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Shakespeare's Hamlet
Words: 2184 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 96084999
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Characterization of Ophelia in Shakespeare's Hamlet

In illiam Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the character of Ophelia is perhaps the most tragic, as her wishes and desires are constantly sublimated in favor of the scheming characters around her. Essentially she is used as bait for Hamlet, and when her father dies, she is left to her own madness and death (a death whose circumstances leave open the possibilities of accident or suicide). By examining the characterization of Ophelia in Shakespeare's Hamlet, it will be possible to see how the play uses her conversations to heighten the tragedy of her death and subsequently implicate the other characters, and especially Polonius and Gertrude, more fully in her breakdown and death, thus revealing the destructive nature of gender stereotypes and the social roles they reinforce.

Before examining the character of Ophelia in more detail, it will be useful to briefly examine previous critical work on…

Works Cited

Hunt, Maurice. "Impregnating Ophelia."Neophilologus. 89.4 (2005): 641-663. Print.

Peterson, Karaa. "Framing Ophelia: Representation and the pictorial tradition." Mosaic: a Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature. 31.3 (1998): 1-24. Print.

Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. Shakespeare Navigator. 2011. Web. 31 May 2011.

.

Milton Paradise Lost Books
Words: 881 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63954206
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Characterizations of Satan in Paradise Lost

The character of Satan is a prominent figure in "Paradise Lost." In fact, it is arguable that without this character, there would be no poem and there would be no myth of the fall of humanity and the war in heaven. The paper will focus upon this character's significance and role in the overall narrative. The paper will reference Books 1, 2, and 4 as part of this discussion. As most people are aware and certainly readers of "Paradise Lost" are aware, Satan was an angel in heaven, a servant of God. When he rose against God and the kingdom of heaven, a great and epic struggle ensued, which is the primary narrative thrust of the poem. Examination of this character can provide insight into other characters, themes of the poem, and other literary structures that are present within Milton's great opus.

Milton's initial…

References:

Literature.org. (2012) Paradise Lost. Milton, J. Available from  http://www.literature.org/authors/milton-john/paradise-lost/index.html . 2012 June 01.

Short Stories Comparison
Words: 1065 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99667324
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Timothy Findley's "Stones" and Alice Munroe's "Something I've Been Meaning to Tell You." The former is a memoir, a most painful recounting of a young boy's life with his father who was indelibly altered during the course of events of orld ar II. The latter is a work of fiction detailing the relationship between a pair of sisters and their lovers. However, a more thorough analysis of these works reveals that there are commonalities in characterization and the point-of-view of the narration between these tales that is undeniable. Moreover, each details the maturation of the characters from a period which spans from early life to adulthood. As such, the similarities in the point-of-view of the narrators and the characterization of the principle people in each tale reveal that both of these coming of age stories are ultimately tragedies.

One of the primary similarities between both of these stories revolves about…

Works Cited

YOU DIDN'T PUT THE NAME OF THE BOOK

Adonais and Don Juan Explored
Words: 1586 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40630200
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hile most of the poem centers around this face, there are a few stanzas where the poet breaks away and discovers what he knows to be himself after this tragedy. The dreadful aspect of life and even his own early demise surface in the emotions revealed in this poem. It is deeply personal and intense. On the other hand, "Don Juan" is less personal. hile the poem may feel less personal, it cannot be denied that we see a little of Byron in this character. However, this is more than a character sketch. Each poem successfully utilizes the literary techniques of voice, mood, and tone to explore meaning. Shelley is remarkably successful in capturing moments of grief. The mood and tone of the poem are nothing to question. The stanzas examine focus primarily on sorrow and how this sorrow affects the poet. There is nothing else to know about this…

Works Cited

Byron, George. "Don Juan." Textbook. City: Publisher. Year.

Shelley, Percy. "Adonais." Textbook. City: Publisher. Year.

Being Earnest a Critique of Wilde's the
Words: 2245 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14703682
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Being Earnest

A Critique of Wilde's the Importance of Being Earnest

First performed in 1895, Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest satirized manners and social customs of late Victorian England. Focusing on a pair of young men who live "double lives," the comedy brings to light an element of English society that was ripe for exposure. Wilde was a master satirist. With this play, he shows how cynical attitudes creep into one and before long lead to all sorts of problems. For Jack and Algernon, maintaining a phony second identity is the only way to lead a satisfying life. However, as the story unfolds, the two realize that true fulfillment can only be obtained through honest living. This paper will critique Wilde's Importance of Being Earnest and show the plot, themes, characters and title all work to give an "important" message to the audience.

Critical Summary

Otto einert (1956)…

Reference List

Foster, R. (1956). Wilde as Parodist: A Second Look at the Importance of Being

Earnest. College English, 18(1): 18-23.

Pearce, J. (2000). The Unmasking of Oscar Wilde. UK: HarperCollins.

Reinert, O. (1956). Satiric Strategy in The Importance of Being Earnest. College English, 18(1): 14-18.

Raymond Carver's Cathedral Which Is
Words: 344 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18837078
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"

This essay is well-written and well-constructed. The writer refers to the primary source material liberally and provides in-text citations as well as a bibliography. However, the writer could use active voice more often. For example, the sentence "The use of different point-of-view for the narration of the story has great influence on how the elements of characterization and setting are presented" could be rewritten and presented in active voice: "...great influence on how the authors present elements of characterization and setting." The sentence that follows is also slightly clumsy and would be improved through using more parallel verb forms. It reads: "The first person narrative can use more direct characterization to establish the people in the story while the objective point-of-view relies on indirect interpretation." It could be changed to read: "The first person narrative uses direct characterization to establish the people in the story, while the objective point-of-view…

Interpretation and Analysis
Words: 1677 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 11323478
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Discrimination and Madness: Examining Motifs in the Short Stories of Faulkner and Gillman

"The Yellow Wallpaper," by Charlotte Perkins Gillman and "A ose for Emily," by William Faulkner, though remarkably different in style and voice, feature stories where women are the main characters. Both of these stories take the reader through a raucous trip through time and sanity leaving the reader constantly guessing. In the midst of these vivid journeys through the narrative, both short stories showcase their female protagonists in fictional worlds where various pertinent social issues fester in the background.

"The Yellow Wallpaper" tells a story written in the first person of a vivacious, imaginative woman who explains that she suffers from a temporary nervous depression colored by a bit of hysteria. Her husband, a doctor, who the narrator tells us is extremely practical, believes she is not sick and rents a colonial mansion for the summer so…

References

Faulkner, William. A Rose for Emily. 1930. In LitWeb the Norton Introduction to Literature Website. Retrieved from  http://www.wwnorton.com/college/english/litweb05/workshops/fiction/faulkner1.asp 

Gillman Perkins, Charlotte. The Yellow Wallpaper. 1891. In LitWeb the Norton

Introduction to Literature Website. Retrieved from  http://www.wwnorton.com/college/english/litweb05/workshops/fiction/gilman1.asp

Setting and Plot in Puig's
Words: 1484 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4189873
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(They must pass time through story telling and caring for each other). In "If This is a Man," Primo has to bury his dignity and identity. (Ch. 1 p. 19 before he is arrested he is rebellious. Chapter 2 p. 33 a hollow man reduced to suffering and needs, he is at the bottom. P. 34 name is replaced by a prison number with which one can get food. Chapter 13 the selection to gas chamber, cold, hunger and work leaves little margin for though, even this though, resignation or despair, p. 131).

Contrasting

While similar in many ways the works are also very different. In Levi's work plot is not as important an issue as is Primo's concern with telling his tale through the day-to-day experiences he encounters. Yet these very details including the various settings in which he lives and the tales shared by his character help the…

References

Brent, L. (2000). "Overview Kiss of the Spider Woman." Literature of Developing Nations for Students, Vol. 1, The Gale Group. Available:

http://mb.sparknotes.com/mb.epl?b=65&m=907770&h=spider, kiss, woman

Levi, P. (1991). "If This is a Man." New York: Abacus.

Alex Cross Evinces the Fact
Words: 1313 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 56227871
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This part of the movie has little intrinsic value for the movie as a whole, yet is responsible for setting the events in motion that result in Cross's character's subversion. In fact, Cross's jailhouse visits actually aid him in his subversive attempts to destroy Picasso by illicit means when the former breaks into his own police department and steals the one piece of evidence that can free the imprisoned girl and dispel any criminal wrongdoing on the part of her uncle in exchange for her uncle's help in locating Picasso. The fact that the girl's uncle is a criminal, and that Cross is working to both help free him from any wrongdoing as well as to illicitly kill Picasso, demonstrates just how profound his subversion is.

Virtually all of Hitchcock's masterful thriller's end fairly abruptly with a degree of ambiguity that leaves audiences unsure how to feel about the character…

Works Cited

Alex Cross. Dir. Rob. Cohen. Perf. Tyler Perry, Matthew Fox, Edward Burns. 2012. Film.

Lowe, Nick. "The Well Tempered Plot Device." Ansible. (46). 1986. Web.

Sharkey, Betsy. "Review: 'Alex Cross' and Tyler Perry are Armed with Silly Lines." Los Angeles Times. 2012. Web.

Truffaut, Francois, Hitchcock, Alfred, Scott, Helen. Hitchcock. New York: Simon & Schuster. 1985. Print.

American Novel
Words: 2521 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 95673385
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Uncle Daniel and Lester Ballard

Proper characterization is one of the greatest skills that a writer possesses because often times poor development of characters or their inapt portrayal can completely destroy even the most perfect of stories. It has been noticed that while most writers pay close attention to evolution of their characters, they do tend to go overboard with negative or positive characterization on some occasions. Despite their good intentions, they get carried away with a desire to create unusual characters that cannot be related to easily. A writer's ability to develop realistic characters tend to add to the overall impact and popularity of their works and similarly a poorly developed or unrealistic character can destroy an otherwise good plot. However in some rare cases, even a seemingly unreal character manages to leave a lasting impact because of the sheer creative genius of the authors. This is exactly what…

References

Girard, Rene. Violence and the Sacred, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.

Lang, John. "Lester Ballard: McCarthy's Challenge to the Reader's Compassion," Sacred Violence El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1995

McCarthy, Cormac. Child of God, New York: Vintage Books, 1993.

Eudora Welty, The Ponder Heart, Harvest Books: 1954

Caesar Cesar's Work The Gallic
Words: 985 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47903322
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One aspect at which Cesar's work excels in the interrelation between the descriptive geography and the characterization of the Germans is the political geography approach. In fact, much of Cesar's work is relevant exactly because it is a very scientific description of the way the tribes lived together in tribal formations during that time and how they came in contact with one another. Cesar is always very descriptive in his approach and clearly marks the areas in which these tribes lived, including the Germans, but also many of the neighboring tribes (his focus is certainly on the Gauls).

The Rhine is obviously central to the existence of the Germans and Cesar mentions it several times in his work, although most of the time only so as to limit the theatre if his own operations in Gaul. As such, his approach is that the Rhine marks the delimitation and border between…

Bibliography

1. Caesar, Julius. De Bello Gallico. Translation by Emanuel Hoffman. Oxford -- Clarendon Press. 1898

Caesar, Julius. De Bello Gallico. Translation by Emanuel Hoffman. Oxford -- Clarendon Press. 1898

Ibid.

Film in Bedroom Story Killings Andre Dobus
Words: 1314 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92079596
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film "In Bedroom" story "Killings Andre Dobus.

Too Hollywood: "Killings" vs. In The Bed

In all actuality, it would be exceedingly difficult for any feature film to match the emotional depth and breadth of a (good) work of literature. Although Hollywood will claim otherwise, a true story cannot be told with images but with the connotations, the complexities, and the nuances of words, and with words alone. Subsequently, as can be expected anytime anyone attempts to stretch out a 15-page short story (approximately) into a two hours plus (130 minutes) film, there are several inconsistencies between Andre Dubus' short story entitled "Killings" and its feature film adaptation, In The Bedroom. But that's not the primary problem with the latter which, even more so than the short story itself, is a bloated, exceedingly lengthy production high on theatrics and drama and relatively low on emotion and characterization. The primary problem with…

Hard Times in His Novel Hard Times
Words: 3013 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51021164
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Hard Times

In his novel Hard Times, Charles Dickens is not shy in confronting what he sees as the paramount social evils of his day, particularly when those evils come in the form of ostensibly beneficent social movements themselves. In particular, Dickens satirizes Jeremy Bentham's Utilitarianism through the characterization of Thomas Gradgrind and Josiah Bounderby as men of cold reason and hard facts, and uses the fates of the various characters to demonstrate the destructive potential of Utilitarian ethics when applied without a comprehensive, objective standard for determining good and bad. The city of Coketown represents the physical embodiment of the cruel, alien world produced by the enactment of Utilitarian policy, and contrasts with its creators expressed dedication to facts and reason. By considering the characterization of Gradgrind and Bounderby, the setting of Coketown, and the narrator's particular use of language throughout the novel alongside the philosophy of Utilitarianism as…

Works Cited

Bentham, Jeremy. The principles of morals and legislation. Oxford: University of Oxford Press,

Dickens, Charles. Hard Times. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1854.

Bentham 2.

Bentham 2.

Inorganic Chemistry Linear Sp Carbon Allotropes in
Words: 1415 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62343041
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Inorganic Chemistry

Linear sp Carbon Allotropes in Question

While modern day discoveries and characterizations of allotropes are reported, the definition of allotropy remains ambiguous as the question of what constitutes an allotrope is under debate. Lagow et al. reported the synthesis of a terminally capped linear acetylenic carbon with alternating single and triple binds, claiming it to be a stable sp carbon allotrope (1994), a subject of debate as the classification of acetylenic carbon as an allotrope continues to be determined, and the stability of such a compound is in question. The proposed structure and stability of a linear sp carbon of such a proposed length and with alternating single and triple bonds is disputed by Hirsch et al. Thus, the stability of long-chain carbon allotropes and the characterization of the linear sp carbon synthesized by Lagow et al., given its terminal end design, remains in question as to the…

Bibliography

Demishev, SV, Pronin, AA, Sluchanko, NE, Samarin, NA, Glushkov, VV, Lyapin, AG, Kondrin,

MV, Brazhkin, VV, Varfolomeeva, TD, Popova, SV, & H. Ohta. (2002). "New nanocluster carbyne-based material synthesized under high pressure." General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences. Russia: Moscow. Vol. 44, No. 4, pp. 585-588. [Online]. Available at  http://www.ioffe.rssi.ru/journals/ftt/2002/04/p585-588.pdf 

Lagow, RJ, Kampa, JJ, Wei, HC, Battle, SL, Genge, JW, Laude, DA, Harper, CJ, Bau, R,

Stevens, RC, Haw, JF, & E. Munson. (20 Jan. 1995) "Synthesis of Linear Acetylenic Carbon: The 'sp' Carbon Allotrope." Science, New Series. Vol. 267, No. 5196, pp. 362-367.

Rochester Through Different Eyes an
Words: 1035 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 26194234
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Wide Sargasso Sea is primarily narrated by Rochester's other wife, Antionette, who has not had the opportunity to develop the same ideas about marriage and love that Jane has. She does not mention Rochester -- indeed, is not aware of him, for the very simple reason that he has not entered her life -- until the third part of the novel, at which point she is already being held in the attic, seeing almost no one except for Grace Poole. Her sanity is also in some doubt for this section of the book, and Rochester is possibly at least partially to blame for the degradation of her mental state. All of this adds up to a confused and distant view of Rochester; Antoinette longs for him to rant her release, but he is not the focus of her anguish. The middle section of the novel is much more revelatory as…

Classical Greek Theater
Words: 1363 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 22673869
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omen in Ancient Tragedy and Comedy

Both the drama of Euripides' "Medea" and the comedy of Aristophanes' "Lysistrata" seem unique upon a level of even surface characterization, to even the most casual students of Classical Greek drama and culture. Both in are female-dominated plays that were produced by male-dominated societies and written by men. Both the drama and the comedy features strong women as their central protagonists, whom are depicted under extreme circumstances, in relatively positive lights. And both plays, despite their very different tones, also have an additional, unique feature in that they show 'the enemy' -- or the non-Greek or non-Athenian, in a fairly positive and humane fashion.

The sympathies of the viewer for female's plights are immediately arisen by Aristophanes from the first scene of "Lysistrata," as Cleonice, the friend of Lysistrata, and a common Athenian housewife states, regarding the lateness of the other women that frustrates…

Works Cited

Arkins, Brian. "Sexuality in Fifth-Century Athens." Ancient History: Journal of University College Dublin, Ireland, Volume 1: 1994. http://ancienthistory.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.ucd.ie/%7Eclassics/94/Arkins94.html

Aristophanes. "Lysistrata." Retrieved on 6 November 2004 from Exploring World Cultures Website, 1997. http://m3.doubleclick.net/875354/freeze10012004.html

Euripides. "Medea." MIT Classics Archive, 2001. Retrieved on 6 November 1997 at  http://classics.mit.edu/Euripides/medea.html 

Hemminger, Bill. "Why Study Ancient World Cultures?" Retrieved on 6 November 2004 from Exploring World Cultures Website, 1997.

Walter Huston's Adaptation of the Opening of
Words: 1034 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8648119
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Walter Huston's Adaptation of the Opening of the Maltese Falcon (1941) Movie. What Does it Do Well? What Does it Lack?

The Maltese Falcon -- Book vs. film

Whenever a film is made of a beloved novel, people are often quick to point out the discrepancies between the original depiction and the cinematic version. Dashiell Hammett's classic novel The Maltese Falcon, the tale of how his detective hero Sam Spade became embroiled in an intrigue involving a famous gold statue of a bird, was made into a film directed by John Huston starring Humphrey Bogart and Mary Astor. The movie was extremely faithful to the book and the first scene, textually, often transposes full pages of the novel's dialogue into the film. This is rather unusual in a cinematic adaptation, given that film is widely considered to be a visual medium vs. The verbal medium of the page. However, because…

Analyzing Contemporary Fiction Books
Words: 664 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17210467
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Deconstructing Characterization in Chosen

Ted Dekker's Chosen is a timeless tale of good versus evil in a fantasy story setting in which the heroes triumph despite the fact that all odds are against them. The book chronicles the lot of four teenage warriors who are attempting to protect their homeland from a force of evil known as the horde. Along the way, they learn much about themselves, the nature of the world, and about the interminable battle of good versus evil. A thorough analysis of Chosen reveals that the mind is more powerful than the body, the fight against evil is continual, and good has an everlasting need to prevail.

The characterization of Johnis, the central protagonist in this story, demonstrates that the mind is much more powerful than the body. Johnis is highly unlikely to lead a mission of forest dwellers on their quest to save their homeland, simply…

Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka Theme
Words: 1462 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3680047
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Gradually, Gregor discovers how unimportant he really is to the family, and how little they really care about him. He has given them his love and devotion, and they repay him by locking him away when he needs them the most.

Kafka uses the plot to show the increasing disinterest of Gregor's family, and how they have used him for the last five years. His father has grown "fat and sluggish," his mother relied on the servants (that he paid for), and his sister did nothing much at all. He worked like a dog to keep the family together, and in thanks, they lock him away in his room when he becomes an embarrassment. Kafka uses this plot device to add information about the family, all the while showing Gregor's sweet disposition. Gregor's life is meaningless and empty, but he does not blame them for any of it. Instead, he…

References

Bloom, Harold, ed. Franz Kafka's 'The Metamorphosis.' New York: Chelsea House, 1988.

Kafka, Franz. Selected Short Stories of Franz Kafka. Trans. Willa Muir and Edwin Muir. New York: Modern Library, 1952.

Olsen, Eric. "The Labyrinth Within: Franz Kafka and the Predicament of Modern Man." World and I, Volume: 19, Issue: 6, June 2004.

Cult TV Series E G True Blood Watched
Words: 1660 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90612528
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cult TV series (e.g. True Blood) watched, making

Television of Steel

There are several different definitions of, and criteria for, what constitutes a cult television series. Smallville, however, is one of the few television series that fulfills nearly all such requisites for the attaining of cult status. The show was broadcast before a national audience during prime time hours for 10 years, has won a host of awards, and generated a following that has spanned so many different genres, media, and spin-offs, that virtually the only word to describe it would be cult. However, one of the primary factors that readily afforded Smallville to be able to attain a cult like status was in place well before a single scene was shot or before a solitary actor had been cast. The fact that Smallville was based on the character of Superman, originally a DC Comics character and best selling title,…

References

Sumner, D. (2011). "Smallville bows this week -- with Stargate's world record." GateWorld. Retrieved from  http://www.gateworld.net/news/2011/05/smallville-bows-this-week-with-stargates-world-record/ 

Bennet, C., Gottesfelf, J. (2002). Smallville: See No Evil. New York: Little, Brown Young Readers.

Ives, N. (2003). "The Media Business: Advertising -- Addenda; Verizon and WB Join for Promotion." The New York Times. Retrieved from  http://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/12/business/the-media-business-advertising-addenda-verizon-and-wb-join-for-promotion.html

David Copperfield and Joseph Andrews
Words: 1138 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58789478
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Home: David Copperfield and Joseph Andrews

Consider the respective namesakes of Joseph Andrews and David Copperfield. Briefly, how much do we know about these two characters? Are they fully developed characters? Are they atypical in terms of their respective novels? What does that information suggest about the respective methods of characterization of Henry Fielding and Charles Dickens?

The naming of the protagonists of the novels David Copperfield and Joseph Andrews is important, as these two characters are, to use Dickens's phrase, the heroes of their own lives. David's birth is filled with portents, from the caul around his neck, to his weak mother whom is a foreshadowing in waxen doll like attitude and form to her son's eventual wedlock with the silly Dora. The younger David becomes a kind of replacement father to his mother, taking the name and place of his ghostly, elderly father whom barely functions as a…

Plot The Most Important Element
Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48615606
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1272).

The plot itself consists of a symbolic journey unto the Puritan heart of darkness, a place of communion with the devil himself, which, as it turns out, is only a dream. Nevertheless, the dream material clearly traumatizes Young Goodman Brown as much as if the evil trip into the forest, where in the dream, he even meets his wife Faith (" My Faith is gone!'" (p. 1269), he cries in despair, into the darkness, seizing one of his wife's symbolic pink ribbons from the branch of a tree) had happened to him in real life.

ithin his frightening dream, Young Goodman Brown, reluctant yet somehow determined, sets out, near sunset, on a journey into the forest, from which his new young wife with pretty pink ribbons in her hair, "My love and my Faith'" (p. 1264) tries in vain to keep him back. This is not just for purposes…

Work Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Young Goodman Brown." The Norton Anthology of American Literature 1820-1865. Volume B. (Pkg. 1). Nina Baym et al. (Eds).

New York: Norton, 2003. 1263-1272.

Setting of a Story Can Reveal Important
Words: 1219 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57204372
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setting of a story can reveal important things about the narrative's larger meaning, because the setting implies certain things about the characters, context, and themes that would otherwise remain implicit or undiscussed. In their short stories "The Lottery" and "The Rocking-Horse inner," Shirley Jackson and DH Lawrence use particular settings in order to comment on the political and socio-economic status of their characters without inserting any explicitly political or socio-economic discussion into the narrative. In the case of "The Lottery," the setting transforms the story from a one of simple horror to a more nuanced critique of American society, and particularly its dedication to arbitrary, destructive beliefs. Lawrence's "The Rocking-Horse inner" makes a similar point, but in this case the setting serves to implicitly critique the consumerism encouraged by capitalist hegemony in England. Comparing and contrasting these two settings allows one to better understand how each story makes an identifiable…

Works Cited

Jackson, Shirley. The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, 2005.

Lawrence, DH Selected Short Stories. Toronto: Dover Publications, 1993.

Film Field of Dreams Executive Review The
Words: 832 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Movie Review Paper #: 79999728
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film Field of Dreams

Executive review: The objective of this paper is to provide an in-depth analysis of the film 'Field of Dreams' [1989], taking into consideration such intrinsic aspects of the film as the plot; characterizations; contextualization and storyline; moods and particularly evident ideological perspectives.

The plot within Field of Dreams begins to take shape when, due to instruction given unto him by a mysterious, heavenly voice one day, Ray Kinsella [Costner], a struggling owa farmer, begins to turn one of his cornfields [virtually the exclusive source of his income] into a baseball diamond. The characters he meets and the experiences he subsequently has, the eventual result of his accomplishment (s) and the ultimately reconciling and redeeming conclusion collectively converge to make for a movie that, in spite of having various fictional and illogical inclinations, depicts a pot that is fundamentally logical moralistic.

The film, directed by Phil Alden…

It begins to become increasingly apparent as the movie nears it conclusion, especially with the appearance of the ghost of Kinsella's father that the prime objective of the movie isn't baseball or success; in fact, it becomes increasingly evident that this is movie based upon representing the lives of people living with deep set regrets due to particular wasted chances within their lives. The film isn't just for baseball fans and neither is it just for those with sentimental tendencies, its fundamentally for people those experienced loss and want, just for a few minutes, a shot at regaining things that they have lost as a result of past mistakes.

External Source

Ebert, R. (1989). Field of Dreams. Digital Chicago @  http://www.suntimes.com/ebert/ebert_reviews/1989/04/349987.html

English Protestant Clergy in Literature
Words: 3374 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86316964
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Adams, Primrose and Yorick: A Comparison of 18th Century Church of England Clergymen

One of the clearest features shared by Fielding's Adams in Joseph Andrews, Goldsmith's Primrose in The Vicar of Wakefield, and Sterne's Yorick in A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy is relentlessness that the characters demonstrate, as though by sheer force of will they may manage affairs to a happy conclusion. In spite of their sometimes obtuse qualities, their evident pride in themselves, their naivete, their innocence, their ability to bungle their way into all manner of episodic conundrums, their resolute good humor through it all ensures the reader that whatever grace they do possess will be sufficient to make all well by the end of the narrative. Such is true of all three clergymen, and to the extent that all three clergymen represent the pastors of the Church of England in the 18th century, one could…

Black Tulip the Novel the
Words: 666 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22316430
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At times these endings are mesmeric, while at others they increase the pace to integrate smoothly with the subsequent chapter.

Dumas also uses characterization to create suspense. One good example of this is William of Orange, who makes his initially anonymous appearance in Chapter 3 of the novel. He is described as a pale, thin, and almost creepy person. he reader learns only later that this is William of Orange. After the murders, the reader also learns that William's inner being is quite as uncomely as his physical appearance, when it is revealed that he is behind the murders of the De Witt brothers.

Dumas' addressing the reader directly gives the impression of being taken into the author's confidence, as if secret information is to be revealed. his contributes to the suspense of the overall plot by creating parallel between the reader-author relationship and the lives of the characters.

Romance…

Tulipomania serves as the central image of the novel. It serves first as a contrast, and then as a parallel to the less noble properties of the human spirit. Its first appearance in the novel, in the form of Cornelius van Baerle. His innocent enjoyment of tulips is in direct opposition to the mob mentality at the beginning of the novel. However, his life is soon invaded by jealousy and rivalry in the form of Isaac Boxtel. The rivalry created in this way parallels the initial political scene, where the innocent suffer as a result of evil elements.

Source

Dumas, Alexandre. The Black Tulip. Pdf Ebook retrieved from  http://manybooks.net/titles/dumasalpetext97tbtlp10.html

Hemingway Fitzgerald the Great
Words: 2071 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3288813
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Unable to serve in the army, he too, like Jake is haunted by a feeling of vulnerability. His mother financially supports his career as a novelist, and he is highly dependant upon Frances, the woman with whom he is involved, even while he is lusting after Lady Brett. Likewise, Jake's feelings for Brett are characterized by male vulnerability: "I was thinking about Brett and my mind stopped jumping around and started to go in sort of smooth waves. Then all of a sudden I started to cry. Then after a while it was better and I lay in bed and listened to the heavy trams go by and way down the street, and then I went to sleep" (39).

In love, Jake is frustrated. However, Jake is far from impotent in other manly pursuits. Especially when he is away from Paris, the city of romance and love, he finds a…

Works Cited

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. May 11, 2009.

 http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/f/fitzgerald/f_scott/gatsby/ 

Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises. New York: Scribner, 2006.

Rise and Fall of the
Words: 1015 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54029825
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The myth destroys the dream because they are so closely connected and when one fails, the other is doomed. Gatsby cannot have not can he enjoy his lavish lifestyle without Daisy.

hile Gatsby makes his mistakes, there is something about him that draws us near. Harold Bloom maintains, "Fitzgerald's oddest triumphs that we accept his vision of Gatsby's permanent innocence . . .e come to understand that Gatsby is in love neither with Daisy nor with love itself, but rather with a moment out of time that he persuades himself he shared with Daisy" (Bloom). His love is pure and we can even go as far to say that his intentions are pure as well and this is why he emerges as the victim in this novel. John Fraser agrees, adding that why we come to appreciate the man is a "tribute to the further aspect of the illusion of…

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold, ed. "Bloom on The Great Gatsby." The Great Gatsby, Bloom's Guides. 2006.

Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. Information Retrieved April

12, 2009.

Donaldson, Scott. "Possessions in The Great Gatsby. Southern Review. 2001. EBSCO

Danger of Authority Explored in
Words: 986 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 73396853
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Lupack points out that conventional male and female roles are "comically reversed" (Lupack 96), emphasizing the "underlying principle of ironic contrast and the reason for the novel's universal appeal... madness is sanity and sanity is madness" (96). In addition, we come to grasp the notion that the patents are more "sane" (96) than their caretakers are but they only become aware of this after they check themselves into the asylum. Lupack observes, "The Combine's order is actually chaos, and the random natural elements of the world outside provide the only real meaning and order in life" (96). hile life appears to be orderly, it is actually empty. In Brave New orld, the irony exists in the premise of what defines happiness. The Savage touches on it briefly when he realizes that without pain, there can be no real, measurable pleasure. In a sense, everything is equal and while this may…

Works Cited

Hochman, Jhan. "An overview of Brave New World." Exploring Novels. 1998. Gale Resource Database. Information Retrieved February 01, 2005. www.infotrac.galegroup.com

Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: Harper and Row Publishers. 1960.

Kesey, Ken. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. New York: Signet Books. 1962.

Lupack, Barbara. Insanity as Redemption in Contemporary American Fiction. Gainsville: University Press Florida. 1995.

Odyssey Odysseus the Family Man
Words: 674 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 68197781
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Even though Odysseus's family holds high opinions of his character as a family man, his actions with Calypso are the true measures of his character. In book five of the epic poem, Minerva, who goes to rescue Calypso, finds the father and husband "sitting upon the beach with his eyes ever filled with tears of sheer home sickness" (Book V). The poem goes on to explain that while Odysseus is forced to sleep in Calypso's cave each night, he does not do this of his own volition, and would much rather be home. Thus, while Calypso, a goddess, attempts to seduce Odysseus, he does not betray his home and his family, but rather remains homesick for them, while being tired of the goddess. Though Calypso is a goddess of extreme beauty, Odysseus is more enticed with his own wife and son. In fact, Odysseus loves his family enough to cry…

Works Cited

Homer. The Odyssey. 10th ed. trans. Samuel Butler. Gutenberg, 1999. 24 October 2008. http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext99/dyssy10.txt.

Risk Melathion I Have Been
Words: 825 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45509417
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Mosquitoes cause immediate hazards to human beings. For the pesticide, it is required only that human beings not be exposed to the application process. The substance degrades to harmless soon after application. It could furthermore reduce the mosquito population by 90%, which also means a like reduction in WNV hazards to local inhabitants and tourists.

c. Exposure

As mentioned above, the effects of exposure are immediate. Exposure to either mosquito carriers of WNV and the pesticide during and immediately after application should be entirely avoided. Education regarding pesticide exposure is easier to control than mosquito exposure.

d. Risk Characterization

Another concern voiced by opponents to the pesticide option is that an information program may not reach all inhabitants. Some of the poorer community may for example not have televisions, radios, or the Internet so that such vital information can reach them. This is however easily mitigated by door-to-door visits, as…

Self-Discovery in Their Eyes Were
Words: 1661 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17040482
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Again, we see a strong, confident woman in Janie. She is also mature. Hattenhauer maintains that we can see this in they way Janie understands certain truths about life. She states that the "tragic truth, Janie has learned, is something no one could have told her, and something she cannot tell anyone" (Hattenhauer). hile Janie may be in denial of her immediate death, it is clear that she knows it will come to her sooner or later. hen she tells Phoeby that so many individuals never see the light at all, we know that "she sees the light at last: her fate is to wait and see if God's will is to take her life" (Hattenhauer). This is proof that Janie has emerged a strong, independent woman.

Their Eyes ere atching God is a glorious and painful story of one woman's discovery of her own voice. Janie evolves as a…

Works Cited

Hattenhauer, Darryl. "The Death of Janie Crawford: Tragedy and the American Dream in 'Their Eyes Were Watching God.'" GALE Resource Database. Site Accessed April 05, 2008.

Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. New York: Harper Collins Publishers. 1998.

Walt Whitman and Herman Melville
Words: 1389 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95002246
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Whitman uses simile effectively ("The glories strung like beads on my smallest sights and hearings") and uses metaphors effectively to link himself with others that have crossed the river in the past ("The dark threw its patches down upon me also…") because he certainly wasn't and isn't perfect at all so he had a metaphor for that ("I too knitted the old knot of contrariety…"). Melville's narrator, whose work is brilliant but a bit tedious, can slip personification, a metaphor and a simile into the same sentence for effect. For example, talking about Turkey, a previous employee ("a temperate young man") the narrator explains that "…nature herself seemed to have been his vintner, and at his birth charged him so thoroughly with an irritable, brandy-like disposition, that all subsequent potations were needless." Melville's narrator seems to have an obsession to either understand Bartleby, or at least be able to rationalize…

City as a Character in Film
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imagery in the movies Chinatown and Blade unner and compare the film-noir type of imagery against the actual statistics available in the latest Census results from Los Angeles that characterize the complexion of Los Angeles in 2010. In all three arenas, we see a Los Angeles area that is multi-ethnic, grime and dirt included. In many ways, while the movie imagery is different, in many ways all three characterizations have more in common than have differences. In all three portraits, the dirty, gritty and repressive city scape has the potential to swallow up the inhabitants in the Los Angeles darkness that is almost as thick as palpable as the ninth Egyptian plague of darkness. The films accurately and effectively discuss the "feel" of the city and the city's neighborhoods. The author will provide examples from the films to illustrate this, as well as the similarities and differences.

Analysis

In all…

References

U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Dept of Commerce. Los Angeles city, California QuickLinks. Washington,

D.C.: U.S.G.P.O., 2012. Web. .

Akutagawa Uses Perspectivism in His Story in
Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48366917
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Akutagawa uses perspectivism in his story In a Grove here the main focus is on the incident that is being investigated by the high police commissioner. Here Takehiko is found murdered and the police highly suspect Tajomaru "The man that I arrested? He is a notorious brigand called Tajomaru." Tajomaru, confesses to the murder and gives a detailed description of the occurrence of the incident he began with agreeing and the "…when I disposed of him, I went to his woman and asked her to come and see him… (6)" then "...I was about to run away from the grove, leaving the woman behind in tears, when she frantically clung to my arm…"(6) and finally "…Then a furious desire to kill him seized me.(6)" As much as this appears to be an easy case to solve, matters get complicated when the wife of the slain Samurai testifies. She confesses to…

Faulkner's Story Is Titled A Rose for
Words: 881 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5152375
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Faulkner's story is titled "A Rose for Emily," the text does not mention rose. It is ironic that Faulkner gives his story a title that seems to run counter to the characterization of Emily. Emily is portrayed as an object, at the same time the narrator pities her and describes her as an irritating person who would rather live life on her own terms, which eventually leads to her death. This appears to the reason for such a tittle. It seems to be an attribute to Emily, a way of expressing condolences to her death as well as sympathy to loneliness and her imagination about her status. He begins the story with a description of her funeral "When Miss Emily Grierson died, our whole town went to her funeral: the men through a sort of respectful affection for a fallen monument..." (Faulkner 484) he goes on to say that "…the…

Mark Twain Huck Finn
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Huckleberry Finn

Suspense: Find examples of suspense in chapter 24-30. What do these events cause a reader to feel anxious for Huck? Is he ever in real danger?

Suspense is maintained throughout the Wilks scam by wondering whether the increasing inventions of the King and the Duke will still enable them to maintain their con game, and then whether the mounting threat of mob violence will claim their lives, or even possibly Huck's. If there is a moment when Huck may face real danger, it is when the mob forms to demand justice.

As a reader, do you feel anxious for the Duke or the king? Why or why not?

The Duke's and king's situation in these chapters is precarious. The Wilks scam seems unlikely to pan out and brings out the worst in them both -- Huck says their behavior makes him "ashamed of the human race." But the…

Paul and Trevor These Stories Tell Us
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Paul and Trevor

These stories tell us that there are as many kinds of rebellions as there are rebels - in different strata of society and in different times. Some rebel against the external world, some, against the inner world, although all rebellion is inherently internal or inner.

Trevor seems to have become a rebel because of peer pressure, especially among the poor. Gangs form because there is nothing more gainful or meaningful to do, as in the case of Womrsley Common Gang of London. The young, especially, must acquire a sense of identity and belonging, no matter what identity or belonging it is. Trevor submits himself to the humiliation of initiation, especially because of his shy nature. He has relished the bright idea of burglarizing the rickety house of Old Misery and it becomes his passport to leadership in this thugs' association. Life is as simple but unsatisfying and…

Bibliography

Cather, Willa. (1996). Paul's Case and Other Stories. Dover Thrift Pubris

Greene, Graham. (1997). The Destructors and Other Stories. Creative Education

Consequence of Strangers Explored in
Words: 898 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94350239
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There can be no surprise when the "shame and pride threw a double gloom over his countenance" (52). He is so taken aback by Catherine and what she says that he must be commanded to shake her hand. hen Earnshaw tells him to shake her hand in a way this is "permitted" (52), it becomes more than Heathcliff can bear. hile Catherine claims she did not mean to laugh at Heathcliff, the damage is done. She does not realize the extent of her damage and continues to do even more damage by telling Heathcliff he is "sulky" (52) and looks "odd" (52) and things would not be so bad for him if he would just brush his hair and wash his face. This scene only lasts a few moments but it is critical in that it drives much of the plot after this point. It drives Heathcliff to do what…

Work Cited

Bronte, Emily. Wuthering Heights. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1972.

Burnout and Technical College Counselors
Words: 7250 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 98439444
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The assumption here is that ounselor burnout may be heightened as a result of the diversity of students who attend post seondary eduational institutions, and the variety of servies the 2-year postseondary ounselors must provide to these students. This assumption is ongruent with the findings of a study by Wilkerson and Bellini (2006) who advise, "Professional shool ounselors are asked to perform multiple duties as part of their daily work. Some of these duties math the desriptions set forth by national standards for shool ounseling programs, whereas others do not" (p. 440).

Consequently, shool ounselors are required to formulate deisions on a daily basis onerning the best way to perform their jobs (Wilkerson & Bellini). Not surprisingly, many shool ounselors are overwhelmed by these onstantly hanging working onditions and requirements, and a number of ounselors experiene high levels of stress as a result. Beause the onnetion between high levels of…

cited in Angerer, 2003). Unfortunately, it would seem that most helping professionals, including counselors, possess characteristics which predisposed them to this construct. For example, Lambie notes that, "Counselors may have increased susceptibility to burnout because of their training to be empathic which is essential to the formation of a therapeutic relationship. In fact, research has found counselor empathy to account for two thirds of the variance in supporting clients' positive behavioral change" (p. 32). The ability to remain empathic to the plights and challenges typically being experienced by students in community colleges is complicated by the enormous diversity that is increasingly characterizing these institutions, of course, but all helping professionals run the risk of becoming burned out while performing their responsibilities by virtue of their empathic sharing. In this regard, Lambie emphasizes that, "Empathy helps counselors understand the client's experience, but at the same time, a counselor may experience the emotional pain of multiple traumatized clients. Empathy is a double-edged sword; it is simultaneously your greatest asset and a point of real vulnerability; therefore, a fundamental skill of effective counselors, being empathic, may place counselors at high risk for burnout" (p. 33).

Citing the alarming results of a national survey of counselors that indicated that incidence may be almost 40%, Lambie also emphasizes that although all professions involve some degree of stress, counselors and other human service providers are at higher risk of burnout compared to other professionals. For example, this author notes that, "Counseling professionals are often in close contact with people who are in pain and distress. This continuous exposure to others' despair, combined with rare opportunities to share the benefits of clients' successes, heightens counselors' risk for burnout" (Lambie, p. 34). Other authorities confirm the incidence of burnout among educators, and cite even higher rates than the foregoing estimate. For instance, Cheek, Bradley and Lan (2003) report that, "Based on several international studies, approximately 60% to 70% of all teachers repeatedly show symptoms of stress, and a minimum of 30% of all educators show distinct symptoms of burnout" (p. 204). Indeed, a study by Lumsden (1998) determined that overall teacher morale was sufficiently severe that fully 40% of the educators who were surveyed indicated they would not choose teaching again as a career, and far more than half (57%) remained undecided at the time concerning ending their teaching career, were actively making plans to leave teaching, or would opt to leave the teaching field in the event a superior opportunity presented itself.

There are some other qualities that typify school counselors that may predispose them to becoming burned out over the course of time (some quicker than others, of course), but which may reasonably be expected to adversely effect the ability of school counselors to maintain their effectiveness in the workplace. For instance, Lambie concludes that, "Common counselor qualities of being selfless (i.e., putting others first), working long hours, and doing whatever it takes to help a client place them at higher susceptibility to burnout. As a result, counselors may themselves need assistance in dealing with the emotional pressures of their work" (p. 34).

Counselors and Characteristics of Burnout

Much

Disney's the Tortoise and the
Words: 2363 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27150824
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Succinct structural form marks all Disney's pictures and makes other animated cartoons, no matter how ingenious they may be, look pallid."

The narrative source of the production is consistently the characters themselves, and the film's style is a mixture of realism in terms of the lush and colorful scenery and a caricature of the protagonist and antagonist, Toby and Max, as the bullied and bully, the show-off and the showed-off, respectively. As Nowell-Smith points out:

The technical advances explored in the Silly Symphonies partly arose from a rivalry with the Fleischers, who, among all the other animation studios that survived into the sound era, consistently produced excellent cartoons in the early 1930s. Unlike the Disney product, which tended increasingly to an 'illusion of life' live-action imitation, the earlier Fleischer cartoons reveled in stylization, caricature, unrealistic transformations, elaborate repetitive cycles, direct address to the audience, and illogical developments which seem inherent,…

References

Hunggyu, Kim and Robert J. Fouser. 1997. Understanding Korean Literature. Armonk, NY M.E. Sharpe.

Jacobs, Lewis. 1939. The Rise of the American Film: A Critical History. New York: Harcourt Brace.

Lounsberry, Barbara, Susan Lohafer, Mary Rohrberger, Stephen Pett and R.C. Feddersen. 1998. The Tales We Tell: Perspectives on the Short Story. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Nowell-Smith, Geoffrey. 1997. The Oxford History of World Cinema. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Imagery & Symbolism in the
Words: 2160 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48211361
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"She relaxed limply in the seat. "Oh, no. No. I don't want to go. I'm sure I don't." Her face was turned away from him. "It will be enough if we can have wine. It will be plenty." She turned up her coat collar so he could not see that she was crying weakly -- like an old woman" (Steinbeck).

There are a number of fairly eminent points to be made about this quotation -- the first of which is that Allen's husband has taken her away from her source of power -- her garden. Away from that source, she is described by imagery that is rather enervating and in opposition to the vivacity she previously personified. The imagery of her sitting "limply" and weeping "weakly" is strongly contrasted with the images of her cutting through plants and powerfully gripping handfuls of earth -- which symbolizes the source of her…

Works Cited

Budnichuk, Monica. "The Chrysanthemums: Exposing Sexual Tension Through Setting And Character." Universal Journal. No date. Web.  http://ayjw.org/print_articles.php?id=647033 

Hemingway, Ernest. "Hills Like White Elephants." Men Without Women. New York: Scribner's Sons, 1927. Online reprint. Scribd.com, 2011. Web.

Hashmi, Nilofer. "Hills Like White Elephants": The Jilting of Jig." The Hemingway Review. (2003): 72-83. Print.

Hunt, D. "Steinbeck's Allegory of the Cave: Deconstructing Elisa Allen in "The Chrysanthemums." Universal Journal. No date. Web.  http://www.ayjw.org/articles.php?id=582962

Unifies and Permeates an Entire
Words: 1176 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91474170
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Short story -- A brief story where the plot drives the narrative, substantially shorter than a novel. Example: "Hills like White Elephants," by Ernest Hemingway.

Allusion -- A casual reference in one literary work to a person, place, event, or another piece of literature, often without explicit identification. It is used to establish a tone, create an indirect association, create contrast, make an unusual juxtaposition, or bring the reader into a world of references outside the limitations of the story itself. Example: "The Wasteland" by T.S. Eliot alludes to "Paradise Lost" by John Milton.

epetition -- The repeating of a word or phrase or rhythm within a piece of literature to add emphasis. Example: The story of Agamemnon in The Odyssey by Homer.

Blank verse -- Unrhymed lines of ten syllables each with the even-numbered syllables bearing the accents, most closing resembling the natural rhythms of English speech. Example: "The…

References:

Wheeler, Dr. L. Kip. "Literary Terms and Definitions." Web.

"Word List of Literary and Grammar Terms." Web.

Nurse Discuss as Well as
Words: 7577 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 66122797
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The fact that a novel in the sentimental and seduction genre attained such heights of popularity is, in the first instance, evidence its impact and effect on the psyche and minds of the female readers of the novel. As one critic cogently notes:

hy a book which barely climbs above the lower limits of literacy, and which handles, without psychological acuteness or dramatic power, a handful of stereotyped characters in a situation already hopelessly banal by 1790, should have had more than two hundred editions and have survived among certain readers for a hundred and fifty years is a question that cannot be ignored.

(Fiedler 94)

The initial question that obviously arises therefore is what made this book so popular and in what way does this novel speak to the feelings and aspirations of the readers to make it such a perennial favorite. As Fudge ( 1996) notes,

It is…

Works Cited

Barton, Paul. "Narrative Intrusion in Charlotte Temple: A Closet Feminist's Strategy in an American Novel." Women and Language 23.1 (2000): 26. Questia. Web. 10 Dec. 2011.

Fiedler, Leslie A. Love and Death in the American Novel. Rev. ed. New York: Stein and Day, 1966. Questia. Web. 10 Dec. 2011.

Fudge, Keith. "Sisterhood Born from Seduction: Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple, and Stephen Crane's Maggie Johnson." Journal of American Culture 19.1 (1996): 43+. Questia. Web. 10 Dec. 2011.

Greeson, Jennifer Rae. "'Ruse It Well": Reading, Power, and the Seduction Plot in the Curse of Caste." African-American Review 40.4 (2006): 769+. Questia. Web. 10 Dec. 2011.