Cross Cultural Psychology Essays (Examples)

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Cross Cultural Leadership There Is

Words: 3076 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4327320

Internal and external customers are both considered important and their needs must be anticipated and satisfied in the most suitable manner. The decisions that the executive leader makes must be based on solid information. He must be aware of the consequences of his decisions. At the same time, he must have a long-term perspective and make the best choice even if at the beginning its consequences might seem negative.

A further competency that must be taken into consideration refers to the ability to efficaciously manage strategic resources including the human ones, the financial ones and the information ones. From this point-of-view, one needs to be updated with the technological development which are relevant for his work area. In addition, he must make sure that everything from the recruitment process to the selection and rewarding of the staff members is done in the manner which best serves the organization.

A leadership…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Executive Competencies, Retrieved November 26, 2007 from web site: https://www.opm.gov/ses/ecq.asp

Executive management, Retrieved November 26, 2007 from web site: http://www.govexec.com/features/0404-15/0404-15view.htm

Krishnan, R. (2002). Impact of gender on influence, power and authoritarianism, Women in management review, vol.17, 197-206

Leadership, Retrieved November 26, 2007 from web site: http://www.leadershiplouisville.org/programs/network
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Cross-Cultural Barriers to Mental Health

Words: 803 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14721311



ecommended policy

To deal with these difficulties, several recommendations can be formulated:

1. Cross-cultural variables: Ethnic matches should be arranged between client and therapist. These will be effective in dealing not only with communication problems, but also with cultural perceptions of the disease as well as with possible social stigmas attached to the disease. The therapist, sharing similar cultural background to the patient understands the patient's concern and speaks the patient's language therefore is more able than another to 'pull' her through.

Other recommendations include items such as that Government should allocate more funding to establishing specific mental health treatments that are run by and appeal to the various ethnic minorities. In a similar manner, government should increase their funding for research and clinical training of ethnic and racial minority members (e.g. The minority Fellowship Program and the CO). Finally, general Mental health services should incorporate cross-cultural communication variables in…… [Read More]

References

Leong, F.T.L., & Lau, A.S.L. (2001). Barriers to providing effective mental health services to Asian-Americans. Mental Health Services Research, 3, 201 -- 214.

Leong, F.T.L., & Kalibatseva, Z. (2011) Cross-cultura Barriers to mental Health services in United States. Cerebrum. The DANA Foundation. http://www.dana.org/news/cerebrum/detail.aspx?id=31364
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Cross-Cultural Counseling in the 21st Century

Words: 2622 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94553005

Coss Cultual Moes and Values: Middle-Easten Ameicans, South Asian-Ameicans and Native Ameicans

No longe a melting pot but moe like a salad bowl, the United States has always been a land of immigants and its divese demogaphic composition today is a eflection of this pocess. In fact, just one goup, Native Ameicans, can be egaded as being the oiginal inhabitants, but anthopologists ague that even these people likely migated fom othe continents tens of thousands of yeas ago, making them immigants in a sense as well. Thee goups in paticula stand out in the Ameican demogaphic mix as being in need of thoughtful attention in coss-cultual counseling situations, namely Middle-Easten Ameicans, South Asian-Ameicans and Native Ameicans. To detemine what counselos need to know in ode to develop effective inteventions fo membes fom these thee goups, this pape povides a eview of the liteatue, followed by a summay of the eseach…… [Read More]

references:

A study of Lumbee undergraduates. Journal of College Counseling, 9(1), 47-55.

South Asia countries. (2014). World Bank. Retrieved from http://web.worldbank.org/.
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Cultural Theories

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86249456

Cross Cultural Psychology

Cultural Theories

Comparing cross-cultural approaches to psychology:

An ecocultural vs. An integrated approach

The need to take into account different cultural perspectives when treating patients has become increasingly recognized within the profession of psychology. Cross-cultural psychology, in contrast to other branches of psychology, allows that the definition of what is psychologically 'normal' is often highly dependent upon one's cultural context. Two similar, but slightly different approaches to cross-cultural psychology include the ecocultural model and the integrative model.

The ecocultural model, posits "that the individual cannot be separated from his or her environmental context. People constantly exchange messages with the environment, thus transforming it and themselves" (Chapter 1 summary, n.d). Someone acculturated in a nation other than the U.S. will show different developmental features than someone acculturated in America. The United States' culture supports a particularly long adolescence, and leaving home and beginning a family is no longer…… [Read More]

References

Chapter 1 summary. (n.d). Retrieved:

http://www.ericshiraev.com/resources/Chapter+1+Summary.pdf

Trommsdorff, G. (2002). An eco-cultural and interpersonal relations approach to development over the life span. Online Readings in Psychology and Culture, 6 (2).1-15 Retrieved from http://scholarworks.gvsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1057&context=orpc
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Cross-Cultural Comparison on Work Value Between US and China

Words: 2471 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15997293

Work Values

Cross-cultural comparison on work value between U.S. And China

A value is "what a person consciously or subconsciously desires, wants, or seeks to attain" (Locke, 1983). Peterson and Gonzalez (2005) say values "are motivational forces," and "influence the role work plays in people's lives." Dawis (2005) asserts that each person (P) has requirements that need to be met, most through their environments (E). In fact, Dawis claims that "Many of P's needs in adulthood can be met at work." The ones that matter most to P. are E's ability to deliver rein forcers (e.g., pay, prestige, and working conditions) that satisfy P's needs. Similarly, E has parallel and complementary requirements that can be met by P. And make P. A satisfactory worker. Thus, understanding work values has a benefit for both individuals (as they look for work environments that support their values), and also for organizations (if they…… [Read More]

References

Bernstein, Paul. (1997). American Work Values: Their Origin and Development. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Cappelli, P., Bassi, L., Katz, H., Knoke, D., Osterman, P. And Useem, M. (1997). Change at Work. New York: Oxford University Press.

Dawis, R.V. (2005). The Minnesota theory of work adjustment. In Brown, S.D. & Lent, R.W. (Eds.) Career development and counselling: putting theory and research to work. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Farber, Henry S. (1997). "Changing Face of Job Loss in the United States, 1981-1995." Brookings Papers on Economic Activity 1: Microeconomics: 55-128.
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Cross-Cultural Competencies

Words: 986 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21093143

Krentzman and Townsend (2008) indicates that multicultural competence means "having the beliefs, knowledge, and skills necessary to work effectively with individuals different from one's self; that cultural competence includes all forms of difference; and that issues of social justice cannot be overlooked" (p. 7). Although improved cultural competency is widely regarded as being an important element of high quality health care services, it is not a "magic bullet" for mitigating existing inequities in the provision of such care (Larson & Ott, 2010). Nevertheless, developing cross-cultural competencies is viewed by many health care providers as an essential first step in improving access and the quality of health care services in Australia today (Sharma & Phillion, 2011). Therefore, in this context, the term "multicultural competence" is used to describe the relationship between a counselor and a patient in cross-cultural settings (An introduction to cultural competency, 2012). The focus of cultural competence is…… [Read More]

References

An introduction to cultural competency. (2012). Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

Retrieved July 21, 2014 from https://www.racp.edu.au/index.cfm?objectid=FCBB0411-

9 DFF-0474-A0B250ACA0737BF8.

Hawley, L.D. (2006, Fall). Reflecting teams and microcounseling in beginning counselor training: Practice in collaboration. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development, 45(2), 198-202.
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Looking Into Cross Culture Psychology

Words: 668 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53750984

Cross Culture Psychology

Introduction into ST. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Jude hospital is one of the leading research hospitals helping to find ways of dealing with and managing childhood cancer (St. Jude Hospital, 2015). The Hospital has spent over 50 years in finding cures and helping children to live to adulthood. Their studies are an instrumental part in helping the survival rate of cancer grow from a low of 20% in 1962 to a high of 80% in the year 2015 (St. Jude Hospital, 2015). The main value proposition of the hospital is to "find cures and save children" (St. Jude Hospital, 2015).

Organizational Core Values

'Core values' are principles to guide an organization's actions and the actions of its employees. According to authors Porras and Collins, core values are inherent in the organization and can never be compromised. Core values are also made to reflect the values of an…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Lencioni, P. (2002, July). Make your values mean something. Retrieved from Harvard Business Review: https://hbr.org/2002/07/make-your-values-mean-something

St. Jude Hospital. (2015). About Us. Retrieved from https://www.stjude.org/?sc_cid=kwp93&ef_id=VS8mWQAAAF2sXQC5:20151030220421

St. Jude Hospital. (2015). Our History. Retrieved from https://www.stjude.org/about-st-jude/history.html
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Cultural Group Polish

Words: 3162 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9082468

POLISH

Culture Group- the Polish

Culture Group -- the Polish

The Polish

The polish culture group is a category of people who speak the Slavic lingo of Poland and practice the cultural norms in line with their beliefs and customs. It is perceived that the culture essence of the polish is one that unconstrained emotional expressions (Wierzbicka, 2003, pg 121). The culture originated from a confluence with interweaving ties alongside Germans, Latinos and the Byzantines. The originality is also as a result of cultural traits of the proto-slavs. The geographical position and occupancy of the polish are found in the heart of Europe, the nation of Poland. Their nation is bordered by the Baltic Sea, Ukraine and Belarus, Germany, Czech epublic and Slovakia to the northern side, east, and west and southern respectively. The polish people experience a long-term climatic environment. It is rough and adverse and has taken long…… [Read More]

References

Albala, K. (2011). Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia. New York: ABC-CLIO.

Dyczewski, L. (2002). Values in the Polish cultural tradition. Chicago: CRVP.

Jasinski, P. (1999). Environmental regulation in transforming economies. Great Britain: Ashgate Publishing.

Kronenberg, J., Bergier, T., et al. (2010). Challenges of Sustainable Development in Poland. Pomerania: Fundacja Sendzimira.
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Differences in Some Area Between Two Cultural Groups

Words: 2646 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87415490

Cultural Psychology

Two Cultural Groups

Contrasting Cultural Psychology between the East Asian and the Western Part of the World

The different fear level for the super-ordinates and ordinates in Westerns and East Asians

Globalization is considered to be the phenomenon that owns a positive tendency to tame the behaviors of the individuals dwelling in all parts of the world in an accord of productivity and peace. It is for this reason that the inclination of the global economy is tilting towards the studies of cross cultures and its implications is a result of progressive development of the world towards a multicultural and cosmopolitan state of behavior- in individuals as well as in the nations. But yet the fast fact paced technological advancements and the tamed behavior does not guarantee the homogeneity of psychology (Shweder, 1999). Psychology as a matter of fact is a complex framework of individuals' perceptions, cognitions, apprehensions…… [Read More]

References

L Berry, J.W. (2002). Cross-Cultural Psychology: Research and Applications. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hui, C.H. (2000). Measurement in Cross-Cultural Psychology. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 19-32.

Jung, K.D. (1994). Is Culture Destiny? The Myth of Asia's Anti-Democratic Values, 4-8.

Lehman, D. (1995). Cultural variation in unrealistic optimism: Does the West feel more vulnerable than the East? . Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 595-607.
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Racial Identity Complexities and Potential in Cross-Cultural

Words: 3485 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15192106

acial Identity

Complexities and Potential in Cross-Cultural Counseling

In 1897 the French sociologist Emile Durkheim wrote about the influence of culture on suicide rates among different groups. He found that while suicide seems to be the most private and most individualistic choice that a person can make (what could be more private than the dialogue that an individual has with eternity, after all) cultural values still hold sway. His research has been criticized over the decades, but its central point remains valid. Culture seeps into every level of both our conscious and unconscious behaviors, and therefore must be attended to in every aspect of the therapeutic process. However, while at least most therapists as well as most of those individuals studying to become therapists are certainly aware of this fact, this awareness does not necessarily translate into sufficient care taken to minimize the harm that cross-cultural misunderstandings or blindnesses that…… [Read More]

References

Bimrose, J. (1996). Multiculturalism, in Bayne, R., Horton, I. & Bimrose, J. (Eds.) New directions in counseling. London: Routledge.

Fouad, N. et al. (2012). Qualitative study of the dislocated working class. Journal of career development 39, 287-310.

LaFromboise, T., Trimble, J., & Mohatt, G. (1990). Counseling intervention and American Indian tradition: An integrative approach.The counseling psychologist 18(4), 628-654.

Jones, A.C. (1985). Psychological functioning in black Americans: A conceptual guide for use in psychotherapy. Psychotherapy 22 (2), 363-369.
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Challenges in Cross-Cultural Counseling

Words: 3681 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72560009

cross-cultural values and mores to identify the author's interactions with gay, lesbian, and transgendered individuals, Latinas and individuals with disabilities. Further, this paper integrates the case study analyses provided in "Case Studies in Multicultural Counseling and Therapy" and relevant Social Justice Counseling issues to support the discussions. In addition, for each of these three cultures, a discussion concerning what factors should be kept in mind during interfaces with each so that all parties are honored to facilitate work with them as a therapist, colleague, social acquaintance, partner, and neighbor. Finally, an analysis concerning what was especially easy and fun and what was challenging to understand about these cultures given the author's unique worldview is followed by a summary of the research and important findings about these three cultures and cross-cultural values and mores in the conclusion.

eview and Analysis

Gay, Lesbian, and Transgendered Individuals

With growing numbers of states legalizing…… [Read More]

References

Beam, C. (2014). Is Hispanic the same thing as Latina? Slate. Retrieved from http://www.

slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2009/05/is_hispanic_the_same_thing_as_latina.html.

Beecher, M.E. & Rabe, R.A. (2007, Spring). Practical guidelines for counseling students with disabilities. Journal of College Counseling, 7(1), 83-87.

Bess, J.A. & Stabb, S.D. (2009, July). The experiences of transgendered persons in psychotherapy: Voices and recommendations. Journal of Mental Health Counseling,
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Analyzing Multiple Assignments for Cross Cultural Education

Words: 5084 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72383288

Cross Cultural Education

Cultural History

The information gathered was mostly from my grandparents and my parents. From the interviews conducted, I found out that my ancestors came to the United States in 1850. The main reason why they came to the United States is due to famine. According to information obtained, at the time, Ireland was facing a severe famine, owing to upsetting crop disasters. Due to lack of food for lengthy periods, my ancestors were left with no other option but to move to the United States. However, there are quite a number of challenges they faced upon arrival. To begin with, they had no expertise and no preceding experience in becoming accustomed to a new nation. In addition, they also faced the challenge of having no cash, minimal clothes and lack of education. Another distinctive challenge that they faced upon arrival to the United States was a great…… [Read More]

References

Colin, M., O'Dea, M. (2006). The Feckin' Book of Everything Irish. New York, Barnes & Noble.

Derderian-Aghajanian, A., & Wang, C. C. (2012). How culture affects on English language learners'(ELL's) outcomes, with Chinese and Middle Eastern Immigrant Students. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 3(5).

Frontline. (n.d). A Class Divided. PBS. Retrieved from: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/class-divided/

McDonald, K. E., Keys, C. B., & Balcazar, F. E. (2007). Disability, race/ethnicity and gender: themes of cultural oppression, acts of individual resistance. American Journal of Community Psychology, 39(1-2), 145-161.
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Cultural Counselor Being a Counselor Can Sometimes

Words: 2185 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34235489

Cultural Counselor

Being a counselor can sometimes be a really tough job. Counseling can only be effective and beneficial when the counselor places himself or herself in the shoes of his or her client. If he or she is unable to do so, he or she will never become an effective counselor. Placing oneself in the circumstances of someone else is not easy, let alone placing oneself in the shoes of a person who is of a different race, religion or culture. That is the real test of a counselor. In this paper I shall discuss what is required to understand the cross-cultural relationships in counseling to help the client get over their problem easily. All the dimensions pertaining to counseling (of a client of a different background that the counselor) will discussed with the case scenario.

Case Scenario

When clients and counselors have different cultural (or ethnic or racial)…… [Read More]

References:

Cannon, E.P. (2008). "Promoting moral reasoning and multicultural competence during internship." Journal of Moral Education, 37(4), 503-518.

Crethar, Hugh C. And Ratts, Manivong J. (2008). "Why Social Justice is a Counseling Concern?"

Gilbert, Jane. (2002). "Cross-cultural issues in counseling skillstraining: lessons from Lesotho."

Journal of Social Development in Africa. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons.
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Cultural Intelligence in Today's Increasingly Culturally Diverse

Words: 1242 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90887850

Cultural Intelligence

In today's increasingly culturally diverse world, cultural competence, or what has become known as "cultural intelligence (CQ)" has received increasing research attention. Several authors, with various purposes and audiences, have developed assessment instruments to help individuals and groups understand their level of cultural intelligence. Included among these is the instrument developed by Earley and Mosakowski (2004), under the title "Diagnosing Your Cultural Intelligence."

Earley and Mosakowski's instrument addresses three areas of CQ: The cognitive, the physical, and the emotional/motivational. The cognitive component can be regarded as the "head" of cultural competence. On a cognitive level, this areas focuses on an individual's understanding of differences between cultures. This involves asking questions and investigations to identify any differences that might exist among cultures. Being aware of these on a cognitive level can greatly enhance a person's ability to understand and interact with foreign cultures.

The physical component focuses on a…… [Read More]

References

Earley, P.C. & Mosakowski, E. 2004. 'Cultural intelligence', Harvard Business Review, 82 (10), October, pp.139-146 [Online]

Mendenhall, Mark. 2007. Global Leadership: Research, Practice and Development. Routledge.
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Psychology - History of Psychology

Words: 1415 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59949647



Whereas the behaviorist and psychodynamic models contradict each other in their fundamental assumptions and focus, humanistic perspective does not necessarily contradict behaviorism or the psychodynamic approach, except that it considers both of those views as explanations of only portions of human behavior rather than all human behavior.

The Cognitive Perspective:

The Cognitive perspective broadens the study of human psychology even further than the humanistic perspective. In addition to considering all of the influential elements within the behaviorist, psychodynamic, and humanistic views, cognitive psychology also studies the combined contributions of knowledge, memory, previous experience, subconscious desires, external factors, and volitional thought on external behavior (Gerrig & Zimbardo 2005).

Cognitive psychology accepts many of the fundamental concepts of other schools of psychological thought, and much like the humanistic point-of-view, merely considers them incomplete explanations of human behavior rather than oppositional theories.

According to cognitive psychologists, even the most inclusive theories like humanistic…… [Read More]

REFERENCES Coleman, J.C., Butcher, J.N., Carson, R.C. (1984) Abnormal Psychology and Human Life. Dallas: Scott, Foresman & Co. Gerrig, R, Zimbardo, P. (2005) Psychology and Life. 17th Edition.

New York: Allyn & Bacon.
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Cultural Schemata Theory Together With Formal Schemata

Words: 1631 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74524173

Cultural Schemata Theory:

Together with formal schemata and linguistic schemata, cultural schemata are some of the main types of schema theory, which is a hypothesis on how knowledge is gained and processed. Actually, schema is a technical word used by cognitive supporters to explain how people arrange, process, and store information in their brain. Notably, schemata focus on how people arrange information to long-term memory in relation to experiences, attitudes, values, strategies, skills, and conceptual understanding. The schema theory is founded on the belief that every act of an individual's understanding includes his/her knowledge of the world. The received knowledge is in turn organized into units that contain stores information.

Understanding Cultural Schemata Theory:

Cultural schemata is also known as abstract, story, or linguistic schema and is developed on the basis of people's basic experiences ("Schemata Theory in Learning," n.d.). Cultural schemata theory is described as the pre-existing knowledge about…… [Read More]

References:

Fuhong, T. (2004, April 10). Cultural Schema and Reading Comprehension. Retrieved December 5, 2011, from http://www.celea.org.cn/pastversion/lw/pdf/TanFuhong.pdf

Gilakjani, A.P. & Ahmadi, S.M. (2011. June). The Relationship between L2 Reading

Comprehension and Schema Theory: A Matter of Text Familiarity. Journal of Information and Education Technology, 1(2), pp. 142-149, Retrieved from  http://www.ijiet.org/papers/24-K002.pdf 

Gudykunst, W.B. (2005). Theorizing about intercultural communication. Thousand Oaks:
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Psychology Is a Multifaceted Field

Words: 1705 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85096253



eferences

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101936297

Blocher, DH (2000). The Evolution of Counseling Psychology. New York: Springer. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102034235

Darlington, Y., & Scott, D. (2002). Qualitative esearch in Practice: Stories from the Field / . Crows Nest, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=10079016

Hoagwood, K., Jensen, P.S., & Fisher, C.B. (Eds.). (1996). Ethical Issues in Mental Health esearch with Children and Adolescents. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99086817

Lewis, D. (1960). Quantitative Methods in Psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=9395983

Newman, I., & Benz, C.. (1998). Qualitative-Quantitative esearch Methodology: Exploring the Interactive Continuum. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5006987353

Poyrazli, S. (2003). Validity of ogerian Therapy in Turkish Culture: A Cross-Cultural Perspective. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development, 42(1), 107+. etrieved February 28, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101936297

Blocher, DH (2000). The Evolution of Counseling Psychology. New York: Springer. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102034235

Darlington, Y., & Scott, D. (2002). Qualitative Research in Practice: Stories from the Field / . Crows Nest, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=10079016

Hoagwood, K., Jensen, P.S., & Fisher, C.B. (Eds.). (1996). Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Children and Adolescents. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99086817
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Cultural Experience Description the Event Is More

Words: 2391 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26516045

Cultural Experience

Description

The event is more a series of events. I went on vacation with some friends to Miami, and while not everything I experienced on that trip would count as a cultural experience, there is little question that there were some very different experiences. There was the visit to the Haitian restaurant, for example, but the event that stands out the most was my visit to Calle Ocho, the old Cuban neighborhood. As Korean student I find it challenging enough to deal with mainstream American culture, but Hispanic culture is completely different again, so this experience provided me with an interesting counterpoint to my usual experiences in the United States.

In this neighborhood, if people can speak English they do not admit it. There are coffee windows where strong, sugary shots of Cuban coffee and cafe con leche are dispensed to passers-by in a hurry. There are old…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Devine, P. (1989). Stereotypes and prejudice: Their automatic and controlled components. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol. 56 (1) 5-18.

Geert Hofstede.com (2012). National culture. Geert-Hofstede.com. Retrieved May 7, 2012 from http://geert-hofstede.com

Hofstede, G. (1983). The cultural relativity of organizational practices and theories. Journal of International Business Studies. Vol. 14 (Fall 1983) 75-89.

Mallol, C., Holtom, B. & Lee, T. (2007). Job embeddedness in a culturally diverse environment. Journal of Business Psychology. Vol. 22, 35-44.
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Cultural Perspectives on Health Changing

Words: 2175 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76259472



In the health care practice, there are those aspects of culture that are sensitive and that the health care practitioners need to consider when making decisions related to the practice. Some of these cultural aspects are those that contradict with the principles of modern medicine. Therefore, by the practitioner having a good understanding of these sensitive aspects of culture, he/she will be able to make the appropriate decision for the situation at hand.

Communication skills are also important for all culturally competent health care professionals. For example, in situations which concern culture and the norms associated with culture based on the amount of information that can be disclosed and the type of information. This can form a serious barrier in the provision of health care and therefore the practitioner needs to understand the culture and the norms in order to be able to enable communication and self-disclosure of the patient.…… [Read More]

References

AUSTRALIAN NURSING and MIDWIFERY COUNCIL National Competency Standards for the Registered Nurse. Australia: Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council.

BURNS, N. & GROVE, S.K. 2009. The practice of nursing research: Appraisal, synthesis, and generation of evidence., St. Louis, MO Elsevier.

CROSS, T., BAZRON, B., DENNIS, K. & ISAACS, M. 1989. Towards a Culturally Competent System of Care, Volume I, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Child Development Center, CASSP Technical Assistance Center.

LEE, H.C., DUDLEY, R.A. & GONZALES, R. 2011. Translating Evidence into Practice, Policy, and Public Health in Perinatal Medicine. NeoReviews, 12, e431-e438.
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Cultural Diversity in Organizations Organization

Words: 4681 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71138902

The solutions are numerous and more diversified.

Knowledge is crucial for business success. There are two types of knowledge: explicit or tacit. The explicit type is easily codified, stored and transmitted to other individuals. As opposed to the former, the tacit one is embedded in people. The size of the tacit knowledge is proportional to the diversity of the workplace. Therefore, organizations face the increasing challenge today of finding ways to grasp into the pool of tacit knowledge they own in order to create competitive advantage. This is the type of knowledge to which competition doesn't have access because it's embedded in unique individuals belonging to a give organization.

Knowledge can be enhanced by the learning process. Its final objective is to be materialized into products and services. This final stage of the process refers to the innovation part. Innovations are the most important tool an organization has in hand…… [Read More]

Reference list:

Brittan, S. (1996, June 6). Keynes and globalization. Financial Times, p. 12.

Hofstede, G. & McRae, R.R. (2004). Personality and Culture Revisited: Linking Traits and Dimensions of Culture. Cross Cultural Research, vol. 38(1), pp. 52-88.

Hofstede, G. (2001). Culture Consequences, 2nd ed. London: Sage.

Hofstede, G. (1984). Cultural Dimensions in Management and Planning. Asia Pacific Journal, pp.84-99.
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Cultural Differences of Adolescent in the United States

Words: 4157 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66223470

Cultural Differences of Adolescent in the United States

The United States, ever since the time when its history began, has been an accumulation of different cultural patterns who took refuge here for independence in expressing the thoughts. esiliency or adaptability is featured as a phenomenon of fruit yielding adaptability in spite of difficult or intimidating surrounding. In this paper we shall analyze the cultural differences among adolescents in the country. In 1996 Gordon discovered that adaptable young men have concrete self-confidence in their realizing capabilities and concrete sentiments of association in the school surrounding as against their non-adaptable associates. Consistently Arellano and Padilla in 1996 discovered that cooperative families and tutors saved students from vulnerable educational surroundings. Again Liebowitz, Catellani, and Cuellar in 1999 discovered the relatively important foreseer of sexual attitude to be the persistence of morals existing betwixt the young men and their family. Outcomes threw light on…… [Read More]

References

Brook, J.S; et al. (1998) "Drug use among African-Americans: Ethnic identity as a protective factor." Psychological Reports- 83:1427-1446

Brook, J.S; Whiteman, M; Balka, E.B; Win, P.T; and Gursen, M.D. (1998) "Drug use among Puerto Ricans: Ethnic identity as a protective factor." Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences- 20(2): 241-254

Carlin, J.F. (1979) "The Catastrophically Uprooted Child: Southeast Asian Refugee Children." In Basic Handbook for Child Psychiatry- Volume I, edited by J.D. Noshpitz et.al. New York: Basic Books.

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. (2001) "HIV / AIDS Surveillance Report"- 13(2):144.
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Cultural Intonation Cultural Differences in

Words: 3430 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73347025

2009). Othe studies had peviously concluded that English infants developed a pefeence fo tochaic wods, the dominant stess constuct of English wods, ove iambic stess pattens within the fist yea of life (Hohle et al. 2009). A compaison of Geman and Fecnh infants in fou distinct expeiments confims and even naows down the timefame in which this diffeentiation of pefeence occus, and also shows (though the Fench language expeiments) that the ability to distinguish the two opposing stess pattens does not necessaily esult in the development of pefeence, if the taget language itself lacks a dominant stess stuctue (Hohle et al. 2009). Even at six months, a specific language begins to mediate peception.

An ealie study suggests that the timing of stess and intonation pefeence development is even soone than six months. While citing evidence suggesting that language-independent phonetic contasts and melodic vaiations ae ecognized within the fist fou months…… [Read More]

references during the first half year of life: Evidence from German and French infants." Infant behavior and development 32(3), pp. 262-74.

Laroche, M.; Pons, F. & Richard, M. (2009). "The role of language in ethnic identity measurement: A multitrait-multimethod approach to construct validation." Journal of social psychology 149(4), pp. 513-40.

Nguyen, T.; Ingrahm, C. & Pensalfini, J. (2008). "Prosodic transfer in Vietnamese acquisition of English contrastive stress patterns." Journal of phonetics 36(1), pp. 158.

Turk, a. & Shattuck-Hufnagel, S. (2007). "Multiple targets of phrase-final lengthening in American English words." Journal of phonetics 35(4), pp. 445-72.

Wyatt, J. (2007). "Skinner 1, Chomsky 0." Behavior analysis digest 19(4), pp. 13-4.
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Cultural Differences in Today's World Then Explain

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15989882

cultural differences in today's world. Then explain two ways you might address those challenges in your professional life. Support your responses using current literature.

Challenges of diversity: Positives and negatives

Affirmative action embodies many of the paradoxes of the diversity of American society. On one hand, America has long proclaimed itself a land of freedom and equality. However, for many years, African-Americans and other minority groups were discriminated against, resulting in economic, educational, as well as political disenfranchisement. Affirmative action, or taking race into consideration to promote a more diverse environment in schools and in the workplace, is one way to create a fairer and more pluralistic society. It reflects the fact that persons who are privileged in America have historically come from specific races, classes, and ethnicities. However, many people believe that affirmative action's use of racial preference is, in effect, a form of discrimination itself. The courts have…… [Read More]

References

Kassin, S., Fein, S., & Markus, H.R. (2010). Social psychology. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

The Harvard Clinical and Translation Science Center (2009). Cultural Competence in Research. Retrieved on February 10, 2013 from http://www.mfdp.med.harvard.edu/catalyst/publications/Cultural_Competence_Annotated_Bibliograp

hy.pdf.

Write Response to colleague's
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Cultural Impact on Hospitality Industry

Words: 2972 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45084448

Tourism Management

The impact of technology and the increase of international travel and exploration, the global environment has provided a landscape that depends on the knowledge of other culture. The differences among the human race are everywhere and the denotation of such individualities create challenges for those wishing to attain a successful career based in international exposure.

The purpose of this essay is to explore various themes and ideas that relate to cross-cultural management theory applied in a practical and pragmatic manner. This essay aims to answer the following question:

Which international skills, knowledge, behaviours and experiences will be advantageous in the development of my future career?

My future career selection is not quite clear at this time but I have narrowed it down to becoming involved in hotel management in Central America. This essay will first examine the basics of culture to help give a theoretical background to my…… [Read More]

References

Branine, M. (2011). Managing across cultures: Concepts, policies and practices. Sage.

Crowne, K.A. (2008). What leads to cultural intelligence?. Business Horizons,51(5), 391-399.

De Bono, S., & Van Der Heijden, B. (2011). Managing cultural diversity. Meyer & Meyer Verlag.

Duncan, T. (2005). Current issues in the global hospitality industry. Tourism and Hospitality Research, 5(4), 359-366.
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Culture Psychology

Words: 1950 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15291211

Cultural Psychology

Review of Saudi Arabia

Muslim culture is one of the religions with the oldest and most extensive histories. It has its impacts on the world's greatest civilizations such as Sultanate of Usmania, Saudi Arabia, and Middle East and in different eras, Muslim rulers have extended their kingdoms to various parts of the world. Muslim culture even has its imprints on various fields of Science and Sociology. Despite all the richness of this culture, it is the one facing major criticism globally. One after another, events are taking place in a sequence which has highlighted the importance of Muslim countries in global Politics and economy.

These days, political decisions taken by the governments of Iran, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and other Muslim countries have become part of daily news headlines. On the other hand, the incident of 9/11 has changed the global scenario of this world. Policies of many western…… [Read More]

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Psychology -- Aspects of the Self as

Words: 716 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44536471

Psychology -- Aspects of the Self

As a women, I have been intimately familiar with interdependency for the majority of my life. It is only in the last few years that I have embraced a level of independence that rivals that of the men I know. Triandis (1994) suggests that we draw on the interdependent and independent aspects of ourselves as we need to, but I suspect that these construals are also established by the moment-by-moment interactions we have with others. My independence is represented by the social roles that I adopt: I am a sister and a girlfriend. In these roles, I proceed from a relational construal. My actions are fundamentally considered to be my own, reflecting well or poorly on me -- not on my brother and not on my girlfriends. Similarly, my interdependency is reflected in my role as a daughter. Social and familial regard for me…… [Read More]

References

Kitayama, S., Marcus, H.R., Matsumoto, H., & Norasakkunkit, V. (1997). Individual and collective processes in the construction of the self: self-enhancement in the United States and self -criticism in Japan. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72, 1245-1267.

Kuo, B.C.H., & Gingrich, L. (2004). Correlates of self-construals among Asian and Caucasian undergraduates in Canada: Cultural patterns and implications for counseling. Guidance and Counceling, 20, 78-88.

Triandis, H.C. (1994). Culture and social psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill.
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Psychology Master's Degree Methodology Degree

Words: 2396 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70293634

The subject promises to
approach issues of theology, sociology, ethicality and behavior with
necessary interdependency.

sychology: rofessional Ethics and Legal Issues (523), though an elective,
seems to be an absolutely indispensable channeling of study time. The
examination of issues of ethical and legal centrality to the research or
practice of psychology should arm future professionals with the underlying
information and philosophical orientation needed to approach this complex
field with sensitivity, objectivity and integrity.

Teaching Introduction to sychology (GIDS 524) is an elective which should
serve to further the knowledge and information obtained in Advanced
Educational sychology (GIDS 521), continuing to refine the ideas and
theories instructed through my larger course of study into a set of tools
for the demonstration of this knowledge. Here, I anticipate sharpening the
skills which I already possess to serve in the instructional capacity on
the interdisciplinary relevance of psychology.

hase 1:
This first phase…… [Read More]

Psychology: Professional Ethics and Legal Issues (523)

Spring 2010:
Advanced Educational Psychology (521)
Teaching Introduction to Psychology (GIDS 524)
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Psychology and Culture Lynn's Parenting of Her

Words: 684 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99438194

Psychology and Culture

Lynn's parenting of her son takes an authoritarian approach to child-rearing. In her culture, parental authority is rarely questioned. Not only would she find support in her family, but she would also find support for her parenting decisions in the community and in the Cambodian interpretation of the Buddhist religion. One of the parenting practices that is acceptable in her culture is the use of physical punishment for children. Children are expected to be obedient in her culture and to listen, without argument, when a parent gives instructions. This obedience is part of the authoritarian approach to parenting. In addition, it is clear that she expects the child to conform to her standards. Despite the fact that the child was having a difficult day, she decided to go to the mall, which is reflective of the attitude that children should be obedient.

I think that this question…… [Read More]

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Psychology of Consumer Behavior

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72385198

Psychology of Consumer Behavior

The research into how young women perceive their own bodies -- in response to constant exposure to media images of un-naturally thin and extraordinarily beautiful females -- has been a popular topic for many years. But when it comes to male models that are nearly perfect, handsome and muscular in exactly the right places, there has not been as much attention or research. This paper reviews the potential of -- and reality of -- dissatisfaction in males based on the media's model images of males.

Body Image for Males -- Background

Annette La Greca is Professor of Psychology at the University of Miami and Gerald Koocher is the Dean of the School for Health Studies at Simmons College. As co-authors of The Parents' Guide to Psychological First Aid: Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Predictable Life Crises they assert that the research for body dissatisfaction among…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cassell, Dana K, and Gleaves, David H. (2009). The Encyclopedia of Obesity and Eating

Disorders, Third Edition. New York: Infobase Publishing.

Grogan, Sarah. (2007). Body Image: Understanding Body Dissatisfaction in Men, Women, and Children. Florence, KY: Taylor & Francis.

Koocher, Gerald P., and La Greca, Annette. (2010). The Parents' Guide to Psychological First
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Cross Dressing

Words: 2128 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79269326

Cross Dressing

Upon meeting an individual, the first distinction observed is whether the person is male or female. More often than not, this first impression is made from what the individual is wearing, such as a man's suit or a woman's dress. However, sexual gender cannot always be assumed by what one is wearing.

Based on history and culture, people have been conditioned to visually assess whether an individual appears as they are expected, meaning, a woman looks like a woman and a man looks like a man based on how he or she is dressed (Lyons pp). "Dress is the most visible manifestation of gender and status because it provides information about an individual's characteristics and expected role behaviors," thus, establishing an social path for communication (Lyons pp). This process of gender appropriate dress begins at birth, as parents dress their children in "gender-symbolic dress that encourages other to…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Moulton, John L. III; Adams-Price, Carolyn E. "Homosexuality heterosexuality and cross-dressing: perceptions of gender discordant behavior."

Sex Roles: A Journal of Research, Sept, 1997; pp.

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2294/is_n5-6_v37/ai_20247084/pg_3

Dugaw, Dianne. "Transgender Warriors: Making History from Joan of Arc to RuPaul." The Women's Review of Books; 4/1/1997; pp.
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Psychology of Gender in Business

Words: 2497 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37458156

Psychology of Gender in usiness

Traditional gender roles have defined the business lives as well as the home lives of families and breadwinners for numerous generations. Certain expectations were put in place at what seems to be the dawn of time. The evolution of these decided obligations went on to shape the traditional family and the roster of the traditional workplace. Expansions and millenniums of progression in this historical framework then gave way to what the modern world still often considers gender specific job roles. Though, without question, this segregative and selective approach to the business world is surely archaic. Nevertheless, over the last decade or so there has been a revolution that is gaining steam in the business community. The idea of equality is becoming more and more popular among businesses and government agencies. Such powerful and influential entities have finally realized that the furthering and promotion of gender…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adams, S.M., Gupta, A., Haughton, D.M., & Leeth, J.D. (2007). Gender Differences in CEO Compensation: Evidence from the U.S.A. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 22 (3), 208-224.

Altbach, P.G., Reisberg, L., & Rumbley, L.E. (2009). Trends in Global Higher Education: Tracking an Academic Revolution. UNESCO 2009 World Conference on Higher Education. Paris, France.

Blau, F.D., & Kahn, L.M. (2000). Gender Differences in Pay. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 14 (4), 75-99.

Bowling, N.A., & Beehr, T.A. (2006). Workplace Harassment from the Victim's Perspective. Journal of Applied Psychology, 91 (5), 998-1012.
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IQ & Cultural Bias IQ

Words: 2634 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23761124



The researchers found that the student's minimum performance rate correlated more closely with their IQ scores than any other single variable. High and low IQ scores were predicted on the basis of the worst performance (minimum recall) and the best performance (maximum recall). When compared, those that were predicted on the basis of the worst performance were more accurate, indicating that "worst performance reveals more about intelligence than best performance" (p. 9). The study was significant because it measured preparatory strategies which earlier research did not. It was also the first time the Worst Performance rule was tested on children rather than adults. The findings suggested "developmental invariance," that is, no difference between people of different ages. But this should be tested in a project that puts adults and children together and gives them the same task. The researcher points out that low-IQ participants sometimes do well, but they dip…… [Read More]

References

Coyle, T.R. (2001). IQ is related to the worst performance rule in a memory task involving children. Ablex Publishing Corporation, 29 (2), 117. Retrieved 3 December 2008 from Expanded Academic ASAP database via Gale.

Hogan, R. (2002). Might outdoor education help develop intelligence? Outdoor Council of Australia, 6 (2), 2. Retrieved 3 December 2008 from Expanded Academic ASAP database via Gale.

Holden, C. (2003). The practical benefits of general intelligence. American Association for the Advancement of Science, 299 (5604), 192. Retrieved 3 December 2008 from Expanded Academic ASAP database via Gale.

Nunley, M. (1995). "The bell curve" too smooth to be true, 39 (1), 74. Retrieved 3 December 2008 from General OneFile database via Gale.
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hispanic psychology and'shared experiences

Words: 569 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53800257

Hispanic psychology has allowed clinical researchers to study the unique complexities of the Hispanic experience. Among the cornerstones of Hispanic psychology include issues related to biculturalism, acculturation, the immigrant experience, racism, oppression, in-group/out-group relations, and identity construction. Hispanic psychology has both individual, behavioral-cognitive components, as well as social-psychological components.

elevance

This article is relevant to both the text and lecture material on ethnicity, identity, and psychology. Issues related to cultural competence, and the biases within the social science are also relevant. This article helps to remove cultural bias in the field of psychology in particular because instead of imposing culturally biased frameworks and paradigms, Hispanic psychology uses a culturally specific and relevant paradigm. Also, this article is relevant to specific lessons and readings on Hispanic culture. Hispanic culture is itself heterogeneous, and within the overall rubric of Hispanic culture there are many subsets of identity from Nicaraguan to Cuban.

eflection…… [Read More]

References

Image 1: https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjHsLvG2aHQAhUWzWMKHYqyDfEQjRwIBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dealerelite.net%2Fprofiles%2Fblogs%2Fa-recipe-for-connecting-hispanic-consumers-to-your-dealership&psig=AFQjCNG-EddH0a69-1l2n3tyhKXpbh9DOw&ust=1478987719707085

Image 2: https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Fhispanic-marketing.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2014%2F06%2FGatorade-World-Cup-2014-Ad1-495x400.png&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Fhispanic-marketing.com%2Fhispanic-culture%2F&docid=3sf5IC2qRhJNXM&tbnid=KIIetigIR8hY9M%3A&vet=1&w=495&h=400&safe=off&bih=676&biw=1191&ved=0ahUKEwi-m6Te2KHQAhUQ8GMKHSkQBIQQMwhxKDEwMQ&iact=mrc&uact=8

Padilla, A. M. (2002). Hispanic psychology: A 25-year retrospective look. In W. J. Lonner, D. L. Dinnel, S. A. Hayes, & D. N. Sattler (Eds.), Online Readings in Psychology and Culture (Unit 3, Chapter 3), Center for Cross-Cultural Research, Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington USA.
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Clinical Psychology

Words: 60005 Length: 200 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12402637

Deam Content as a Theapeutic Appoach: Ego Gatification vs. Repessed Feelings

An Abstact of a Dissetation

This study sets out to detemine how deams can be used in a theapeutic envionment to discuss feelings fom a deam, and how the theapist should engage the patient to discuss them to eveal the elevance of those feelings, in thei pesent, waking life. It also discusses the meaning of epetitious deams, how medication affects the content of a deame's deams, and if theapists actually "guide" thei clients in what to say. This "guidance" might be the theapist "suggesting" to thei clients that they had suffeed some type of ealy childhood tauma, when in fact, thee wee no taumas in thei ealy childhoods. The oigin of psychiaty is not, as it would have people believe, medicine, theapy o any othe even faintly scientific endeavo. Its oiginal pupose was not even to cue mental affliction.…… [Read More]

references. This may be related to the large decrease in familiar settings in the post-medication dreams. Although Domhoff (1996) does not list a high percentage of elements from the past as an indicator of psychopathology, he does mention that people suffering post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a type of anxiety disorder, tend to have dreams in which distressing events are relived again and again. It may be that other anxiety disorders invoke a similar response in which the dreamer has a tendency to dwell on past events, which merits further research.

A final observation is that the results of this study provide support for Hartmann's (1984) biological model of the effects of drugs on dreams. An early study which focused mainly on long-term sleep patterns found little change in dream content associated with psychotropic drug administration (Hartmann & Cravens, 1974), but a later study conducted in Hartmann's laboratory indicated that increased levels of dopamine resulted in more vivid, nightmarish dreams (Hartmann, Russ, Oldfield, Falke, & Skoff, 1980). Based on his own research and the literature on drugs and nightmares, Hartmann (1984) proposed that drugs that increase the neurotransmitters dopamine or acetylcholine, or decrease norepinephrine or serotonin, produce nightmares and more vivid and bizarre dreams.

Drugs that have the opposite effects would decrease the incidence of disturbing dreams. The dreamer in this study was taking a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which served to increase the effects of serotonin. According to the biological model, with the onset of medication the dreamer should have experienced a decrease in nightmares, or, in Hall and Van de Castle's terms, lower aggression, negative emotions, and other unpleasant factors. This was, in fact, the case.

The emphasis on statistically significant differences without regard to effect sizes slowed progress in the study of dream content by creating unnecessary polarities and focusing energy on methodological arguments. The introduction of effect sizes into the study of dream content makes it possible to suggest that the controversy over home and laboratory collected dream reports never should have happened. The emphasis in dream content studies henceforth should be on effect sizes and large samples. Then future dream researchers could focus on testing new ideas using dream reports collected either at home or in the sleep laboratory.

Summary
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Can'skill'surveys cross cultures

Words: 878 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72791553

Nature vs. Nurture

To any decently educated or aware person, the "nature versus nurture" argument is nothing new. Something else that is not new is the idea that while there are arguments for both, there always seems to be one idea that is more prevalent and "true" than the others. Such is the case with the microcosm of "nature versus nurture" that is in play when it comes to the work of Patricia Greenfield. Her initial statements in a recent article are very much a framing of a "nature versus nurture" argument and then she provides her version of the answer. While some might disagree with what Ms. Greenfield has to say, it is fairly clear that she is rather spot-on in her analysis and decision when it comes to the subject in question.

Analysis

The primary so-called battlefield of nature versus nurture that Ms. Greenfield approaches and talks about…… [Read More]

References

Gaynor, M. (2016). Genes, Depression, and Anxiety. Psychology Today. Retrieved 25 October 2016, from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/your-genetic-destiny/201411/genes-depression-and-anxiety

Greenfield, P. (1997). YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU: Why Ability Assessments Don't Cross Cultures.

ecdgroup.com. Retrieved 25 October 2016, from http://www.ecdgroup.com/download/ sa1yctii.pdf#search='cross%20cultural%20psychology%20and%20intelligence
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Effects of Recruiting Methods on Cultural Diversity

Words: 3298 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93952133

ecruiting Methods on Cultural Diversity

The Effects of ecruiting Methods on Cultural Diversity

Maintaining cultural diversity in an organization can lead to innovation and an increased competitive advantage in the marketplace. In the past, the term cultural diversity referred to differences in race or religion. Now, the term cultural diversity means much more than that. As the uniqueness of each individual is recognized, the term cultural diversity has grown to encompass many factors about a person and their background. Cultural diversity is no longer delineated by major lines of color and national origin. This research will explore the effects of human resources on cultural diversity within an organization.

Cultural Diversity and the Workforce

acial diversity issues have increased in importance since the Civil ights Movement of 1964. It was recognized that white, Caucasian, males still constituted the majority in the workforce. Until that time, the select group was treated as…… [Read More]

References

Avery, D.R. & McKay, P.F. (2006). Target practice. An organizational impression management approach to attracting minority and female job applicants. Personal Psychology.

Chrobot-Mason, D. & Leslie, J.B. (2003). The role of multicultural competence and emotional intelligence in managing diversity. 32 (3): 269-263.

Cox, T. (1993). Cultural diversity in organizations: Theory, research and practice. San Francisco,

CA: Berrett-Koehle Publishers, Inc.
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Pacific Islanders in New Zealand

Words: 1650 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66597697

Cross-Cultural Case Study

Definition and an example of cultural and cross-cultural psychology

elationship between cultural and cross-cultural psychology

The methodology associated with cross-cultural research

The case study helps better understand how ethnicity, race, and worldviews are separate yet related concepts and role of enculturation.

"Pacific Islands Families Study: The Association of Infant Health isk Indicators and Acculturation of Pacific Island Mothers Living in New Zealand" examines the associations between maternal acculturation which was measured by an abbreviated version of the General Ethnicity Questionnaire and selected infant and maternal health risk indicators. The study was conducted on 1,398 Pacific infants born in Auckland, New Zealand (Borrows, Williams, Schluter, Paterson & Langitoto Helu, 2010).

The study finds out that the families who had a strong alignment to Pacific culture were found to have a higher degree of better infant and mortality risk factor outcomes than the families which did not possess a…… [Read More]

References

Betts, K., & Bottomley, G. (1993). From Another Place: Migration and the Politics of Culture. International Migration Review, 27(4), 899. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2546925

Borrows, J., Williams, M., Schluter, P., Paterson, J., & Langitoto Helu, S. (2010). Pacific Islands Families Study: The Association of Infant Health Risk Indicators and Acculturation of Pacific Island Mothers Living in New Zealand. Journal Of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 42(5), 699-724. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022022110362750

C. C.,. (1996). Culture Health and Illness, Third Edition (Book). Sociol Health & Illness, 18(2), 290-290. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9566.ep10935353

Connell, J. (2008). Niue: Embracing a Culture of Migration. Journal Of Ethnic And Migration Studies, 34(6), 1021-1040. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13691830802211315
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Industrial Organization Psychology Scenario The

Words: 2132 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55142920

" (Ivin, 2005)

The notion of utilizing sevant leadeship to enhance team wokgoups to pefom such as in the case study scenaio is a contempoay viewpoint with empiical evidence to show thee is effectiveness in implementing this fom of leadeship within the oganizational development famewok.

Poblem solving within the oganizational hieachy is often elegated to job specific activity to which one may o may not actual solve the poblem inheently active in thei domain. Often, poblem solving becomes a function of the goup think to which individual identities in the poblem solving pocess ae meged into a collective membane fo joint analysis. The use of motivational methods (Dubin, 2004) to incease the motivation to poblem solve has yielded meitocatic oganizations that focus on delivey of pefomance above all othe vaiables.

Additionally, the use of meta-communication (Dubin, 2004) evolves aound impoving oganizational communication such as teamwok communication and infomal netwok communication.…… [Read More]

references. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 75(09631798), 315-315-337. Retrieved fromhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/199345870?accountid=13044

Irving, J.A. (2005). Servant leadership and the effectiveness of teams. Regent University). ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/305356267?accountid=13044 

Moliver, N. (2010). Psychological wellness, physical wellness, and subjective vitality in long-term yoginis over 45.Northcentral University). ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Retrieved fromhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/506140189?accountid=13044

Petison, P. (2010). Intercultural communication and relationship marketing: A conceptual perspective. The Business Review, Cambridge, 16(2), 127-127-133. Retrieved fromhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/818338248?accountid=13044
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Industrial Psychology Any Human Interaction

Words: 2403 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22337699

More specifically, my goal as a student, for example, is to achieve grades that are as high as possible, which will determine the type of work I will be able to get in my future. As employee, I will strive to reward my employer's trust in me by delivering work of as high quality as possible. As family member, my goal is to spend enough time with those close to me to maintain my relationship with them. As citizen, my goals are to further the principles and values of my country by participating in public debate and politics. As human being, my goals are to make my best effort to help those in need of assistance and to be part of the interconnected network of humanity in such a way that life and peace are promoted.

My main motivators can be found in McClelland's acquired needs theory (CliffsNotes, n.d.). These…… [Read More]

References

Antariksa, Y. (n.d.). Selection Error. Retrieved from:  http://www.explorehr.org/articles/Selection_+_Recruitment/Selection_Error.html 

Bingham, a. And Spradin, D. (2011, Apr. 18). Introduction ot the Open Innovation Marketplace. Financial Times. Retrieved from: http://www.ftpress.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1697886&seqNum=4

Brown, K. (2009, Oct. 3). Unions -- Good or Bad? Retrieved from:  http://klbrown1.blogspot.com/2009/10/disadvantages-of-labor-unions.html 

CliffsNotes. (n.d.) Motivation Theories: Individual Needs. Retrieved from: http://www.cliffsnotes.com/study_guide/Motivation-Theories-Individual-Needs.topicArticleId-8944,articleId-8908.html
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HIV Prevention Cultural Change Typically Culture Is

Words: 644 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87385711

HIV Prevention

Cultural Change

Typically, culture is defined as a unique way of life that is both shared and developed by a group of people that is passed down from generation to generation and provides a framework that organizes society. While there are differing cultural formations, and these formations depend on a number of complex elements, there are also several similarities that allow a greater "macro" human culture, and various levels of understanding between cultures that share a number of characteristics that make us human. Among these are language, regional differences and adaptions to the environment, religious or spiritual beliefs, and political systems. Indeed, not all cultural groups share all elements of culture; and in larger cultural groups there are also smaller, micro-groups. Individuals may be part of more than one cultural group, and may also separate themselves based on either cultural similarities as well as cultural differences (Ferraro, 2008).…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ferraro, G. (2008). Cultural Anthropology. Belmont, CA: Thompson Higher

Education/Cenage.

Gudykunst, W.B., ed. (2003). Cross-cultural and Intercultural Communication.

Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
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Catholic Culture

Words: 1620 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31655612

Cross Culture Catholic Case Study

The impacts of culture on a society can be measured in the collective behaviors that manifest from those who celebrate some sort of culture. Culture is a combination of many aspects, but in totality suggest a background environment of impulses and forces which lay out a pathway of behavior for an individuals. These pathologies are not healthy or unhealthy in themselves, but serve as backdrops or roles for humans to play and interact within society.

Cross cultural psychology aims to examine the impact of culture on mind behavior. The strength and efficiency in which organized religion plays within one's culture cannot be argued. The spiritual content of human beings cannot be denied and the aims of religion is to make sense of these spiritual urges and blend them within our total and whole being. Organized religion makes this very difficult in many aspects and the…… [Read More]

References

Plante, T.G. (1996). Catholic priests who sexually abuse minors: Why do we hear so much yet know so little?. Pastoral Psychology, 44(5), 305-310.

Terry, K.J. (2008). Stained Glass The Nature and Scope of Child Sexual Abuse in the Catholic Church. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 35(5), 549-569.

Terry, K.J., & Ackerman, A. (2008). Child Sexual Abuse in the Catholic Church How Situational Crime Prevention Strategies Can Help Create Safe Environments. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 35(5), 643-657.
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Analyzing the Social Cultural Diversity

Words: 2609 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81908575

Social and Cultural Diversity

The U.S.A. is widely viewed as a unifying state in which immigrants are accommodated and assimilated into the largely 'white' dominant socio cultural structure. This principle has allowed the country to facilitate a friendly environment for the nation to sustain a pluralistic perspective. The immigrants retain and maintain their beliefs and ideals even as they adjust their lives to be practically functional in their new American society. Multicultural counseling has come up against three core challenges linked to such diversity. There is the culture, attitude and theoretical perspective; then there is the culture of the client and, finally the many variables naturally wound around individual characteristics (olton-rownlee, n.d.).

Oversimplifying the Client's Social asis: Application of universal categories is essential for our understanding of human experiences. However, if we lose sight of differences between individuals, it would lead to a range of ethical breaches. Clients are influenced…… [Read More]

Bibliography

ACA. (2014). 2014 ACA Code of Ethics. American Counselling Association.

Banks, J. A. (1996). Multicultural Education, Transformative Knowledge, and Action. New York: Teachers College Press.

Barnett, J., & Bivings, N. (n.d.). Culturally Sensitive Treatment and Ethical Practice. APA Divisions.

Bolton-Brownlee, A. (n.d.). Issues in Multicultural Counseling. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Digest. Retrieved from Eric Digests: http://www.ericdigests.org/pre-925/issues.htm
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How Art and Psychology Are Related

Words: 1211 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44730124

Neuroscience

Art is processed in the brain, and neuropsychological principles show how. One of the prime examples showing the way art influences the brain is with the Mona Lisa. Da Vinci's painting is notable for the peculiar and ambiguous smile on the subject's face. There is "dynamism" in the smile, artist understood this and deliberately make optical illusion of sorts (Chakravarty 69). The illusion is a product of "imaginative thinking which involves frontal cortical activation in the viewer's brain coupled with activation of the motion area (area V5/MT) of the viewer's visual cortex," (Chakravarty 69). Thus, some viewers may perceive La Gioconda as smiling, and others may not.

Evolutionary Psychology

Cave art proves that creative expression has always been a part of human history. As Dutton points out, the ancient Greeks were the first to recognize that art had a distinct psychological component. Art has functioned differently in different cultures…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Behavior Genetics." Retrieved online: http://www.personalityresearch.org/bg.html

Chakravarty, Ambar. "Mona Lisa's Smile." Medical Hypotheses. Vol. 75, No. 1, July 2010, pp. 69-72.

Dutton, Dennis. "Aesthetics and Evolutionary Psychology." The Oxford Handbook for Aesthetics, edited by Jerrold Levinson (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003). Retrieved online: http://www.denisdutton.com/aesthetics_&_evolutionary_psychology.htm

Gallese, Vittorio. "Mirror Neurons and Art." Chapter 22. Retrieved online: http://old.unipr.it/arpa/mirror/pubs/pdffiles/Gallese/2010/bacci_melcher_22_2010.pdf
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Socio Cultural Environment of Delta

Words: 1054 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11482533

Delta Airlines is a U.S. airline that services primarily domestic routes, in addition to some routes between the U.S. and other countries. Because of restrictions in the airline industry, airlines are barred from servicing domestic routes in foreign countries. Thus, the U.S. is effectively closed to non-U.S. airlines for travel between American cities, and Delta cannot expand to routes that do not include an American city. The socio-cultural context for Delta is therefore almost entirely related to the American market.

For the airline industry, there is actually little difference in the relationship that consumers have with airlines. Airlines provide a service that is highly standardized the world over. Where there are consumer differnces, these are reflected in the service-price dimension primarily. In some countries, consumers prefer to pay more to get a better in-flight experience. This is true of the focus country in this report, Japan. In the United States,…… [Read More]

References

Bloom, N., Genakos, C., Sadun, R. & Van Reenen, J. (2012). Management practices across firms and countries. NBER Working Paper No. 17850.

Hamamura, T. (2012). Are cultures becoming individualistic? A cross-temporal comparison of individualism -- collectivism in the United States and Japan. Personality and Social Psychology Review. Vol. 16 (1) 3-24.

Hofstede, G. (2015). Japan. Geert-Hofstede.com Retrieved October 18, 2015 from http://geert-hofstede.com/japan.html

Hofstede, G. (2015). United States. Geert-Hofstede.com Retrieved October 18, 2015 from http://geert-hofstede.com/united-states.html
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Multicultural Business Environment Geert Hofstede's Cultural Dimension

Words: 1189 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57741089

multicultural business environment, Geert Hofstede's cultural dimension provide an interesting framework by which to understand the management function. Hofstede proposed that there are five dimensions along which cultures differ -- power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism vs. collectivism, masculinity vs. femininity, and time horizon. Managers today must understand each of these dimensions, because they closely relate to how well the workers in the company are going to respond to management challenges.

Hofstede's Dimensions

Since their inception, Hofstede's dimensions have come under scrutiny by the academic community, even though people in business have found them particularly useful to put intercultural interactions into their appropriate context. Hofstede (2011) himself notes that the dimensions are aggregate, and should not be placed on any given individual, because while some individuals more readily fit the dimensions, every individual is different and it is risky to assume that there is going to always be a perfect fit.…… [Read More]

References

Hofstede, G. (2011). Dimensionalizing cultures: the Hofstede model in context. Psychology and Culture. Article 8, retrieved April 24, 2014 from http://scholarworks.gvsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1014

Minkov, M. & Hofstede, G. (2011). The evolution of Hofstede's doctrine. Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal. Vol. 18 (1) 10-20.

Taras, V., Kirkman, B. & Steel, P. (2014). Examining the impact of culture's consequences. University of North Carolina

Jones, R., Lyu, J., Runyan, R., Fairhurst, A., Kim, Y., Jolly, L. (2014). Cross cultural consensus: Development of the universal leadership model. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management. Vol. 42 (4)
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Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings

Words: 478 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52197051

Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings for Nurses

On a continuum of cultural awareness to cultural relativity, how do you view yourself and your interactions with others?

As a nurse practitioner, it is easy to see the patient simply as a patient, as a sick person needing treatment, rather than a well person who perceives his or her body as only temporarily ill, but sees his or her person as permanently a part of a family and culture outside of the hospital. As Small and Dennis (2003) counsel, the increase in immigration has resulted in greater diversity of both patients and practitioners within the United States, rather than in traditional urban locations. Thus Small and Dennis remind the nurse that it is not simply enough to treat the patient, but the patient must also understand his or her illness in culturally comprehensible terms. A nurse must be able to communicate to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dennis, Betty Pierce & Ernestine B. Small. (Jan-Feb, 2003) "Incorporating cultural diversity in nursing care: an action plan" The ABNF Journal.

"New Position Statement Originated by: Council on Cultural Diversity in Nursing Practice, Congress of Nursing." (1996) Adopted by: ANA Board of Directors.
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Cultural Diversity Issue of Non-American Employees Communicating

Words: 4611 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43058477

cultural diversity issue of non-American employees communicating frequently in their own native language creating an environment of sensitivity and bias amongst the non-Hispanic community.

Handling Diversity in an Organization

The contents of this paper focus on the cultural diversity involving Films ecovery Systems, an American company located at the heart of Chicago, Illinois. The paper takes an insight into the issue and also proposes solutions that can resolve the problem. The most important aspect of the paper is that it takes into account the material we find and read in books and compares to what degree the literature is actually applicable in real life situations.

Academic Literature

The study of public administration includes a spectrum of many disciplines, which include psychology, sociology, philosophy and also management sciences. Even though, the nature of public administration does not conveniently classify its elements into components, public administration is primarily categorized to highlight the…… [Read More]

References

Leaders are Learned Optimists - The CLEMMER Group Management

Consulting, available at http://www.clemmer.net/excerpts/leaders_learned.shtml accessed on: March 31, 2004

Robert Bacal, Conflict Prevention In The Workplace, available at http://www.work911.com/products/i-coop.htm, accessed on March 31, 2004

QSM Consulting - Leadership Driving Change, available at http://www.qsmconsulting.com/lds/index.shtml, accessed on: March 31, 2004
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Psychology and Development

Words: 1444 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98919814

Childhood Development of Sexual Minorities

One might originally think it odd to approach a question about the experienced childhood development of minorities by opening a discussion of the children who will grow to be sexual and gender-identity minorities. Unlike most other minorities, these children are not generally being raised in a minority culture and family, and do not have the immediate support of their own race or culture about them to help prepare them for life as a minority. So in some ways, this is actually the ideal place to start such a discussion, because in this area one has unmitigated access to the experience of being a minority on the child's development, without the sheltering environment that surrounds other minorities. These children will, a majority of the time, emerge from the crucible of childhood as homosexual or possibly bisexual adults. A few more will go on to actually have…… [Read More]

Bibliography

ACPM. "Report XX of the Council on Scientific Affairs." American College of Preventive Medicine. http://www.acpm.org/pol_compNOTPOLICYbullying.htm

Ceglie, Domenico.

GENDER IDENTITY DISORDER IN YOUNG PEOPLE. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment (2000), vol.6,pp. 458-466, http://www.mermaids.freeuk.com/gidyp.html

Mermaids. "Newspaper Archive http://www.mermaids.freeuk.com/newarch.html
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Psychology Affect on Domestic Violence on Children

Words: 3107 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42557590

psychological research there a thousands of pressing questions, yet among all those questions one rises to the top of the list. In the area of family psychology and family therapy the question of the psychological affects of domestic violence on children has been hotly debated and eternally researched, yet many questions remain unanswered. These questions are pressing as the institution of family in our culture evolves and emerges as an entirely different social dynamic than existed even twenty years ago. The psychological effects of violence, in the family upon children are vast and will probably always need further address.

Many families garner a different definition as more and more family units are head primarily by one parent and many families combine to become families consisting of several members who are related only by law, rather than by genetics. These trends began many years ago but continue to change the face…… [Read More]

References

Breggin, P.R. (2000). Reclaiming Our Children: A Healing Solution for a Nation in Crisis. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books.

Cummings, E.M., El-sheikh, M., Cummings, E.M., & El-sheikh, M. (1991). 7 Children's Coping with Angry Environments: A Process-Oriented Approach. In Life-Span Developmental Psychology: Perspectives on Stress and Coping, Cummings, E.M., Greene, a.L., & Karraker, K.H. (Eds.) (pp. 131-147). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Dakof, G.A. (1996). Meaning and Measurement of Family: Comment on Gorman-Smith Et Al. (1996). Journal of Family Psychology, 10(2), 142-146.

Gorman-Smith, D., Tolan, P.H., Zelli, a., & Huesmann, L.R. (1996). The Relation of Family Functioning to Violence Among Inner-City Minority Youths. Journal of Family Psychology, 10(2), 115-129.
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Affecting of Internet to Our Brains

Words: 837 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62021574

Internet Psychology

Introduction and Theory

Cognitive psychology is an area of scientific research that explores the human mental processes and their impact on human behavior. Using cognitive psychology, researchers can study a variety of subjects including how people perceive the world, how those perceptions impact behavior, and how both emotions and thoughts influence behavior. The article "Familiarity and prevalence of Facebook use for social networking among individuals with traumatic brain injury" uses a cognitive psychology perspective to study behavioral responses and changes in persons who have experienced a traumatic brain injury.

Traumatic brain injury is associated with social isolation and withdrawal, which in turn leads to depression and other serious mental health issues. For this reason, it is important to study ways to mitigate the tendency toward social withdrawal. Because Facebook can be used to connect with people in a non-threatening way, from the safety of one's own home, the…… [Read More]

Reference

Tsaousides, T., Matsuzawa, Y. & Lebowitz, M. (2011). Familiarity and prevalence of Facebook use for social networking among individuals with traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury 25(12): 1155-1162.
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Considerations when doing market research

Words: 745 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80096699

As one might expect, cultural psychology is no different. The author of this brief report has been asked to consider a brief case study and example from the cultural psychology field. Specifically, the author has been asked to go to a grocery store or restaurant that is different than one's own culture. Concurrent and primary to that will be a review of an article that is relevant to the field and example given above. Included in that would be items such as the narrative of the article, the methods and samples used, the reporting/findings delivered, the relevance to the class and a few other things. While it would be optimal to be a "fly on the wall" in areas of different cultures, there is the recognition and reaction that reflects that one is not of that culture, even if it is subtle.

Analysis

The author of this report, as part…… [Read More]

References

Cartwright, L. (2016). Cultural considerations when working with Mexicans. human-kinetics.

Retrieved 24 October 2016, from http://www.humankinetics.com/excerpts/excerpts/ cultural-considerations-when-working-with-mexicans

Mendoza, R. (1989). An Empirical Scale to Measure Type and Degree of Acculturation in Mexican-American Adolescents and Adults. Journal Of Cross-Cultural Psychology,

20(4), 372-385. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022022189204003
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Culture Bias in Intelligence Assessments

Words: 4715 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78028729

Culturally Biased Intelligence Assessment

Intelligence assessments have existed since the early twentieth century and have continued to be a topic of debate. We all know full well that intelligence assessment is critical to the type if academic success that we achieve in life. One of the primary tools used to assess intelligence is the IQ test. However, the intelligence quotient test has been under scrutiny for decades because it is believed to harbor culturally biased precepts.

The purpose of this discussion is to explore the cultural bias' that exist in intelligence quotient testing. We will begin with a literary review which will start by explaining the definition of cultural bias in testing and the historical implications. We will explain the origins of the IQ test and the reasons why the cultural bias exist. Our discussion will then focus on how cultural bias in intelligence assessment has produced historical implications.

We…… [Read More]

References www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=5001314786

Educators Should Require Evidence. (1999). Phi Delta Kappan, 81(2), 132.

Enriching the Focus on ethnicity and race. (1998). APA Monitor. VOLUME 29, NUMBER 3 - March 1998 www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=95784671

Alexander, K.L. (1997). Public Schools and the Public Good. Social Forces, 76(1), 1-30.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=86928340
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IQ Tests Are in Common

Words: 690 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66134815

The implication of this hypothesis, and research into the subject in general, shows that test outcomes do reflect at least in part cultural factors. There are "cultural differences in valued and therefore trained strategies to solve certain cognitive tasks" as well (Ibid). That these differences have been identified within cognitive science illustrates that cultural bias does not simply reflect differences in cognitive potential among members of certain groups, but rather that it reflects differences in the ways that cognitive potential is operationalized.

Shiraev and Levy (n.d.) argue this case further. They cite research that shows that people adapt the way that they operationalize their intelligence to their local setting. They cite the examples of an Indian chess master, who uses the same psychological mechanisms in playing chess as a farmer would use to secure a deal on a new tractor. The example is apt -- chess-like problem solving strategies are…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Malda, M.; van de Vijver, F. & Temane, Q. (2010). Rugby vs. soccer in South Africa: Content familiarity contributes to cross-cultural differences in cognitive test scores. Intelligence. Vol. 38 (6) 582-595.

Shiraev, E. & Levy, D. (no date). Cross-cultural psychology: Critical thinking and contemporary applications, fourth edition.
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Color Research the Importance of

Words: 2170 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1678222

Desciptive statistics wee used to summaize data. The esults evealed that paticipants had stonge positive feelings about the wods that wee in yellow vs. The same wods that wee in bown. The wods in bown aveaged a "4," so the espondents still ecognized the wod as somewhat positive. Both males and females scoed the yellows similaly, and males scoed the bown highe than gils.

DISCUSSION

The esults of this study suggest that wods ead online o in pint have diffeent emotional esponses based moe on the colo of the wod than they do on the wod itself.

This efes back to the Jones (1997) and Gacia and Bohle (1986) studies noted above who wee analyzing business maketing and communication emotional esponses on vaious audiences.

They found that mateials in colo bette gabbed the attention of the eades/viewes when in colo vs. black and white. Thei studies wee concened only with…… [Read More]

references Perceptual and Motor Skills, 34, 724-726.

Clore, G.L., Ortony, a., & Foss, M.A. (1987). The psychological foundations of the affective lexicon. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 53, 751-766.

Hemphill M (1996) a note on adults' color-emotion associations. J Genet Psychol.157(3):275-80.

Hupka Ralph B, Zbigniew, Zaleski, Jurgen Otto, Lucy Reidl and Nadia V. Tarabrina the colors of anger, envy, fear, and jealousy: a cross-cultural study. Journal of Cross- Cultural Psychology 28.(2)156-162

Jaensch E.R. (1930) Eidetic Imagery, London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co.,
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Interaction Between Culture and Individual

Words: 1701 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17851767

Whether the rejecter's brain functions differ was not studied in their research, but in the future merging neurobiology with cultural psychology would yield even more fruitful results about the extent to which our culture does and does not produce specific responses in terms of how we think and act.

eferences

Delude, Cathryn (2008).Culture influences brain function, study shows. MIT News.

etrieved October 9, 2011 at http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2008/psychology-0111.html

Fischer, onald & Shalom Schwartz. (2011). Whence differences in value priorities?:

individual, cultural, or artifactual sources. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

42: 1127-1144.

Hofstede, Geert. (2001). Culture's Consequences: comparing values, behaviors, institutions, and organizations across nations. Thousand Oaks, CA.

Leung, Angela K.-Y. & Dov Cohen. (2011). Within- and between-culture variation: Individual differences and the cultural logics of honor, face, and dignity cultures.

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100 (3): 507 -- 526.

Nauert, . (2010). Cultural environment influences brain function. Psych Central. etrieved on…… [Read More]

References

Delude, Cathryn (2008).Culture influences brain function, study shows. MIT News.

Retrieved October 9, 2011 at http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2008/psychology-0111.html

Fischer, Ronald & Shalom Schwartz. (2011). Whence differences in value priorities?:

individual, cultural, or artifactual sources. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
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Family Independence Across Cultures Independence

Words: 2234 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95096515

Once the children are of age, the parents' duty to take care of them reduces as the child takes charge to start a new life somewhere else. The parent usually has saved enough money through life insurance scheme and retirement savings to cater for himself after retirement. hen the child is grown, there is no dependence between the parents and children. Traits like hard work and honesty are encouraged towards children to ensure their survival in different societies when he grows up. In some cases when the parent is too weak and old to look after himself, he is taken to a home for the elderly since none of his children is available to take care of him (Stewart et al. 580).

The other model of family model is the model of psychological or emotional interdependence. In this model, the children are of less material help to the family. Parenting,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chou, K.L. Emotional autonomy and depression among Chinese adolescents. Journal of Genetic Psychology, pp 161-169, 2000.

Jose, P.E., Huntsinger, C.S., Huntsinger, P.R. & Liaw, F-R. Parental values and practices relevant to young children's social development in Taiwan and the United States. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 31, pp 677-702, 2000.

Misra, G., & Agarwal, R. The meaning of achievement: Implications for a cross-cultural theory of achievement motivation, from a different perspective: Studies of behavior across cultures, Lisse: Swets and Zeitlinger, pp 250-266. 1985.

Phalet, K. & Schonpflug, U. Intergenerational transmission of collectivism and achievement values in two acculturation contexts: the case of Turkish families in Germany and Turkish and Moroccan families in the Netherlands. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol 32, pp 186-201, 2001.
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Usefulness of Rational Decision-Making for Managers When Making Strategic Choices

Words: 2232 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77478288

Management

"Critically evaluate the usefulness of rational decision-making for managers when making strategic choices"

Characteristics of strategic decisions

Long-term survival of the organization

Scope of organization activities

esources and competences / Competitive advantage

Then strategy is concerned with the strategic fit to the external environment

Stakeholders' expectations

Power in the organization - The expectations and worth of powerful agents in and around the company

Strategy as ational decision making

Set objectives

Understand problem

Determine options

Evaluate options

Improvement in strategic decision making

Involvement of different stakeholders

Organization should have focus and flexibility

Organization should learn the strategy

eferences

Introduction

Strategic management is the process of determining clear objectives of the company, and evaluation of internal and external environment in order to form a strategy solution, implement it, assess the progression, and make adjustments accordingly. In this report we will discuss the usefulness of rationale decision making for managers while making…… [Read More]

References

Bazer. M 2006, 'Judgement in Managerial decision making', Ed. 6th, New York, Publisher, Wiley.

Bontempo, R., Lobel, S. & Triandis. H 1990, 'Compliance and value internalization in Brazil & the U.S. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology', 20, pp., 200-213

Cooke, S & Slack, N 1991, 'Making Management Decisions', Ed. 2nd, Publisher, Prentice Hall.

David Hunger & Thoman L.Wheelen 2010, 'Strategic Management and business policy' Ed.12th, Saint Peterburg, Florida, Publisher, Prentice Hall.
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Analyzing the Life Span

Words: 3311 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28050935

Life Span

Lifespan development is a field of study that involves growth patterns stability and change in one's behavior in the whole stretch of life. The definition does not fully capture the intricate process of the study. The study employs scientific approaches to establish these trends. We need a close examination of the elements of the definition above. In examining stability, growth and change, lifespan development checks the assumptions about the course and nature of the development of a human being. This is a scientific way of establishing the facts in the study. Scientists evolve development theories and apply systematic scientific methods to establish the exactness of these assumptions. The focus of the studies is the development of human beings (FLDNMC, 2010).Lifespan Development scientists select a topical area of focus and consider the age range of study. The span normally spreads out in broad age range segments. These segments include…… [Read More]

References

Adolescence. (n.d.). Pearson Highered. Retrieved from:https://www.pearsonhighered.com/assets/hip/us/hip_us_pearsonhighered/samplechapter/020559526X.pdf

Baltes, P. B., Lindenberger, U., & Staudinger, U. M. (2007). Life Span Theory in Developmental Psychology. In Handbook of Child Psychology. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9780470147658.chpsy0111/abstract

Chand, S. (2013). How to Adapt CBT for Older Adults? Current Psychiatry, 12(3), 10-15.

Cooper, J., Masi, R., & Vick, J. (2009). Social-emotional Development in Early Childhood. National Center for Children in Poverty.
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Erickson Studies According to Psychologist

Words: 2702 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76573829

In Poland, a ritual exists by which a znajomy becomes a kolega: When the two parties-- regardless of gender -- give mutual permission to allow each other to drop the "Mr." And "Miss" and call each other by their first names. A celebration involving drinking frequently follows, frequently with the two drinking shots of alcohol with arms linked. The English terms closest to kolega are "buddy," "pal," and "companion."

The authors (McAndrew & ybak, 2006) hypothocized that since the Poles had more formalized and precise friendship words, they would differentiate more readily and consistently between different types of friends than Americans. They also looked at sex differences in judgments made about friendship, expecting that women in both America and Poland would probably make more discriminating judgments about relationships than would men.

Participants were either college students from the U.S. Or Poland. There were 56 Polish and 57 American participants. All…… [Read More]

References

Bell, S., & Coleman, S. (Eds.). (1999). The anthropology of friendship. Oxford: Berg.

Bond, M.H. (1988). Finding universal dimensions of individual variation in multicultural studies of values: The Rokeach and Chinese value surveys. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 55, 1009-1015.

Erikson, E.H. (1968). Identity: Youth and Crisis. New York: Norton.

Greenberger, E., & Chen, C. (1996). Perceived family relationships and depressed mood in early and late adolescence:a comparison of European and Asian-Americans. Developmental Psychology, 32, 707-716.
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International Business Expansion Process International Recruitment and

Words: 11013 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67287537

international business expansion process.

International recruitment and selection brings a number of challenges for business organizations. They not only face difficulties in hiring the desired skillful staff from the host country, but may also have to deal with severe financial and cultural diversity issues. Through this research study, an effort has been made to highlight the major challenges and issues which make the international recruitment and selection process more complex and challenging for multinational organization.

The research report starts with an ample introduction to the esearch question and proceeds by highlighting the core objectives of the research study. The research question clearly states the major objective of this research study in a quite precise and succinct manner. The most important section of the research report is Literature review which has been written after a comprehensive research from a number of academic and industry journal articles and books; most of which…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ashamalla, M.H. 1998, International Human Resource Management Practices: the Challenge of Expatriation. CR, 8 (2): 54-63.

Andeason, A.W. 2003, Expatriate Adjustment to Foreign Assignments. The International 6 tyJournal of Commerce and Management, 13 (1): 42-60.

Andersen, T.M., & Svarer, M. 2006, Flexicurity -- the Danish Labor Market Model. Available from [Accessed July 26th, 2012]

Baudler, C.R. 2011, Employee Engagement: Through Effective Performance Management by Edward M. Mone and Manuel London, Personnel Psychology, 64 (3): 813 -- 816.
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Tourism After September 11

Words: 11294 Length: 45 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53060413

Terrorist Attacks on New York City

Consumer ehavior and Risk

Terrorism and Consumerism in the Melting Pot

How has September 11 Impacted Americans

Economic Impact of terrorism

Outlook for the New York Economy

Examination of the Effects on usiness

Regaining Consumer Confidence

Sampling Procedures

Survey Construction

Survey results

Recommendations for Further Studies

Survey of Consumer Patterns After The September 11 attacks on the World Trade Towers

Survey Results presented Graphically

Store Owner Interviews

The Impact of the Terrorist Attacks on New York City: One Year Later Chapter 1

The attacks on the World Trade Towers on September 11, 2001 threatened the American People's sense of security in a way that had not been felt since the attack on Pearl Harbor. To say that the attacks changed the lives of many people would be an understatement. The attacks literally brought the country to a halt for nearly three days. It can…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Bankers Association. 2001. "Post Sept. 11 Survey Shows Nation's Bankers Are Optimistic." ABA Press Release, December 3, 2001.

Atkinson, J.W. 1957. Motivational determinants of risk-taking behavior. Psychological Review,

Barone, Ronald; M. Rigby, Peter;Schwartz, Bruce; Simonson; Arthur F; Chew; William H;

Eiseman, Barbara A, and Shipman, Todd A. 2002. Consequences of Sept. 11 Attacks Put
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Latin Women and Vocational Empowerment

Words: 5451 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82623396



y contrast, this was not found to be true for the Colombian couples. Instead, their level of relationship satisfaction was predicted by having a similar level of expressiveness between spouses, irrespective of whether the level was high, medium, or low (Ingoldsby, 1980). Likewise, Colombian women and men were determined to be are equally likely to say what they feel and to express themselves at the same level as North American males. In the United States, female spouses are typically significantly more expressive as a group than are their male counterparts (Ingoldsby, 1980).

In a significant recent paper, ailey (2006) focuses on biotechnological discoveries in birth control methods that offered women greater power to choose the timing of childbearing. This power may have translated into higher investments in education and increased labor force participation of women. In an excellent paper, among other things, Goldin (1995) focused on technological International Research Journal…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aptekar, L. (1990). "How Ethnic Differences Within a Culture Influence Child

Rearing: The Case of Colombian Street Children." Journal of Comparative

Family Studies 21(1):67 -- 79.

Balakrishnan, R. (1976). "Determinants of Female Age at Marriage in Rural and Semi-Urban Areas of Four Latin American Countries." Journal of Comparative Family Studies 7(2):167 -- 173.
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Ethnic Cultures' Experience of Art

Words: 2675 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56733059



For example, the ethnic client who paints a huge red heart with an arrow piercing its center is communicating a universally understood message: I have been affected by love/passion/emotion.

Natalie Rogers, founder of the Person Centered Expressive Therapy Institute is a strong proponent of expressive art. In this form of art therapy, the ethnic client is encouraged to "express inner thoughts by creating outer forms."

When treating a client with art therapy, Ms. Rogers uses many techniques of expressive art: drawing, coloring, dancing, musical demonstrations, and the like.

Once these exercises are completed, the participants are encouraged to explore the nuances involved in the interaction: did communication occur? Was it a pleasant experience? Were boundaries an issue? Who led? Who followed?

Despite the fact that this work is not done solely with ethnically displaced clients, the premise remains the same; through expressive creativity, one's self may be realized, recognized, and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Art Therapy, a Guide for Mental Health Professionals. New York: Brunner/Mazel,

Inc.

Burt, H. (1993). Issues in art therapy with the culturally displaced American Indian youth. Arts in Psychotherapy. 20: 143-151.

Cohen, B., Barnes, M., & Rankin, a. (1995). Managing Traumatic Stress Through Art. Maryland: Sidran Press.
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Vietnamese Americans Neither American nor

Words: 3898 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95505060

Stresses associated with migration itself, discrimination against racial minorities in this country, poverty, unemployment, and crowded living conditions heighten the chance that a husband will become abusive" (p. 1402). From the Vietnamese-American perspective, these issues are even more pronounced and they are discussed further below.

a. Male dominance. One of the most powerful forces affecting Vietnamese families at home and abroad today is Confucian ideology, an ideology that is predicated on the dominance of men over women (Kibria, 1993). According to Lowe and her colleagues (2003), some gender socialization influences on Vietnamese men are similar to those that are typically experienced by men in other Asian cultures. "Similarities in gender role socialization that Vietnamese men share with other Asian men arising from shared influences of Confucian, Taoist, and Buddhist philosophies include messages about appropriate family roles, emotional expressiveness, and the role of assertive behavior" (Lowe et al., p. 246). For…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, M.J. (1993). A license to abuse: The impact of conditional status on female immigrants. Yale Law Journal, 102(6), 1401.

Daniel, A.M., & Yi, J.K. (2001). Substance use among Vietnamese American college students. College Student Journal, 35(1), 13.

Do, H.D. (1999). The Vietnamese Americans. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Doan, J.H.D., Huer, M.B., & Saenz, T.I. (2001). Understanding the Vietnamese American community: Implications for training educational personnel providing services to children with disabilities. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 23(1), 27.
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American Popular Culture Impact Overseas

Words: 4214 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94179363

The cultural practices are evolved and based on the financial, social and moral understanding and capabilities of the local population, and it has been observed that Americans, Asians and Africans share extremely different perspectives and understanding on these issues, therefore the cultural adoption has been intense in countries where the technological revolution has been of the same intensity as in North America (Zelli, 1993). In some of the cases, the Americans companies has attempted to nullify the concerns and shortcomings of the American culture, by incorporating the cultural values of the local region, and has therefore evolve a different taste for the customers to avail, this has further delighted and fascinated the local population of different regions towards the American culture, for example the American culture has major differences with the Islamic culture adopted in Arab countries, therefore to compensate for such difference the American companies introduced the concept of…… [Read More]

References

David W. Noble. Death of a Nation: American Culture and the End of Exceptional-ism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2002

Tafarodi R., Swann W. Individualism-collectivism and global self-esteem: Evidence for a cultural trade-off. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 1996

Trubisky P, Ting Toomey S, Lin S. The influence of individualism collectivism and self-monitoring on conflict styles. International Journal of Intercultural Relations. 1991

Huesmann, Zelli, Fraczek, Upmeyer. Normative attitudes about aggression in American, German and Polish college students. Presented at Third European Congress of Psychology. Tampere, Finland. 1993
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Leadership Styles Among Male and Female Principal and How Teachers Rate Their Principals

Words: 14019 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37659084

Leadership Styles Among Male and Female Principal

It is the intention of this research to study the leadership and cognitive styles of teachers and instructors of both genders within the educational system and their preference for types of leadership in a principal of that institution.

The research will include teachers and educators from all levels of the educational system from grade school to high school. The study will also include teachers and instructors from all major academic fields of study offered in public and private schools. The studies conducted thus far in the educational arena indicate that teachers are equally inclined towards different cognitive styles.

Teachers prefer a mix of idealist, analytical and realistic cognitive styles of leadership in their Principals. Studies have also indicated that teachers prefer that principals are people oriented and task oriented in their approach to running the school or institution. In addition, teachers also prefer…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Berens, Linda V., and Dario Nardi. Personality Types, Descriptions for Self-Discovery. New York: Telos Publications, 1999.pp.

Blake, R.R., H. Shepherd, and Jane Srygley Mouton. Managing Intergroup Conflict in Industry. Houston, Tx: Gulf Publishing Company, 1964.pp.

Blau, Francine D., Marianne A. Ferber, and Anne E. Winkler. The Economics of Women, Men, and Work. Prentice-Hall Series in Economics. 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2002.pp. xviii, 446

Bossert, S.T., et al. "The Instructional Management Role of the Principal." Educational Administration Quarterly 18.3 (1982): 34-64.
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Youth Leadership and Theory

Words: 4853 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32117537

Theory

Compare and contrast at least three views on what constitutes a theory. Distinguish the related concepts of theories, such as hypothesis, paradigm, model and concept.

Differentiating between hypothesis and theory

The word hypothesis is a description of various phenomenon occurring. In most cases, it's not a confirm statement. In other cases, it can be well-developed, designed and explained to follow through the workings and mechanisms of certain phenomenon. According to one definition, it states particularly that it's a precursor to a conditional proposition. A hypothesis is an unconfirmed theory. One can develop a hypothesis while the observation is being tested, that could be unconfirmed too. By an observation, one can simply have a window of opportunity to verify a hypothesis. A hypothesis can be detailed and inclusive of details. This permits lucid testing. Apart from that, it is the distinguishing factor from a theory (Harris, 2001).

The word theory…… [Read More]

References

Ardichvili, A., & Gasparishvili, A. (2001). Leadership profiles of managers in post-communist countries: A comparative study. Leadership and Organization Development Journal, 22(2): 62-75.

Ashkanasy, N.M., Trevor-Roberts, E., & Earnshaw, L. (2002). The Anglo cluster: Legacy of the British Empire. Journal of World Business, 37, 28-39.

Bakacsi, G., Sandor, T., Andra, K., & Viktor, I. (2002). Eastern European cluster: Tradition and transition. Journal of World Business, 37, 69-80.

Bass, B.M. (1990). Bass and Stogdill's Handbook of Leadership. (3rd Edition.). New York: Free Press.
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Color and Mood it Is

Words: 2090 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 257158

The school incorporates a lot of natural light and has all updated materials in excellent condition. The Lea school is about 30 years old and, like many Philadelphia public schools, lacks adequate facility funding. Many of the materials and building are outdated and deteriorating.

Students at Penn Alex were significantly more positive than students at Lea regarding their school and rated wall color, variety of wall color, amount of lighting, amount of art work on display, personally having art work on display, overall appearance of the school, peers opinion of overall appearance, and elements that should be changed all higher. In addition, Penn Alex students had more positive attitudes including proud to show visitors, school makes them feel good, school appearance is not distracting, adults care about how the school looks, appearance is fine the way it is, and feelings of responsibility for taking care of the school. Students at…… [Read More]

References

Ballast, D.K. (2002). Interior design reference manual. Professional Pub. Inc.: Belmont, CA.

Boyatzis CJ and Varghese, R. (1994) Journal of Genetic Psychology; 155(1) 77-85

Hupka, R.B, Zbigniew, Z, Jurgen O., Reidl, L. And Tarabrina, L. The colors of anger, envy, fear, and jealousy: a cross-cultural study. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology 28.(2)156-162

Kuller, R. (1976). The Use of Space -- Some Physiological and Philosophical Aspects. Paper presented at the Third International Architectural Psychology Conference, University Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France.
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Ethnic Diversity Over the Past

Words: 819 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76372785

95). While many nationalities have such established support systems already in place, many such immigrant support networks remain weak today (amirez, 2002).

Furthermore, these elderly citizens will likely be accustomed to a level of respect and honor that may be missing from the cultural setting upon their arrival in the United States, further contributing to the potential for "culture shock." According to Haskins (1999), culture shock is "a feeling of impotence that results from the inability to deal with the environment because of unfamiliarity with cognitive aspects and role-playing skills; we usually think of culture shock when we imagine immigrant groups visiting or moving to a new country" (p. 122). There are opportunities for culture shock across all measures for new immigrant, many of them unperceived and unexpected from the host nation's perspective. For example, Stanger (1999) notes that despite the ready availability of a modern metro subway system, most…… [Read More]

References

Aroian, K.J., Chiang, L., & Norris, a.E. (2003). Gender differences in psychological distress among immigrants from the Former Soviet Union. Sex Roles: A Journal of Research, 39.

Cross, S.E. (1995). Self-construals, coping, and stress in cross-cultural adaptation. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 26(6), 673-97.

Haskins, D. (1999). Culture Shock. College Teaching, 47(4), 122.

Inose, M., & Yeh, C. (2002). Difficulties and Coping Strategies of Chinese, Japanese and Korean Immigrant Students. Adolescence, 37(145), 69.
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Organization Awards Since the Industrial

Words: 716 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14256811

This suggests that people act fairly in part because of what they think may be the result of other people's reaction to the self-serving behavior. People appreciate distributive equity that further supports their personal circumstances. On the other hand, more recently, social scientists, such as Miller (1999) have argued that people do care about justice and behave with justice-seeking behavior instead of this more selfish self-interest. In other words, there is no overall behavior that is common to all people.

As noted in ischer et al. (2007), what motivates employees has normally been studied in laboratory settings, which is an artificial approach. or, the better alternative, studies have asked employees about their thoughts concerning the company's allocation policies. As noted, it is important to know what employees actually perceive instead of what decision makers intend to do. Thus, ischer's research focused on employees' perceptions of the allocation decisions made by…… [Read More]

Fischer, R., Smith, PB., Richey, B et al. 2007 "How Do Organizations Allocate Rewards?"

Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, vol 38, no 1, pp 3-18.

Miller, DT 1999. "The norm of self-interest," American Psychologist, vol 54, pp.1053-1060.