Capitalism Essays (Examples)

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Arguing for Egalitarian Societies

Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81266852

Capitalism vs. Democracy

Curing Neoliberalism with Democracy

Pope Francis, never one to shy away from controversy, attacked contemporary forms of capitalism as not only exclusionary, but also deadly (Downie). To support his claim, Francis notes that the news media regularly report a meaningless one or two percent change in the Dow Industrials, but the death of a homeless person goes unnoticed; or that daily tons of food is thrown into the trash while millions starve. Although some liberty was taking in the paraphrasing of Francis' words, the point is the same; i.e., capitalism today, as it is being practiced, rewards the ruthless and powerful and marginalizes the rest. According to the author of the ashington Post article about Pope Francis' stinging criticism of neoliberalism, James Downie, what separates Pope Francis from earlier papal proclamations of capitalist evils is that Francis talks specifics, such as the destructiveness of trickle-down economics and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Downie, James. "Pope Francis's Stinging Critique of Capitalism." Washington Post 26 November 2013. Web. 26 Feb. 2015.

Muller-Doohm, Stefan. "Nation State, Capitalism, Democracy: Philosophical and Political Motives in the Thought of Jurgen Habermas." Trans. Stefan Bird-Pollan. European Journal of Social Theory 13.4 (2010): 443-57. Print.

Piketty, Thomas. Capital in the Twenty-First Century. Trans. Arthur Goldhammer. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2014. Print.
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Economics and Its Impact on Business

Words: 1951 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70803157

Capitalism is predicated on the principles of "Creative Destruction" where the loss of one item or industry, leads to the creation of another more beneficial product or industry. This principle has both destroyed and given rise to numerous industries throughout the world. For example, in the early 1900's, farming gave way to the industrialization of American made goods. Producers went from the farm lands to the assembly line of manufacturers. Entire industries, including the automobile, rail; oil and gas industries were born and created. Today, we are seeing a shift from producing tangible products to producing intangible services and technology. Industries often change for the better. The low-calorie frozen, microwavable food industry is no different in this regard. Shifts and changes in consumer preferences and industry dynamics necessitate a shift within the overall industry. In assignment 1, the industry was predicated on perfect competition with price competition and products that…… [Read More]

References:

1) Bradley R. chiller, "Essentials of Economics," New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1991.

2) Chia-Hui Chen, course materials for 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics, Fall 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [12 Sept 2009]

3) Sullivan, Arthur; Steven M. Sheffrin (2003j). Economics: Principles in action. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458: Pearson Prentice Hall. p. 111. ISBN 0-13-063085-3.

4) Silberberg & Suen, The Structure of Economics, A Mathematical Analysis 3rd ed. (McGraw-Hill 2001) at 181
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Bell Daniel The Cultural Contradictions

Words: 1495 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90639883

Mass production and mass advertising "by the creation of new wants and new means of gratifying those wants" renders individuals complacent and dependent upon 'the system' of production and they are made to feel that their purchase of the next new prefabricated product is a radical act of individualism (34).

The "official, ceaseless searching for a new sensibility" that is at the heart of the restless spirit of modernism, commercials counsel us, can now be treated by buying the latest device (34). Bell envisions a future where inflation, bigger government, and a sense of entitlement produced by the capitalist emphasis on gratification, will only lead to more and more unhappiness and more and more consumption and more dependence upon faceless entities.

It is hard to read Bell's words and not wonder how modern, global capitalism relates to his thesis. The Internet has been a boon to marketers, and seems on…… [Read More]

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Free Will Agency Free Will and

Words: 2211 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6589128

Evaluating how a free market economy views human agency and free will, it is then seen that human beings in this kind of set-up are interpreted as rational human beings with the same capacities, abilities, and resources for competition in an invisible hand economy. ather than the government, the majority of decisions on economic activities and transactions are then assumed by individual key players in the market (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_market).

Comparison of Marxism and Free Market Capitalism and their views on Free Will or Human Agency

The Marxist conception of free will and human agency initially looks at human beings as alienated people because of capitalism. Their existence, identities, and consequent opportunities are then dependent on the social classes they are in. From this point, it can be said that Marx does not ascribe too much on the role of human beings to act out of their own accord. Yet in the…… [Read More]

References List

Alienation" 2006. [online] http://www2.pfeiffer.edu/~lridener/DSS/Marx/MARXW3.htmL

Free Market" 2006. [online] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_market

Human Agency." 2006. [online] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_agency

Marx's Theory of Social Class and Class Structure." 1999. [online]  http://uregina.ca/~gingrich/s28f99.htm
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Positive Moral Basis for Capitalist Society

Words: 1891 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78168664

Moral Basis of Capitalism

Positive Moral Basis for Capitalist Society

The theory of property right is probably society's turning point towards capitalism. Locke's theory on civil society and government is centered around individuals' natural right to property. In the Second Treatise, the author's justification of individuals uniting into developing governments, societies, is represented by their intention of preserving property. In Locke's view, it is the preservation of property that draws the limits, rights and obligations of governments and civil society. The issue here is Locke's definition of property. The interesting point is that Locke seems to differently categorize property within the Second Treatise. For example, property in Locke's view is individual's life, liberty and estate in some parts of the writing, while in other parts property is represented by persons and goods. Although specialists in the field have found this view on property as confusing, I think it should not…… [Read More]

Reference list:

1. John Locke (2012). Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved November 10, 2013 from  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/locke/ .
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Economics Crisis as an Inevitable

Words: 4733 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43936576



The U.S. is a property owning civilization and a number of the people wanted land and housing. Americans however scarcely ever create savings. "The country itself lives on other countries' savings by issuing bonds to finance its excessive consumption. The current crisis began with cheap housing loans offered by banks. Banks provided loans but instead of holding the loan in their books, they packaged them into collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) and sold them to other agencies. These agencies passed them on to others and spread them globally as assets" (the Current Economic Crisis, its causes, its impact and possible alternatives, 2009).

Interest rates were lowered and housing loans went up with construction activities leading to land prices increasing. The real estate was booming, generating employment and incomes. But as the rate of interest on housing loans came down, banks started to compete to get more business. Because of low interest…… [Read More]

References

Avizius, R. 2009. Financial Crisis Big Picture: What has the Government Response Been? [ONLINE] Available at:  http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article9229.html . [Accessed 22 May 2012].

Centeno, M.A. & Cohen, J.N. 2012. The Arc of Neoliberalism. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.yale.edu/macmillan/transitionstomodernity/papers/CentenoCohen.pdf. [Accessed 22 May 2012].

Crotty, J. 2009. Structural causes of the global financial crisis: a critical assessment of the 'new financial architecture' . [ONLINE] Available at:  http://cje.oxfordjournals.org/content/33/4/563.full . [Accessed 22 May 2012].

Esteva, G. (n.d.). The Meaning of the Global Crisis and "Recovery" for Study Abroad: What are we Preparing Students for? [ONLINE] Available at: http://digitalcollections.sit.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1110&context=faculty_symposium. [Accessed 22 May 2012].
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Karl Marx's View of Class

Words: 1637 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45158276

Cambridge; Cambridge, MA: Polity Press

Devine, F. (ed.) (2004). ethinking class: culture, identities and lifestyles. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Joyce, P. (ed.) (1995). Class. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press

eid, I. (1989). Social class differences in Britain: life-chances and life-styles. London: Fontana [Franklin-Wilkins HN400.S6 EI]

ose, D and K. O'eilly (eds.) (1997). Constructing classes: towards a new social classification in the UK. Swindon: ESC/ONS

Wright, E. (1997) Classes. London: Verso

Zbigniew, a. (1972). Karl Marx: economy, class and social revolution. London: Nelson

Cohen, G. (2009) Why not socialism?

Elster, J (1986) an introduction to Marx

Gurley, J. (1976). Challengers to capitalism: Marx, Lenin and Mao

Lee, S. (200). European dictatorships, 1918-1945.

Marx, K. And Engels, F. (2005). The Communist Manifesto

Newman, M. (2005). Socialism: a very short introduction

Schumpeter, J (2010) Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy

Wacquant, L. (2009). Punishing the poor; the neoliberal government of social insecurity… [Read More]

References

Butler, T. (2007). Understanding social inequality. London; Thousand Oaks, Calif:

http://books.google.com.tr/books?id=Yv605Xc3vfkC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Cohen, G. (2009) Why not socialism?:

http://books.google.com.tr/books?id=llNlS3FsNi4C&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
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Globalization in Order to Determine

Words: 1935 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53726073

He made a lot of points, but neglected to tie them all together and bring them to his conclusion. Further, he recognizes many things about the new economic world order than Altman fails to address, but he omits consideration of the long-term impacts. He rests his conclusion on what he believes is the self-evident conclusion that promoting free trade is a winning policy. What I would have liked is for him to apply his understanding of the new world economic order to this conclusion. In what ways will the change in the world economic order impact the U.S.' ability to champion the free market?

The criteria that I set out for the evaluation of these papers reveals my biases -- I value facts over rhetoric, efficiency over preponderance, and I prefer at least the appearance of objectivity. Altman argues that the era of globalization is coming to a close, but…… [Read More]

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Walter Lafeber's Michael Jordan and

Words: 316 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84491871

Thus, to use an American basketball star as your key marketing tool points to the success of globalizing tactics employed by American transnationals in spreading the "American way of life." The fact that Nike accomplished this by using exploitive labor practices in their Asian factories is the seamier side of the story, one that elicits no sympathy for practitioners of global capitalism. y continuing these practices - and by continuing to spread American culture through the media, effectively asserting America's hegemony over the developing world - LaFeber argues that violent instability will be provoked, both at home and abroad. Considering the fact that this book was written in 1999, it is easy to see how prescient LaFeber's argument is from a post-9/11 standpoint.

ibliography

LaFeber, Walter. Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism. New York:…… [Read More]

Bibliography

LaFeber, Walter. Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism. New York: Norton, 1999.
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Rise of Business and the New Age

Words: 1562 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11553680

rise of business and the new age of industrial capitalism forced Americans to think about, criticize, and justify the new order -- especially the vast disparities of wealth and power it created. This assignment asks you to consider the nature and meaning of wealth, poverty and inequality in the Gilded Age making use of the perspectives of four people who occupied very different places in the social and intellectual spectrum of late nineteenth-?century America:, the sociologist William Graham Sumner, the writer enry

George, a Massachusetts textile worker named Thomas O'Donnell, and the steel tycoon

Andrew Carnegie.

For Andrew Carnegie, wealth was a good thing. In his "Gospel of Wealth," Carnegies talks about the problem of "our age" which is the proper administration of wealth. e has his own philosophy of how wealth has come to be unequally distributed with the huge gap existing between those who have little and those…… [Read More]

Henry George, Progress and Poverty, Major Problems, pp. 20-?22.

Thomas O'Donnell Testimony before a U.S. Senate Committee, 1885 U.S. Congress,

Capital (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1885