Community Nursing Essays (Examples)

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Community Nurse Diabetic Clinic One

Words: 3696 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69636084

hhs-stat.net).

Type I diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and results from the body's failure to produce insulin. Type 1 account for 5% to 10% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes (Centers for Disease Control, National Diabetes Fact Sheet, www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf). The most common form of diabetes is Type II, which accounts for about 90 to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes (Centers for Disease Control, National Diabetes Fact Sheet, www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf). Pre- diabetes is a condition often present prior to the development of Type II diabetes. In pre-diabetes, blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered diabetic.

Pre-diabetes does not have to lead to the development of diabetes if a person diagnosed with this condition: Patients who work to control their weight and increase their physical activity can often prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. There are 41 million Americans…… [Read More]

References

American Diabetics Association. Retrieved 22 March 2010 from http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/

Centers for Disease Control, National Diabetes Fact Sheet.Retrieved 18 March 2010 from www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf

http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf

2010 from http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2003.pdf www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/released200906.html
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Nursing Scholarship Program in Pursuing

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3406238

One of the invaluable experiences I had working with underserved communities was between the years 2007 and 2008, when I was fortunate enough to be involved as a volunteer conducting missionary work in Atotonilco, Mexico. As a community nurse for the mission, I was responsible for taking the glucose level, vital signs and educated the general public about diabetes and heart disease. I have found my work in Mexico very rewarding that I decided to volunteer again in 2009, this time locally in St. Kitts and Nevis, but the volunteer work covered the same responsibilities assigned to me as a volunteer in Mexico. Perhaps what made my second volunteer stint more challenging is that we conducted home visits to patients afflicted with diabetes, and had to be visited because they cannot walk as a result of having their leg amputated because of diabetes. Indeed, the feeling of fulfillment and happiness…… [Read More]

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Nursing for an Associate Degree

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81080660

Technology-based teaching strategies can greatly accelerate the how both teaching and learning occur and therefore often reduce traditional issues and concerns faced by students and instructors. This approach changes the conventional way of thinking about how quality nursing programs are assessed and changes the levels of requirements to better suit student learning with better access to libraries, counseling and tutoring services, computing equipment, tuition, and financial aid to name a few.

But where this Associates Degree approach will benefit the profession most is in the healthcare system where it is needed most. New nurses will be better acclimated to the needs of sophisticated logging processes, medical billing and inventory as well as scheduling and other tasks now all handled via digital processing and computer. A modern day nurses are more technologically sophisticated, the overall patient care process also gets better as more available free time is offered back to the…… [Read More]

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Nurse's Knowledge Migrating Catheters Washing

Words: 2079 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62610661



As to catheter straps, if fastened too tightly they can act as tourniquets, cutting off the needed flow of blood and presenting. And at least theoretically, use of straps brings about a risk of increasing the complications such as "…deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism" in those patients with "impaired lower extremity circulation" (Billington 504). Research presented in this article shows that the problem of infection due to poorly attached catheters can be reduced significantly through the use of a product called "Bard StatLock" -- which, the authors insist, is an effective stabilization device because it allows movement (through a swivel clip), because it is a "sterile latex-free, tug-resistant product" (Billington 504). An article in the journal RN, incidentally, states that treating "hemodialysis catheter-related bacteremia" can cost a hospital up to $45,000.

ashing "Bloody Hands": An article in the Australian Nursing Journal asserts, "…hand hygiene is the single most effective…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aziz, a.M., Ashton, H., Pagett, a., Mathieson, K., Jones, S., & Mullin, B. (2009).

Sharps management in hospital: an audit of equipment, practice and awareness.

British Journal of Nursing, 18(2), 92-98.

Billington, a., Crane, C., Jownally, S., Kirkwood, L., & Roodhouse, a. (2008).
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Nursing Problem Shortage of Nurses in Healthcare at Local Hospitals

Words: 2710 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45327903

Nursing Problem: Shortage of Nurses in Healthcare

Nursing Shortage

The researcher works at Phoebe Memorial Hospital, where there is an extreme nursing shortage. Without an adequate amount of nurses, patient care and safety may turn out to be compromised, while nurses themselves may be stunned, upset, and dissatisfied. At the researcher's workplace, high patient-to-nurse ratios has been displaying that there is a lot of frustration and job burnout, which is linked to higher yield. At Phoebe, there is an inadequately staffed nursing force which has been discovered to play a negative part in patient results. In difference, studies have confirmed that hospitals like Phoebe Memorial Hospital with low nurse turnover are the ones that have the lowest rates of risk-adjusted death and severity-adjusted span of stay.

There is no very exact way of describing the concept of nursing shortage at the Phoebe Memorial Hospital Phoebe, but a report of this…… [Read More]

References

NURSING PROBLEM: SHORTAGE OF NURSES
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Nurse Case Manager Case Management in the

Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84835461

Nurse Case Manager:

Case management in the nursing field is basically described as the functions and activities carried out by the nurse case manager within a specific care setting. In some cases, these functions and activities are usually performed by a self-governing practitioner, especially in private case management practices and community nursing facilities (Cohen & Cesta, 2005, p.278). Generally case management responsibilities are provided by the nurse case manager in acute care, primary care, home care, and managed care organizations. Nonetheless, these activities may be offered to particular patient populations and communities like the elderly. Some of the most case management activities include patient identification and intake, problem identification and assessment, patient outreach, development and implementation of plan of care, and coordination of care.

oles and Functions of Nurse Case Manager:

In acute care organizations, the roles and functions of the nurse case manager includes coordinating the care provided to…… [Read More]

References:

Blancett, S.S. & Flarey, D.L. (2006). Case studies in nursing case management: health care delivery in a world of managed care. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publishers, Inc.

Cohen, E.L. & Cesta, T.G. (2005). Nursing case management: from essentials to advanced practice applications (4th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Meadows, P. (2009, January). Community Health Nursing. American Journal of Nursing,

109(19). Retrieved from  http://journals.lww.com/ajnonline/fulltext/2009/01001/community_health_nursing.5.aspx
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Nursing Health Promotion Across the Lifespan

Words: 659 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33281795

Nursing: Health Promotion Across the Lifespan

Which model or models of health are most applicable to Mr. And Mrs. Arahan and their family? Why?

Since Mr. And Mrs. Arahan seem to be well-assimilated within the American environment and also appear to be of good health, the initial model that appears to be applicable is one of self-care as well as community care. Community members in the church, for example, can help them dealing with minor concerns and give advice regarding more serious intervention should this become necessary. As they age, the couple might choose to use a combination of professional health care and community care, since their relative wealth will most likely support professional interventions over the long-term.

Which "Healthy People 2020" (web site) objectives are of greatest importance to the Arahan family?

The most important objectives for the family include maintaining healthy nutrition for the older couple, including foods…… [Read More]

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Nursing Is in a Unique Position to

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99421538

nursing is in a unique position to take on the challenge of the public's health. hat more could we do? How does nursing implement the Core Functions of Public Health?

Nursing is an integral part of the nursing profession. Even more so than doctors, the nurses will be in direct contact with patients. They are the first people that a patient sees when he or she seeks out treatment. In this, the nurses are able to see exactly what is affecting humanity on a larger scale and are able to interpret that to those in higher positions in the health industry. More could always be done. Often nurses are so harried with a large amount of patients, particularly in heavily populated areas of the world, that they do not take account of larger health trends. More attention and an inclination to create change will inherently help in policy creation and…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

ASTDN (2003). Quad council PHN competencies.

Center for Disease Control (2012). Core functions of public health and how they relate to the 10

essential services. CDC: Atlanta, GA. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehs/ephli/core_ess.htm 

Definitions for population-based health care vs. community-based health care (2012). Retrieved
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Nursing Is a Rewarding but

Words: 2016 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67198611



he Neuman Model is appropriate for senior care.

Studies necessary with other models.

Penrod, et.al.; Reframing Person Centered Care for Persons with Dementia

Research and heory for Nursing Practice

2007

Lit. Review, discussion

Lit. Review

Research shows individual personhood approach has positive effects on care.

Biomedical and psychological models must be merged for persons with dementia.

Integration models

Further study using different integration modeling.

Rajapaksa and Rothstein; Factors hat Influence the Decisions of Men and Women Nurses to Leave Nursing.

Nursing Forum

2009

Case Study

Qualitative, some quantitative analysis

For men, compensation largest barrier to remaining in nursing; for women dissatisfaction with career goals

Barriers to entry in profession for men and still social stigma

It is possible for hospitals and care centers to develop program to retain more nurses

Needs more demographic and psychographic variation.

Gillespie and Peterson; Helping Novice Nurses Make Effective Clinical Decisions

Nursing Education

2009

Case…… [Read More]

Their Experiences With a Refugee Population." Journal of Nursing Education.

46(8):380.

Watson, J. (2008). "Social Justice and Human Caring." Creative Nursing. 14 (2): 54+.
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Nurse-Care Analysis of Sheepshead Bay the Area

Words: 3471 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58690886

Nurse-Care Analysis of Sheepshead Bay

The area is 4,074 square miles. Its population is 123,178. The people density of people who live in Sheepshead Bay compared to general inhabitants of Brooklyn of people per square mile is 30,233 to 34,917 (City-data.com; web).

On my visits there, I was astounded by the mass of people rubbing shoulders one with the other. The streets seemed dense and crowded with a great number of apartment buildings, more than those in the more laid back areas such as Flatbush and Queens, and also more than those in the vicinity of Coney Island. There were also a lot of immigrant offices and lawyers specializing in immigration services that was telling of the area.

In fact, involvement with immigrants who had been seeking service with bureaucracy involved with obtaining a Green card revealed that many of them, although living in other parts of Brooklyn (sometimes far…… [Read More]

References

Berke, N. (2009). Crime Prevention and Safety Workshop. Sheepshead Bites. Retrieved on 3/6/2011 from:  http://www.sheepsheadbites.com/2009/06/crime-prevention-and-safety-workshop/# 

Chan, S. (2006). Fatal Construction Accidents in the City Rise Sharply Over 12 Months New York Times. p. C13.

Chiswick, Barry R., (1991). Speaking, Reading and Earnings among Low-Skilled Immigrants, Journal of Labor Economics, 9, 149-170.

City-data.com. Sheepshead Bay. Retrieved on 3/6/2011 from:  http://www.city-data.com/neighborhood/Sheepshead-Bay-Brooklyn-NY.html )
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Community Healthcare Intervention Examples

Words: 1100 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24109330

Healthy People 2020

The author of this report is asked to offer a brief summary of the role of a community nurse and the interventions that are meant to meet or exceed the four main goals of the Healthy People 2020 initiative. For each of the four main goals, the author of this report will describe at least one intervention that meets the goal in question. After that, the author will offer an example of an intervention that is already in full swing in the community of the author. While the goals of the Healthy People 2020 initiative are lofty and far-reaching, they are noble and just goals and should be achieved in any reasonable and ethical way possible.

The first goal of the Healthy People 2020 initiative is to "attain high-quality, longer lives free of preventable disease, disability, injury and premature death" (Healthy People 2020, 2015). Of course, the…… [Read More]

References

Brown, E., & Shapiro, T. (2015). Schools face new challenges as poverty grows in inner suburbs. Washington Post. Retrieved 20 June 2015, from http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/as-poverty-shifts-to-the-suburbs-schools-face-new-challenges/2015/02/27/e1900cd4-bdef-11e4-8668-4e7ba8439ca6_story.html

CDC. (2015). CDC | Aging | Healthy Aging for Older Adults. CDC.gov. Retrieved 20 June 2015, from http://www.cdc.gov/aging/index.html

Healthcare.gov. (2015). Where to Receive Low Cost Health Care in Your Community. HealthCare.gov. Retrieved 20 June 2015, from https://www.healthcare.gov/lower-costs/low-cost-community-care/

Healthy People 2020. (2015). Healthy People 2020. Healthypeople.gov. Retrieved 20 June 2015, from http://www.healthypeople.gov/
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Reason for Choosing Nursing as a Career

Words: 838 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79705697

Nursing

Personal Statement

Choosing Nursing

My life has centered upon answering a central question. This question has been a in my mind since I was 10 years old. At that age, my first image of medicine was largely influenced by the doctors and nurses who were always helping my grandfather battle a rare form of brain cancer. His illness was a life changing experience for me, as, at that age, I watched his condition gradually deteriorate over a period of three months, and I detested I could do nothing to help. This thought, however painful then, has motivated my entire life, and has led to my choosing of nursing as a profession,

Though some did not approve of this particular career path, I never gave up my dreams. For this reason, I began studying and volunteering so as to combine education in theory with education in practice. Giving back to…… [Read More]

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Professional Transitions in Nursing

Words: 845 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87353042

Nursing Leadership

A brief review of Dr. Patricia Benner's theory on the transition from novice nurse to expert nurse will provide the grounding for the three resources selected for the reference list. Brenner held strong beliefs about the validity of skills and knowledge gained through experience, and introduced the idea that an expert level of nursing is achieved as patient care is provided over time -- and as that knowledge is folded into the formal training that nurses receive when they earn a degree in nursing. Benner is famously known for asserting that a nurse could "gain knowledge and skills (knowing how) without ever learning the theory (knowing that). Dr. Benner posited a three-pronged approach to knowledge in the applied disciplines of nursing specifically -- and medicine in general -- that entails extending practical knowledge through research and clinical experience. Dr. Benner asserted that a nurse could not truly achieve…… [Read More]

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Geographical Community

Words: 7841 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90268082

Community Analysis: Columbus, Ohio - Hilltop Area/Franklinton

Identification and History

The Franklinton/Hilltop area of Columbus, Ohio is located on the west side of the greater metropolitan area. Franklinton is in a river valley next to the Scioto iver and the Hilltop area is just west of that on a rise. The Hilltop area is defined as the area between I-70 on the north, the B & O. railway to the east and south, and the I-270 outerbelt to the south and west (Greater Hilltop Area Commission, 2011). Its main street is West Broadstreet, otherwise known as U.S. route 40. There are welcome signs to the area near Mound Street and Hague Avenue. Franklinton is bordered by the Scioto iver on the north and east, Hague Avenue on the east, Stimmel oad and Greenlawn Avenue on the South, and I-70 on the West. The main street in this area is also…… [Read More]

References

Bush, Bill (2011). Census shows Columbus' growth was uneven. February 11, 2011. The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved from  http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2011/03/11/census-shows-columbus-growth-was-uneven.html 

City-data.com (2011a). Franklinton neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio. Retrieved from  http://www.city-data.com/neighborhood/Franklinton-Columbus-OH.html 

City-data.com (2011b). Greater Hilltop neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio. Retrieved from  http://www.city-data.com/neighborhood/Greater-Hilltop-Columbus-OH.html 

City of Columbus (2003, July). The Franklinton Plan. Department of Development, Planning Division. Retrieved from http://development.columbus.gov/UploadedFiles/Development/Planning_Division/Document_Library/Plans_and_Overlays_Imported_Content/franklinton.pdf
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Racial Disparities Nursing

Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6722824

Community Health Nursing

One of the most important aspects of healthcare today is prevention. Some of the many preventable diseases within the American population today include diabetes and kidney disease. Often, a key to such prevention is medical screening and education. One major challenge medical professionals today are facing is the growing incidence of kidney disease, not only in the general population, but especially among Hispanics. This population is one of the fastest-growing racial groups in the country (Banabe and ios, 2004). This group is also twice as likely to develop kidney failure as those who are non-Hispanic and white. For a community nurse, this is of particular concern, especially in terms of strategies to help this population prevent the prevalence of kidney failure and its causes.

The disease is among this population is of particular interest, since the researcher has worked with this population for some time. Several questions…… [Read More]

References

Benabe, J.E. And Rios, E.V. (2004, Jun.). Kidney disease in the Hispanic Population: facing the growing challenge. Journal of the National Medical Association, 96(6). Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2568348/ 

DaVita Healthcare (2014). Risks for CKD in Hispanic-Americans. Retrieved from: http://www.davita.com/education/article.cfm?educationMainFolder=causes-of-kidney-disease&category=assessing-your-risk&articleTitle=risks-for-ckd-in -- hispanic-americans&articleID=5009
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Nursing in the Rural Area a Well-Deserved

Words: 2307 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32606725

Nursing in the Rural Area

A WELL-DESERVED SECOND LOOK

Rural nurses are particularly endangered by the current and worsening shortage in nurses. As it is, rural nursing is already beset with issues that range from a lack of professional practice system, the need for larger incentives for nurses to work in the rural areas, a general unwillingness to live in these areas among the nurses and the foreseen depletion of the supply of rural nurses. Possible solutions and approaches have been proposed.

Approximately 20% or 54 million U.S. residents live in locations categorized as rural (ushy, 2006). These residents are distributed across 80% of the nation's total land area. About 99 or fewer residents occupy every square mile in these areas and experience the shortage of nurses more acutely than in urban areas. Moreover, they have generally lower annual income, less education and poorer health status than urban residents. Local…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Arnaert, A. et al. (2009). Homecare nurses' attitudes towards palliative care in a rural community in western Quebec. 11 (4) Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing:

Medscape. Retrieved on October 17, 2011 from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/715133

Blaauw, D. et al. (2010). Policy interventions. World Health Organization. Retrieved on October 18, 2011 from http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/88/5/09-072918/en

Bushy, A (2006). Nursing in rural and frontier areas: issues, challenges and opportunities. Vol 7 # 1 Harvard Health Policy Review: University of Harvard.
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Community Emergency Preparedness and Response it Is

Words: 2129 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79006002

Community Emergency Preparedness and esponse

It is not only exams that require preparedness. More than a planned activity, preparedness is required for unplanned activities. In health care, emergencies may mean danger to life of self or the loved ones. The medical emergencies are often stressful even for the doctors not only the victims. Hence the more a society is prepared for an emergency, the less will be side effects and in the same way if a society is caught by an emergency unprepared, the loss will can be potentially much higher than otherwise. Therefore, as they say prevention is better than cure, a society should be always prepared for emergencies.

Events in Neighborhood

Like bad time never comes with an alarm, a fire incident took place in forest and spread to the neighborhood nearby. The fire could not be overcome due to the windy season and it brought irrevocable damage…… [Read More]

References

Looking for a Career in Public Health Program Management? (2013), Retrieved from:

http://www.cdc.gov/phps/

Pfau, S., (2013), "Ten Essential Public Health Services," Retrieved from:

http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/sub_section_main_1804.aspx
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Nursing Phil Throughout My Life I Have

Words: 1349 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36251920

Nursing Phil

Throughout my life, I have exemplified core Christian values like faith and temperance. Christian role models have helped me to shape a character and identity that is conducive to a life of selfless service, which I view the nursing profession to be. I want nothing more than to participate in a Christian nursing community, with the goals of making the world a better place one patient, and one community, at a time. Effective nurse education will allow me to develop my skills in all areas of nursing: from leadership to bedside practice. The Mark and Huldah Buntain School of Nursing is unique in that it offers a perfect fusion of Christian values with cross-cultural awareness, and correspondingly, cultural sensitivity.

I have always valued my spiritual health every bit as much as my physical and psychological health. This is why I gravitated towards the Mark and Huldah Buntain School…… [Read More]

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Nursing Concepts and Theory Conceptual-Theoretical Structure Paper

Words: 1674 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18218062

Nursing Concepts and Theory

Conceptual-Theoretical Structure paper

Personal belief about nursing theory and knowledge development process for nursing practice

All nursing theories play an important role in defining nursing and giving the roles that nurses need to play. Originally, the role of nurses was simply to carry out activities as instructed by doctors, however, over the years, this role has been changed to include more responsibilities as the nursing world has evolved. Nursing theories describe, predict and explain the various phenomena in nursing practice and thus create foundations for nursing practice. They also help to generate knowledge in the field of nursing and to point the direction which the field should develop in future. This view is supported by Carper (1978)

who states that nursing theories elaborate nursing practice and create professional boundaries for the profession. Nursing knowledge comes from research that has been conducted on nursing which forms scientific…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, A.M. (2005). Nursing Leadership, Management, and Professional Practice for the LPN/LVN (3rd ed.). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.

Carper, B. (1978). Fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing. Advances in Nursing Science, 1(1), 13-23.

Clark, M.J. (2003). Community health nursing: Caring for populations (Fourth ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Dayer-Berenson, L. (2010). Cultural Competencies for Nurses: Impact on Health and Illness. Burlington, Massachusetts: Jones & Bartlett Learning.
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Nurse Practitioners' Autonomy the Current

Words: 2015 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63318773



hat is the current level of autonomy among NPs?

How independent are nurse practitioners? It is well-known that NPs desire and deserve autonomy -- which gives NPs "substantial control over [their] professional practice" (Bahadori, et al., 2009, p. 513). The research conducted by Bahadori and colleagues shows that of 48 primary care NPs (all of whom attended a state clinical conference in Florida and completed a detailed questionnaire with 30 items to evaluate), "…had very high levels of autonomy" (517). Specifically, NPs that had been practicing in "family specialty practice area" reported "greater clinical decision-making authority, and the NPs involved in acute care had "…very high levels of autonomy also" (Bahadori, 517). The conclusion for this article explained that while the NPs enjoyed "high levels of autonomy," and had high levels of skill and accountability, that had "…only moderate levels of empowerment" (rights, privileges, and legal status) (Bahadori, 518).

Collaboration…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bahadori, a., and Fitzpatrick, J.J. (2009). Level of autonomy of primary care nurse

Practitioners. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 21(9), 513-519.

Carryer, J., Gardner, G., Dunn, S., and Gardner, a. (2007). The core role of the nurse

Practitioner: practice, professionalism and clinical leadership. Journal of Clinical Nursing,
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Nurse Educator Strategic Plan

Words: 1008 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84346085

Nurse Eduactor Strategic Plan

Nurse educator strategic plan

A strategic plan for a nurse educator

At present, I would say that my greatest strength as a nurse educator is my willingness to challenge myself in the pursuit of excellence. Within the next year, I will obtain my MSN with a specific concentration in education. Previously, I obtained certification as a Basic Life Support instructor (BLS). Also within the next year I intend to seek out certification in Advance Cardiac Live Support (ACLS) and Pediatric Life Support Instructor (PAL) with the intention of becoming both an ACLS and PALS instructor. These will enhance my capabilities as a nurse educator and provide greater specificity in the range and types of teaching I will be able to convey.

My second great strength as a nurse educator is the compassion I have for my patients and my genuine love of teaching. A nurse is…… [Read More]

References

Covey, S. (2012). 7 habits of highly effective people. Franklin Covey.

Gardner, H. (2007). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. New York: Basic

Books.

Professional Nurse Educator's Group. (2013). Official Website. Retrieved from:
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Nursing Leadership as Nursing Has Moved Toward

Words: 1375 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18587694

Nursing Leadership

As nursing has moved toward professionalization, roles for nurses in leadership positions have been created. Historically, the roles of charge nurse, nurse manager, nurse educator, and nurse leader, have existed to coordinate and improve care delivery. In recent times, advanced practice nursing education has been introduced in order to formalize and improve performance of this role, in order to ensure evidence-based practice and improve patient care outcomes. While the presence of CNS's and other graduate-prepared nurses has been shown to improve patient outcomes, the existence of problems with medical errors and cost escalation still extant in hospitals has prompted health care leaders to develop a new role addressing these problems. This nascent, credentialed role, created by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in consultation with nursing faculty, clinical experts and other stakeholders, is called a Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL).

Nursing administrative position

The outcome variable of…… [Read More]

References

Aiken, L.H. (2002). Superior outcomes for magnet hospitals: The evidence base. In M. McClure & A.S. Hinshaw (Eds.), Magnet hospitals revisited (pp. 61 -- 81). Washington, DC: American Nurses Association.

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2005). CNL frequently asked questions. Retrieved October 5, 2007, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu/CNL/faq.htm.

Deutschendorf, A.L. (2003). From past paradigms to future frontiers: Unique care delivery models to facilitate nursing work and quality outcomes. Journal of Nursing Administration, 33 (1), 52 -- 59.

Manthey, M. (1990). Definitions and basic elements of a patient care delivery system with an emphasis on primary nursing. In G.G. Mayer, M.J. Madden, & E. Lawrenz (Eds.), Patient care delivery models (pp. 201 -- 211). Rockville, MD: Aspen Publishers.
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Nurse's Role as Researcher the Nurse Plays

Words: 1671 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77211857

Nurse's ole As esearcher

The nurse plays a unique role as a researcher. This involves them focusing on the latest treatment options, how they affect patients and the best times specific techniques should be utilized. Moreover, they must understand the numerous side effects of different therapies and how this will affect the patients they are working with. These areas help them to serve as confidant in comprehending how and when to apply certain procedures. (Allan, 2005)

At the same time, the nurse will understand the psychology, customs, behavior and biological factors which are contributing to a host of conditions. This enables them to comprehend the challenges patients are going through and the lasting impact this is having on them. When this happens, they can reduce suffering and improve their ability to cope with the issues they are facing. These insights will help patients to make a full recovery with reduced…… [Read More]

References

Allan, J. (2004). Clinical prevention and population health. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 27(5), 470-481.

Allan, J. (2005). Clinical prevention and population health curriculum framework: The nursing perspective.

Allen, D. (2002). The Changing Shape of Nursing Practice. New York, NY: Routledge.

American Academy of Nurses. (2009). Nurses transforming health care using genetics and Genomics. Washington, DC: Author.
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Nursing in the Media Not

Words: 2210 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54993298

The author quotes Gary Zukav as emphasizing that if a nurse perceives herself as powerless and her image as negative, the idea can sink to the subconscious level and realize itself. She will be drawn to those who will reinforce the idea. Practitioner Pauline Robitaille's stresses impact each nurse has on others. Her influence on people she comes in contact at the peri-operative setting cannot be overstated. She found the published feedbacks of registered nurses in nursing journals as very positive while others were very negative. Those who gave positive feedbacks described the efforts of preceptors to teach and support them. Thus the intended learning flowed smoothly. However, other nurses reported the negative, punitive and critical behavior of their preceptors. The nurses described the difficulty of working with these preceptors. Hence, the nurses did not benefit from their experience with the preceptors.

Ulmer emphasizes that those in the profession must…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gonzales, L. (2005). A mission for the center for nursing advocacy. 3 pages. Nevada RN Foundation: Nevada Nurses Association

Nursing BC (2002). How to create community media coverage for nursing. 2 pages. Registered Nurses Association of British Columbia: ProQuest Information and Learning Company

Ulmer, B.C. (2000). The image of nursing. 4 pages. AORN Journal: Association of Operating Room Nurses, Inc.

Willging, P (2005). it's time to take the politics out of nursing home quality. 5 pages. Nursing Homes: Medquest Communications, LLC
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Nursing Most Scholars Are in

Words: 2627 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36022230

" (1) What does the phrase "concept inventing" mean to you?

2) Does the process of concept inventing add clarity to a unique lived experience that aides in individualizing patient care? - or - Does the process of concept inventing add unnecessary jargon to the profession of nursing which creates barriers in collaboration with other disciplines? (3) State your stance on this issue and create a logical argument to defend your thoughts.

C. (1). "Concept inventing" can be thought of as a way to analyze situations in such a way as to contemplate their meaning to create understanding. Using both the aspects of science, including logic, rationality, and empirical analysis, and art, including intuition, emotion, integrity, honor, and compassion, nurses can process information in such a way as to create a complete conceptual picture of both the abstract aspects and concrete facts of a situation. In doing so, nurses can…… [Read More]

References

Chen, K.M. (2000, January.) The focus of the discipline of nursing: Caring in the holistic human health experience. Nursing (Graduate Research), 2(1). Retrieved Dec 3, 2006 from Graduate Research. Website: http://www.graduateresearch.com/kueimin2.htm.

Nagai-Jacobson, M.G., & Burkhardt, M.A. (1996). Viewing persons as stories: A perspective for holistic care. Alternative Therapies, 2(4), 54-58.

Rogers, M.E. (1990). Nursing: Science of unitary, irreducible, human beings: In E.A.M. Barrett (Ed.), Rogers' Science-Based Nursing. New York, NY: National League for Nursing.

Wainwright, P. (1999). The art of nursing. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 36, 379-385.
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Nursing With the Intention of

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10486000

This is one of the many reasons I look forward to being able to work within my own community. Nurses are at the forefront of community outreach and community betterment. As I get to know the local physicians, administrators, and program leaders, I can become a more effective member of the health care community.

In the future I intend to serve my community in a position of leadership, as a coordinator for healthcare services. I want to apply family systems theory to my nursing practice, because I see a growing demand for more collaborative methods of intervention that support rather than deny the role of family systems. With a great sensitivity to diversity in terms of religion and culture, I will be of great service to the local patient population.

While with the Post Masters Nurse Practitioner Program, I will improve my communications and networking skills because I believe in…… [Read More]

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Community Health Issue Nursing and

Words: 1323 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94289019

The team analyzed samples for carcinogen-DNA adducts, biomarkers associated with increased cancer risk, and cotinine, a measure of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure. Based on prior findings in animal models, scientists believe only one-tenth of the dose of PAH passes from the mother to fetus through the placenta. Even so, the investigators found that newborns incurred DNA damage at a rate slightly higher than their mothers" (ood, 2006). In other words, even if a mother does not smoke, the nurse may wish to ask about the patient's partner's smoking habit, or if the patient works in a smoke-containing environment.

The study also found that "detectable adducts were identified in 45% of the newborns and 42% of the mothers. Newborn cotinine levels were higher, 47% in the infants versus 44% detectable in the mothers," despite the screening effect of the placenta (ood, 2006). "Researchers said the fetal concentration may be due to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Green, Pauline M,

Polk, Laura V.,

Slade, Diann S. "Environmental nursing diagnoses:

proposal for further development of Taxonomy II."
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Nursing Intervention in Disaster the Possibility of

Words: 1365 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3266108

Nursing Intervention in Disaster

The possibility of occurrence of disasters is a reality. With this in mind there should be efforts made to prevent any upcoming or potentially disastrous events. These efforts are what are known as disaster prevention. Disaster prevention therefore refers to efforts put in place to ensure that adverse effects of events that are potentially disastrous are prevented even when the disaster cannot be controlled. Disaster prevention is done at various levels of the society and is undertaken so as to prevent all types of disasters. Nurses are involved to a large extent when it comes to the prevention and mitigation of disasters. Nurses are involved in institutions that can influence change and due to the unique skills that they posses they can make interventions in disasters. To perform efficiently, a nurse must be always prepared to make changes in plan actions at any time and at…… [Read More]

References

Harden, E.G., (2004). The role of nursing in disasters. Retrieved march 22, 2013 from  http://helid.digicollection.org/en/d/Jdi018e/2.html 

Rittenmeyer, L., (2007). Disaster preparedness: Are you ready? Retrieved march 22,2013 from http://www.nursingcenter.com/prodev/ce_article.asp?tid=726331

Wolters Kluwer Health, (2007). LWW Journals - Beginning with A. Retrieved March 22, 2013, from http://journals.lww.com/smajournalonline/fulltext/2007/09000/spiritual_issues_in_the_aftermath_of_disaster.32.aspx
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Nursing According to the Joint Statement on

Words: 628 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58695806

Nursing

According to the Joint Statement on Delegation produced by the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) "the N assigns or delegates tasks based on the needs and condition of the patient, potential for harm, stability of the patient's condition, complexity of the task, predictability of the outcomes, abilities of the staff to who the task is delegated, and the context of other patient needs" (Joint Statement).

In this particular case, it is easy to determine the frustrating aspects affecting Ms. W. It can also be a relatively simple matter to correct the situation in order to ensure effective care for Ms. . The nursing supervisor in this case would sit down with Ms. W. And map out a strategy for the patient's care, remembering of course that the key to successful delegation "depends on the quality of N and NAP working…… [Read More]

References

Joint Statement on Delegation, American Nurses Association and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN).

Potter, P.; Deshields, T.; & Kuhrik, M.; (2010) Delegation practices between registered nurses and nursing assistive personnel, Journal of Nursing Management, Vol. 18, Issue 2, pp. 157-165
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Nursing Organizations One of the

Words: 1129 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12699302



The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists - The NACNS was founded in 1995, specifically to enhance and promote the unique and high-value contributions that clinical nurses make to the health and well-being of individuals, families, groups, and communities in their particular branch of healthcare. They also have a foundation, scholarship programs, a journal and discussion portal, various levels of conferences, scholarship programs, honors and awards, and the ability for advanced certification. A Clinical Nurse Specialist is a licensed N who has graduate preparation (MA or PhD) in nursing specifically as a Clinical Nurse Specialist. This field of healthcare goes beyond the duties of an LPN or N, or even charge nurse, and deals with either advanced levels of clinical specialization, or broader, community and national health concerns. The field requires a rather significant academic bent, and the association is designed to support and enhance that paradigm focus (CNS -…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

About ENA. (2010, January). Retrieved October 2010, from Emergency Nurses Association: http://www.ena.org/about/Pages/Default.aspx

About the ACNM. (2010, February). Retrieved from American College of Nurse-Midwives: http://www.midwife.org/members.cfm

CNS - Who We Are and What We Do. (2010, January). Retrieved October 2010, from National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists: http://www.nacns.org/AboutNACNS/MissionStatement/tabid/57/Default.aspx

Kozier, B., Erb, G. & Blais, K. (1997), Professional nursing practice (3rd edition),
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Nursing Pus Bodily Fluids and

Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90930668

Nursing means working one on one with individuals who may be bogged down will all manner of physical or mental pain and suffering or who may even be on the brink of death. Because nurses work so closely with the most delicate matters of human existence: pain, suffering, and death, ours is a difficult job.

Nursing is but one of many healthcare professions and involves unique and specific work. For instance, nurses work directly with the patient by touch and voice. Nurses listen to people's complaints and address them immediately; we massage, we empty bed pans, we bandage bruises and poke people with needles and stick tubes down their throats. Not everyone wants to deal so intimately with patients but would rather remain in the lab. Nurses usually have more direct contact with patients than doctors do, for instance. Nurses must possess a full understanding of the profession and what…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bolton, Zoe. "Is nursing a profession in crisis?" Daily Mail. 12 May 2004. Online at http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/health/healthmain.html?in_article_id=302561&in_page_id=1774.

Virginia Avernal Henderson." Nurses.info.  http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_person_henderson_virginia_.htm .
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Nursing Industry Nursing Is One of the

Words: 618 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47367001

Nursing Industry

Nursing is one of the most important professions in the world today. It involves not only physical healing, but also healing on a deeper level, where the care giving extends to the patient's environment and relationships to speed the healing process. The nursing environment then often also concerns politics and political involvement. As caregivers who operate in an inclusive environment and relationships, it is often necessary for nurses to be aware of political processes and policies. In this way, nurses can ensure an optimal environment for their patients and the healing process in general.

Des Jardin (2001) defines politics as "a means to an end." Nurses who are concerned with policy formation outcomes must involve themselves in politics. There are a number of ways in which this can be accomplished. Mainly, the author notes that nurses can affect the development of institutional policies by becoming involved in politics…… [Read More]

References

Des Jardin, K.E. (2001, Oct.). Political involvement in nursing education and empowerment. AORN Journal. Retrieved from: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FSL/is_4_74/ai_80159541/
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Nursing Nurses Specialize in Various

Words: 977 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80304435



According to the South Carolina Nurse Practice Act, the practice of nursing includes "the provision of services for compensation," and the use of "nursing judgment." Nursing judgment is clearly defined as "the logical and systematic cognitive process of identifying pertinent information and evaluating data in the clinical context in order to produce informed decisions." The South Carolina Nurse Practice Act is lengthier than either of the other two definitions provided here. It deals directly with practical and mundane matters related to the profession such as monetary reward for the practice of nursing; the different classes of nurses, "commensurate with the educational preparation," and other official areas of interest: "Nursing practice occurs in the state in which the recipient of nursing services is located." While this definition lacks the inclusion of terms like "compassion," nurses must be firmly grounded in the practical matters of the profession as outlined by the Nurse…… [Read More]

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Nursing Personal Statement for My Entire Life

Words: 503 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49024540

Nursing: Personal Statement

For my entire life, acting as a caregiver has been an integral part of my identity. I come from Cuba, and caring for the old and sick is considered to be a very important obligation. I was the child who took care of the needs of my grandmother and grandfather as they aged, as well as my father who died all too young of cancer. As emotionally difficult as these experiences were, I felt privileged to be able to do something for the people who had given so much to me. I also learned how gratifying it was to nurse someone and to provide them with a sense of self-worth and empowerment, even when they were facing their own mortality. To make this my career would be my dream come true.

I wanted to become a nurse while still living in Cuba but unfortunately Cuban nursing schools…… [Read More]

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Nursing Definitions Autonomy in the Nursing Profession

Words: 3242 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47314806

Nursing Definitions

Autonomy

Autonomy in the nursing profession states the importance of the client's role in making decisions that reflect advocacy for the client (Wade, 1999, p.310). Ultimately, this includes taking care of the patient physically as well as mentally and emotionally, developing a relationship with the patient that is beneficial to his care and actively advocating for the patient's rights and care. This type of autonomy, it is important to note, is not the same as individual or work autonomy, yet it must be considered that empowerment in nursing autonomy will inevitably lead to better professional and personal autonomy and should also lead to increased job satisfaction (Wade, 1999, p.310).

Typical definitions of autonomy would include the idea of complete independence for the person making the decisions. However, in the case of the nursing profession, the client's needs and desires must be heavily weighed and, in fact, become central…… [Read More]

References Cited

Wade, G.H. (1999). Professional nurse autonomy: Concept analysis and application to nursing education. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 30(2), 310-8.

Gaylord, N. & Grace, P. (1995). Nursing advocacy: An ethic of practice. Nursing Ethics, 2(1),

11-18.

White, L. (2004). Foundations of nursing: Second edition. Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Learning.
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Community Health Scenario

Words: 1574 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29707391

Community Health Scenario

Death is an inevitable destiny of life. It is essential to be able to provide the best care that a patient may need during his last days, when all medical treatment fails. Frequently, the battle of life and death leads one to formulate a concept or an analogy of these two processes. This concept is bound to interfere with what one does in life. As a nurse, my idea of death and dying has an impact on the quality of care I provide to patients undergoing this process.

The ideal attitude of a nurse's care for terminally ill patients involves the criteria of flexibility in interpersonal relations, effective communication about critical issues, such as in Mrs. Thomas's case, and psychological stability and mindedness in relation to dying patients their families. (A oberta and A. olland. Nurses' attitudes about end-of-life referrals. 2009).

According to the Journal of Medicine…… [Read More]

References

Bottarf, JL. (1995). Comforting: exploring the work of cancer nurses. School Of Nursing. 22(6), 1077-84.

Dunn, K.S., Cecilia, O. & Stephans, E. (2005). Nursing experience and the care of dying patients. Oncology Nursing Forum. 32(1), 97-104.

Gloria, W. (2004). Basic geriatric nursing. Philadelphia: Library of Congress.

Matzo, M. And Witt Sherman, D. (2010). Palliative care nursing: quality care to the end of life. Springer Publishing Company: New York.
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Nursing Kidney Nursing Perceptions and

Words: 2121 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89660948

(2008). The study measures public opinion concerning two scenarios: one in which the kidney donor is given a fixed financial compensation; and one in which the donor is provided with health insurance coverage for life. According to the findings of the study, "although almost half of the respondents (46%) were reluctant towards introducing a system with fixed compensation to increase the number of living kidney donors, still 25% of the general public reacted positively." (Kranenburg, 1039) This study would conduct a similar comparative discussion, but would expand the number of available options discussed and would use a different sample population, as discussed in the subsequent section.

Subjects and Sampling Technique:

The subjects will be drawn from amongst nursing professionals working in randomly selected renal specialty facilities and wards. Initial contact will be made by phone with a Director of Nursing at selected facilities requesting participation. Those that agree will receive…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Conesa, C.; Rios, a.; Ramirez, P.; Sanchez, J.; Sanchez, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Martinez, L.; Ramos, F. & Parrilla, P. (2009). Attitude of Primary Care Nurses Toward Living Kidney Donation. Transplantation Proceedings, 37(9), 3626-3630.

Kranenburg, L.; Schram, a.; Zuidema, W.; Weimar, W.; Hilhorst, M.; Hessing, J. & Busschbach, J. (2008). Public Survey of Financial Incentives for Kidney Donation. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 23(3), 1039-1042.

Neyhart, C. & Colaneri, J. (2004). Living Anonymous kidney donation: A solution to the organ donor shortage? Nephrology Nursing Journal. Online at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ICF/is_3_31/ai_n17207253/

Watson, J. (2007). Theory of Human Caring: Theory Evolution. University of Colorado at Denver. Online at http://www.nursing.ucdenver.edu/faculty/jw_evolution.htm
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Nursing Conceptual Model Develop Your

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77625252

Nurses may feel as if they do not have anyone who understands them: even their non-nursing partners may not seem to truly comprehend what they deal with on a regular basis, day in and day out at the hospital. Nurses may be isolated from one another in the hospital, too busy to 'talk shop' in a positive way with like-minded colleagues, or deal with doctors who are not sympathetic to the unique demands of nursing. Nurses may also find it difficult to have an appropriate work and life balance, as increasingly they are pressured to do more and more at work, to make up for declining numbers of caregivers at the facilities where they work. They may be called upon to perform many additional duties traditionally performed by doctors and physician's assistants that strain at the traditional definitions of nursing.

Nurses may feel as if their unique insights as nurses…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burnout: Warning signs. NurseWeek. 97.2.

Retrieved July 9, 2009 at http://www.nurseweek.com/features/97-2/burn2.html

Gelinas, Lillee. (2003, October 1). Addressing nurse burnout - Changing culture is the cure

Staffing the Suite. Endonurse. Retrieved July 9, 2009 at http://www.endonurse.com/articles/3a1staffing.html
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Nursing Model Theory Application a Nurse's

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12125618

"From an historical standpoint, her concept of nursing enhanced nursing science this has been particularly important in the area of nursing education." ("Virginia Henderson's Need...," 2008) Principles of Henderson's theory, published in numerous primary nursing textbooks utilized from the 1930s through the 1960s, along with principles embodied by the 14 activities continue to prove vital in evaluating nursing care in thee21st century, not only in cases such as Keri's, but in a myriad of others benefiting from nursing.

eferences

Kearney, Kathleen M., the Nurse's Duty to eport Child Abuse vs. The Attorney's Duty of Confidentiality: The Nurse Attorney's Dilemma Journal of Nursing Law. Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.; January 25, 2007. etrieved September 25, 2007, at http://ssrn.com/abstract=1256366.

esuggan, ay N;PN;MN. (Last Modified: August 17, 2008). "Virginia Avernal Henderson." Nurses.info. etrieved September 25, 2007, from: http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_person_henderson_virginia_.htm.

Singleton, Joanne K. "Nurses' perspectives of encouraging clients' care-of-self in a short-term rehabilitation unit within…… [Read More]

References

Kearney, Kathleen M., the Nurse's Duty to Report Child Abuse vs. The Attorney's Duty of Confidentiality: The Nurse Attorney's Dilemma Journal of Nursing Law. Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.; January 25, 2007. Retrieved September 25, 2007, at http://ssrn.com/abstract=1256366.

Resuggan, Ray RN;RPN;MRN. (Last Modified: August 17, 2008). "Virginia Avernal Henderson." Nurses.info. Retrieved September 25, 2007, from:  http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_person_henderson_virginia_.htm .

Singleton, Joanne K. "Nurses' perspectives of encouraging clients' care-of-self in a short-term rehabilitation unit within a long-term care facility," Rehabilitation Nursing, January 1, 2000. Retrieved September 25, 2007, from: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P348282208.html.

Trail Ross, Mary Ellen. (1993). "Linking Ethical Principles With Community Practice." Journal of Community Health Nursing, Vol. 10. Retrieved September 25, 2007, at http://www.questia.com/read/95780716?title=Linking%20Ethical%20Principles%20W%20Community%20Practice.
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Nurse Theorist the Roy Adaption Model

Words: 3386 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64933693

Nursing Theorist: Sr. oy Adaptation Model

The oy Adaptation model for Nursing had its beginning when Sister Callista oy happened to get admitted in the Masters Program of pediatric nursing in the University of California, Los Angeles, in the year 1964. At that time, Sr. Callista was familiar with the idea of 'adaptation' in nursing, and it must be mentioned that Sr. Callista's adviser at that time was Dorothy E. Johnson, who believed firmly in the need to define nursing as a means of focusing the development of knowledge, for the practice of nursing. When Sr. Callista oy started working with children in the pediatric ward of the hospital, she was quite impressed with the basic resiliency of the small children who had been admitted into the wards for treatment. This was why when the first seminar in pediatric nursing was called for; Sr. Callista oy proposed that the basic…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Callista Roy's Adaptation Model" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/callistaroy Accessed 28 October, 2005

'Case Study" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/casestudy.html Accessed 28 October, 2005
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Nursing the Nurse as Learner and Teacher

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53010490

Nursing

The Nurse as Learner and Teacher

Nursing is truly a lifelong study. While in school, a future nurse learns the tactics and the theory of the profession, and while in practice, he or she learns the social part of the profession, including interaction with patients, and difficulties relating to the workplace, and how to solve the latter. Due to these reasons, nursing is not a "one track" career, and involves constant adaptation and learning. Yet nurses are also teachers, and they fulfill that role every day, from the very first time that they step into the workplace. This paper will aim to present the nurse as both a learner and a teacher, and relate this to personal learning abilities.

From a new graduate to chief nurse, an individual embarking upon this career may very well see it in stages, but what is certain is that a nurse is often…… [Read More]

References:

Greer, A.G. (2010). Learner-centered characteristics of nurse educators. International journal of nursing education scholarship. 7(1).

Kelly, C. (2006). Student's perceptions of effective clinical teaching revisited. Thompson Rivers University. Retrieved from < http://ezproxy.library.nyu.edu:2111/science/article/pii/S0260691707000135>.

Consulted Sources:

Advance Perspectives: Nurses The Role of the Nurse as Learner & Teacher. (2011). Advance Web. Retrieved October 1, from .
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Nursing as a Profession and Its Status

Words: 1719 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 146636

Nursing profession is among the oldest in history. Currently, there is much debate that surrounds the profession because of the need for more trained nurses. In recent years the nursing shortage has become a major problem for the medical profession and has resulted in poor patient care and slower patient recover. The purpose of this discussion is to provide an in depth examination of the nursing profession. We will discuss the current state of the nursing profession, including the causes for the shortage and the solution. We will also explore the status of the nursing profession in Australia. Let us begin our discussion by providing a comprehensive definition of what is means to be a nurse.

Definition of a nurse

According to the American Heritage Dictionary, a nurse is defined as " a person trained to care for the sick or disabled under the supervision of a physician." (American Heritage…… [Read More]

References

American Heritage Dictionary. (1982) Second Edition.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=5000534396

Bashford, A. (1997). Starch on the collar and sweat on the brow: self sacrifice and the status of work for nurses. Journal of Australian Studies, (52), 67+. Retrieved August 24, 2003, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=5001774259

Caines, E. (1999, September 6). How to end the nursing shortage. New Statesman, 128, 23. Retrieved August 24, 2003, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=5000779782
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Nursing Is One of Those Professions That

Words: 786 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85517325

Nursing is one of those professions that provides the opportunity not only to further oneself on a professional level, but also on a personal level. It provides the individual with the opportunity to connect with others by providing a platform of health care, while also providing a helping hand that promotes not only short-term healing, but also long-term well-being. This makes nursing one of the most caring professions, as it provides the nurse with the opportunity to use his or her skills, and also to lend a hand above the duties of simple physical health care. In this way, nursing extends to caring for the whole person rather than the physical being alone. This is one of the major factors that has attracted me to the profession throughout my life.

According to Limon (2001), there are four central concepts that are central to the metaparadigm of nursing, including the person…… [Read More]

References

Kocisko, D. (2010, Jan 23). Counselor, patient advocate, researcher, teacher -- and nurse: A Nurse's Journal. Retrieved from:  http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2010/01/counselor_patient_advocate_res.html 

Limon, C. (2007). The Components of the Metaparadigm for Nursing. Nutrition and Health Hub. Retrieved from: http://smalldogs2.com/NutritionHealthHub/The_Components_of_the_Metaparadigm_for_Nursing.html
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Nursing Ba vs Associates Nursing Competencies --

Words: 744 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84521106

Nursing BA vs. Associates

Nursing Competencies -- Associates vs. Baccalaureates

The difference competencies between nurses prepared at the associate-degree level nursing vs. The baccalaureate-degree level are significantly different on many levels. Today's nurses work in a healthcare environment that is undergoing a constant evolution at a speed never before imagined (NLN Board of Governers, 2011). Patient needs have become more complicated; nurses must implement requisite competencies in leadership, health policy, system improvement, research, evidence-based practice, and teamwork and collaboration in order to deliver high-quality care. Furthermore, nurses are also required to master different technologies that are also evolving extremely rapidly.

There are basically three different alternative paths to becoming a registered nurse. Some hospitals offer a three-year program that is administered in the hospital setting. Another option is a two to three-year program in which graduates receive an associate's degree and can be administered at a community college or any…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Mahaffey, E. (2002, May 2). The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Retrieved from The Relevance of Associate Degree Nursing Education: Past, Present, Future:  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Volume72002/No2May2002/RelevanceofAssociateDegree.aspx 

Moltz, D. (2010, January 7). Nursing Tug of War. Retrieved from Inside Higher Ed: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/01/07/nursing

NLN Board of Governers. (2011, January). Transforming Nursing Education: Leading the Call to Reform. Retrieved from NLN Vision: http://www.nln.org/aboutnln/livingdocuments/pdf/nlnvision_1.pdf

Rosseter, R. (2012, April 2). The Impact of Education on Nursing Practice. Retrieved from American Association of Colleges of Nursing:  http://www.aacn.nche.edu/media-relations/fact-sheets/impact-of-education
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Nursing Law and Ethics Name

Words: 1913 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92225100



The death of a child is significant and in this case avoidable and a plaintiff has the right to seek compensatory damages as is allowed by law.

Case Study 1 Part B

At the end of the night shift, Nurse Brown took a verbal handover and then noticed the observation chart had not been filled in. To assist her friend, Nurse Harvey, whom she knew had a busy night, filled in the observation chart and fluid balance chart for the hours from 0200-0600 hrs.

Overcome by the events of the last 24 hrs, Nurse Harvey and Nurse Brown go to the local tavern for a few drinks before Nurse Harvey goes on duty. They discussed Mr. Spencer and his son. John, a friend of Mr. Spencer, overheard the conversation and joined them. He was also upset by the events of the day and was most keen to discuss the accident…… [Read More]

References

Hall, J. (1960). General Principles of Criminal Law (2nd ed.). Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill.

Markesinis, B.S., & Deakin, S.F. (1999). Tort Law (4th ed.). Oxford: Clarendon Press.

ANCI Competency Standards for the Enrolled Nurse at  http://www.anmc.org.au/docs/Publications/Competency%20standards%20EN.pdf 

Scope of Nursing Practice Decision Making Framework, 2006 at http://www.nursingboardtas.org.au/nbtonline.nsf/attachment/SoPDMFFinal/$File/Scope%20of%20Nursing%20Practice%20Decision%20Making%20Framework.pdf
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Nursing Fatigue and Compassion as Functions of

Words: 598 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52488070

Nursing

Fatigue and Compassion as Functions of Ethical Nursing

The American Nursing Association's Scope and Standards of Practice are designed to provide a blueprint for preempting and addressing the various challenges, pitfalls and procedurals norms of the profession. These help to draw a professional, ethical and practical connection that offers a basic outline for that which is expected of the registered nurse. Indeed, it is of critical benefit to the nursing professional and to the patient community that there exist some clearly elaborated set of ethical standards that pertains directly to sometimes difficult to identify challenges such as bedside manner and fatigue. The American Nursing Association (ANA) provides just such standards, and these function to significantly aid in the decision-making, workplace culture and treatment processes undertaken by nurse professionals.

Ethical orientation is an important feature of a nursing team, particularly as it impacts the morale of nurses and the treatment…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

AIPPG. (2010). Betty Neuman's System Model. Nursing Theories.

American Nursing Association (ANA). (2004). Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice. Nursingbooks.
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Nursing Summaries Ember Benson Bn

Words: 388 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49084858



FCER Points Out Error to erck; erck Confirms Change"

This commentary illustrates the issue of problematic wording within the medical community. A Doctor of Chiropractic expressed concern to the Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research over improper phrasing written in the erck anual.

The bothersome statement written in the erck anual was thought to have originated from medical data derived over 30 years ago. This article points the importance of knowing one's own specialty, and having a thorough knowledge of medical terminology so as to correct and prevent medical mishaps.

ackechnie C, Simpson, R (2006) "Traceable Calibration for Blood Pressure and Temperature onitoring" Nursing Standard 21, 11, (2006): 42-47

Correct diagnosis and monitoring largely depend on accurate pulse, respiration, blood pressure, and body temperature measurements. any measurement errors can be minimized by confirming that instruments are calibrated. This article emphasizes to need for instruments to be traceably calibrated to national…… [Read More]

Mackechnie C, Simpson, R (2006) "Traceable Calibration for Blood Pressure and Temperature Monitoring" Nursing Standard 21, 11, (2006): 42-47

Correct diagnosis and monitoring largely depend on accurate pulse, respiration, blood pressure, and body temperature measurements. Many measurement errors can be minimized by confirming that instruments are calibrated. This article emphasizes to need for instruments to be traceably calibrated to national standards.

Nurses are responsible for taking measurements, so it is imperative that nurses be aware of the issues of measurement precision. Unreliable instruments (due to lack of traceable calibration) can lead to inaccurate measurements resulting in misdiagnosis and poor patient care.
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Nursing Educator and the AED Personal Experience

Words: 844 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 943500

Nursing Educator and the AED

Personal Experience of Teaching and Helping Other Nurses to be More Ready in the Use of a Phillips Heart Start Defibrillator (AED)

Children and young adults as well as other adults can and do have cardiac arrest. Estimations state that undiagnosed heart conditions cause the deaths of one individual every three days in organized youth sports in the United States. (AED Universe, 2012, paraphrased) The Survivor's Foundation states that 460,000 deaths occur each year in the U.S. from sudden cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is reported to occur "when the lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles) suddenly stop beating normally and develop what is called ventricular fibrillation (VF). VF is a chaotic heart rhythm that is similar where the heart muscle begins quivering which prevents the heart from effectively pumping blood. If this condition is not corrected immediately, death will follow within ten…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Automated External Defibrillators Reviewed (2003) Survivor's Foundation. Retrieved from:  http://firstaidcoach.com/AED_comparison.pdf 

Deakin C. et al. (2010) European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2010. Section 3. Electrical therapies: Automated external defibrillators, defibrillation, cardioversion and pacing. Resuscitation; 81: 1293-1304.

Jevon, Phil (2011) Defibrillation 1: Using an AED Outside Hospital. Nursing Times. 23 Sept 2011. Retrieved from:  http://www.nursingtimes.net/ 5035495.article

Philips Announces 8-year warranty on Heartstart Onsite and FRx AED's (2012) AED Universe. Retrieved from:  http://aeduniverse.blogspot.com/
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Nursing Before and After 1945

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25843175

Nursing Jobs History

Nursing has changed much since the time before 1945 to now. In the Middle Ages, nursing duties and hospital jobs were sponsored by the Catholic Church, which was popular throughout all Europe and which supported the building of hospitals and the care of the sick in communities. This support fell apart during the Protestant eformation. Monasteries, hospitals and inns were taken from the Church. Also, the study and technique of developing and applying medicine were removed from monasteries and placed in Universities. The art of nursing which had been passed on for centuries in the monasteries was now cut off from the nurses who had practiced it. Protestant society considered nurses to be among "the lowest level of human society" (Sundstrom, 1998). Over the course of the next 200 years, the public approach to nursing changed. A charitable institution in the Middle Ages, suppressed under the Protestants,…… [Read More]

Reference List

BMJ Quality and Safety. (2013). Registered nurses often lack time for nursing care activities. News Medical. Retrieved from  http://www.news-medical.net/news/20131111/Registered-nurses-often-lack-time-for-nursing-care-activities.aspx 

Rinehart, M. (1931). Beyond Bed Pans. History Matters. Retrieved from  http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/60/ 

Sundstrom, A., H. (1998). From the Decline/Dark Ages to the Rebirth/Renaissance of Nursing. Angelfire. Retrieved from  http://www.angelfire.com/fl/EeirensFaerieTales/NursingDeclineHistory.html
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Nursing in Bisphosphonate Therapy for

Words: 330 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3320937

One of the primary role of the nurse, notes the authors, is to help educate the patient about the parameters of his or her disease. Part of the education process is teaching patients about the drugs recommended to them by their doctors or the pharmaceuticals they are already taking to alleviate symptoms. urses can use their knowledge to make patients feel more comfortable about their treatments, more well-informed, and therefore more in control of their course of treatment. Patients who are cognizant of the possible side-effects and benefits of the drugs they take to manage their disease are more likely to comply with guidelines for treatment because they understand the motives behind them. The authors also claim that patient education is an integral part of healing. The article's impact on the nursing profession is broad and extends beyond the limited subject matter they address in "Bisphosphonate therapy for metastatic bone…… [Read More]

Nursing

In "Bisphosphonate therapy for metastatic bone disease: the pivotal role of nurses in patient education," authors Fitch & Maxwell (2008) focus on the importance of nurse awareness of oncology treatments. Nurse awareness of existing and cutting-edge oncology treatments fosters deeper patient trust and understanding. The more comfortable nurses are with their knowledge of bisphosphonates, the better their patients can understand the drugs as a part of their treatment. Fitch & Maxwell (2008) outline the different types of bisphosphonates, various methods of administration, and also detail their role in treating metastatic bone diseases and cancer with the ultimate objective of creating a more well-informed nursing and patient community.

The Fitch & Maxwell (2008) article is not an experiment related to bisphosphonates or bone disease. Rather, the article is a meta-analysis, a summary of existing and prior research on how bisphosphonates can help patients with metastatic bone diseases. The authors explain the use of bisphosphonates and their role in aiding recovery. Most importantly, Fitch & Maxwell (2008) urge nursing professionals to learn about and understand bisphosphonates. One of the primary role of the nurse, notes the authors, is to help educate the patient about the parameters of his or her disease. Part of the education process is teaching patients about the drugs recommended to them by their doctors or the pharmaceuticals they are already taking to alleviate symptoms. Nurses can use their knowledge to make patients feel more comfortable about their treatments, more well-informed, and therefore more in control of their course of treatment. Patients who are cognizant of the possible side-effects and benefits of the drugs they take to manage their disease are more likely to comply with guidelines for treatment because they understand the motives behind them. The authors also claim that patient education is an integral part of healing. The article's impact on the nursing profession is broad and extends beyond the limited subject matter they address in "Bisphosphonate therapy for metastatic bone disease: the pivotal role of nurses in patient education."