to make your shoulders touch the wall while keeping your back flat, and hold…… [Read More]

401. Available from  http://www.racgp.org.au/afp/200406/20040601jensen.pdf 

Rogers, Sabrina. (2010). Top 10: exercises for back pain. Available from  http://www.askmen.com/top_10/fitness/26c_fitness_list.html 

Maisie, M. (2010). Exercises to Release Sciatic Nerve Pain. Available from  http://www.buzzle.com/articles/exercises-to-release-sciatic-nerve-pain.html
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Mountain Bike Rear Suspension Pds

Words: 1168 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70350405

The system also has to undergo thousands of cycles and vibrations and needs to be able to stand up to the same reliability standards as the rest of the components on the bike.

Conventional and Proven ear Suspension Designs

Given all of the previously mentioned considerations, the design itself is important in making sure the rider and the manufacturer are getting the most out of the system.

The Fox acing Homepage (2011) has some excellent examples of both the strut style rear suspension as well as the shock with spring and strut combination system. The latter is typically reserved for use on higher-end advanced bikes since these systems are costlier and requires more maintenance. To be more specific, the Van C product represents the higher-end strut and spring combination while the Float design is a basic, oil dampened design for use on more entry-level designs. The Van C model is…… [Read More]

References

Bu, Yan; Tian Huang, Zhongxia Xiang, Xiaofan Wu and Chun Chen. (2010). "Optimal design of mountain bicycle based on biomechanics." Transactions of Tianjin University,

Volume 16, Number 1, 45-49.

DT Swiss Homepage. (2011). Accessed Jan. 5 at:

http://www.dtswiss.com/Products/Suspension/DT-Swiss-Shocks.aspx.
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Kinesiology I Am Choosing Sphere

Words: 977 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43070554

The intrinsic approach revolves around the subjective exhilaration and personal meaning that one receives from physical activity; the 'high' that it gives us and the consequent motivation to persist.

Jeff has to find the exercise component that personally gives him the greatest satisfaction and exhilaration and that is relevant to strengthening his back. Finding an activity that is enjoyable for him to engage in and seeing definite results will merge the subjective and extrinsic approaches causing Jeff to retain the motivation to engage in this exercise on a long-term basis.

Factors primary to the enjoyment of the physical activity are that they must provide Jeff with evenly matched challenges -- it must be neither too difficult for him nor too simple, so that he will neither be discouraged nor bored. He must, also, receive clear goals and feedback so that he will best know how to practice the exercise. Feedback…… [Read More]

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Companion Diagnostics Translational Medicines

Words: 4711 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9971327

Translational medicine is a new discipline, which covers studies on basic science, on human investigations, non-human investigations, and translational research (Mankoff et al. 2004). asic science studies address the biological effects of medicines on human beings. Studies on humans discover the biology of disease and serve as foundation for developing therapies. Non-human or non-clinical studies advance therapies for clinical use or use in human disease. And translational research refers to appropriate product development for clinical use. Translational research looks into the identity, purity and potency of a drug product during early clinical trial (Mankoff et al.). Translating the knowledge derived from basic sciences into clinical research and treatments is the task of translational medicine (Nagappa 2006). There is a groaning need for this type of research on account of voluminous information in the information age. Using this information is the challenge encountered by scientists and healthcare providers everywhere in the…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hersh, William. A Stimulus to Define Informatics and Health Information Technology.

Vol 9 BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making: BioMed Central Ltd., 2009.

Retrieved on November 24, 2010 from  http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6947/24 

Mankoff, Stacey P. et al. Lost in Translation: Obstacles to Translational Medicine Vol 2
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Nike Inc

Words: 1787 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40015853

viable marketing plan for the footwear giant, Nike. The plan has been adequately substantiated with thorough research on different factors affecting the firm along with various ways of addressing future challenges. This research paper highlights that Nike is confronted with multifarious issues which need to be negotiated amicably. Result of the study concludes that there is still a world waiting for the Nike to be exploited, outsmarting its competitors employing its innovative and creative business strategy.

MINI usiness / MARKETING PLAN -- NIKE, INC.

COMPANY OVERVIEW

In 1962, two individuals from the University of Oregon established a small company with the name of lue Ribbon Sports (RS). In 1972, the company was renamed to Nike, the name adopted from the Greek goddess of victory. At present, Nike owns facilities in Oregon, Tennessee, North Carolina and The Netherlands. It also operates leased facilities for 15 Nike-towns, over 80 Nike Factory Stores,…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

All Products, Nike.com http://nikeid.nike.com/nikeid/index.jhtml?ref=global_home#category,view_all

Andris A. Zoltners, Prabhakant Sinha, Greggor A. Zoltners, Accelerating Sales Force Performance, April 2001

Catherine Colbert, Nike, Inc.

http://www.hoovers.com/nike,-inc./--ID__14254 -- /free-co-factsheet.xhtml
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Thoracic Manipulation on Patients With Chronic Mechanical

Words: 1941 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79983766

Thoracic Manipulation on Patients with Chronic Mechanical Neck Pain: A andomized Controlled Trial

The objective of this work in writing is to critique the study reported in the work of Lau, Chiu, and Lam (2011) entitled "The Effectiveness of Thoracic Manipulation on Patients with Chronic Mechanical neck pain -- A andomized Controlled Trial" reported in the Journal of Manual Therapy.

The aim of the study reported by Lau, Chiu, and Lam is stated to be assessment of the effectiveness of "thoracic manipulation (TM) on patients with chronic neck pain." (2011, p.141) Lifetime prevalence of neck pain is stated at 66.7% and 12-month prevalence at 53.6%. (Lau, Chiu, and Lam, 2011, p.141) Neck pain is expensive to treat in addition to the suffering of the individual and lost work time due to employee absenteeism. (Lau, Chiu, and Lam, 2011, paraphrased)

There is growing evidence, which has demonstrated that manipulation with exercise…… [Read More]

References

Barrett, AJ and Breen, AC (2000) Adverse Effects of Spinal Manipulation. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 2000;93;258-9.

Cagnie, B et al. (2004) How Common are Side Effects of Spinal Manipulation and Can These Side Effects be Predicted? Manual Therapy 2004;9:151-6.

Cleland, JA, et al. (2004) Immediate effects of thoracic manipulation in patients with neck pain: a randomized clinical trial. 24 Jul 2004. Manual Therapy. Retrieved from:  http://academic.regis.edu/clinicaleducation/pdf%27s/Cleland_tx%20manip%20for%20neck%20pain.pdf 

Flynn, T. et al. (2007) The immediate effect of thoracic spin manipulation on cervical range of motion and pain in patients with primary complaint of neck pain -- a technical note. Orthopedic Division Review: 2007;32-6.
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Crabb's Book Effective Biblical Counseling and the

Words: 1018 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32399667

Crabb's book, Effective Biblical Counseling and the theories presented there. This paper will examine how Crabb treats some of the more popular theories in the book and how he is able to summarize them for the reader -- largely accomplishing this in a very accessible manner.

For instance, Crabb's treatment of Abraham Maslow's theory of classical needs hierarchy is extremely astute and user-friendly. Crabb explains how the need on the lowest rung of the hierarchy needs to be met and completed in order for the individual to be able to have sufficient motivation to get the subsequent need met and so on (Crabb, 1986). According to these ideologies, the lowest needs are the physical ones: food, water and comparable needs -- these are the needs that the organism must fulfill in order to survive (Crabb, 1986). The following need is the need of security, which encompasses a general sense and…… [Read More]

References

Crabb, L. (1986). Effective Biblical Counseling. Grand Rapids: Zondervan Publishing.
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Athletic Trainer

Words: 819 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86305146

career of an athletic trainer, including the background necessary for the career, the necessary education, and job opportunities for athletic trainers. Athletic trainers form a necessary backbone of most professional sports organizations, and many private organizations. A professional athletic trainer can make the difference between a life-changing injury, or returning to the game. Athletic trainers are an essential and integral part of modern sports medicine, and as sports and athletics increase in importance in our society, they will continue to play an important part in our healthy lives.

Athletic trainers have been around for centuries, but today, most trainers are certified, and not only work with sports clubs or educational facilities, they can work in gyms and fitness centers, and even corporate workout centers.

Certified athletic trainers (ATCs) are medical experts in preventing, recognizing, managing and rehabilitating injuries that result from physical activity. Athletic trainers can help you avoid unnecessary…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Author not Available. "Athletic Trainer." NortheastAHEC.org. 2003. 25 Sept. 2003. http://www.neahec.org/hc/HealthCareerPgs/AthleticTrainer.html

Editors. "What Does a Certified Athletic Trainer Do?" NATA.org. 2003. 25 Sept. 2003. http://www.nata.org/downloads/documents/306CareerInfoBrochure.htm

Hibberts, Rob. "How to Start Your Career." Cerro Coso Community College. 1998. 25 Sept. 2003. http://athletics.cerrocoso.edu/sportsmedicine/how_to_start_your_career.htm

Kornspan, Alan S., et al. "Career Opportunities in Sport and Exercise Among College Students." College Student Journal 36.3 (2002): 367+.
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Thermo Therapy

Words: 3365 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52189201

Thermo Therapy

Application of healing thermal agents to certain body areas that feel wounded or dysfunction is heat treatment. The main use of a heat treatment is to help alleviate pain, support muscle repose, increase function of the tissue cells, improve blood flow, and remove poison from cells and to increase the extensibility of soft tissues. Superficial and deep are the two types of heat treatment. Superficial heat treatments apply heat to the exterior part of the body. Heat aimed at certain inner tissues through ultrasound or by electric current is deep heat treatment. Heat treatments are favorable before exercise, giving a limbering up result to the soft tissues involved. Heat treatment using conduction as a form of heat transfer in hot pacts is very common. Damp heat packs are easily available in most hospitals, physical treatment centers and sports teaching rooms.

For tissue heating many thermal agents are on…… [Read More]

References

Bigos S, Bowyer O, Braen G. et al. Acute lower back problems in adults. Clinical Practice Guideline, Quick Reference Guide Number 14. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, AHCPR Pub. No. 95-0643. December 1994.p.3-6

Biundo JJ Jr., Torres-Ramos FM: Rehabilitation and biomechanics. Curr Opin Rheumatol 1991 April; 3(2): 291-99

Fedorczyk J: The role of physical agents in modulating pain. Journal of Hand Therapy 1997 Apr-June; 10(2): 110-21

Grana WA: Physical agents in musculoskeletal problems: heat and cold therapy modalities. Instructional Course Lecture 1993; 42: 439-42.
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Best Way to Avoid Bedsores

Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23053657

Stress Ulcer Prevention

The subject up for study in this report shall be whether stress ulcers in hospital patients induced by being bedridden can be mitigated or even prevented by turning the patient to a new position at least once every two hours. The amount of research on this subject is not pervasive and voluminous. However, some material about the subject does exist. Thus, a conclusion should be possible regarding whether patient-turning is a solution to prevent stress ulcers from forming in the first place. While it may not truly be a fix-all solution, the practice of turning patients at two hour intervals shows some promised based on evidence-based research and results.

Stress ulcers, otherwise commonly referred to as deep tissue injury (DTI) is a pressing and persistent issue in the medical field. This is especially true when speaking of patients that are bedridden for any significant amount of time…… [Read More]

References

Behrendt, R., Ghaznavi, A.M., Mahan, M., Craft, S., & Siddiqui, A. (2014).

CONTINUOUS BEDSIDE PRESSURE MAPPING AND RATES OF HOSPITAL-

ASSOCIATED PRESSURE ULCERS IN A MEDICAL INTENSIVE CARE

UNIT. American Journal Of Critical Care, 23(2), 127-133.
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Flat Feet and Residual Conditions

Words: 995 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70467762

The condition called Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) denotes a flaw in the tendon functions directly supporting the foot, leading to the compensatory collapse of the arches. The condition is clinically explained as "an inflammation and/or overstretching of the posterior tibial tendon in the foot. An important function of the posterior tibial tendon is to help support the arch. But in PTTD, the tendon's ability to perform that job is impaired, often resulting in a flattening of the foot." (FP, 1)

Other implications to the condition will relate directly to the likelihood of pain and discomfort in the foot itself.

The improper distribution of weight and pressure in one's step can be the close for undue and excessive ground contact with load-bearing parts of the foot. The heel is especially vulnerable to inflammation and pain, contributing to the close connection between the presence of flat feet and the intrusion of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

IntelliHealth Inc. (2007). Fallen Arch. Aetna Intellihealth. Online at http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WS/9339/25652.html

James, E. (2006). Knee Pain.

Comfort Shoes. Online at http://www.comfortshoe.com/knee_pain.html

Jones, B.H.' Thacker, S.B.; Gilchrist, J.; Kimsey, C.D. & Sosin, D.M. (2002). Prevention of Lower Extremity Stress Fracturesin Athletes and Soldiers. Epidemiological Reviews, 24, 228-247.