Biopsychosocial Model Essays (Examples)

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Etiology of Schizophrenia

Words: 1571 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35674980

Biopsychosocial View of Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia can be a debilitating condition that adversely affects the quality of life of sufferers and their families. Although clinicians in some parts of the world view schizophrenia as a brain disease that is incurable, while most practitioners in the Western world view the condition as having a genetic or organic basis that can be successfully treated with prescription medications and psychosocial interventions. To determine the fact, this paper provides a review of the relevant peer-reviewed and scholarly literature concerning schizophrenia using a biopsychosocial model. The review includes evidence supporting brain localization for schizophrenia, the genetic factors in the onset of this disorder and an evaluation of the environmental factors in the onset of this disorder.

eview and Discussion

On the one hand, some researchers have suggested that schizophrenia is a disease of the brain that is common to all human societies, and that it is…… [Read More]

References

Bemak, F. & Epp, L.R. (2007, Spring). Transcending the mind-body dichotomy: Schizophrenia reexamined. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development, 41(1), 14-

19.

Cantor-Graae, E. (2009, May). The contribution of social factors to the development of schizophrenia: A review of recent findings. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 52(5), 277-

Farmer, R.L. & Pandurangi, A.K. (1999, May). Diversity in schizophrenia: Toward a richer biopsychososocial understanding for social work practice. Health and Social Work,
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Nurse Theorist the Roy Adaption Model

Words: 3386 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64933693

Nursing Theorist: Sr. oy Adaptation Model

The oy Adaptation model for Nursing had its beginning when Sister Callista oy happened to get admitted in the Masters Program of pediatric nursing in the University of California, Los Angeles, in the year 1964. At that time, Sr. Callista was familiar with the idea of 'adaptation' in nursing, and it must be mentioned that Sr. Callista's adviser at that time was Dorothy E. Johnson, who believed firmly in the need to define nursing as a means of focusing the development of knowledge, for the practice of nursing. When Sr. Callista oy started working with children in the pediatric ward of the hospital, she was quite impressed with the basic resiliency of the small children who had been admitted into the wards for treatment. This was why when the first seminar in pediatric nursing was called for; Sr. Callista oy proposed that the basic…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Callista Roy's Adaptation Model" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/callistaroy Accessed 28 October, 2005

'Case Study" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/casestudy.html Accessed 28 October, 2005
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The Book Addict and Disease Model

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90425930

Addict, Michael Stein uses a case study approach to exhibit, analyze, and discuss addiction in general and how addiction impacts the lives of individuals specifically. The author takes into account psychological trauma, psycho-social issues, and other situational variables but ultimately ascribes to the disease model of addiction. Stein concludes from his case study with Lucy that substance abuse is a disease just as heart disease is but does not provide any substantial evidence backing up this claim. In fact, Stein (2010) simply calls addiction "the disease of wanting more," which is hardly a scientific assessment of substance abuse (p. 25). If the disease model were supported by the literature, there would be clear outlines of disease etiology and the neurobiological pathways upon which it works. In fact, the disease model has not received unequivocal research support. Although popular and politically effective in terms of freeing up funding for addiction treatment,…… [Read More]

References Not Cited

Lilienfeld, S.O., Lynn, S.J. & Lohr, J.M. (2015). Science and Pseudoscience in Clinical Psychology. New York: The Guilford Press.

Rasmussen, S. (2013). A management model for a chronic disease called addiction. APHA 275427. Retrieved online: https://apha.confex.com/apha/141am/webprogram/Paper275427.html

Volkow, N.D., Koob, G.F. & McLellan, T. (2016). Neurobiologic advances from the brain disease model of addiction. The New England Journal of Medicine 2016(374), 363-371.
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Social Work Biopsychosocial Assessment

Words: 2376 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41539262

multiple factors present influencing the client in the situation described, including social, environmental and psychosocial factors. The client Marvin is currently suffering from emotional, physical and educational neglect largely resulting from environmental factors but also social circumstances. Environmental factors contributing to his case include lack of proper housing and possible nourishment, a family history of substance abuse and poor living conditions. Both child and parent in this case lack adequate social support networks to work through their problems and deal with the stressors associated with their lifestyle.

The most pressing issue influencing the client's case in this case is environment. Child abuse is more frequently the result of environmental factors that include family, relatives and poverty as well as multiple social factors that predisposition a family to disadvantage (Gitterson, 2001). Marvin is a product or consequence of uncontrollable aspects of his environment. So to is his mother who has suffered…… [Read More]

References:

Ivey, A. & Pederson, P.B. (1993). Culture-centered counseling and interviewing skills: A

practical guide. Westport: Praeger.

Gelles, R.J. & Lancaster, J.B. (1987). Child abuse and neglect: Biosocial dimensions.

New York: Aldine De Gruyter.
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personal'self assessment and'self awareness

Words: 1978 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74625179

Professional Presence

Different Models of Health and Healing

Models of health and healing influence patient attitudes and lifestyle, and also impact health seeking and healthcare behaviors. Often, the concept of healing a patient has will come from cultural or religious beliefs However, healthcare workers also operate within their own models of health and healing, which could conflict with those of their patients. When nurses become more aware of the different models, they can better communicate with patients about healthcare issues.

Physical Body: The Mechanistic View

The rise of empiricism and the triumphs of modern science gave rise to the view that the body itself can be treated as a discreet system. Although the mechanistic view can be traced back as far as Asclepiades, it was never fully accepted as a viable model of health and healing until the 20th century (Curtis & Gaylord, 2004, p. 8). The mechanistic view predominates…… [Read More]

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Chemical Addiction Progress More Rapidly in Young

Words: 2102 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98392642

Chemical Addiction Progress More apidly in Young People than Adults?

Chemical dependency is the obsessive use of chemicals like drugs, alcohol, and tobacco and the incapacity to stop using them, in spite of all the troubles caused by their use. People with a chemical dependency can stop using for a while but find it hard to start all together. This is where professional help is needed to stop it for life. Those who quit without professional help, typically overcome with an agonizing desire to resume alcohol, tobacco or drug use. Alcohol and drug addiction are progressive diseases. In most, addictions begin gradually and grow until one's life becomes increasingly uncontrollable. As recurring efforts to gain control over the addiction are unsuccessful, life for the person who has developed a chemical dependency begins to fall apart (Chemical dependency, n.d.).

Drug addictions in young people have been found to progresses more quickly…… [Read More]

References

Chapter 2 -- The Role of PPC in a Managed Care Environment. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://kap.samhsa.gov/products/manuals/tips/13b.htm

Chemical Dependency. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.aboutdrugtreatment.org/chemical_dependency.htm

Chemical Dependency. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.galaxrecovery.com/chemical_dependency_treatment.asp

Drug and Alcohol Information. (2005). Retrieved from http://www.egetgoing.com/drug_addiction/chemical_dependency_treatment.asp
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Congestive Heart Failure Case Management

Words: 2139 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34374449

Questions regarding all three aspects should be asked during intake because this disease should be treated holistically meaning that everything should be factored in.

IV. DISEASE Management MODEL

A disease management plan is necessary for the congestive heart failure patient because so many other illnesses are associated with this disease. The plan is designed to improve the patient's health, while at the same time reducing medical costs.

Disease Management Model

Purpose

To manage as well as reduce congestive heart failure and the illnesses generally associated with it.

Target Population

Patients who already have congestive heart failure or those who are at risk.

Goals

To reduce the chances of developing other illnesses and diseases associated with congestive heart failure.

To cut down on hospital admissions by ensuring patients follow instructions for at home care as well as regular follow up visits.

To cut down on medical costs by monitoring patients at…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Jones, M., Edwards, I., and L. Gifford. (2002). Conceptual models for implementing biopsychosocial theory in clinical practice. Manual Therapy, 7(1), 2-9.
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Abnormal Psychology Is Often Misunderstood as a

Words: 1101 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98321108

Abnormal Psychology is often misunderstood as a field of psychology because it deals with behavior that "creates a problem for an individual or society" -- and hence, the question immediately arises as to just what is "abnormal" and what is "normal"? The AP Psychology 7th Edition (Sharpsteen, et al., 2005) text suggests that abnormal behavior is "maladaptive or pathological behavior" and before determining whether a behavior is abnormal or not, the "total environment and impact of a person's behavior" must be taken into consideration. Moreover, abnormal psychology does not attempt to link "normal and abnormal" with the concepts of "good and bad," Kendra Cherry explains. Abnormal psychology deals with "psychopathology and abnormal behavior" covering a wide swath of disorders, including sexual deviation, depression, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, to name a few (Cherry, 2008).

The History and Evolution of Abnormal Psychology into a Scientific Discipline

In 800 B.C., Homer believed that mental illness…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AS Psychology. (2009). Biological and Psychological Models of Abnormality. Retrieved July 9,

2011, from http://as-psychology.pbworks.com.

Bennett, Paul. (2006). Abnormal and Clinical Psychology: An Introductory Textbook. New York: McGraw-Hill International.

Cherry, Kendra. (2008). Psychology / What Is Abnormal Psychology? About.com. Retrieved July 8, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com.
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Influence of Culture on Spiritual Development of Young Children

Words: 1150 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61083275

SPIRITUALITY IN YOUNG CHILDREN'S TEMPERAMENT AND SELF-CONTROL: THE CULTURAL INFLUENCE

The objective of this study is to address the cultural contexts relating to spirituality in young children's temperament and self-control.

Child-Well eing Outcomes

Jesus grew in wisdom

Jesus grew in stature

Jesus grew in grace

Einoth's work entitled "uilding Strong Foundations World Vision's Focus on Early Childhood Development and Child Well-being" published by World Vision 2010 reports that World Visions biblical bases for the definition of Child Well-eing Outcomes is found in the ible in the ook of Luke, Chapter 2, Verse 52 which states "And Jesus grew in wisdom and stature, and in favor (grace) with God and with people'. (2010, p. ix) Einoth states that in the tradition of the Jewish people that the body "is the object of special care because it is God's creation and special gift of grace. Growing in stature implies growing caring for…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Einoth, SR (2010) Building Strong Foundations World Vision's Focus on Early Childhood Development and Child Well-being. A research project carried out on behalf of the World Vision Institute for Research and Development in co-operation with the Child Development and Rights Team within World Vision International's Children in Ministry Department. Friedrichsdorf/Germany . May 2010. Retrieved from:  http://www.worldvision-institut.de/_downloads/allgemein/TheorieUndPraxis_5_StrongFoundations.pdf 

Holloday, R. (2007) Cultural Trends Influence Our Children. United Church of God. 28 Apr 2007. Retrieved from: http://www.ucg.org/sermon/cultural-trends-influence-our-children/

Sharley, V. (2012) New ways of thinking about the influence of cultural identity, place and spirituality on child development within child placement practice. Adoption and Fostering, 22 Sep 2012. Retrieved from:  http://www.thefreelibrary.com/New+ways+of+thinking+about+the+influence+of+cultural+identity,+place...-a0310516728
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Influence and Presence Professional

Words: 4372 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42805495

Professional Presence and Influence

Professional Presence

Discuss the differences between two models of health and healing (e.g., physical body, body-mind, body-mind-spirit/bio-psycho-social,) as they relate to what it means to be human.

Analyze differences between one of the models discussed in part A1 and your professional presence (i.e., current beliefs, attitudes, and actions regarding health and healing).

Discuss how your professional presence (mindful or distracted) influences your nursing practice.

Personality Preferences

Submit your results from the Keirsey Temperament personality test.

Analyze your test results, including areas that may or may not align with how you view yourself.

Evaluate how the preferences identified by the test align with your relationships, favorite activities, and career choices.

b. Discuss two potential challenges or barriers (e.g., barriers in communication, decision-making) that could be minimized by your enhanced self-awareness when working with opposite personality types. 13

C. Mindfulness Practice 14

1. Develop a mindfulness practice plan…… [Read More]

References

Buckner, J., Heimberg, R., Ecker, A., & Vinci, C. (2012). A Biopsychosocial Model of Social Anxiety and Substance Use. Depression and Anxiety, 30(3), 276-284. doi:10.1002/da.22032

Samsel, M. (2014). A Mind-Body Look at the Concept of Asperger's Syndrome, pp. 1-33. London. Retrieved from http://www.michaelsamsel.com/Content/Asperger/Asperger's%20Mind%20Body%20Approach.pdf

Staff Members of the Institute of Internal Auditors, (2010). Professional Presence: Managing Non-verbal Communications, pp. 2-27. Altamonte Springs: Institute of Internal Auditors.

Staff Members of the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia, (2014). Professional Presence and Registered Nurses in Nova Scotia, pp. 1-4. Nova Scotia: College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia. Retrieved from http://www.crnns.ca/documents/ProfessionalPresence2014.pdf
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People Help Themselves An Interdisciplinary

Words: 12988 Length: 47 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92004923

The study will also be important to those in the future, because scientists have not yet found ways to cure these chronic illnesses or correct some of these problems that are seen today, and therefore it stands to reason that there will be more people in the future who will have to face the same problems as those with chronic illnesses and traumatic injuries today.

Scope of the Study

The scope of the study is relatively large, simply because there has been a great deal written about chronic illness and injuries from the perspective of the physician and from the perspective of the patient. Both sides are important, although the focus here will remain largely on the patient perspective. Because there are so many people today that suffer from a chronic illness or traumatic injury, much study has been done about these individuals. Despite these studies, however, not a lot…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.L. (2002). Biobehavioral Outcomes Following Psychological Interventions for Cancer Patients. Journal of Counsulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(3), 590-610.

Brannon, L., & Fiest, J. (2004). Health Psychology: Vol.. An Introduction to Behavior and Health (Fifth ed.) Belmont CA: Thompson/Wadsworth.

DiMatteo, M. (2004). Social Support and Patient Adherence to Medical treatment: A Meta- analysis. Health Psychology, 23(2), 207-218.

Eitel, P., Hatchett, L., Friend, R., Griffin, K.W., & Wadhwa, N.K. (1995). Burden of Self-Care in Seriously Ill Patients Impact on Adjustment. Health Psychology, 14(5), 457-463.
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Aetiology and Management of Cancer

Words: 4918 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77784533

This is related to bronchitis, asthma and long-term conditions such as lung cancer and bladder cancer (obinson, 2009).

It is estimated that the chances of getting bladder cancer is high for ex-smokers and passive smokers even after thirty years later. This brings us to the question of management of bladder cancer for current and ex-smokers as well as passive smokers.

The management of bladder cancer is a three-pronged approach that involves reducing the progression of the disease, protecting the bladder and increasing the chances of survival. The course of treatment depends to a large extent on the stage of the cancer. During the earlier stages, surgery, trans urethral resection, intravesical chemotherapy and immunotherapy are used to contain the disease and prevent it from progressing further. The malignant areas are treated with one of the above procedures to remove the tumor. In the case of a more advanced stage, radical cystectomy…… [Read More]

References

Cancer Research UK. (2011). Cancer in the UK: April 2011. Retrieved from http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/cancerstats/mortality/

Friedman, Howard. (1990). Personality and Disease. Publisher: New York, John Wiley & Sons.

Abrahamson; Seligman; Teasdale. (1978). Learned Helplessness in Humans: Critique and Reformulation. Abnormal Psychology. Vol 87. pp 49-74.

McAllister, Robert. (May 1974). Viral Etiology of Cancer: Two Hypotheses with relevance to chemical exposure. Pediatrics. Vol 53 (5). pp826.
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Teaching on the Cognitive Learning

Words: 9169 Length: 33 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78651518

The kidneys of someone that has chronic renal failure are generally smaller than average kidneys, with some notable and important exceptions (ogers, 2004). Two of these exceptions would be polycystic kidney disease and diabetic nephropathy (ogers, 2004). Another diagnostic tool that is used, that of the study of the serum creatinine levels, can not only diagnose chronic renal failure, but also help to distinguish it from acute renal failure, as the acute version would see a rapid and sudden spike in the serum creatinine levels over several days or several weeks, as opposed to a gradual rise that is seen over months or even over years (ogers, 2004).

Sometimes, the levels of serum creatinine have not been measured in the past, and therefore the patient is often first treated as having acute renal failure. Only when blood tests continue to show elevated serum creatinine levels and it is determined that…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.L. (2002). Biobehavioral Outcomes Following Psychological Interventions for Cancer Patients. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(3), 590-610.

Arszyla, D.M. & Gastelum, K. (2001). Coursework Document: Theorist Presentation. Retrieved at http://dana.ucc.nau.edu/~dma27/WebWizard/courseworkdoc0.html

Boston College. (2003). The Roy Adaptation Model. Retrieved at http://www2.bc.edu/~royca/

Coresh, J. & Greene, T. (2003). Prevalence of chronic kidney disease and decreased kidney function in the adult U.S. population: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. American Journal of Kidney Disease, 41, 1-12.
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Sociology Social Influences on Health

Words: 2570 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77807695

In terms of the plainness of gendered inequalities in the health and longevity of women, compared with men, the majority world demands our notice. The world-wide toll in terms of women's raised levels of mortality and morbidity corroborates that limited or negligible access to political power, land-ownership, education, sexual self-determination and earning ability has detrimental bodily effects (Bradby, 2009).

While sociologists have long studied the aspect of illness, it has only been recently that they have turned their attention to the development of sociology of health. Sociologists' interest in health emerged in part in reaction to the biomedical mode, which focused primarily on disease. A more holistic approach to health and healing, sociologists argued, must also encompass the idea of positive health and well-being. The concept of health itself needs to be explored, and such exploration must take lay perspectives into account. A holistic, or socio-environmental, model of health also…… [Read More]

References

Albrecht, Gary L., Fitzpatrick, Ray and Scrimshaw, Susan. 2003. "Handbook of Social Studies

in Health and Medicine." Sage Publications: California.

Bradby, Hannah. 2009. "Virtual Special Issue on feminism and the sociology of gender, health and illness." Sociology of Health and Wellness. Available at:

http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/shil_enhanced/virtual2_full.asp
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Multiculturalism in Counseling Theories

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26869793

Counseling Alternatives in Modern Times

There are certainly several benefits to counseling theories that consist of contemporary, multicultural, and Biopsychosocial counseling and its integration. However, since each of these respective types of counseling theories focus on a particular aspect of psychology and counseling, there are also drawbacks to them as well. Perhaps the true strength in each of these theories lies in their integration -- both with one another and with other theories in general.

The most salient positive associated with multicultural counseling theories and integration is the emphasis they place on one's cultural identity. As such, clinicians are supposed to help cultivate a client's cultural identity -- which greatly pertains to his or her ethnicity, socio-economic status, religion, and other eminent cultural factors. Another boon associated with this approach is that it considers the client as a unique individual, one whose identity "is embedded in multiple levels of experience…… [Read More]

References

Banks, J.A., Banks, C.A., McGee, E. (1995). Sue, D.S. Toward a theory of multicultural counseling and therapy. In Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education. New York: MacMillan Publishing.

Borrell-Carrio, F., Suchman, A.L., Epstein, R.M. (2004). The Biopsychosocial model 25 years later: Principles, practice and scientific inquiry. www.annfammed.org / Retrieved from http://www.annfammed.org/content/2/6/576.full
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Compulsive Hoarding Due to Childhood

Words: 4019 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62247855

" (p. 12) According to Cromer (2005) the literature that addresses the relationship between stressful life events and obsessive compulsive disorders does provide some degree of support implicating traumatic life-stress as being a factor in the onset and maintenance of the obsessive compulsive disorders however the exact relationship between the SLE and OCD "remains an empirical questions" specifically relating to "traumatic negative life events" (2005; p.13) Most of studies in this area investigation the association between SLEs and OCD have held limitations of: (1) small sample sizes; and (2) difficulty of establishing retrospectively the temporal relationship between onset and SLEs; and (3) a limited scope with regard to the effect of SLEs on OCD. (2005; p.13) Cromer relates that "mounting evidence suggests that early life-stress, in particular may preferentially incline individuals to develop adult psychiatric disorders." (2005; p.13) McCauley et al. (1997) states evidence from a large epidemiological investigation that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beamish, Patricia M. And Hill, Nicole R. (2007) Treatment outcomes for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a critical review.(Private Practices) Journal of Counseling and Development 22 Sept 20077. Online available at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-170413211.html

Bechtel, Robert B. And Ts'erts'Man, Arzah (2002) Handbook of Environmental Psychology. John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

Boston University School of Social Work (2007) Online available at http://www.bu.edu/ssw/training/pep/programs/workshops/boston/index.shtml

Cromer, Kiara R. (2005) a Pathoplastic Vulnerability Mode: An Association Between Traumatic Stressful Life Events & OCD. Florida State University 2005. Online available at http://etd.lib.fsu.edu/theses/available/etd-11/unrestricted/Cromer_Thesis_Nov_2005.pdf
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Scientific Approaches to Hookup Culture

Words: 3934 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22341787

Scientific Approaches to Hookup Culture

On a practically day-to-day basis we are swamped with tales about the collapse of the current star marital relationship-- and cheating is usually the source of those who choose to separate. Is it even possible for 2 individuals to remain together gladly over a prolonged time frame? Since early evolution day, we've been informed that sexual monogamy comes normally to our types. However it does not and never ever has (yan and Jetha, 2010).

Mainstream science-- in addition to spiritual and cultural establishments-- has long propagated the belief that males and females progressed in nuclear households where a guy's possessions and defense were exchanged for a female's fertility and fidelity. However this story is breaking down; now more so than before. Less and less couples are marrying and divorce rates keep climbing up while adultery and flagging sexual libido drag down even relatively strong marital…… [Read More]

References

Abbey, A., Ross, L.T., McDuffie, D., & McAuslan, P. (1996). Alcohol and dating risk factors for sexual assault among college women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 20, 147 -- 169.

Armstrong, E.A., England, P., & Fogarty, A.C.K. (2009). Orgasm in college hookups and relationships. In B.J. Risman (Ed.), Families as they really are (pp. 362 -- 377). New York, NY: Norton.

Backstrom, L., Armstrong, E.A., & Puentes, J. (2012). Women's negotiations of cunnilingus in college hookups and relationships. Journal of Sex Research, 49,1 -- 12.

Bisson, M.A., & Levine, T.R. (2009). Negotiating a friends with benefits relationship. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 38, 66 -- 73.
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Life Situation Can Create a

Words: 4073 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47113692

The objective is to impede rumination. 3. In the third stage -- relapse prevention or rehabilitation -- Mr. Thomas will be encouraged to participate in activities (such as hobbies that he enjoys, listening to music, socializing, his work and so forth) and to move towards increased interest in his work, and other components of his life outside of his depressing domestic situation. The whole model would focus around prevention and intervention where prevention aims at reducing the individual's psychobiological vulnerability (via for instance reducing the stress facing Mr. Thomas by enlisting the aid, for instance, of his children and coworkers) whilst intervention seeks to strengthen that same vulnerability (via for instance cognitive-behavioral techniques or other depression-reducing interventions).

oemtiems, conflicts in commucantion occur inthis type sof stiaution when ethical condudresm are invoeld such as a perosn wishing to die whislt eveyroen else wants her to live on, or the gnawing unceratiny…… [Read More]

Sources

Berne, D. Games People Play. Grove Press, Inc., 1954

Couric, K. (2011) The best advice I ever got: Lessons from extraordinary lives. NY: Random House

Goulston, M. (2010). Just listen USA: AMACOM

Jaffe, C. & Ehrlich, C.H. (1997). All kinds of love: Experiencing hospice. New York,
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Sigmund Freud's Theories

Words: 570 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17587217



The major criticisms of Freud's Theory thought that it was difficult to test and there was too much emphasis on Biology.

Humanistic Theory- was developed by Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow and emphasizes the internal experiences such as feelings and thoughts and the individual's feelings of worth. It believes that humans are naturally good and have a positive drive towards their own self-fulfilment. Rogers was most interested in the interaction between mental health, self-concept and self-esteem. Maslow believed that every person has an in-born drive to develop all their talents and capacities and calls this self-actualization. The critics of this theory felt that it is naive to assume that all people are good and think it takes a narrow view of personality.

Social-Cognitive Theory- by Albert Bandura believes that personality comes from the person's history of interaction with the environment. He believes that self-efficacy comes from having a strong belief…… [Read More]

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Diversity and Environment

Words: 1197 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69139646

Diversity and Environment

Diversity as an object of sociological analyzation comes from the idea that diversity is an issue that affects everyone. The way society is shaped, the way that it functions, and the way that it is structured all have histories in the way that diversity has interacted with each other (Bonacich 1973). From a sociological perspective, diversity is what defines a society. Focusing on one of its most important and influential aspects, the idea of diversity has guided the way society has formed its ideas of one another, and how its reactions vary from situation to situation, comes this idea that diversity even exists. However, diversity goes beyond that of physical differences from person to person. Diversity is a result of the implications that society has put upon every given diverse group (Smedley & Smedley 2005).

When diversity is brought up as an issue impacting economics, negative connotations…… [Read More]

References:

Bonacich, E. (1973). A theory of middleman minorities. American Sociological Review 38(5), 583-594.

Clark, R., Anderson, N.B., Clark, V.R. & Williams, D.R. (1999). Racism as a stressor for African-Americans: a biopsychosocial model. American Psychologist, 54(10), 805-816.

Duster, T. (2003). The reality of race. Scientific American

Eberhardt, J.L. (2005). Imaging race. American Psychologist, 60(2), 181-190.
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Vulnerable Adults in Healthcare Settings

Words: 998 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24855774

Older people are associated with increased risk for hospitalisations due to illness or trauma (Seymore & Cannon, 2010). The nature and burden of the illness that the older person faces is related to the quality of health care services they may receive when admitted to a hospital or other clinical setting (Dossa & Capitman, 2010). In terminal cases, the patient may choose to engage Hospice services, either in the clinical setting or at home. The human rights of such patients are ethically fundamental in their quality of care through palliative care services (Brenna, Carr, & Cousins, 2007).

The care received in the clinical health care setting for elderly patients may be substandard due to staffing and regulation issues (Maas, Specht, Buckwalter, Gittler, & Bechen, 2008). There is a need to identify the failings in quality of care and promote the human rights of elderly patients in healthcare settings (Gittler, 2008).…… [Read More]

References

Barry, P., & Planalp, S. (2008). Ethical issues for hospice volunteer. The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, 458-462.

Brenna, F., Carr, D., & Cousins, M. (2007). Pain management: a fundamental human right. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 205-221.

Dossa, A., & Capitman, J. (2010). Community-based disability prevention programs for elders: predictors of program completion. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 235-50.

Gittler, J. (2008). Governmental efforts to improve quality of care for nursing home residents and to protect them from mistreatment: a survey of federal and state laws. Research in Gerontological Nursing, 264-284.
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Teen Aggression Is a Serious

Words: 1412 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64568234

In addition, factors that cause stress such as divorce or death increase the likelihood that a teenager will have aggressive tendencies (Peterson and Sheldon 2006). Additionally maternal depression, substance abuse or maternal anxiety can all lead to aggressive behaviors in teenagers (Peterson and Sheldon 2006).

According to Peterson and Sheldon (2006) teenage aggression can also be linked to neuropsychiatric disorders. In fact the authors asserts that

"Persistent aggressive behavior is a common feature in many neuropsychiatric disorders and is the most common reason for referral to a child and adolescent mental health clinic [1]. Neurological features associated with aggression include low overall IQ and relative deficits in verbal learning, memory, and fluency [2]. Deficits in executive functioning and working memory are also common [3] and may be especially pronounced with co-occurring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)."

The aggressive behavior can involve lashing out at family members, friends or strangers. The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arseneault L, Tremblay RE, Boulerice B, (2002) Obstetrical complications and violent delinquency: testing two developmental pathways. Child Development, 73:496 -- 508.

Dodge KA, Pettit GS (2003) A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic conduct problems in adolescence. Developmental Psychology, 39:349 -- 371.

Facts for teen Aggression. Retrieved November 26, 2009 from  http://www.herkimercounty.org/content/Departments/View/11:field=services;/content/DepartmentServices/View/68:field=documents;/content/Documents/File/123.PDF 

Feindler E.L. (2005) Adolescent Aggression and Anger Management. Encyclopedia of Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Springer U.S.
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Clinical Decisions in This Chapter

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71668409

The MMPI-2 has been used successfully to detect feigning in neurological and psychiatric control groups (Klein, 2007). As a result, the MMPI-2 is the most frequently used test in forensic psychological testing. There is, however, still substantial "debate which of the four subscales is most useful for identifying malingering" (Klein, 2007). However, one of the MMPI-2's lingering problems is that it is a test where people can incorporate coaching, so that it is somewhat vulnerable to coaching.

The issue of coaching is critical in the forensics environment. This is because the goal of forensic psychology is to use neuropsychological assessment methods to help in some type of legal proceedings. These proceedings can be civil or criminal proceedings. In both civil and criminal environments, the need for accurate diagnosis can be critical to outcomes for the person being tested and for people being impacted by their testing. Moreover, it can be…… [Read More]

References

Klein, H. (2007). Assessment of malingered neuropsychological deficits. New York: Oxford
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Prenatal Maternal Stress and Prematurity A Prospective

Words: 578 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15367221

Prenatal Maternal Stress and Prematurity: A Prospective Study

of Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Women

Medical risks only predict one half to two thirds of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Even though elevated levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine reduces bloodflow and oxygen to the fetus, which may inhibit fetal growth and precipitate labor, studies that have explored stress factors related to low birthweight and premature delivery have found mixed. Researchers Lobel, Dunkel-Schetter, and Scrimshaw (1992) pursued the relationship between stress and adverse pregnancy outcomes in greater detail in their study of disadvantaged women. They looked at stress more holistically than previous studies and found stronger relationships.

The first major difference between this and previous studies was that Lobel et al. integrated biomedical data and psychosocial data, as opposed to just one or the other. They also looked at the relationship between weeks of gestation and birthweight, which many researchers overlooked. These researchers' operationalization of the…… [Read More]

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Aging in Our Society

Words: 1737 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4961730

bio-psychosocial model to assess a 70-year-old adult (referred as Mr. X) suffering from mental retardation and makes appropriate recommendations regarding a treatment plan. However, before we make a medical diagnosis of Mr. X, it is important that we briefly review the "mental retardation" ailment. "Mental retardation is not something you have, like blue eyes, or a bad heart. Nor is it something you are, like short, or thin. It is not a medical disorder, nor a mental disorder. Mental retardation is a particular state of functioning that begins in childhood and is characterized by limitation in both intelligence and adaptive skills. Mental retardation reflects the "fit" between the capabilities of individuals and the structure and expectations of their environment." Taken from (http://www.aamr.org/Policies/faq_mental_retardation.shtml).

Medical diagnosis

Mental retardation ailment of Mr. X has had two fundamental and noteworthy impacts. The first is the intellectual performance that is considerably below normal standard and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

David Sedgwick. An Introduction to Jungian Psychotherapy: The Therapeutic Relationship. Brunner-Routledge, Hove, England, 2001.

Merna J. Alpert. The Chronically Disabled Elderly in Society. Greenwood Press. Westport, CT. 1994.

Definition of mental retardation. Taken from: http://www.aamr.org/Policies/faq_mental_retardation.shtml
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Children in Sports From a

Words: 1584 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20076480

According to Smoll and Smith, there are two basic attitudes toward competition; an ego attitude and a mastery attitude. Parents who have an ego attitude toward their own competition -that is, they compete to win and to be better than others - are especially likely to be competitive with other parents about their child's achievements. Essentially, the parent goes from being proud to being boastful.

These, then, are the four psychological factors that must be recognized as we try to understand the youth sports experience of families: the identification of the parent with the child, the tendency of parents to fantasize about their child's potential, the sense of youth sport as an investment, and competitiveness between parents. Combined, these factors drive many parents to push their child to excel, and to take action when they feel that their child's potential is being ignored or inhibited. The unfortunate result is children…… [Read More]

References

Smoll, F.L., & Smith, R.E. (2002) Children and Youth in Sport: a Biopsychosocial Perspective 2nd ed. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co.
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Asher Lev Just as One

Words: 4145 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12492046

Such relationships in childhood begin with the parents, and for Asher, these early relationships are also significant later, as might be expected.

However, as Potok shows in this novel, for someone like Asher, the importance of childhood bonds and of later intimate bonds are themselves stressed by cultural conflicts between the Hasidic community in its isolation and the larger American society surrounding it. For Asher, the conflict is between the more controlled religious environment of the community and the more liberal environment of the art world he joins. What Potok shows about this particular conflict might seem very different from what others experience, others who are not part of such a strict religious background and who are not artists. However, children always find a conflict between the circumscribed world of their immediate family and the world they join as they strike out on their own. This conflict is often portrayed…… [Read More]

References

Belkin, L. (2004). The Lessons of Classroom 506. New York Times Magazine, 40-53.

Bowlby, J. (1988). Developmental psychiatry comes of age. American Journal of Psychiatry, 145, 1-10.

Erikson, E.H. (1963) Childhood and Society. New York: Free Press.

Kim, W.J., Kim, L. & Rue, D.S. (1997). Korean-American Children. In G. Johnson-Powell & J. Yamamoto (Ed.) Transcultural Child Development: Psychological Assessment and Treatment (pp. 183-207). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Supervision Portfolio Personal Philosophy and Supervision Forms

Words: 2593 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37659791

The experience I had accumulated in my secondary days as a supervisor in mathematics also assists me in my place of work.

I also had experience as a supervisor in my workplace, which enhanced my development level as a supervisor. My development level as a supervisor also continues in my workplace before getting admission into the university. Before I got admission in into the university, I had worked in series of companies notably manufacturing companies. For example, I worked with Toyota Company for 5 years as an assistant supervisor. My working experience in the company has assisted my development level as a supervisor. In my working experience, I understand that it is critical for a supervisor to build working relationships with supervisees. Typically, supervisory-supervisees relationships enhance mutual alliance between the two parties. The supervisor and supervisees share responsibility of developing empathy, genuineness, warmth, emotional and reliability engagement to develop key…… [Read More]

References

Arthur, M.E. (2012). Application of the Discrimination Model of Supervision for Residency Education, Annals of Behavioral Science and Medical Education,18 (1):32-37.

Bernard, J.M. (1979). Supervisor training: A discrimination model. Counselor Education and Supervision, 19, 60-68.

Bernard, J.M., Goodyear, R.K. (1992). Fundamentals of clinical supervision. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Bernard, J.M., & Goodyear, R.K. (2009).Fundamentals of clinical supervision, (4th Edition). Columbus, OH: Merrill.
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Health Promotion Theory Description and

Words: 1506 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58731126

Pender's is a theory of preventive medicine, for the healthy rather than the chronically ill. However, in an age where lifestyle-related disease are on the rise, it can provide an important function, particularly for nurses facing an epidemic of pre-diabetic and diabetic adolescents reared on poor diets and little physical activity. Some might protest that the genetic component to even Type II Diabetes, or obesity in general, might be unacknowledged in the model, but Pender would no doubt respond to her critics that although it is true that certain individuals have a greater predisposition to certain lifestyle diseases, everyone can act within those parameters to improve their life with preventative medicine, as counseled by her model.

orks Cited

McEwen & illis. (2007). "Chinn & Kramer Model." From Chapter 5 of Theoretical bases for nursing.

Pender, Nola J. (2003). "Most frequently asked questions about the Health Promotion

Model and my professional…… [Read More]

Works Cited

McEwen & Willis. (2007). "Chinn & Kramer Model." From Chapter 5 of Theoretical bases for nursing.

Pender, Nola J. (2003). "Most frequently asked questions about the Health Promotion

Model and my professional work and career." Last modified 4 Aug 2006. Retrieved 14 Sept 2007 at http://www.nursing.umich.edu/faculty/pender/pender_questions.html

Pender, Nola J., Murdaugh, C.L., & Parsons, M.A. (2002). "Assumptions and theoretical principles of the Health Promotion Model." Retrieved 14 Sept 2007 at http://www.nursing.umich.edu/faculty/pender/HPM.pdf
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Report Attempted Change

Words: 3069 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76084742

Addiction recovery

Theoretical models

A brief overview of some prominent theoretical models relating to behavior modification is felt to be a pertinent starting point for his study, as many of these aspects can be compared to the actual interviews and case studies of the subjects. Research suggests that the recovery from drug and alcohol addictions is commonly a long-term process and can involve relapses before sustained and permanent rehabilitation is achieved. ehavioral theories have been shown to be effective in this process. Theories such as cognitive behavioral relapse prevention are a method that has been proven to have a sustained success rate. This theory relates specifically to the formations of behavioral changes in that patients are taught ways of acting and thinking that will assist them in avoiding previous addictions.

For example, patients are urged to avoid situations that lead to drug use and to practice drug refusal skills. They…… [Read More]

Bibliography

An Analysis of Behavioral Change and Addiction Recovery. Retrieved April 30, 2005.Web site: http://www.coursework.info/i/67785.html

Borges, G., Cherpitel, C.J., Macdonald, S., Giesbrecht, N., Stockwell, T., & Wilcox, H.C. (2004). A Case-Crossover Study of Acute Alcohol Use and Suicide Attempt. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 65(6), 708+. Retrieved May 2, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Cisler, R., Holder, H.D., Longabaugh, R., Stout, R.L., & Zweben, A. (1998). Actual and Estimated Replication Costs for Alcohol Treatment Modalities: Case Study from Project MATCH. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 59(5), 503+. Retrieved May 2, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Crabbe, J.C. (2002). Genetic Contributions to Addiction. 435+.
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Students Smoking Behavior

Words: 1077 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67689990

Student Smoking Behavior

Given that the health risks of smoking are very well-known, one would think that smoking would be rare behavior among college students. After all, the average college student is not only young enough to have been exposed to anti-smoking education throughout their lifetimes, but might also values education more than their same-age peers who are not students. However, according to the research, young people, including college students, do smoke. In fact, college students may actually smoke more than their peers outside of college. What this suggests is that there is a social factor linked to smoking behavior. As a result, I would expect to be able to observe more students smoking when in social situations than in non-social situations.

Assumptions

I began with three assumptions about smoking behavior. The first assumption was that approximately one-third of observed college students would smoke. The second assumption was that students…… [Read More]

References

Levinson, A., Campo, S., Gascoigne, J., Jolly, O., Zakharyan, A., & Vu Tran, Z. (2007).

Smoking, but not smokers: Identity among college students who smoke cigarettes. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 9(8), 845-852.

Schorr, M. (2013, August 13). A third of college students smoke. Retrieved February 5, 2014

from ABC News website:  http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=118065
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Psychosocial Assessment

Words: 1748 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34201218

Psychosocial Assessment

Describing Problem

Personal Status

Current Pattern of Use and Drug History

Substance Abuse and Treatment History

Medical History and Current Position

Family History and Present elationships

Positive Support Structures

Crime and Law-breaking

Education

Employment

Inclination for Treatment

Social History

esources and Accountabilities

Mental Status Exam Narrative

Treatment Plan

Psychotic Disorder

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Drug Dependence, in sustained remission

Depression

Psychosocial Assessment

PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT-William Burg

Describing Problem

William is a 35-year-old, black male. William Living in CUCS supportive housing, alcohol addiction/sober for 6 months and has PTSD. He also does not have rent money and needs employment to be able to pay the minimal rent required.

Personal Status

William is the middle of three brothers and sister. He has an older brother and a younger sister. William was born and raised in Kentucky. He moved to New York at the age of 21. He was thrown out of the…… [Read More]

References

Cox, C.B. (2005). Ethnicity and Social Work Practice. New York city: Oxford University Press.

Gitterman, A. & . (2008). The life model of social work practice: Advances in theory & practice. New York City: Columbia University Press; 3rd edition.

Goldstien, E. (1995). Ego Psychology and social work practice. New York City: The Free Press; 2nd edition .

H., N. (1995)). Clinical Social Work: Knowledge and skills. Oxford University Press.
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Antwone Fisher

Words: 2291 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89850191

The heart-rending autobiographical, Antwone Fisher, portrays Fisher’s (who is the movie’s scriptwriter) obsession for a family life, and spells of extreme melancholy and loneliness. The character of Antwone Fisher, an African-American sailor, is portrayed as volatile and uncontrollable. This nature makes way for compulsory psychiatric sessions with Dr. Davenport, after Fisher has a violent spell, leaving a peer bearing the brunt of his temper. Initially, Fisher doesn’t cooperate and remains silent for several weeks; the two clash. According to naval rules, three therapeutic sessions are imperative, beginning from when the client starts speaking. However, ultimately, the real reasons underlying Fisher’s anger issues surface: childhood abuse and the constant fear of abandonment. (Skomormj, 2003). The conversation initiated between client and therapist sheds light on the heart of Fisher’s problems. The tale commences with an ordinary day in navy workers’ life but ends leaving spectators heartbroken. The client’s tale may be counterpointed…… [Read More]

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Born to Be Big Childhood

Words: 2102 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85178688

People can exercise their free choice at the grocery store by choosing organic foods, although because of generally higher costs of organic products, this will not be a solution for everyone. People in lower socioeconomic groups often get food at discount chains or even food pantries where organics are not even a choice at all.

There is no incentive for makers of agricultural chemicals to modify their products in response to charges about obesogens. As the documentary films the Future of Food and King Corn pointed out, the use of pesticides is very big business. Though detrimental effects of pesticides and genetically-modified seeds and food have been shown, further research is needed to prove the link between pesticides and genetic modifications that lead to obesity in infants and children. When and if that link is proven, the public will have to demand that the government take action. Consumer advocate organizations…… [Read More]

References

Adler, N.E., & Stewart, J. (2009). Reducing obesity: motivating action while not blaming the victim. Milbank Quarterly 87 (1), pp. 49-70. Retrieved from Academic Search

Premier database December 29, 2010.

Baillie-Hamilton, P.F. (2002). Chemical toxins: a hypothesis to explain the global obesity epidemic. Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine 8 (2), pp. 185-192.

DOI: 10.1089/107555302317371479. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database December 29, 2010.
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Education Maximum Security The Culture

Words: 2026 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48325948

By providing more time for children to be in school, the program takes away dangerous time that students will be on the streets making negative alliances. Additionally, by increasing home-school interactions and providing greater access to teachers, the program may offset some of the negative conditions caused by single parent homes.

Because studies have suggested that juvenile alliances and socioeconomic status, as well as other social conditions, are some of the causes for juvenile delinquency, addressing those causes has become an important method to avoiding juvenile offenders, victims, and witnesses of violent crimes. ith schools being a major part of children's lives during childhood and adolescence, teachers and administrators, with programs like KIPP, must take on the burden of preventing or counterbalancing these social conditions that lead to juvenile delinquency. Although the process of doing so may seem difficult to teachers who have been educated primarily in instructing and only…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abdul-Adil, Jaleel. K. And Farmer, David Alan. "Inner-City African-American Parental

Involvement in Elementary Schools: Getting Beyond Urban Legends of Apathy." (NEED to PROVIDE REST of CITATION. WAS NOT PROVIDED to RESEARCHER.)

Boehnke, Klaus and Bergs-Winkles, Dagmar. "Juvenile Delinquency Under the Conditions of Rapid Social Change." Sociological Forum. 17.1 (2002): 57-79.

Bowling for Columbine. Michael Moore. DVD. a-Film. 2002.
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Understanding Violence

Words: 1916 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86996299

Psychosocial Assessment

Identifying Information / Setting

The purpose of this study is to examine Jackson. This client is in his early 40's and works as a professional police officer in a men's correctional facility. Jackson is a veteran and is married to a minority wife. They have a twins, a boy and girl aged 10. This study is based on therapy that is being conducted online.

eason for eferral

Jackson was referred to me due to issues at his job. The client was involved in a physical dispute with his wife that resulted from an argument over gambling. It is evident that Jackson's wife has serious gambling problem. Jackson's wife called the police during the dispute and this resulted in his police department's standard operating procedure to provide mandatory counseling for 13 weeks. Another result of the dispute, required Jackson to surrender his firearms. In order for client to get…… [Read More]

References

Babcock, J.C., Green, C.E., & Robie, C. (2004). Does batterers' treatment work? A meta- analytic review of domestic violence treatment. Clinical psychology review, 23(8), 1023- 1053.

Cross, C.L., & Ashley, L. (2004). Police trauma and addiction: Coping with the dangers of the job. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 73(10), 24-32.

Diagnostic and statistical manual-text revision (DSM-IV-TRim, 2000). American Psychiatric Association, 2000.

Gersons, B.P. (1989). Patterns of PTSD among police officers following shooting incidents: A two-dimensional model and treatment implications. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2(3), 247-257.
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Why Only Christian Psychologists Can Practice True Psychology

Words: 19429 Length: 71 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78576075

Soul: Why Only Christian Psychologists Can Practice "True Psychology"

Today, there are more than one hundred thousand licensed psychologists practicing in the United States. These mental health professionals are in a unique position to provide individuals, groups, and American society with valuable counseling services for a wide range of mental health issues and mental disorders. This study uses a triangulated research approach to demonstrate that true psychology can be done only by Christians since only Christians have the resources that are needed to understand and transform the soul in healing ways. The first leg of the research approach consists of a review of the relevant literature, the second leg consists of a custom survey of 25 practicing American psychologists, and the final leg of the triangulated research approach consists of an exegetical analysis of relevant biblical verses concerning the human soul and its relevance for mental health professionals. Finally, a…… [Read More]

References

American people and society. (2015). CIA world factbook. Retrieved from https://www.cia. gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html.

Bassett, R.L. (2013, Winter). An empirical consideration of grace and legalism within Christian experience. Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 32(1), 43-49.

Black's law dictionary. (1990). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co.

Bobgan, M. & Bobgan, D. (1987). PsychoHeresy: The psychological seduction of Christianity.
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Nola Pender Theory Health Promotion Background Theoretical

Words: 1120 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61011624

Nola Pender theory Health promotion: background, Theoretical assertions propositions, concepts, elevant nursing practice.

Nola Pender's health promotion model

Nola Pender's health promotion model

Nola Pender's model of health promotion was intended to address what Pender saw as a deficit in existing nursing theories, namely the failure to promote wellness as well as cure sickness. The Pender model defines health as a positive and dynamic state, not merely the absence of disease. Pender identifies her rubric as a model, rather than a meta-theory, and states that it is complementary to a variety of nursing disciplines and perspectives. "The model focuses on following three areas: individual characteristics and experiences; behavior-specific cognitions and affect; behavioral outcomes" (Health promotion model, 2011, Nursing Theories). Health may mean different things for different people at different life stages. 'Health' for a young, athletic adolescent may be defined in a different manner than for someone at the end…… [Read More]

References

Health promotion model. (2011, January). Nursing Theories. Retrieved March 11, 2011 at http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/health_promotion_model.html
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Fictional Drug Abuse Case

Words: 5191 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7740320

Chemical Dependency

Jesse Bruce Pinkman is one of the most important characters in the popular TV series, 'Breaking Bad'. He plays the deuteragonist (2nd most important character) in the series, partnering with Walter White in his methamphetamine drug ring. Pinkman acts as a dealer and manufacturer of methamphetamine, and is also a methamphetamine user. Jesse was also a former student in White's chemistry class.

According to the program script, Pinkman was born September 14, 1984, into a middle income family in Albuquerque, New Mexico. While still in high school, he began using and dealing methamphetamine. After being thrown out of the house for his continued drug use, he moved into his Aunt Ginny's place, and looked after her until she died of lung cancer. After her death the ownership of the house fell to his parents who allowed him to continue staying there. The rift between Pinkman and his family…… [Read More]

References

Bettmann, J., Russell, K., & Parry, K. (2013). How Substance Abuse Recovery Skills, Readiness to Change and Symptom Reduction Impact Change Processes in Wilderness Therapy Participants. Journal Of Child & Family Studies, 22(8), 1039-1050. doi:10.1007/s10826-012-9665-2

DSM-5.pdf (PDFy mirror). (n.d.). Retrieved May 19, 2015, from https://archive.org/stream/pdfy-85JiVdvN0MYbNrcr/DSM-5#page/n136/mode/1up

Gregorowski, C., Seedat, S., & Jordaan, G.P. (2013).A clinical approach to the assessment and management of co-morbid eating disorders and substance use disorders. BMC Psychiatry, 13(1), 1-12. doi:10.1186/1471-244X-13-289

Hall, W., Farrell, M., & Carter, A. (2014). Compulsory treatment of addiction in the patient's best interests: More rigorous evaluations are essential. Drug & Alcohol Review, 33(3), 268-271. doi:10.1111/dar.12122
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Fibromyalgia One Might Consider Fibromyalgia to Be

Words: 6457 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37868620

Fibromyalgia

One might consider fibromyalgia to be one of the most confounding conditions around today. It is debilitating. It results in several quality of life issues. The confounding aspect of this condition is that it is difficult to diagnose. It is also difficult to treat. Most treatment modalities today recourse to treating one or more specific symptoms -- but there is no treatment that can comprehensively treat all the symptoms. (NIAMS, 2004) More holistic treatment modes however, are being researched, explored and considered. Fibromyalgia often presents symptoms of other diseases. Essentially therefore, fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain that cannot be localized to any part of the body. It is also associated with fatigue and other specific (though not necessarily widespread) symptoms that will be discussed later in this work.

Fibromyalgia syndrome is often referred to in its abbreviation FMS. Some of the symptoms (though not all) enjoy significant overlap…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adiguzel, O., Kaptanoglu, E., Turgut, B., & Nacitarhan, V. (2004). The possible effect of clinical recovery on regional cerebral blood flow deficits in fibromyalgia: a prospective study with semiquantitative SPECT. South Med J, 97, 7, 651-655

Baldry, P. (1993). Complementary medicine. The practice of acupuncture needs tighter safeguards. Bmj, 307, 6899, 326

Baumgartner, E., Finckh, A., Cedraschi, C., & Vischer, T.L. (2002). A six-year prospective study of a cohort of patients with fibromyalgia. Ann Rheum Dis, 61, 7, 644-645

Bennet, Robert. (2000). The Scientific Basis for Understanding Pain in Fibromyalgia. Myalgia.com. Retrieved August 21, 2004, from the World Wide Web: http://www.myalgia.com/Scientific%20basis.htm
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Health Promotion Strategies and Methods DQ

Words: 2450 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15047224

Nursing Case Study and Theoretical Knowledge of Healthcare System

Significant evidence shows that the responsibilities of the primary and acute care nurses vary significantly. The variation creates differences in the scope of work for the nurses, as they are engaged in different job perspectives. Primary and acute care nurses provide an array of services that aim at promoting health, preventing the occurrence of diseases, treating the sick, and providing the e clients with services, meeting their needs alongside creating public awareness to issues that affect their health and well-being. The difference of the services provided by the two becomes evident by the fact that the acute care nurses provide their services to patients who are critically sick, creating continuum variation in the services provided. In addition, nurses involved in the provision of nursing care services in the acute setups require specialized knowledge, skills, and expertise that allows them to provide…… [Read More]

References

Brown, L., Burton, R., Hixon, B., Kakade, M., Bhagalia, P., Vick, C., et al. (2011). Factors Influencing Emergency Department Preference for Access to Healthcare. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 13(5), 410-415.

Brown, S., & Stenner, P. (2009). Psychology without foundations history, philosophy and psychosocial theory. London: Sage Publications.

Crowe, M., & Carlyle, D. (2003). Deconstructing risk assessment and management in mental health nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 43(1), 19-27.

DiClemente, R.J., Crosby, R.A., & Kegler, M.C. (2002). Emerging theories in health promotion practice and research strategies for improving public health. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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Combination of Modern and Postmodern Bereavement Theory Explain and Contrast

Words: 5009 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16035742

Postmodern Bereavement Theory

Bereavement is a universal observable fact as every human being experiences the loss of a loved one at some point in his/her life. However, every individual experiences it in a unique way. It is, without a doubt, an undeniable truth that to be human is to grieve. The passing away of a loved one can be difficult, irresistible and dreadful for any normal individual. When people are faced with such overwhelming situations, a majority of them especially the older adults get into the habit of enduring their loss with time. On the other hand, to forget and live without a loved one is not as easy for some individuals. It becomes difficult for these people to cope up with the grief-stricken situations as they experience a grief of greater concentration or time (Hansson & Stroebe, 2007). There are a number of theorists who have put forwarded their…… [Read More]

References

Bartholomew, K., & Horowitz, L.M. (1991). Attachment styles among young adults: A test o f a four-category model. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 61(2), 226-244. Retrieved from http://www.sfu.ca/psyc/faculty/bartholomew/attachmentpub_files/bh1991.pdf

Bonanno, G.A., Keltner, D., Holen, A., & Horowitz, M.J. (1995). When avoiding unpleasant emotions might not be such a bad thing: Verbal-autonomic response dissociation and midlife conjugal bereavement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,

69(5), 975-989.

Dent, A. (2005). Supporting the Bereaved: Theory and Practice. Counselling at Work, 22-23. Retrieved May 28, 2012 from http://www.bacpworkplace.org.uk/journal_pdf/acw_autumn05_ann.pdf
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Alcohol Drinking Among Young Jews

Words: 23454 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67540801

Paenting Style Influence on Excess Alcohol Intake Among Jewish Youth

Clinical Psychology

The health hazads that ae associated with adolescent alcohol use ae well documented, and thee is gowing ecognition among policymakes and clinicians alike that moe needs to be done to addess this public health theat. The pupose of this study was to examine the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish college students in the United States. The study daws on attachment theoy, social leaning theoy, and a paenting style model as the main theoetical famewoks to evaluate the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish adolescents to develop infomed answes to the study's thee guiding eseach questions concening the elationship between peceived paenting style and excess alcohol use of male, Jewish, college students aged 18-26 yeas, the elationship between academic achievement and the alcohol use fequency of male Jewish…… [Read More]

references to gender.

Scoring: The PAQ is scored easily by summing the individual items to comprise the subscale scores. Scores on each subscale range from 10 to 50.

Author: Dr. John R. Buri, Department of Psychology, University of St. Thomas, 2115

Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105.

Source: Buri, J.R. (1991). Parental Authority Questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Assessment, 57, 110-119
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Alcohol Drinking Among Young Jews

Words: 23424 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99740327

Paenting Style Influence on Excess Alcohol Intake Among Jewish Youth

Clinical Psychology

The health hazads that ae associated with adolescent alcohol use ae well documented, and thee is gowing ecognition among policymakes and clinicians alike that moe needs to be done to addess this public health theat. The pupose of this study was to examine the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish college students in the United States. The study daws on attachment theoy, social leaning theoy, and a paenting style model as the main theoetical famewoks to evaluate the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish adolescents to develop infomed answes to the study's thee guiding eseach questions concening the elationship between peceived paenting style and excess alcohol use of male, Jewish, college students aged 18-26 yeas, the elationship between academic achievement and the alcohol use fequency of male Jewish…… [Read More]

references to gender.

Scoring: The PAQ is scored easily by summing the individual items to comprise the subscale scores. Scores on each subscale range from 10 to 50.

Author: Dr. John R. Buri, Department of Psychology, University of St. Thomas, 2115

Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105.

Source: Buri, J.R. (1991). Parental Authority Questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Assessment, 57, 110-119
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Drinking With Younger Jews

Words: 24280 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42632920

Paenting Style Influence on Excess Alcohol Intake Among Jewish Youth

Ross

Maste of Science, Mental Health Counseling, College, Januay, 2008

Clinical Psychology

Anticipated; Decembe, 2016

The health hazads that ae associated with adolescent alcohol use ae well documented, and thee is gowing ecognition among policymakes and clinicians alike that moe needs to be done to addess this public health theat. The pupose of this study will be to examine the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish college students in the United States. The study daws on attachment theoy, social leaning theoy, and a paenting style model as the main theoetical famewoks to evaluate the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish adolescents to develop infomed answes to the study's thee guiding eseach questions concening the elationship between peceived paenting style and excess alcohol use of male, Jewish, college students aged 18-26…… [Read More]

references to gender.

Scoring: The PAQ is scored easily by summing the individual items to comprise the subscale scores. Scores on each subscale range from 10 to 50.

Author: Dr. John R. Buri, Department of Psychology, University of St. Thomas, 2115

Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105.

Source: Buri, J.R. (1991). Parental Authority Questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Assessment, 57, 110-119
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School-Based Mental Health Program on

Words: 8166 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67429057

This is discussed at length by Fusick and ordeau (2004) "...school-based counselors need to be aware of the disturbing inequities that exist in predominantly Afro-American urban school districts, where nearly 40% of Afro-American students attend school in the United States" (Fusick and ordeau, 2004) This again places emphasis on the need for mental health programs in these areas of concern. This is also related to findings from a study by McDavis et al. (1995) Counseling African-Americans, which refers to research that stresses the "...widening achievement gap between Afro-American and Euro-American students." (McDavis, et al. 1995)

An important study Laura a. Nabors, Evaluation of Outcomes for Adolescents Receiving School-ased Mental Health Services (2002) refers to the particular issue and problems experience at inner-city schools. The author states that, "School mental health (SMH) programs are an important setting for providing mental health services to adolescents, especially urban youth who typically face in-…… [Read More]

Bibliography.aspx www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308

Smith, P.B., Buzi, R.S., & Weinman, M.L. (2001). Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic. Adolescence, 36(142), 323. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622

Stern, S.B., Smith, C.A., & Jang, S.J. (1999). Urban Families and Adolescent Mental Health. Social Work Research, 23(1), 15. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228

Sternberg, R.J., & Dennis, M.J. (1997). Elaborating Cognitive Psychology through Linkages to Psychology as a Helping Profession. Teaching of Psychology, 24(3), 246-249. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383

Stock, M.R., Morse, E.V., Simon, P.M., Zeanah, P.D., Pratt, J.M., & Sterne, S. (1997). Barriers to School-Based Health Care Programs. Health and Social Work, 22(4), 274+. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383
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Improving Emergency Department Flow by Using a Provider in Triage

Words: 11016 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23819753

Emergency oom Efficiency

Improving Emergency Department Flow by Using a Provider in Triage

Emergency room triage plays an essential role in the speed and quality of the emergency room departments. Triage represents only one small part of the process that determines quality of patient care. Emergency rooms can be crowded. Busy times are often unpredictable, making it difficult to avoid bottlenecks in the system. This has an affect on the amount of time between arrival and when the patient sees a physician. Patients can be in for frustrating long waits while sitting in the hospital lobby.Patients often leave the emergency room waiting areas without being seen because they get tired of waiting. These patients are referred to as left-without-being seen (LWBS). educing LWBS rates is crucial for improving quality of patient care in emergency rooms. Long waits also cause a potential liability for the hospitals, as patients that are critically…… [Read More]

References

Arkun, A,, Briggs, W., & Patel, S. et al. (2010). Emergency Department Crowding: Factors

Influencing Flow. West J. Emerg Med. 11(1): 10 -- 15. PMCID: PMC2850834

Armstrong, J., Hammond, J, & Hirshberg A, et al. (2008).Is overtriage associated with increased mortality? The evidence says "yes." Disaster Med Public Health Prep. P. D: 18388647. 2(1):4-5;

Bieler, G., Paroz, S., & Faouzi M, et al. (2012). Social and medical vulnerability factors of emergency department frequent users in a universal health insurance system. Acad Emerg Med. 19(1):63-8.
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PTSD Treatments

Words: 1372 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69290584

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) on one's well being can be problematic if not successfully understood and incorporated within a person's psyche. The purpose of this essay is to critically review the literature on the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of PTSD from a "biopsychosocial" perspective. This approach is holistic in nature and is helpful in understanding that nature of disorders and their place within the medical profession. Disorders are important because they suggest a relative problem and not an objective problem. Order is subjective and the need to view PTSD from a more objective viewpoint is helpful in learning what its study can truly do for those who are suffering from the ill effects of trauma. While trauma is inherent in the human condition, successful ways of dealing with this issue of life development have not been adequately expressed in a cohesive manner. This essay attempts to bridge these gaps of…… [Read More]

References

Edwards, D. (2013). Responsive integrative treatment of clients with PTSD and trauma-related disorders: An expanded evidence-based model. Journal of Psychology in Africa, 23(1), 7- 19.

Haugen, P.T., Splaun, A.K., Evces, M.R., & Weiss, D.S. (2013). Integrative approach for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in 9/11 first responders: three core techniques. Psychotherapy, 50(3), 336.

Jakovljevi?, M., Brajkovi?, L., Jaksi?, N., Lon-ar, M., Aukst-Margeti?, B., & Lasi?, D. (2012). POSTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDERS (PTSD) FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES: A TRANSDISCIPLINARY INTEGRATIVE APPROACH. Psychiatria Danubina, 24(3.), 246-255.

Peri, T., & Gofman, M. (2014). Narrative Reconstruction: An integrative intervention module for intrusive symptoms in PTSD patients. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 6(2), 176.
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Jenny Case Study

Words: 2454 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27229274

Characteristics did Jenny have as a child that are common in individuals who develop hoarding disorder?

Hoarding usually involves having difficulty getting rid of items and also issues on the maintenance of control over belongings. This behavior affects school and social functioning and appeared to Jenny when she was aged eight (Sorensen, 2011). Jenny also experienced problems at school as the teacher often sent notes stating that her desk is messy and she appeared to be absent minded in class. By the time she was in second grade, she had started being left behind in some subjects.

Literature points out that hoarding has been higher among children having ADHD than in children who are relatively healthy (Sorensen, 2011). In the case of Jenny, she was diagnosed with ADHD by a neuropsychologist. Dr. Davis said that she had neurodevelopment disorder that ensured it was hard for her to sustain her attention…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2014). Hoarding Disorder. Retrieved 26 February 2015, from

Frost, R., Tolin, D., & Maltby, N. (2010).Insight-Related Challenges in the Treatment of Hoarding. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 17(4), 404-413. doi:10.1016/j.cbpra.2009.07.004

Pogosian, L. (2010). Treatment of Compulsive Hoarding: A Case Study. The Einstein Journal of Biology and Medicine, 8-11. Retrieved from http://www.einstein.yu.edu/uploadedfiles/ejbm/page8_page11.pdf

Sorensen, R.J. (2011). Hoarding Disorder (Compulsive Hoarding): A Comprehensive Literature Review and Professional Training to Prepare Clinicians to Treat Problematic Hoarding. Retrieved from
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Spirituality and the Healing Environment in Hospitals

Words: 1149 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67963991

Healing Hospital and the Importance of Spirituality

Chapman (2003) defines a Healing Hospital as being about "loving service to others" (p.4). This paper examines the concept of the Healing Hospital and the role that spiritually plays in that model.

Numerous theorists have argued that advances in technology, pressure on budgets, and drives for efficiency over the last few decades have shifted the focus of attention from general care giving to technological and pharmacological interventions, with the need to extend life and fix broken parts (Puchalski, 2001; Treloar, 2000). However, there has also been increased realisation, back by significant research, that better outcomes are achieved when the patient is treated in a holistic manner (Baboni, Puchalski, & Peteet, 2014; Puchalski & Mcskimming, 2006).

The Healing Hospital is based on the premise of treating the whole person, rather than just the illness (Chapman, 2003). This includes all physical needs, as well as…… [Read More]

References

Baboni, M. J., Puchalski, C. M., & Peteet, J. R. (2014). The Relationship between Medicine, Spirituality and Religion: Three Models for Integration. Journal of Religion and Health, 53(5), 1586 -- 1598. Retrieved from  https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Balboni/publication/263055322_The_Relationship_between_Medicine_Spirituality_and_Religion_Three_Models_for_Integration/links/57039a6408aeade57a259720.pdf 

Chapman, E. (2003). Radical Loving Care: Building the Healing Hospital in America. Nashville, TN: Baptist Healing Hospital Trust.

Diaz-Gilbert, M. (2014). Spirituality, Suffering, Meaning, Resiliency, and Healing: Research Findings and a Patient's Story of Overcoming a Medical Challenge. International Journal for Human Caring, 18(4), 45 -- 51.

Johnson, B. H., Abraham, M. R., & Parrish, R. N. (2004). Designing the neonatal intensive care unit for optimal family involvement. Clinics in Perinatology, 31(2), 353 -- 382.
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Schizophrenia on the Mind and Body an

Words: 2006 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36727452

Schizophrenia on the Mind and Body

An Analysis of the Etiology of Schizophrenia and Its Impact on the Mind and Body

Perhaps no other human condition has received so much publicity, but remains so misunderstood by the general public as schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is widely believed to be associated with multiple personalities and other acute symptoms that would make sufferers readily apparent; however, the reality of the condition is that people can have schizophrenia and never know it. However, while much has been learned about the disease and its etiology over the last hundred years, much remains unclear about who is at risk and precisely how the disease progresses. Nevertheless, a number of efficacious treatments have been identified, and today, some schizophrenics recover completely or sufficiently enough to lead normal and productive lives. This paper provides an overview of schizophrenia and its incidence, the etiology of the disease and its symptoms,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alanen, Yrjo O. And Sirkka-Liisa Leinonen. Schizophrenia: Its Origins and Need-Adapted

Treatment. London: Karnac Books, 1997.

Beebe, Lora Humphrey. (2003). Theory-Based Research in Schizophrenia. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 39(2):67.

Bigelow, Llewellyn B. et al. Schizophrenia and Manic-Depressive Disorder: The Biological
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Cardiovascular Case Study Management

Words: 3112 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51501524

Although the severities of congestive signs may be similar, medical evaluation should be instructed to determine whether there is accompanying proof of cardiovascular disease. Physical proof of cardiovascular disease contains the narrow pulse pressure, cool arms, and legs, and sometimes changed mentation, with supporting proof sometimes provided by reducing serum sodium level and deteriorating renal function. Cardiovascular disease is frequently difficult to recognize through phone contact but may be suspected when previously effective diuretic increases fail, nurses report lower blood pressure, or patients explain improved lethargy.

Facilitators and barriers to optimal disorder management and outcomes

Environmental factors and cultural beliefs; motivators and hinders

In this case, the client thought he was suffering from a heart attack and feared to come to the hospital. The symptoms had presented for four days before the patient sought help. The patient had been suffering from similar symptoms for the past six months, but thought…… [Read More]

References

American Association of Cardiovascular (2013). Guidelines for cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention programs. John Wiley & Sons.

Bunting-Perry, L.K., & Vernon, G.M. (2007). Comprehensive nursing care for Parkinson's disease. New York: Springer Pub.

Holloway, N.M. (2014). Medical-surgical care planning. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Gulanick, M. (2007). Nursing care plans: Nursing diagnosis and intervention. St. Louis: Mosby.
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Analyzing the Summary Chapters

Words: 1210 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17665140

Stress is delineated as demand that is made on a being for adaptation, coping, or adjusting. There is stress that is healthy and is referred to as eustress. Prolonged stress impacts moods, ruins capacity to have pleasure and is also harmful to the body. Some of the aspects that generate a great deal of stress include everyday hassles, changes in life and also health problems. According to a survey undertaken by the American Psychological Association, the two biggest sources of stress are money and work and this causes people to become irritable, angry and fatigued. There are four kinds of conflict. Approach-approach conflict is the least stressful, having two objectives that can be attained whereas avoidance-avoidance conflict has more stress as one is enthused to evade two adverse objectives. Approach-avoidance encompasses objectives that generate mixed intentions and lastly multiple approach-avoidance conflict include numerous alternative actions that have upsides and downsides.…… [Read More]

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Hemophilia the Most Common Genetic

Words: 3476 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95055081

The viruses that cause AIDS (HIV) and hepatitis can be carried in clotting factors however there have been no documented cases of such transmission in about ten years. Prevention of viruses can be prevented by: careful screening of donors; testing of donated blood products; treating donated blood products with a detergent and heat to destroy viruses (Hemophilia 2006). Both preventive and as-needed therapy can be administered at home, thus resulting in quicker treatment, fewer doctor or emergency room visits, and less costs. Vein access devices can be surgically implanted to allow easier access to a vein however infections can result from such devices (Hemophilia 2006).

All patients with bleeding disorders may benefit at times from using aminocaproic acid, an oral antifibrinolytic medication that helps stabilize clots (Curry 2004). Aminocaproic acid is the only product available in the United States in oral form, however it is not user-friendly, with dosing every…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, Gaylene. (2006 October 06). Promising Non-Viral Alternative for Gene Therapy

Involves 'Jumping Gene' From a Moth. Ascribe Higher Education News Service. Retrieved December 20, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Bayer Grant Promotes Groundbreaking Hemophilia Research and Education; Bayer Hemophilia

Awards Program Continues to Be a Critical Source of Funding for Hemophilia Research and Education. (2006 May 23). Business Wire. Retrieved December 20, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.
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Transition From Childhood to Adolescence

Words: 403 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10980009



Risk taking behavior usually comes from feeling like one does not belong with others. At that point, a person does things that they would not otherwise do in an effort to fit in with other people. A lot of them do drugs or drink or smoke cigarettes, and some of them turn to promiscuous behavior in order to try to be accepted. I never did these things at that age because I was too afraid of the things that could happen to me. I did not want to get caught or be labeled a 'bad person' or get in trouble with my parents. They were very controlling, and that was part of the reason that I never did anything like that. I was not brave enough to be interested in taking that kind of risk because of my fear that my parents would punish me or not care about me…… [Read More]

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Eating Disorder Is Characterized by Abnormal Eating

Words: 3326 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38191377

Eating disorder is characterized by abnormal eating habits involving excessive or insufficient intake of food which is detrimental to the individual's physical and mental well-being. There are two common types of eating disorders although there are other types of eating disorders. The first is bulimia nervosa which is excessive eating coupled with frequent vomiting. The second type is anorexia nervosa which is immoderate restriction of food which leads to irrational weight gaining. The other types of eating disorders include eating disorders not otherwise specified which are essentially where a person has anorexic and bulimic behaviors, binge eating disorder which is compulsive overeating without any kind of compensatory behavior, and pica which is craving for certain non-food items such as glue, plaster, paper. It is estimated that roughly 10-15% of cases of eating disorders occur in males and statistics show that women are at a higher risk of developing eating disorders…… [Read More]

References

Doll, H.A., Petersen, S.E., & Stewart-Brown, S.L. (2005). Eating Disorders and Emotional and Physical Well-Being: Associations between Student Self-Reports of Eating Disorders and Quality of Life as Measured by the SF-36. Quality of Life Research, 14(3), 705-717. doi: 10.2307/4038820

Kime, N. (2008). Children's Eating Behaviours: The Importance of the Family Setting. Area, 40(3), 315-322. doi: 10.2307/40346135

Krauth, C., Buser, K., & Vogel, H. (2002). How High Are the Costs of Eating Disorders - Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa - for German Society? The European Journal of Health Economics, 3(4), 244-250. doi: 10.2307/3570016

Martin, A.R., Nieto, J.M.M., Jimenez, M.A.R., Ruiz, J.P.N., Vazquez, M.C.D., Fernandez, Y.C., . . . Fernandez, C.C. (1999). Unhealthy Eating Behaviour in Adolescents. European Journal of Epidemiology, 15(7), 643-648. doi: 10.2307/3582136