Chrysanthemums Essays (Examples)

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Imagery & Symbolism in the

Words: 2160 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48211361

"She relaxed limply in the seat. "Oh, no. No. I don't want to go. I'm sure I don't." Her face was turned away from him. "It will be enough if we can have wine. It will be plenty." She turned up her coat collar so he could not see that she was crying weakly -- like an old woman" (Steinbeck).

There are a number of fairly eminent points to be made about this quotation -- the first of which is that Allen's husband has taken her away from her source of power -- her garden. Away from that source, she is described by imagery that is rather enervating and in opposition to the vivacity she previously personified. The imagery of her sitting "limply" and weeping "weakly" is strongly contrasted with the images of her cutting through plants and powerfully gripping handfuls of earth -- which symbolizes the source of her…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Budnichuk, Monica. "The Chrysanthemums: Exposing Sexual Tension Through Setting And Character." Universal Journal. No date. Web. http://ayjw.org/print_articles.php?id=647033

Hemingway, Ernest. "Hills Like White Elephants." Men Without Women. New York: Scribner's Sons, 1927. Online reprint. Scribd.com, 2011. Web.

Hashmi, Nilofer. "Hills Like White Elephants": The Jilting of Jig." The Hemingway Review. (2003): 72-83. Print.

Hunt, D. "Steinbeck's Allegory of the Cave: Deconstructing Elisa Allen in "The Chrysanthemums." Universal Journal. No date. Web. http://www.ayjw.org/articles.php?id=582962
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Human Condition When One Compares Characters in

Words: 1420 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25895840

human condition when one compares characters in the stories of different writers. Each writer's story indicates a perception of the human condition that is acted out by the story's characters. One interesting study may be to compare the character of Miss Emily Grierson from "A Rose for Emily" by illiam Faulkner with the character of Elisa Allen in "The Chrysanthemums" by John Steinbeck. Through the author's description of the characters, the world around them, and their reactions, the reader can learn a lot about the individuals, and even more so when they are compared to one another. Miss Emily Grierson and Elisa Allen's very different lifestyles create in each of them a similar perception about the world they live in, but they each respond to their perception of life in very different ways.

It would first be prudent to take a look at the differing lifestyles of the two protagonists,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Faulkner, William. A Rose for Emily. 1930. 23 March 2011.
/tkim/Files/Lit100_SS2.pdf>.

Steinbeck, John. The Chrysanthemums. 1938. 23 March 2011.
/webs/amb/american/4/steinbeck/chrysanthemums.htm>.
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Elisa Allen and Neddy Merril

Words: 1561 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28118755

" His use of alcohol only enforces his incapability to distinguish between what is real and what is memory. It seems as though every stop represents a moment in Ned's life that he chose to ignore, oblivious to the fact that it might interfere and disturb the course of life. He does not recognize what people are telling him, nor does he find himself on the same length with them, and he feels the journey has exhausted him more than he expected. As he finally reaches his home, he is bewildered not to find anything nor anyone there, as if the house were deserted. This is what constitutes the reality of the story, that Ned's life had been broken down by his incapacity to change his demeanor and to realize what was really going on. That people were reminding him of financial issues, that he seemed to like alcohol a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cheever, J. "The Swimmer." 19 June 2013. PDF file.

Steinbeck, John. "The Chrysanthemums." Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry and Drama. Ed X.J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia. 6th ed. New York: Harper Collins, 1995. 239-247. Print.
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comparing the protagonists in chopin and'steinbeck

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39231159

Elisa Allen is the protagonist of John Steinbeck's short story “The Chrysanthemums,” and Louise Mallard is the protagonist of Kate Chopin's “The Story of An Hour.” Both Elisa and Louise are products of their social and historical contexts, particularly when it comes to gender norms. Elisa and Louise are passive protagonists, because patriarchy has stripped them of political agency. By creating passive protagonists in their respective short stories, Steinbeck and Chopin make powerful social commentary about the role of women in their private and public lives.

Both Elisa and Louise feel stuck in their marriage, but perceive liberation as impossible within the confines of their culture. In both short stories, nature symbolizes wasted potential. For example, Elisa is capable of so much more than gardening: "The chrysanthemum stems seemed too small and easy for her energy," (Steinbeck). Similarly, Louise realizes that she has wasted her life when she sees nature…… [Read More]

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Goodman Brown of Hawthorne's Young

Words: 312 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28309486

Both Elisa Allen and Goodman Brown suggest that sexual tension might be at the root of their conflict.

Allen arguably deals with her pain more constructively than Brown does. Brown becomes bitter as a result of the conflict he perceives in his heart. Moreover, Brown fails to ground himself in reality. Questioning whether or not the forest vision was real, Brown neglects to contemplate its value even as a dream. Learning that he does have longings to break free from the social conventions tying him down to the rigid and conformist Puritan society would have helped Brown come to terms with the Faith he does genuinely seek. Elisa cries but deep down knows that a simple dinner out with her husband is as much freedom as she can have while still savoring the joy of…… [Read More]

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Character & Setting Odour of

Words: 1416 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80565398

Bates to come home, there is a battle between light and dark, heat and cold. These are powerfully suggestive symbols of good and bad. Entering the scene, "the kitchen was small and full of firelight; red coals piled glowing up the chimney mouth. All the life of the room seemed in the white, warm hearth and the steel fender reflecting the red fire" (Lawrence). The fire is a good indicator of the anger that burned inside Elizabeth as she expected, once again, for her husband to be late. Later in the scene however, the fire began to go out and become a dull red. Annie, Elizabeth's daughter, describes it as "beautiful," and "full of little caves -- and it feels so nice, and you can fair smell it" (Lawrence). The fire has become a source of warmth and pleasantness, it is beautiful and it is good. As the coals struggle…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lawrence, DH "Odour of Chrysanthemums." The Norton Introduction to Literature. Tenth Edition. City of Publication: W.W. Norton & Company, 2010. Page range. Print.
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Wallace Stevens -- the Idea

Words: 2447 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99644511



One of Wright's major works was Black Boy and one of the most poignant sections of that book was Chapter 12 in which Wright described the experiences of two southern black boys exploited by the "five dollar fight." Working for an optician in Memphis, Tennessee, the protagonist (Richard) hopes that his experiences with white people in Memphis will be better than in the small town of Jackson, Mississippi "The people of Memphis had an air of relative urbanity that took some of the sharpness off the attitude of whites toward Negroes & #8230;"

However, Richard finds that white people are just as exploitative and abusive of blacks in the big city as in small towns. Some of the white men where Richard works pay another black boy a quarter at a time to let them kick him in his rear end and even when white men seem to be nice…… [Read More]

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Social Status Explored in Cannery

Words: 1196 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63798530

e see this reality as crude and unfair but, nevertheless, true.

In "The Chrysanthemums," we find Elisa in a situation that is similar to those in Cannery Row. Elisa is able to escape her situation through her gardening techniques but even that is shattered when she encounters the stranger. Elisa's story is different from those in Cannery Row in that she sees the gravity of it. After the stranger destroys her flowers, she understands her station in life and becomes quite sad about it. e can assume from this point-of-view that ignorance truly is bliss.

Elisa has great needs in her life, which are not meet through her husband. She is more than likely not going to have children.

Because she has no children of her own, she cultivates her flowers with extreme care. Her flowerbed has "no aphids, no sow bugs or snails or cutworms were there, no sow…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Steinbeck, John. Cannery Row. New York: Penguin Books. 1986.

The Chrysanthemums." The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction. Cassill, R.V., ed. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1981. 1326-35.
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Asian Museum Exhibit the Museum of Asia

Words: 701 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68106746

Asian Museum Exhibit

The Museum of Asia and India (MIA) is proud to host the traveling exhibition of Art and Society in Japan and China: Floral epresentation through the Centuries. The exhibit will run for three months at the MIA before traveling to other venues across the globe in the two-year schedule. Museums in Amsterdam, Copenhagen, London, Madrid, Munich, New York, Nice, Oslo, Prague, San Francisco, Sydney, Toronto, and Zurich will play host to the special exhibit from November 2011 through May of 2012.

The exhibit provides glimpses into the impact of religion, philosophy, language, and culture on Asian art. With artistic grounding in writing as an art form, Chinese and Japanese art often includes the written word as a visual element in art. Often, the writing conveys a wise aphorism or a blessing that exists harmoniously with the subject of the art. The influence of Confucius in Asian art…… [Read More]

References

The Gallery of China. Retrieved  http://www.galleryofchina.net/floral.html 

Culture of Japan, Every Culture. Retrieved  http://www.everyculture.com/Ja-Ma/Japan.html#ixzz1biccnYtM 

All Posters. (2011). Retrieved http://www.allposters.com/-sp/Chrysanthemums-Posters_i1585174_.htm?aid=1203620802&LinkTypeID=1&PosterTypeID=1&DestType=7&Referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Epaintingsoncanvas%2Enet%2Fprint-8042-1585174%2Fchrysanthemums-giclee-print%2F

Cargile, S. (2009). Cherry Blossoms in Japanese Art and Culture. Retrieved http://www.stolaf.edu/people/kucera/YoshidaWebsite/evolution/essay_pages/stephanie_cargile.htm
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Women Are Confined in Society as Depicted

Words: 1150 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42380582

women are confined in society as depicted in the stories by Steinback, Joyce and Oates.

Stories set in the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th century often depict women as being confined to the norms of society even while they struggle to be free. Authors of literary works may they be short or long stories have often presented these women as being frustrated with the status imposed upon them and show the problems they face in a patriarchal society. In John Steinback's Chrysanthemums for instance, the female character Elisa Allen has been portrayed as "a strong, capable woman kept from personal, social, and sexual fulfillment by the prevailing conception of a woman's role in a world dominated by men" (Steinback, 306). Her appearance, manner and speech all suggest that she is a woman frustrated with the male dominated world. Her husband forever reminds Elisa that she…… [Read More]

References

Walker, Alice. "Everyday Use." The Norton Anthology, 4th ed., shorter. New York: Norton, 1995.

Wright, Richard. "The Man Who Was Almost a Man" available at www.xroads.virginia.edu/~DRBR2/wright.htm

Oates, Joyce Carol. "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" accessed on 8-11-2002 at: www.usfca.edu/fac-staff/southerr/wgoing.html
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National Character Studies Were All

Words: 2304 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99024088



Moreover, it seems less than completely effective to urge people to make connections to each other because being self-centered really leads to a healthier community. Yes, keeping up our networks does help each one of us. But this does not seem to be the kind of inspirational call to a wider world that will transform the current problems in the nation.

elational, Not Instrumental Connections

Lawler, Thye, & Yoon argue that it is not simply sufficient to create the shell of the kinds of institutions that can encourage and support community. ather, we must consider the ways in which we can shift the connections between people and institutions and between institutions and institutions from being essentially instrumental to being more deeply relational.

This volume argues that there are fundamental social conditions under which transactional, purely instrumental ties to a group tend to become relational and expressive. We reframe the transactional-relational…… [Read More]

References

Lawler, E., Thye, S., & Yoon, J. (2009). Social commitments in a depersonalized world. New York: Russell Sage Foundation Publications.

Putnam, R. (2001). Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American communities.

Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Wuthnow, R. (2002). Loose connections: Joining together in America's fragmented communities. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
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Japanese History Attribute Meiji Masculinity

Words: 4126 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99910135



Disorder does not descend from Heaven,

It is the spawn of a woman. 10

Contemporaneous with relocating the capital from Edo to Tokyo was the drawing up of the 'Memorandum on Reform of the Imperial Palace' in which Article 1 states that the emperor would 'deign to hear about all political matters' in the front throne room adding that 'women are to be prohibited from entering the front throne room' 11.

Yoshii Tomozane, enior ecretary for Court Affairs peremptorily dismissed all court ladies, after which a rare few were reselected for appointment. In his dairy, he noted: 'this morning, the court ladies were dismissed in their entirety… the power of women already lasting for centuries has been erased in a single day. My delight knows no bounds." 12.

In this way the power of the 'hens' was removed from the 'Enlightened regime' of Meiji rule and suppressed throughout the country.…… [Read More]

Sources

Adler, Philip. World Civilizations. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth / Thomson, 2008

De Vos, George & Wagatsuma, Hiroshi, "Value Attitudes Towards Role Behavior of Women in Two Japanese Villages," American Anthropologist, 63, (1961).

Hastings, S.A. "Gender and Sexuality in Modern Japan" a Companion to Japanese History, Blackwell Pub., 2007

Hendry, Joy, Understanding Japanese Society. London: Routledge, 1991.
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Catherine the Great Enlightened Flowerpot

Words: 2732 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79412657

They did not expect her to evolve into a ruler of any significance. They were wrong.

Catherine moved quickly to consolidate her power after taking the throne. She studied policy and reached out to consultants and political actors who would both aid her and prove trustworthy. She ruled with a lighter touch, perhaps, than her husband, but she was certainly no push-over. Alexander writes that "Her style of governance was cautiously consultative, pragmatic, and 'hands-on,' with a Germanic sense of duty and strong aversion to wasting time."

She had absolute power, but she acted with a certain reserve, at least initially, which belied the fact that she would eventually become known in history as a toughened despot. Perhaps this notion of Catherine the Great as a despot was introduced due to her later years when she seemed to indicate an unwillingness to allow her son to ascend the throne, or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, John T. Catherine the Great: Life and Legend (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 1989).

Alexander, John T. "Catherine II." Encyclopedia of Russian History. (Cincinnati: Gale/Cengage, 2003).

Catherine II. Memoires of the Empress Catherine II, Written by Herself (New York: D. Appleton and Co, 1859)

De Madariaga, Isabel. Catherine the Great: A Short History (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002,
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Livias Garden the Technical Symbolic

Words: 3646 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16395215

Lusnia characterizes this concept as the persistence of signs that foretell of one's "imperial destiny." (517) Namely, this refers to the adoption of personal signs and symbols with some likely connection to historical imperial iconography and suggesting the principles of strength, virility, valor and divinity. hether present or not throughout the life of the figure in question -- Augustus in this case -- the recurrence of certain specific images such as the laurel, retained within recurrent thematic contexts such as the Octavian 'garden,' would truly be intended to insist upon the hereditary and theological entitlement of Augustus to a seat atop the Roman Empire.

That unification, rebirth and flourishing growth would be themes of the Augustan rule should suggest to us that the images contained in Roman life and in the visual depiction of Roman life were not chosen in idle vanity. Instead, the must be a core psychological imperative…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Caneva, G. & Bohuny, L. (2003). Botanic analysis of Livia's villa painted flora. Journal of Cultural Heritage, 4(2), 149-155.

Flory, M.B. (1989). Octavian and the Omen of the 'Gallina Alba.' The Classical Journal, 84(4), 346-356.

Gabriel, M.M. (). Livia's Garden Room at Prima Porta.

Hoover, M. (2001). The Fine Art of Roman Wall Painting. San Antonio University. Online at http://www.accd.edu/sac/vat/arthistory/arts1303/Rome4.htm
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Windows -- Bernice Morgan One Would Think

Words: 1461 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5964850

Windows -- Bernice Morgan

One would think that waiting for death in the bitter cold of late winter is about as grim as a life can be. But when you are depressed and dirt poor, living in a ramshackle old house that leaks cold air, with a daughter-in-law in the house that you dislike intensely -- and who wants you out of the house whenever possible -- things are seriously awful. For Leah, who has vivid memories of how life used to be in Estonia, her misery is compounded by her confused mind. Author Morgan does a splendid job of portraying Leah's misery -- and the reality of Leah's life beyond Leah's twisted approach to what life she has left -- through three main themes and symbols: colors, sounds, and death. Also incorporated into the short story is Leah's total lack of motivation, her cynical view of the people around…… [Read More]

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Realm of a Dying Emperor

Words: 1894 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66629784

The tale of Chibana Shoichi's, the Okinawan supermarket owner, demonstrates how there is still a major segment of society that believes in the "emperor system," even in Okinawa. However, Field exposes how these people have been forced to conform with this system, though social pressure, threats, and even violence. But despite these obstacles, there are still people like Shoichi who will speak out against this system and its historical amnesia. However, this fight has only just begun and not all those who stand up against the system are successful. Mrs. Nakaya was unsuccessful in her attempt to stop the government from using her husband to reinforce a system that she felt was unjust and restricted her religious beliefs. The response by the government signifies how deeply ingrained into Japanese society is the "emperor system," and how many Japanese, including the Japanese Supreme Court, see no differentiation between tradition Shinto-based emperor…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Field, Norma. In the Realm of a Dying Emperor. New York: Pantheon, 1991. Print.
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Million Americans Suffer From Migraine

Words: 4204 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23813287

Continued use of some anti-migraine drugs has been found to lead to what is known as "rebound headache," a condition marked by frequent and chronic headaches, especially in the early morning hours. The condition can be prevented if the patient takes the drugs only on a doctor's supervision and when taken only in minimal doses. Those suffering from frequent attacks may need preventive therapy (Robinson 1999).

There are alternative treatment modes aimed at preventing migraine (Robinson 1999). ecause it is often linked with food allergies and intolerances, the identification and elimination of the offending foods can contain or decrease the frequency of the attacks. Herbal therapy with the use of feverfew or chrysanthemum parthenium can work this way. iofeedback training may also help prevent some vascular changes when an attack begins by increasing the flow of blood to the extremities. The patient must put the lights down low, put his…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cottrell, C.K. et al. (2002). Perceptions and Needs of Patients with Migraine. Health and Fitness. Journal of Family Practice. http://www.findarticles.com/articles/p/mi_m6689/is_2_51/ai_83551751

Gaby, A.R. (2003). Preventing Migraine with Coenzyme Q10. Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients: the Townsend Letter Group. (http://www.findarticles.com/articles/p/mi_m)ISW/is_2003_Jan/ai_95676502

Huffman, G.B. (2002). Safety of Triptans in Migraine Therapy. American Family Physicians. The American Academy of Family Physicians. http://www.findarticles.com/articles/p/mi_m3225/is_12_65/ai_87721440

Khosh, F. et al. (2002). Natural Approach to Migraine Headaches. Townsend Letter to Doctors and Patients. The Townsend Letter Group. http://www.findarticles.com/articles/p/mi_mOISW/is_2002_August-Sept/ai_90794456
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Backyards Can Be an Expression of Personal

Words: 663 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15996845

Backyards can be an expression of personal taste and creativity. An immaculately manicured lawn and garden expresses sophistication and neatness, while an unruly, unmowed yard replete with wildflowers can entail a free spirit. While it is important to not read too much into the state of a person's backyard, I am proud to admit that mine exists somewhere between these two extremes.

Exiting the back door, I step onto a patio enclosed by screens. A frothing Jacuzzi beckons, enveloping me with the scent of chlorine and the promise of relaxation. The cedar planks of wood beneath my feet trap warmth and comfort every step. I look up at the crawling, sprawling vines that cover the screened-in patio before opening the gate and stepping down onto the lawn.

Our backyard is large enough to frolic in: a great expanse of grass allows for lively games. A tremendous tree looms over the…… [Read More]

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Art Influence of Japanese Art on Western

Words: 3463 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42452259

Vincent Van Gogh, Frank Lloyd right and Madeleine Vionnet. hat did this 19th century artist, architect, and fashion designer share in common? Very simply: They all incorporated Japanese techniques into their works of genius. hen Commodore Perry opened the doors to this Eastern country in 1853, an abundance of unique and influential styles of art rushed out and captured the imaginations of artists throughout the estern world. As author Emile Zola once said,

It is certain that our students painting with black bitumen, were surprised and enhanced by these horizons, these beautiful vibrating spots of the Japanese painters in watercolours. There was a simplicity of means and an intensity of effect which struck our young artists and then influenced them with a painting filled with air and light

This flow of Japanese artistic riches and influence continues to this day. Ask any graphic designers including those at alt Disney Company…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coburn, F.W. "Mr. Benson's Birds," The Boston Herald, November 16, 1913, 28.

Encyclopedia of Visual Art. Grolier Educational Corp., 1984 printing. Danbury, CT: 1983.

Gardiner, Debbi. Japan, Inc., January 2003. Anime in America. http://www.japaninc.net/article.php?articleID=972.Visited 8/03/03.

Japan Economic Society, November/December 2002. Impact of the Kimono on Modern Fashion. http://www.jef.or.jp/en/jti/200211_016.html. Visited 8/04/03.
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Computer Vision Syndrome

Words: 3073 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75177703

Computer Vision Syndrome

According to the Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS) is "A variety of problems related to prolonged viewing of a computer screen. Short-term effects include dry eyes, blurred vision, eye fatigue and excessive tearing. Long-term effects include migraines, cataracts and visual epilepsy. Some solutions are to keep reflections and glare to a minimum and to provide a non-fluorescent, uniform light source. Special lamps are available that maintain the proper light around the monitor and generate light at much higher frequencies than regular light bulbs"

With the ever increasing amount of time consumers are spending in front of their computer screens, this disability is considered on of the fastest growing work related health problems in the country today. For many Americans, the problem cannot be left behind at the office. Individuals come home, to spend time surfing the web, corresponding via email, and pursuing various computer-based entertainment…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anshel, J. 1997, July 1. Computer vision syndrome: causes and cures.

Managing Office Technology.

Chambers, Anne. 1999, Oct. 1. Computer Vision Syndrome: Relief Is in Sight.

Occupational Hazards.
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Joseph Reaves's Book Taking in a Game

Words: 1947 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82887510

Joseph eaves's book, Taking in a Game -- a History of Baseball in Asia, which was published in 2002. The book studies the growth of baseball in Asian countries and how it merged into their cultural and social fabric.

Joseph eaves reads like a newspaper account of some event and this is not some coincidence. eaves has been involved with sports journalism for almost three decades and has worked with newspapers and magazines of repute including United Press International, the Chicago Tribune, and eader's Digest. eaves is a well-known reporter with sound credentials. He was nominated for Pulitzer Prize four times for his realistic coverage of various issues including war and economy. He was also involved in teaching journalism from 1999 to 2001 at Northern Arizona University. The author has written more than one book on his favorite subject i.e. baseball and thus possesses indepth knowledge of the game and…… [Read More]

Reference

Joseph A. Reaves's Taking in a Game: A History of Baseball in Asia, Univ. Of Nebraska, 2002

Taking in a Game: A History of Baseball in Asia: Review by George Grella, Retrieved online March 5th 2004:

http://www.haroldseymour.com/article.asp?articleid=51273
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Seasonal Ingredients Derived From Chinese Medicine

Words: 487 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 523504

Medicinal cuisine is based on seasonal ingredients. Spring, summer, fall and winter have their own specific diets. The concept of seasonal ingredients means that we must be careful to adjust our diet to get the necessary nutrition to survive the season. Seasonal ingredients help strengthen our immune system and prevent and treat the diseases which most often occur during those seasons.

During the spring, the liver can cause the body to exhibit fatigue, eyestrain, headaches, dizziness and drowsiness.

The seasonal food ingredients for the spring are (Korean) wild chive, shepherd's purse, water parsley. And angelica tree sprout.

TCM ingredients for the spring are chuan xiong, dang gui, ju hua, gou qi zi, jie geng, ge gen, bo he, fu pen zi and raisin tree fruit.

In summer, the weather is hot and fruits get ripe. Our body heat is elevated and there is an additional risk of heart problems and…… [Read More]

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Analyzing Art and Death the Chinese

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96512212

Art and Death: The Chinese

Portraying death to children

In the preschool age, educators seldom broach the topic of death. However, some picture books for kids directly address death and related issues. Their current approach is worth utilizing as reference. Book presentations follow the steps: comprehending death with preschoolers' internal experiences, slowly probing into what death means in the eyes of preschoolers, and expanding on the subject by seeking the continuance of love. The above three elements serve as references for Chinese picture books with death as the central theme. Such books depict a child's world using children's language and culture-specific images. The concept of death is taught to students in the form of interesting stories, which portray children's pure world, characterized by curiosity and innocence. Adults are also deeply affected by their simplicity, love and care (Chen, 2012).

Thesis: Death has been incorporated, as a theme, into Chinese books,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chen, Y. (2012). The Expression of Death in Children's Picture Story Books. International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, 210-213.

Danto, A. C. (1998). The End of Art: A Philosophy of Defense. Blackwell Publishing, 127-143.

Han, S. (2012, June 22). The invisible red line - maneuvering Chinese art censorship. Retrieved from All that is banned is desired: http://artsfreedom.org/

Sharf, R. H. (1992). The Idolization of Enlightenment: On the mummification of Ch'an masters in Medieval China. The University of Chicago Press, 1- 31.
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Kimono History and Contempory Fashion

Words: 2040 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66328369

...these designers placed great significance on clothing inherited from the past, including Japanese farmers' clothes designed through necessity and adapted dyed textile and quilting from ancient Japan, which Japanese would not consider fashionable. These designers presented them to the fashion world, gave the opportunity for 'the neglected' to make their existence known, and transformed them into 'fashion'."(Kawamura, 2004, 125)

Kawakubo, Miyake and Yamamoto are considered as the designers who made these first steps towards a new fashion more concrete: "hile Kenzo is considered a pioneer among all Japanese designers, Kawakubo, Miyake and Yamamoto are the ones who created a new style characterized by monochromatic, asymmetrical and baggy looks."(Kawamura, 2004, 125) the asymmetrical and baggy look of their designs is clearly influenced by the loose form of the kimono. Sometimes, in Miyake's creations for example, the dresses are completely shapeless and have random holes that offer a certain freedom when wearing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cort, Louise Allison and Sabur? Mizoguchi. Design Motifs. Weatherhill, 1973

Kawamura, Yunyia. The Japanese Revolution in Paris Fashion. Oxford: Berg, 2004.

Kimono.  http://www.yoshinoantiques.com/kimono.html 

Martin, Richard. "Our Kimono Mind: Reflections on 'Japanese Design. A Survey since 1950.'" Journal of Design History. Vol.8(3), 1995. 215-224.
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Forsaking of Will the Central

Words: 1424 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16353642

Mrs. Mallard's husband could have thought he was doing her a great kind kindness by "bending" her will to his. This quotation demonstrates the fact that even if Brent Mallard was on his best behavior, he still had a negative, oppressive effect upon his wife. With little legal recourse, Chopin is alluding to the fact that for many women, death -- of either the husband or the repressed woman -- is the only way out of such a situation.

Unfortunately for Mrs. Mallard, her weak heart was unable to sustain the shock of seeing her husband alive, after she had finally acclimated herself to the notion that she had finally been freed from his oppressive presence and will. She was strong enough to live with her husband's death, yet was not strong enough to live through the surprise of his continued life at the resumption of her former, oppressed state.…… [Read More]

References

Chopin, K. (1896). The Story of an Hour. Retrieved from http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/webtexts/hour/

Goldberg, S.B. (2007). "Women's Employment Rights." American Bar Association. Retrieved from  http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/publishing/perspectives_magazine/women_perspectives_WomensEmploymentRtsSummer07.authcheckdam.pdf 

Stanton, E.C. (1848). "Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions." Report of the Woman's Rights Convention. Retrieved from  http://ecssba.rutgers.edu/docs/seneca.html 

Stanton, E.C., Anthony, S.B. (1992). The Elizabeth Cady Stanton -- Susan B. Anthony reader: correspondence, writings, speeches. Lebanon: Northeastern University Press.
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Victorian Female Sexuality Victorian Sexuality George Bernard

Words: 2004 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51014090

Victorian Female Sexuality

Victorian Sexuality: George Bernard Shaw's Mrs. arren's Profession and Thomas Hardy's "The Ruined Maid"

omen in the Victorian era must have suffered enormously under the massive double standards and the shameful image of a woman who wanted to be on her own. It is clear from examining the literature of the period how much discrimination was placed on women in the era. George Bernard Shaw's Mrs. arren's Profession and Thomas Hardy's "The Ruined Maid" show the intense sexual and gender discrimination that women in the Victorian era had to endure and the extreme consequences that were reserved for them upon breaking such strict traditions on sexuality and love relationships; however, George Bernard Shaw does allow for a greater sense of freedom for his female characters as his work was written much later at the tail end of the Victorian era, as long as they avoid the contact…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hardy, Thomas. "The Ruined Maid." All Poetry. 1866. Web. http://allpoetry.com/poem/8442925-The_Ruined_Maid-by-Thomas_Hardy

Shaw Festival. Mrs. Warren's Profession: Connections Shaw Festival Study Guide. 2008. Web. http://www.shawfest.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Mrs_Warrens_Study_Guide.pdf

Shaw, George Bernard. Mrs. Warren's Profession. Gutenberg EBook. 2011. Web. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1097/1097-h/1097-h.htm
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Edgar Allen Poe Tale of Premeditated Murder

Words: 1236 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99018907

Edga Allen Poe tale of pemeditated mude such as "The Cask of Amontillado," eades will immediately delight in the autho's skill at suspense. Like wandeing though dakened and ancient catacombs, eading "The Cask of Amontillado" stis the imagination and maintains tension thoughout its eeie passages. Deepe analysis lends insight into Poe's employment of vaious liteay techniques to impat this sense of the tale being a campfie ghost stoy. Poe's cleve use of iony, both damatic and vebal, contibutes to the shot stoy's suspenseful mood. The opening line of "The Cask of Amontillado" whispe Monteso's plan of evenge: "The thousand injuies of Fotunato I had bone as I best could, but when he ventued upon insult, I vowed evenge," (Poe,). Befoe any action occus, the eade is made awae of the intentions of the naato. This damatic display of iony allows the eade to fully engage and paticipate in the tale.…… [Read More]

references to the nitre affecting his victim's health (Poe,). Montresor entombs Fortunato with impunity, and Fortunato laughs nervously, still hoping that the burial is a practical joke: "We will have many a rich laugh about it at the palazzo...over our wine!" Montresor humors the dying man: they will celebrate over the Amontillado. When Montresor seals the crypt with the final stone and erects the "rampart of bones" to guard it, he utters an ironic victory cry: "In pace requiescat," or "rest in peace." Montresor achieved his brutal revenge, adding the bones of his friend to the hundreds that already lay still in the catacombs. Poe's tale manages to remain suspenseful until the final words because the story rests firmly on a sound literary use of dramatic and verbal irony coupled with eerie symbolism.
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EE Cummings Modernist Poet

Words: 962 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24458150

Modernist literature refers to a literary period from the first half of the 20th century, one that reacted to the external influences of an increasingly industrialized society, and one that was becoming more and more globalized. This was a population of people who had been hardened and drained by two world wars. This was a population of people who were pondering the future of humanity, human existence, the human condition and their place in the world. When compared to the romantic period, modernism appears edgier and less serene. The romantic period had more of a focus on the natural world and the experience of being; modernism focused more on the inner self, seeing more of a decline and fraught fragmentation with the external world. From a literary perspective, the period meant a subversion of typical norms: modernist prose and poetry played with structure and form in ways that readers weren’t…… [Read More]