Cabanatuan Essays (Examples)

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Movie Response the Great Raid

Words: 1092 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2431162

Raid provides valuable insight into the war that was occurring in the Pacific during orld ar II. Too often, the conflict in the Pacific is overlooked and emphasis is placed on the conflict in Europe. hile it is an integral part of American history, the conflict between the United States and Japan focuses on the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Great Raid provides the audience with an opportunity to see how the United States retaliated against the Japanese after Pearl Harbor was bombed and the consequences of taking on the Japanese army. Furthermore, The Great Raid provides insight into the collaboration between United States Armed Forces and Filipino armed forces and the control that Japan had on the Philippines.

The film is accurate in depicting the horrors that American POs had to endure while in the hands of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Great Raid. Dir. John Dahl. United States: Miramax Films, 2005. DVD.

"The Great Raid." IMDB.com. Web. Accessed 1 April 2012.

"Margaret Utinsky." Defenders of the Philippines. Web. Accessed 1 April 2012.
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Ghost Soldiers - The Epic Account of

Words: 908 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57216579

Ghost Soldiers - The Epic Account of World War II's Greatest Rescue Mission is a saga of extreme valor of American soldiers and Prisoners of War (POW). The dramatic story of the capture of American and British POW, and their rescue attempt by selected U.S. Army 6th Ranger Batallion took place in Cabanatuan, a province in the Philippine Islands.

Ghost Soldiers is a book that depicts the extraordinary skills and virtue of the soldiers of war. Most of all, it is a chronicle of heroism, sacrifices, and triumph dared by the horror WWII had created. Perhaps, we can say that the story presented by Hampton Sides in Ghost Soldiers is a contribution to the journals of WWII. The book is a breathtaking and detailed account of the horrifying experiences of the POW, the rescuing soldiers, and the rest of the soldiers involved in the rescue mission such as the brave…… [Read More]

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MDMP and Military Strategy

Words: 4751 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48822826

Military Decision Making Process Exam (MDMP)

Movement Estimate of the Operations

Commander's Critical Information equirements (CCIs)

Commander's Judgment

COA Analysis, Comparison & ecommendation

Movement Estimate of the Operations

The POW Camp

The planning for the liberation of American and Allied prisoners held in a compound at Pangatian is to be done at central Luzon. The camp was five miles east of Cabanatuan.

The primary hindrance to the plan would be the rapid and frequent movement of the Japanese troops on the highway in front of the camp where the PoWs were held. The compound, in addition to being behind enemy lines was also the mainstay of Japanese troop movements. The Japanese retreating troops moved at night and rested during the day and the POW camp is one such resting place. The roads in the Pangatian area are regularly used by Japanese tanks. Dense troop concentrations are also reported in the…… [Read More]

References

Barbier, M. And O'Donnell, P. (2002). Beyond Valor: World War II's Rangers and Airborne Veterans Reveal the Heart of Combat. The Journal of Military History, 66(3), p.897.

Kem, J. (2009). Campaign planning. Fort Leavenworth, Kan.: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Dept. Of Joint, Interagency, and Multinational Operations.

King, M. (1985). Leavenworth Papers Number 11. Rangers. Selected Combat Operations in World War II. Ft. Belvoir: Defense Technical Information Center.

Kirkpatrick, C. (1990). An unknown future and a doubtful present. Washington, D.C.: Center of Military History, United States Army.
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The Coa Statement and Sketch

Words: 1240 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14562036

COA Statement and Sketch

Pajota's Guerillas' mission is to block off a mile of road through the use of road blocks on both sides of the highway bridge cross over Cabu Creek of an estimated 300 yards northeast from compound. In order to keep communication at a standstill, phone lines are cut connecting the outside to the camp before the attack. Guerillas will act as support troops, providing flank and rear security after withdrawal for the column. To start the attack, the Rangers attack the compound first, followed by Pajota's Guerillas and their attack on the Japanese batallion situated less than 300 yards in Bivouac beyong Cabu Creek..

Intent:

This is a rescue mission. Over 500 Allied and American prisoners have been held captive in a Japanese Prisoner of War compound and require rescue. The compound is located near Cabanatuan. For successful infilitration of the compound, the Rangers must begin…… [Read More]

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Military Sketch of Camp Pangatian Rescue

Words: 533 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98717991

Captain Pajota's Course Of Action Mission Statement And Sketch

Mission Statement

Captain Pajota aims to assist the Allied extraction of POWs from Pangatian Camp by blocking off a mile section road to the prison to allow the Allies access to attack the camp without interference from more Dokuho 359 forces coming in from General Tomoyuki Yamashita's order of Commander Oyabu's Dokuho 359 towards Cabanatuan City.

Commander's Intent

The purpose of the operation is to assist Allies in the removal of POWs and to show clear weaknesses in the heart of Japanese territory in the Phillipines. The much larger Dokuho 359, assisted with six tanks, is a large force. Holding it off in order to allow the extraction of POWs will show weaknesses in the Japanese defense and increase Allied resolve in the region.

Decisive Operation (DO)

Block the Japanese Imperial Army's Dokuho 359, including 800 men and six tanks, at…… [Read More]

References

King, Michael. (1985). Rangers: Selected Combat. Leavenworth Papers No. 11. Combat Studies Institute.