Cultural Geography Essays (Examples)

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Geographies of Home the Immigrant Experience Geographies

Words: 1350 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89254365

Geographies of Home

The immigrant experience: Geographies of Home

The novel Geographies of Home by the Dominican-American writer Loida Maritza both chronicles and debunks what could be called the quintessential 'immigrant' experience. The family in the novel flees the dictatorship in their homeland of the Dominican Republic, and hope to find a respite from their suffering in the promised land of America. However, the family's attitudes about America are highly conflicted. On one hand, America seems to hold great promise to ameliorate the suffering they knew in the Dominican Republic. Even during the darkest hours of the family, the mother, Aurelia, knows that the family left an untenable situation, and does not romanticize the past although "she had been poor even in the Dominican Republic, but something had flourished from within which had enabled her to greet each day rather than cringe from it in dread." The difficulties the family…… [Read More]

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Geographies of Global Change 1

Words: 2794 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35757888

Loans needed to buy the equipment and seeds create indebtedness to Western banks. Western professionals are needed to intervene and to manage. The productivity of monocrops (e.g., rice or maize) undermines other native crops. Routledge writes, "The project destabilized traditional farming methods, which further rationalized the use of new technologies from the West, and the displacement of traditional foodstuffs by the HYVs" (316). The whole agro-food system has damaged the soil fertility and made dependent the poorer nations, who are compelled to use the seeds of the manufacturers and their means of industrial growth (fertilizer, experts, credit, etc.). People are viewed as irrational and a hindrance to progress. State control over natural and financial resources consolidates the power of the national ruling party who serves the interests of transnational corporations. Routledge writes, "In the process, traditional subsistence economies and their associated cultures are being destroyed; people face displacement from their…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Johnson, R.J., Peter J. Taylor, and Michael J. Watts, eds. Geographies of Global Change: Remapping the World at the End of the Twentieth Century. 2nd edition. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 2002; reprint, 2007.
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Cultural Environment China Is Now

Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99777653

"9.8% in urban areas; substantial unemployment and underemployment in rural areas; an official Chinese journal estimated overall unemployment (including rural areas) for 2003 at 20% (2004 est.)" (CIA orld Factbook "China") the occupation breakdown for the nation is also rather simplistic, with a large protion of the population still being engaged in agricultural industries: "agriculture 49%, industry 22%, services 29% (2003 est.)" (CIA orld Factbook "China")

Cultural habits of China are relatively universal as the nation has relatively few national minorities and limited immigration from other nations due to its communist legacy. The majority ethnic group Han Chinese constitutes 91.9% of the total population with the significant minorities including Zhuang, Uygur, Hui, Yi, Tibetan, Miao, Manchu, Mongol, Buyi, Korean, and other nationalities, constituting only a total of 8.1%. There is though a significant social and cultural disparity between urban and rural populations. Urban China is relatively modern, with many conveniences…… [Read More]

Works Cited

CIA World Factbook "China" at  http://www.umsl.edu/services/govdocs/wofact2005/geos/ch.html 

Goldberg, Jonah. "10 Million Missing Girls." National Review 30 Jan. 2006: 8.
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Cultural and Construction History of

Words: 3190 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30043809



Crusaders were able to implement feudal states throughout their travels during this period of warfare, many of which have been termed Crusader states and which were erected throughout the Holy Land and in parts of Asia Minor as well as Greece. The most famous of these, of course, was the establishment of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, which took place in 1099 and reigned until its fall in 1291.

Kingdom of Jerusalem

It should be remembered that for the vast duration of the reign of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, European settlers were widely outnumbered by Franks and Muslims, and only comprised approximately 15 to 25% of the entire population (Kedar 148). The Europeans lived in areas which were both rural as well as urban, and despite attempts to integrate with the surrounding foreigners, they did not infiltrate areas which were predominantly Muslim and which had never had many Christian dwellers (Ellenblu…… [Read More]

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Cultural vs Biological Evolution Cultural

Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5850796

We now have the means to study the evolution of the human genome more closely than ever in the past. One of the key ideas presented by the authors is the idea of transmission fidelity. This means that culture can act as an inheritance system, promoting the transmission of certain genetic traits in a predictable fashion. This type of cultural inheritance results in distinct societies that not only share the same cultural traits, but also share similar genetic traits as well. In the past, geography and proximity to others was a factor in this process as well. Richerson, oyd, and Henrich (2010) concluded that cultural evolution and biological evolution occur simultaneously. They also suggested that cultural evolution had a significant influence on biological evolution.

This research supports the supposition that cultural evolution has a significant effect on biological evolution. This research focused on cultural evolution, as opposed to placing the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bell, A. And Richard McElreath. Culture rather than genes provides greater scope for the evolution of large-scale human prosociality. PNAS 106 (2009): 17671-17674.

 http://www.des.ucdavis.edu/faculty/Richerson/Bell%20PNAS.pdf 

Boyd, R. And Peter Richerson," Gene-culture coevolution and the evolution of social institutions." In Better than Consciousness? Decision Making, The Human Mind, and Implications for Institutions. Edited by Christoph Engel and Wolf Singer. MIT

Press. 2008. pp. 305-323.
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Jameson Defined Geography Components Global Business Jameson

Words: 1494 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47607095

Jameson Defined Geography Components

Global usiness

(Jameson (2007) has defined geography as one of the possible components of cultural identity needed for cross cultural communication in global business. Discuss how a company might take this component into account in managing their business.

Over the last several years, globalization has been causing firms to begin establishing operations in different areas of the world. Part of the reason for this, is because many regions can offer them significant benefits such as: lower labors costs and the ability to maximize their profit margins. Evidence of this can be seen by comparing labor costs of many developing countries with the United States. As, the below table is illustrating how they are significantly lower in comparison with the U.S.

Table 1: USA Labor Costs vs. Developing Nations

Country

Hourly Labor Costs

USA

$7.25

angladesh

$.25

China

$.69

India

$.57

Mexico

$2.30

Kenya

$.62

South Africa…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Diener, E. (2009). Cross Cultural. Culture and Well Being, 38, 71 -- 91.

Greenway, D. (2009). The World Economy. Malden, MA: Wiley.

Hartel. C. (2006). How Emotions Shape the Process. East Lansing, MI: Academy of International .

Jameson, D. (2007). Reconceptualizing Corporate Identity. Journal of Business Communication, 44 (199), 200 -- 238
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Geography on Political Cultural and Economic Development

Words: 994 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81771943

Geography on Political, Cultural, and Economic Development of Early Civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley

The focus of this study is the effect of geography on the political, cultural, and economic development of early civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley. The characteristic that Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley all have in common is that they were all river valleys. Therefore, the geography of these locations was very much alike and likewise their culture, political landscape, and economic development were all very much the same.

Statement of Thesis

The civilization of Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley were highly affected by the geography of these regions, which resulted in rapid expansion, and growth of these civilizations and which affected the cultural, political, and economic environment of these areas of the world.

Mesopotamia & Egypt

What is known as the Urban revolution occurred in Mesopotamia and Egypt…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ancient Civilizations to 300 BC Introduction: The Invention and Diffusion of Civilization (2006) The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Retrieved from: http://www.uncp.edu/home/rwb/lecture_ancient_civ.htm

Guisepi, R.A. (nd) The Indus Valley and the Genesis of South Asian Civilization. Retrieved from:  http://history-world.org/indus_valley.htm
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Geography's Role in the Spread of Epidemics

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82185845

Diseases that are not native to a certain population and are introduced by outsiders or foreigners can have devastating effects. Native populations are vulnerable to germs and viruses brought in by outsiders because they lack the immunological strength and ability to combat these illnesses. Such was the case during the conquest of both North and South America during early colonial times. The native population was blindsided and crippled by the various diseases that the white man brought with them.

The white man overpowered the Indigenous populations of America with their superior weaponry and battle tactics. These two factors contributed greatly to the white man's dominance, another factor that contributed was, undoubtedly the spread of disease and germs. Some of the diseases that were introduced to the native population by Europeans included: smallpox, measles, typhus, and venereal diseases (Ashburn 199). Small pox was one of the diseases that absolutely decimated the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ashburn, P.M., and Frank Davis Ashburn. The ranks of death, a medical history of the conquest of America . Ann Arbor, Mich.: Xerox University Microfilms, 1975. Print.

E. Cowdry, Albert. This land, this South: an environmental history . Lexington: The University of Kentucky Press, 1996. Print.

J. Bollet, Alfred. Plagues and Poxes: the impact of human history on epidemic disease. New York: Demos Medical Publishing, 2004. Print.
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Cultural Observation

Words: 539 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34124470

Clothing is a very important concept in India and a person is likely to focus on adopting a certain dress style according to the circumstances he or she comes across. Factors like ethnicity, geography, climate, and cultural background are essential in determining the attitudes that a person is likely to take on with regard to dress style. Dressing styles have evolved from Langotas and loincloths to more elaborate costumes that Indians are probable to wear when they attend festivities. hile most people would like to adopt a superficial attitude when regarding what they want to wear, conditions are different in several Indian communities, taking into account that dress styles are treated with a form of intellectual seriousness there.

The Sari is the most popular form of dress for Indian women and is typically wrapped around the lower part of the body with one of its ends and taken over the…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Bruzzi, Stella, and Church Gibson, Pamela, "Fashion Cultures: Theories, Explorations, and Analysis," (Routledge, 2000)
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Socially Constructed Geography

Words: 1925 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4034831

Social Geography

Socially Constructed Geography

As a society, humans by nature relate to the world and define norms by identifying with the environment around them. In America for example, the foundation for the society was built on idealisms that suggested that the first entrants into this society were pioneers, overcoming a vast wilderness and pristine landscape in order to build the foundation upon which modern society now reigns supreme. People by nature identify with social constructed realities that bring them together in a communal and socially responsible manner. In order to help civilians learn about society and social norms, it is often necessary to deconstruct and reconstruct the geographic landscape of a land to build a culture from a blank template.

Human beings have socially constructed the view that the landscape of this nation prior to discovery was naked, raw, virgin; basically one might conclude that it was a pristine…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bogaards, Peter J. "The Underlying thinking of how people learn, acquire knowledge and understand." BogieLand Information. September 2003. {Online}. Available:  http://www.bogieland.com/postings/post_construct.htm 

Denevan, William M. "The Pristine Myth: The Landscape of the Americas in 1942." Department of Geography, University of Wisconsin. 2004.

Dicken, P. "The Roepke Lecture in Economic Geography." Economic Geography, Vol. 70, 1994

Hanson, S., Lawson, V., McDowell, L., Nagar, R. "Locating Globalization: Feminist readings of the subjects and spaces of globalization." Economic Geography, Vol, 78, 2002.
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Thematic Ed Thematic Teaching Geography Through a

Words: 1505 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45681036

Thematic Ed

Thematic Teaching: Geography Through a Lens of Multiculturalism

All too often, students feel that they must leave their everyday lives, experiences and interests outside of the classroom. From the perspective of many students, the more rigid foci of traditional curriculum do not allow for inclusion of personal dimensions such as ethnic background, distinct cultural knowledge or unique personal history. And as students reach the pre-adolescent stages of middle school, and as the formulation of personal identity becomes a stronger force in each individual's life, this rigid quality can have the impact of alienating the individual from the formal educational process. Thus, it is incumbent upon us as educators to find ways to bridge this gap between personal life and public education; between individuals strengths and learning needs; between creative freedom and academic proceduralism. As the Head of the Geography Department for 5th, 6th and 7th Graders, I propose…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Adams, D.M. & Hamm, M. (2005). Redefining education in the twenty-first century: shaping collaborative learning in the age of information. Henry C. Thomas.

Association of Zoos & Aquariums. (AZA). (2011). Thematic Educational Activities. AZA.org.

Heilman, E.E. (2010). Social Studies and Diversity Education: What We Do and Why We Do It. Taylor & Francis.

Indiana University Northwest (2011). School of Education. IUN.edu.
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California Geography Fresno The Desert

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16494747

1). Ironically, these workers who feed others are often hungry themselves, even when they bring home some of the rejected crop they harvest to feed their families. A 2007 study of agricultural workers in the area found that nearly half (45%) met the criteria of food insecurity. 34% of respondents were food insecure without hunger while an additional 11% were food insecure with hunger (irth et al. 2007, p.1). "Nearly half (48%) of eligible respondents reported utilizing the food stamp program, which is comparable to 53% of eligible Fresno County residents. However, food stamp participation varies by season. hereas 55% of eligible respondents utilized the program in the winter, only 37% of eligible respondents did so in the summer. Many respondents interviewed during the summer believed they were not eligible for this program because they were working or earned too much" (irth et al. 2007, p.24). They had little or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fresno California. Greenwich Mean Time. February 29, 2009. November 29, 2009.

http://wwp.greenwichmeantime.com/time-zone/usa/california/fresno/index.htm

Drury, Pauline. "Fresno." Ancestry.com. November 29, 2009.

 http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hummingbird/Fresno-County/fresno_county.htm
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Nauru and Niger

Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13596629

Cultural Geography

The two countries that I have selected are Nauru and Niger. Nauru is an island in the South Pacific, which formerly had significant phosphate resource but those have now been depleted. There is some limited arable land around the fringe of the island, allowing for minimal crops and coconuts. Fishing is a main source of locally-produced food. There are limited fresh water resources and Nauru is far from any markets (CIA World Factbook, 2015). Niger is an African nation that straddles Saharan and sub-Saharan (Sahel). In Niger, there is 11.79% arable land, which should be enough to support the country's relatively small population. However, there are recurring droughts as desertification extends the Sahara farther into the country. The country is landlocked, so has limited access to markets, and none of its neighborhoods has much wealth either. There are limited water resources in Niger, with nearly 80% of the…… [Read More]

References

CIA World Factbook (2015). Nauru. Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/nr.html

CIA World Factbook (2015). Niger. Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ng.html

WNA. (2015). Uranium in Niger. World Nuclear Association. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Country-Profiles/Countries-G-N/Niger/
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Postcolonial Geography Post-Colonial Geography Questions

Words: 2507 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16647719



Question 3:

In some regards, the idea of 'culture' is highly mutable and subject to widespread variations in characterization. Quite in fact, the concept of culture is highly implicated in the weaponzation of words that may be used by one nation to subjugate another. Ideas about how cultures interact, about which cultures are superior and indeed about whether or not the practices of some peoples should even be called 'cultures' have been subjected to rationalization as colonialist nations have subjugated various parts of the developing sphere. It is this understanding that inclines Said's (2002) perspective in "The Clash of Definitions."

Here, Said opposes the idea that there are distinct incompatibilities which persist between civilizations. Instead, he argues that this is the impression which has been foisted upon us by the shifting notions of what is meant by culture, particularly as this depends upon the perspective of hegemonic ethnic groups. This…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bederman, G. (1995). Manliness & Civilization: A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Bender, T. (2006). A Nation among Nations: America's Place in World History. New York: Hill & Wang:

Cabral, A. (1973). National Liberation and Culture. In Return to the Source: Selected Speeches of Amilcar Cabral. New York: Monthly Review Press: 39-56.

McClintock, A. (1995). Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest. London: Routledge.
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Social Geography of the Los

Words: 1242 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3147336

57). This makes the idea that the minority communities that are using the community as a "springboard" for assimilation because there are less of the domestic non-Hispanic whites in the areas in which immigrants would typically assimilate.

There has even been the development of what is referred to as planned communities. Irvine California serves as a good example of such a development. Irvine was developed from ranch lands from a single developer that constructed "urban villages" in Orange County (Maher, 2004, p. 782). The particular site selected for this 1-997 study was in many ways a "typical" Irvine neighborhood. A planned community developed in the mid-1970s, Ridgewood comprised 246 single-family homes on a collection of cul-de-sacs connected by three public through streets: on average, residents were highly educated- 39% had graduate or professional degrees- and most of those who were employed worked in professional, managerial, technical, or sales positions (Maher,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Maher, K. (2004). Borders and Social Distinction in the Global Suburb. American Quarterly, 781-806.

Zhou, M., Tseng, Y., & Kim, R. (2008). Rethinking Residential Assimilation: The Case of a Chinese Ethnoburb in the San Gabriel Valley, California. Amerasia Journal, 55-83.
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Social and Cultural Impacts of Establishing an

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23476641

socal and cultural mpacts of establshng an eco-Toursm enterprse n Joao Pessoa, Brazl. The man focus of the dssertaton s on the followng areas:

An analyss of eco-toursm development

An assessment of the opportuntes - regonal, domestc, nternatonal

An evaluaton of the projects feasblty

An examnaton of the socal-cultural mpact of the eco-toursm

Brazl has a sanctuary of the fnest natural resources ("fauna & flora") n the world, and therefore toursm s n ascendence, and demands for md-class hotels are on the ncrease. The development of eco-toursm n specfc areas s antcpated due to partnershp wth local bankng ntutons; local government nterest and regulatons; and a general growth of awareness of the tenson between the tourst dollar, the envronment and local cultures.

Research Methods

Prmary research (ntervews and questonnares) wll be conducted to analyze the feasblty of the project. Secondary research wll be carred out, n the form of a…… [Read More]

i) Adventurers set out to discover other lands (e.g., Captain Cook) ii) People traveled for scientific research (e.g., Darwin) iii) People traveled for business (trade) iv) People traveled in order to visit friends and family (social), v) People traveled for leisure (relaxation) vi) People travel as Eco-Travelers (learners).

The development of tourism has influenced people and society, and has created thousands of organizations, at many levels: national and international, governmental or non- governmental. Tourism has thus led to the creation of million of jobs worldwide, in what is today is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. Tourism has led people to confront different attitudes and to admire eclectic cultures. In addition, to be able to understand these cultures, society at large has had to adapt to the pluralism of cultures by learning languages other than their own, different types of gastronomy and music, and also by adopting a greater tolerance of different religions.

Accordingly to Kaluf (2001), the development of tourism has been worldwide, and has been sustaining a growth of 20% over last five years: 5% in mass tourism and an incredible 15% in
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World Regional Geography

Words: 2680 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29821841

Regional Geography

hy could Africa be considered on of the richest continents on Earth? Discuss some of sub-Saharan Africa's Assets. Then address why, despite these facts, the majority of African states remain poor. Be sure to include several factors relation to this region's unique physical geography, complex human geography, history.

The spectrum of environments which exist in Africa spans entire moisture and temperature gradients, from perhaps the most arid to among the well-watered places on earth, from the coolness of the Cape to the furnace that is the Sahara. This environmental diversity is mirrored in the proliferation of its fauna and flora, for Africa has seemingly every conceivable combination of climatological, geological, and pedological factors; the plant and animal communities have evolved over time to reflect this heterogeneity. Moreover, it is an ancient continent that has provided a cradle for a wide range of taxonomic groups, from among the very…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Chen-Young, et al. Transnationals of tourism in the Caribbean. London: Commonwealth Secretariat. 2001.

2. Richard Wiffin, William Phettipace, Anas Todkill; Imagining Distance: Spanish Explorers in America. Early American Literature, Vol. 25, 1990.

3. Stephen Zunes; The United States and the Western Sahara Peace Process. Middle East Policy, Vol. 5, 1998.
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Cross Cultural Leadership Cultural Differences in Leadership

Words: 1565 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26626360

Cross Cultural Leadership

Cultural Differences in Leadership

Cultural differences determine certain leadership traits and portions of our personality. It is easy to discredit the importance of cross-cultural differences and their influences on various leadership styles. Different cultures are known for certain traits. For instance, the Australian culture is known for it egalitarianism. Chinese culture is known as an authority oriented culture (Sharpe, 2007). These differences in culture result in the development of different leadership styles and traits. The following will explore the issue of cultural differences and will support the thesis that leaders from authoritarian countries have a greater power distance from their employees than do those in egalitarian cultures.

Sharpe (2007) found that the Australian culture and the Chinese culture dictated certain traits in regards to desirable leadership traits. Both the Australian and Chinese participants felt that these leadership traits were more important on the lower levels than on…… [Read More]

References

DeGrosky, M. (2011). Lost in Translation. Wildfire. Retrieved March 4,.2011 from http://wildfiremag.com/command/cultural-context-leadership-200907/

Deng, L. & Gibson, P. (2008). A Qualitative Evaluation on the Role of Cultural Intelligence in Cross-Cultural Leadership Effectiveness. The International Journal of Leadership Studies. 3 (2): 181-197.

Hofstede, G. (2001). Culture's consequences: Comparing values, behaviors, institutions, and organizations across nations (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage

Lewis, R. (2006). Cultural Differences in a Shrinking World: Leadership Implications. Personnel Decisions. January 2006. Retrieved March 4, 2011 from  http://www.hreonline.com/pdfs/PDIPaper.pdf
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Roles of Physical Cultural & Vernacular Landscapes

Words: 788 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55752382

ROLES OF PHYSICAL, CULTURAL & VERNACULAR

LANDSCAPES IN HUMAN DIMENSIONS RESEARCH

As an extension of the sciences of geography and physical morphology, human dimensions research explores various concepts associated with human fairness, risk, biodiversity and sustainability and provides methods to measure public satisfaction and identify different communities of interest, conflict or consensus. Human dimension categories include economics with a focus on the monetary measurement of ecosystems; recreation which seeks to understand the relationship between the recreation setting and human experience; cultural heritage which explores the characteristics of sustainable societies, and lastly environmental psychology and social interactions which involve the measurement of ecosystem-related public perceptions, attitudes and beliefs and the objectives of the concerned parties.

A prime example of this research concerns the findings of the Department of the Interior and its exploration on how human dimensions affect certain areas of the western United States. Research topics associated with these findings…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alanen, Arnold R. "Grounded in Reality: The Importance of Vernacular Landscapes."

Courier 34 (August 1989): 10-13.

Appleton, Jay. The Experience of Landscape. New York: John Wiley, 1975.

United States Global Change Research Program. The Human Dimensions Program.
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Is the Lack of Social Studies in Classrooms Affecting Students in Geography and Social Science

Words: 687 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60022662

Education

A disturbingly large number of Americans cannot find their own country on a map. Although satirists like Steven Shehori (2008) exaggerate the problem, the truth is that too few Americans are geographically literate. According to osenberg (2007), the number of Americans who cannot locate their home country on a map is around three in fifty: or six percent of the total population. Shehori (2008), a Canadian, jokes that "a full 37% of American citizens are incapable of identifying their home country on a map of the United States." Shehori's hyperbole draws attention to the failures of the American education system in providing the most effective possible geography lessons. Even if 96% percent of Americans can identify the United States on a map, a much fewer number can identify other countries. For example, oach (2006) cites research showing that "63% of Americans aged 18 to 24 failed to correctly locate"…… [Read More]

References

Roach, J. (2006). Young Americans geographically illiterate, survey suggests. National Geographic . May 2, 2006. Retrieved online:  http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/05/0502_060502_geography.html 

Rosenberg, M. (2007). One in five Americans can't find U.S. About.com. Retrieved online: http://geography.about.com/b/2007/08/30/one-in-five-americans-cant-find-us.htm

Shehori, S. (2008). Poll: 37% of Americans unable to locate America on map of America. Huffington Post. Dec 15, 2008. Retrieved online: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steven-shehori/poll-37-of-americans-unab_b_150933.html

Sykes, C.J. (1996). Dumbing Down Our Kids: Why American Children Feel Good About Themselves But Can't Read, Write, Or Add. Macmillan.
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Ngos Geography Groundwork and Initial Steps for

Words: 3166 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 263798

NGOs

Geography

Groundwork and Initial Steps

For this research and analytical paper, we have chosen to work as the members of a small NGO and conduct a research as an executive director of a small non-governmental organization that would utilize its funding of one million dollar donation by establishing its branch in Pakistan, a third world country in order to improve and strengthen the country's educational arena. In this phase, we first had to decide a third world country that actually deserved a good financial aid in the form of a million dollar donation to improve its educational facilities. I came up with Pakistan, because this is one country that unfortunately has one of the most appalling literacy rates and percentages. So, in order to solve the problem at hand that is to answer the question as to where invest the donation, I chose Pakistan. Since, we have twenty years…… [Read More]

References

Bryson, J.M. (1995). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

State of Education in Pakistan, Care. Retrieved September 6, 2003 at http://www.care.org.pk/pakistan_facts/state_of_education.htm

Coffman J. (1997). Private Higher Education in Pakistan: The Need for Order. Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. Retrieved September 6, 2003 at http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/soe/cihe/newsletter/News09/text2.html

Ecotourism Society Pakistan (1999). Role of Non-Governmental Organizations in Pakistan.
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History Geography During the Beginning of Ancient

Words: 1245 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14863458

History Geography

During the beginning of ancient times, Classical civilization still lived as hunters and gatherers. They used the resources available to them and learned to gather grains, berries, and other plant foods and store them for the winter. This required them to live where the geography and climate could support them, and where supplies of water were easily available. Early settlements clustered around rivers and streams for this reason. y the end of the Classical Era, The Roman Empire had fallen. European cultures had been influenced by Rome's accomplishments, however, and Europeans knew how to build aquifers to bring the water to them. They had learned to build both roads and bridges. They had tamed livestock and used them for transportation. y the Classical Era, many of geography's limitations had solutions. Thus people could live in villages, towns and cities, farm the surrounding countryside and transport it to where…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Garraty, John A., and Gay, Peter, Eds. The Columbia History of the World. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1999.
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Managerial Cross-Cultural Interaction

Words: 7475 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33443551

Management STYLE IN THE United States

Cultural Values and Business

Theory X vs. Theory Y

Management the High Tech Way

Management STYLE IN THE DOMINICAN EPUBLIC

CULTUAL VALUES AND Business

ole of Entrepreneurship

In the United States, management values, beliefs and attitudes have undergone a gradual shift away from the simplistic stance of planning, organizing and directing. Valuable managerial skills, no matter what culture is being considered, have traditionally been masculine skills, highlighting the dominant, assertive, and decisive elements of management behavior and downplaying the team and supportive aspects that are more readily identified with women. This traditional view is now giving way in the United States to an approach where team behaviour is seen as increasingly important to a truly successful management style.

The global leadership skills of the future will evolve from a combination of individual/group and masculine/feminine traits involving strategic thinking and communication skills. The final result…… [Read More]

References

Arnold, D.J. & Quelch, J.A. (1998). "New strategies in emerging markets." Sloan Management Review, 40, 7-20.

Bakhtari, H. (1995). "Cultural Effects on Management Style: A Comparative Study of American and Middle Eastern Management Styles." International Studies of Management & Organization, 25(3), 97+.

Barham, K., Fraser, J. & Heath, L. (1988). Management for the future. Foundation for Management Education/Ashridge Management College.

Bennis, W., Heil, G. & Stephens, D. (2000). Douglas McGregor, revisited: Managing the human side of enterprise. New York: John Wiley.
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Globalization in the Age of Globalization Cultural

Words: 1689 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84260781

Globalization

In the age of globalization, cultural precincts are anticipated as having turned out as absorbent, imprecise, and undefined. The home culture comes in contact with the foreign culture as a result of globalization while it impacts culture of the home country leaving it to be not the native but the unstable, displaced, amalgamated, diverse, and adulterated (OCAA). Globalization is the instant of collective relocation, "multiculturalism, and cosmopolitanism" (Szeman, 2003) Once the culture of a nation was perceived by means of newspapers and work of fictions, but the present day has given the ever-present of novel structures of mass culture that has transfigured in to novel intercontinental systems of the thoughts. egarding culture, discussions about globalization are in consequence over and over again centered on border regions, and on the multifaceted dialogues that occur as these borders are investigated, anticipated again, and reemphasized in a world of rising, if not…… [Read More]

References

The Globalization Challenge: Australia's Role in a Rapidly Changing World," Oxfam Community Aid Abroad (OCAA).

Balibar, etienne, and Pierre Macherey (1981) On Literature as an Ideological Form: Some Marxist Propositions." In Untying the Text: A Post-Structuralist Reader, edited by Robert Young. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Bordo, Michael D. (2002) "Globalization in historical perspective: Our era is not as unique as we might think, and current trends are not irreversible," Business Economics, Jan, 2002, http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m1094/1_37/83793969/print.jhtml

Christie, Stuart (2002) Clear and present danger, The Guardian, November 9, 2002, Reviews on the Fences and Windows: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate by Naomi Klein
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Effects of Globalization on Native Non-Western Cultural

Words: 1185 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84712516

Globalization and its effects on non-Western cultural practices

Globalization is typically defined as the phenomena of increasing world interconnectedness. It is an undeniable feature of the modern world. The world is gets smaller as technology advances and economies become interlinked. Today's economic crisis is a prime example of globalization. One nation undergoing a financial crisis can easily become an international economic meltdown. Nederveen (2009) comments how modernization has advanced at the cost of eliminating cultural and biological diversity. This is causing alienation of groups who oppose modernity and change, causing disenchantment among many groups around the world. These groups oppose the Mcdonadlization, or the "increasing cultural standardization and uniformization" (Nederveen, 2009). Cultures around the world have to either adapt to modernization or see their traditions ebb away, as seen in China and Africa.

China

One nation, China, reaps many of the benefits globalization has to offer, seeing its economy turn…… [Read More]

References

Briar-Lawson, K., & Roth, W. (2011). Globalization, social justice, and the helping professions. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Adebayo, Akanmu G., and Olutayo C. Adesina. (2009) Globalization and Transnational Migrations: Africa and Africans in the Contemporary Global System. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars.

Englebert, P. (2009). Africa: Unity, sovereignty, and sorrow. Boulder, Colo: Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Henry, C.M., & Springborg, R. (2010). Globalization and the politics of development in the Middle East. New York: Cambridge University Press.
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Iraq Is Constantly in the News Today

Words: 825 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63680909

Iraq is constantly in the news today, as the war in the Middle East continues. It is important to examine specific details of Iraq in order to gain a better understanding of the country.

Basic Information

Iraq is officially known by four different names. These names are: "conventional long form- Republic of Iraq; conventional short form- Iraq; local long form- Al Jumhuriyah al Iraqiyah; local short form- Al Iraq (www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/iz.html)."

Iraq occupies a total of 437,072 sq km or 271596.5 sq miles, and is "slightly more than twice the size of Idaho (www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/iz.html)." The country is located in the Middle East, "bordering the Persian Gulf, between Iran and Kuwait, with geographic coordinates of 33-00 N, 44-00 E, as compared with the geographic coordinates of the United States of 38-00 N, 97-00 (www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/iz.html)."

Geographic Features

In terms of physical geography, Iraq is "mostly desert with mild to cool winters and dry,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

(World Factbook- Iraq. (Accessed 29 November, 2004).

< www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/iz.html>).
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Mainstream Culture the First Installment of the

Words: 1555 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50033177

Mainstream Culture

The first installment of the Iron Man franchise can be analyzed in the context of whether it either reaffirms or criticizes mainstream culture. Indeed, the film does a bit of both. The movie script itself as well as the underlying method and motives of the filmmakers and actors in terms of how the film is being marketed and portrayed potentially irrespective of what is being asserted directly in the movie itself will also be assessed.. Iron Man and films like it play a two-sided game of both glorifying and condemning ideas that are political and ideological in nature but often does so in a way that is not even-handed or is otherwise not grounded in reality.

Iron Man Observations

hat is clear straight away with the interactions and the developments surrounding Tony Stark (Downey) and Obadiah is that the movie is making a statement about corporate greed and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fisje, John "The Cultural Economy of Fandom," pp. 30-49, in Adoring Audience

Friday, Kirster "A Generation of Men Without History": Fight Club, Masculinity, and the Historical Symptom," Postmodern Culture 13:3 (2003),

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/pmc/v013/13.3friday.html

Henry A. Giroux and Imre Szeman, "Ikea Boy Fights Back: Fight Club, Consumerism,
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Traditional Se Asian Bamboo Flutes

Words: 28549 Length: 95 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64807002

The organization of the five chapters in the study includes:

Chapter I: Chapter I includes the design of the study, the study's research problem and three research questions, study objectives, the scope and limitations of the study, significance of the study of DNA, research methodology and philosophy of the studies from different related literature.

Chapter II: During Chapter II, the researcher presents information to address the first research question; presented in the introduction for the thesis: What evidence points to the origin of flutes in SEA? During Chapter II, the researcher relates the kinds of flute in SEA that have been passed on from one generation to the next and their physical structure hich attributes scale, sound, expressions, melody, and rhythm. In Chapter II, the researcher also discusses the studies on ethnic groups of SEA and their flutes, and additionally notes studies on history of geology and aboriginals' migration map…… [Read More]

works cited:

Purple highlight means reference from his thesis, chapters 1-5

Blue highlight means reference from his raw research that was sent (17 files)

Yellow highlight means that writer could not find reference; one of the 17 files received

Gray highlight means writer found this source
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PESTLE Analysis Macdonald's Step Analysis Technological Economic

Words: 1719 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17190169

PESTLE analysis?

MacDonald's STEP analysis

Technological

Economic

In this paper, we explore the concept of STEP analysis by means of illustration. We perform an elaborate STEP analysis of McDonald's, the world's fast food giant. This is then followed by a recommendation on what actions McDonald's can do in order to take care of the issues that have been exposed via the STEPanalysis.

McDonald's is a food and beverage franchise that by 2001 boasted of close to 28,700 outlets spread in 120 nations Karen,2005). The company's food outlets are very popular among the youth. It offers an environment which is perceived to be safe for families as they can enjoy quality food at an affordable price in a clean environment. The food chain offers its client a familiar environment that is characterized by a McDonald's clown as well as stunning interior worldwide as pointed out by Debres (2005). The company has…… [Read More]

References

Aswathappa, A (2006): International Business: Tata McGraw-Hill: p, 226

Barriaux, M (2007).McDonald's goes green - but not all customers are lovin' it. The Guardian

Greider, W (2003): Victory at McDonald's: The Nation: 277 (5): p, 8

Daniels, K (2010). PESTLE analysis  http://www.cipd.co.uk/hr-resources/factsheets/pestle-analysis.aspx
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American Myths Nature Environment Unlimited Growth and

Words: 1789 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31829670

American Myths Nature Environment

Unlimited Growth and Finite Resources

Western Civilization is currently coming to terms with some very important and unsettling realities. Capitalism, and modern economics thinkers, have idolized economic growth without limit. In most economic textbooks and theories, economic growth is considered an end good, and a lack of economic growth a problem.

Though we can argue about whether economic growth is a good in all situations, it is indisputable that economic growth has natural limits. These natural limits are created by our own natural environment. For this reason, the culture of "more" which dominates Western Civilization and drives all of our reasoning, is not sustainable.

The effect of Western industrial capitalist civilization on the environment has been huge. The culture of Western civilization, currently driven by an ethic of individualism and materialism, empowered by science and technology, has done irreversible damage to the natural environment and continues…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hobson, K. (January 01, 2006). Environmental responsibility and the possibilities of pragmatist-orientated research. Social & Cultural Geography, 7, 2, 283-298.

Abram, David. The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World. New York: Vintage Books, 1997. Print.

Sessions, G. (January 01, 1991). Ecocentrism and the anthropocentric detour. Revision, 13, 3.)

Colombo, Gary, Robert Cullen, and Bonnie Lisle.Rereading America: Cultural Contexts for Critical Thinking and Writing. Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martin's Press, 1992. Print.
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Cultgeo Zakaria Fareed How Democracy

Words: 632 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11736330



Western intervention helped to create Israel, but also destabilized the entire region by installing and supporting brutal dictators. The chickens have come home to roost with the rise of anti-Western terrorists. Now, it would seem, the chickens are dying. Gaddafi is a symbol of the years during which American interventionism in the Middle East reached a peak.

Zakaria focuses on Egypt but the article pertains equally as well to Libya. Fears of Muslim extremism are, as Zakaria notes, overblown. The author states, "Asking women to wear veils is different from making men wear suicide belts. If the U.S. is opposed to every expression of religiosity, it will find itself unable to understand or work with a new, more democratic Middle East," (p. 4).

This article also shows that Americans especially have deep-rooted misperceptions about the Middle East and its cultural geography. Americans are guilty of the following fallacies. First, Americans…… [Read More]

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Immigration Late 1890's Toward the

Words: 1778 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66531230

hile some eventually returned to their homelands, the vast majority settled throughout the United States, forming ethnic communities in urban areas, and homesteading farmlands in the west and mid-west rural areas. They fled their homelands due to economic depressions, and/or religious and political persecutions for the opportunity to establish a better life in the New orld, and in the process endured many hardships and often discrimination. Today, more than 43 million Americans claim German ancestry, and another 34 million claim Irish roots.

orks Cited

Cohn, Raymond L. "Immigration to the United States." Illinois State University.

Retrieved November 13, 2006 at http:/ / the.net/encyclopedia/article/cohn.immigration.us

Hansen, Lawrence Douglas Taylor. "The Chinese Six Companies of San Francisco and the smuggling of Chinese immigrants across the U.S.-Mexico border, 1882-1930." Journal of the Southwest. March 22, 2006. Retrieved November 13, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Hardwick, Susan . "Galveston: Ellis Island of Texas." Journal of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cohn, Raymond L. "Immigration to the United States." Illinois State University.

Retrieved November 13, 2006 at http:/ / the.net/encyclopedia/article/cohn.immigration.us

Hansen, Lawrence Douglas Taylor. "The Chinese Six Companies of San Francisco and the smuggling of Chinese immigrants across the U.S.-Mexico border, 1882-1930." Journal of the Southwest. March 22, 2006. Retrieved November 13, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Hardwick, Susan W. "Galveston: Ellis Island of Texas." Journal of Cultural Geography.
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Texas History

Words: 3692 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43630442

German Influences on Texas Culture

If one has lived in Texas for any length of time, they will realize immediately that the Texas culture is influenced by German culture in a number of ways. Modern day Texas culture would not exist as it does today if it were not for German influence. Today Texas culture can be described as a blending of German and Texas traditions. Though German culture is not the only culture that has impacted the Texas of today, it is often considered one of the most significant influences historically.

Whether one examines the architectural landscape of the towns and cities, examines the art and music or simply talks with many of the German descendants living in Texas, one must immediately acknowledge the significant influence the German people have had on the development of Texas as known today. In early Texas history German influence was widespread, often comprising…… [Read More]

References:

Alvarez, A. (2002). "Oktoberfest in Fredericksburg." Texana Food and Events. 19, November 2004:  http://texana.texascooking.com/news/oktoberfest_fred2002.htm 

Butt, H.E. (2004). "Oktoberfest in Texas." 20, November, 2004: http://www.heb.com/mealtime/celeb-oktoberFestTx.jsp

Galan. (2001). [Online]. "Accordion Dreams: cultures of music and dance." Available

from:  http://www.pbs.org/accordiondreams/cultures/index.html
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Western Perceptions of the Other

Words: 3638 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70291320

" Photography may not, as Susan Sontag has claimed, symbolically reduce its subjects to "corpses,"

(Guimond 18)

It should also be pointed out this is to often not a specifically intentional attempt at disguise, but rather forms part of the cultural views and milieu of the time. This becomes evident if we take an cursory look at some of the photographers of the period.

Francis Johnston

Frances enjamin Johnston's Hampton Album was possibly one of the first photographic attempts to document and 'explain' in images the concept and reality of the American dream. Her work particularly relates to the above problems: the question of the other or minorities in the nation. Johnson created her images at Virginia's Hampton Institute in November and December 1899. This was an institution which was concerned with the education and training of lack people.

Many of the aspects relating to nations building and the American…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bird, S. Elizabeth, ed. Dressing in Feathers: The Construction of the Indian in American Popular Culture. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1996.

Blair, Sara. "Cultural Geography and the Place of the Literary." American Literary History 10.3 (1998): 544-567.

Clark, Walter. Photography by Infrared: Its Principles and Applications. 2nd ed. New York: J. Wiley & Sons, inc.;, 1946.

Conner, Jill. "Representation and Photography." Afterimage 29.2 (2001): 16. Questia. 15 May 2005 .
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Alternation of Generation Between Mosses

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49062476



Chapter Conclusion

This section will be used to provide a summary of the research and important findings supported by citations.

References

Arcand, Yves and Pierre Talbot. (2000) "Using Peat to Treat Wastewater." Journal of Environmental Health 62(6): 36.

Author provides a description concerning the utility of peat moss in wastewater treatment applications. Included in the report is a discussion concerning the origins of habitats favored by peat moss. Author also presents a useful basic description of this species and its physiology.

Coggins, Reed. (2002). "Ferns and Fire: Village Subsistence, andscape Change, and Nature

Conservation in China's Southeast Uplands." Journal of Cultural Geography 19(2): 129-

Author describes the economic impact of fern species for agricultural practices in rural

China where ferns are burned and used as fertilizer as well as used as a rotation crop to improve crop yields. Report provides useful background information for ferns.

Falcon-ong, H.J., D.J. Cantrill and…… [Read More]

Longmans, 1960.

This biology text has several sections devoted to Byrophtya, including the mosses, including detailed descriptions of their life cycles and the processes that are involved.

Author also provides several graphics that will be useful in illustrating these life cycle processes for mosses.
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Creating Identity Through Art

Words: 1457 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95818185

Art Generating Identity

Analysis of Civil art 'humanizes' places, expresses identity, lecturer at NDMOA says by Haley (2014).

A key component in persuading individuals to go along a certain path is establishment of a vision. Speeches are viewed as a means to persuade an audience; likewise, images can also be just as convincing as verbal rhetoric. Art plays a rhetorical role, as well, making viewers believe the authenticity of that which is represented. Cultural and social values and famous historical occurrences are reflected often in art works. Seeing art which reflects ideals, values and life experiences may prompt spectators to think through a reality which may otherwise have been neglected by them. This kind of art, at the very least, drives individuals to challenge large societal problems, thereby, increasing the likelihood of reactive action by the community (Howard & Hoffman, 2013).

The nature of public art isn't merely aesthetic; cultural,…… [Read More]

References

Efroymson, D., Thanh Ha, T.K. & Thu Ha, P. (2009). Public Spaces: How They Humanize Cities. HealthBridge - WBB Trust.

Haley, C. (2014, Mar 14). Civil art 'humanizes' places, expresses identity, lecturer at NDMOA says. McClatchy - Tribune Business News. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/1507232112?accountid=45844

Howard, A.D., & Hoffman, D.R. (2013). A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words: Building American National Identity Through Art. Perspectives on Political Science, 42(3), 142-151. doi:10.1080/10457097.2013.793517

Proshansky, H.M., Fabian, A.K., and Kaminoff, R. (1983), Place-Identity: Physical World Socialization of the Self, Journal of Environmental Psychology, 3.
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From Eurocentrism to Polycentrism

Words: 677 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63925236

Eurocentrism to Polycentrism. Specifically, it will begin with a brief summary of the reading, present a summary of the main points presented in the reading, and finally end with thoughts, questions, and a critique of the article. This article discusses the globalization of our planet and the political differences that keep people apart, rather than join them together in a cohesive whole.

From Eurocentrism to Polycentrism

The article begins with "The Myth of the West," and goes on to point out that terms that mean one thing geographically to us, mean a very different thing to many other peoples of the world. As the author notes in an important concept, "Thus politics overdetermines cultural geography." Unfortunately, that preoccupation with race, religion, and culture still exists today, which is another point the author makes throughout the article while pointing out the domination of the Eurocentric model in our "Western" culture today.…… [Read More]

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Shelley's Frankenstein

Words: 1367 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10490193

Frankenstein

"You, who call Frankenstein your friend, seem to have a knowledge of my crimes and his misfortunes. But in the detail which he gave you of them he could not sum up the hours and months of misery which I endured wasting in impotent passions. For while I destroyed his hopes, I did not satisfy my own desires," (Shelley, Frankenstein, Chapter 24)

Frankenstein's monster remains one of the most misunderstood characters in English literature. Part of the problem can be traced to the commercialization of the book and its adaptation for cinema. As Mary Shelley's work has been appropriated by the horror genre, the monster has taken on a new form as an evil and fearsome creature rather than being the tragic and lonely figure that he actually is in the novel. Film versions of Frankenstein have stripped away from the monster some of the core components of his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hammond, Kim. "Monsters of Modernity: Frankenstein and Modern Environmentalism." Cultural Geographies 11(2). April 2004.

Johnson, Barbara. "My Monster/My Self." Diacritics. Vol. 12, No. 2.

Laplace-Sinatra, Michael. "Science, Gender and Otherness in Shelley's Frankenstein and Kenneth Brannagh's Film Adaptation." European Romantic Review. Vol 9, Issue 2. 1998.

Picart, Caroline Joan S. Remaking the Frankenstein Myth on Film. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003.
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Sexual Politics Loom Large in

Words: 1509 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81393528

Every aspect of sociology is somehow affected by sexual politics and this can be seen in every postmodern representation of sexuality. Media is particularly dependant on sexual politics as a thematic representation and as a guiding force for human emotion. This is particularly true with regard to dramatic representations in film. The two films discussed above can be seen as examples of this thesis and illuminate both postmodernism and sexual politics in the modern world.

orks Cited

Cohen, Eric S. "To onder Again." First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life May 2000: 23.

Films That Go Thud; Some Actors Can Survive Bomb or Two." The ashington Times 5 Aug. 2003: B05.

Green, J. Ronald. "Always Already: Affinities between Art and Film." Afterimage 25.5 (1998): 8.

Hausladen, Gary J., and Paul F. Starrs. "L.A. Noir." Journal of Cultural Geography 23.1 (2005): 43.

Kipnis, Laura. Bound and Gagged: Pornography…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cohen, Eric S. "To Wonder Again." First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life May 2000: 23.

Films That Go Thud; Some Actors Can Survive Bomb or Two." The Washington Times 5 Aug. 2003: B05.

Green, J. Ronald. "Always Already: Affinities between Art and Film." Afterimage 25.5 (1998): 8.

Hausladen, Gary J., and Paul F. Starrs. "L.A. Noir." Journal of Cultural Geography 23.1 (2005): 43.
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Expertise and Development

Words: 3086 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30692249

Expertise

Professional development requires us to reflect on our successes and failures and the ways in which we can learn from them. Nothing stays still. One certainty is that the hazards we face next year will be different ones. It is important to take time occasionally to reflect on what you stand for, where your leadership agenda is taking you, what you need to know in order to realize that agenda, what the results of previous attempts to intervene in change were, and how you would proceed differently next time. These activities help keep us energetic and motivated, and rightly focus attention on the future as well as the present (Taleff, 2006, p. 44).

Instructional Strategy

One of the difficulties in all academic staff development program is making the leap from a focus on skills and techniques to a consideration of the underlying 'working theory' which informs those techniques. It…… [Read More]

References

Appiah-Opoku, S. (2007). Indigenous Beliefs and Environmental Stewardship: A Rural Ghana Experience. Journal of Cultural Geography, 24(2), 79+. Retrieved September 4, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5023123538

Bicker, A., Sillitoe, P., & Pottier, J. (Eds.). (2003). Development and Local Knowledge: New Approaches to Issues in Natural Resources Management, Conservation, and Agriculture. New York: Routledge. Retrieved September 4, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104247737

Grammig, T. (2001). Technical Knowledge and Development: Observing Aid Projects and Processes. New York: Routledge. Retrieved September 4, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108411358

Gutierrez, X. (2008, July). Strategic Investing in Distressed Assets. Mortgage Banking, 68, 66+. Retrieved September 4, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5036899636
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Extra Credit

Words: 912 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73758829

Geography

In each case, what are the symbols of Irishness and Englishness?

The symbols of Irishness according to the Irish-Americans who organized the parade in Boston included heterosexuality. Their definition of their "nation" did not include those with alternate sexualities. This may have been reinforced by the strong Catholic ties in the group. In the case of Blacks in the English countryside, the Black woman feels accepted as "English" when she accepts the "sense of place" from the larger society that she belongs in urban areas but not in the overwhelmingly White countryside.

Whom did you feel sympathy for in each case? Why?

I felt sympathy for both groups. Those who organized the parade were blind to the gays and bisexuals among them, and for whatever reason, alternate sexualities just weren't part of what they thought of when they thought of "Irish." But at the same time, it's hard to…… [Read More]

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Blue Mountain Big White on

Words: 1979 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11912502

These waterfalls provide a contrast to Blue Mountain and other mountains. As mountains rise, waterfalls fall. Another question that this project is focused on is the different ways in which waterfalls and mountains are valued differently as well as how they are valued the same in other situations.

This is how the government of Ontario describes and honors the Niagara Escarpment:

Designated a UNESCO World Biosphere eserve in 1990, the Niagara Escarpment is an internationally recognized landform and is the cornerstone of Ontario's Greenbelt. A landscape of rich biodiversity, home to hundreds of Ontario's Species at isk, vital watersheds, agricultural areas and 450-million year old geological history, the Niagara Escarpment is a treasure to protect for future generations of Ontarians. (Niagara Escarpment)

Perhaps it is that waterfalls can be seasonal while mountains remain all year round. But for a mountain that is defined by snow as opposed to just by…… [Read More]

References

Blue Mountain Skiing, http://www.bluemountain.ca/

Campbell, C.E. (2005). Shaped by the West Wind: Nature and history in Georgian Bay. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Harris, R.C. (Ed.) (1987). Historical Atlas of Canada, Volume I: From the Beginning to 1800. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Niagara Escarpment,  http://www.escarpment.org/home/index.php
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William Renwick The Content of

Words: 5769 Length: 21 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76841378

The biosphere consists of all living organisms on the planet. The atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere function collectively to provide he environment which sustains the biosphere. These four spheres interact to create ecological systems. These ecosystems, as they are called, are groups of organisms and the nonliving environment which they exist in.

In the process of living and working in an area, people modify the landscape to suit their purposes or tastes. These are called cultural landscapes. Many geographers maintain that the entire surface of the earth constitutes a cultural landscape, as humans have changed the face of the planet to such a great degree. Some geographers also put forth environmentalist theories, which emphasize the role of the environment in human life. The interaction between humans and the environment is a circular effect- environment affects human life and culture, while humans alter and transform the environment. Geographers have studied the ways…… [Read More]

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Naming Streets

Words: 449 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69407957

power and describe the three ways that the authors suggest this subject may be viewed and modeled. The essay will conclude with comments on the criticalness of this article and discuss the aims of this article and what the authors are wishing to transform or modify.

Power

The authors suggested that the process of naming streets was directly linked to expressing explicit power over a situation or territory. This can be compared to a dog marking his territory by spreading his marking or scent. They wrote " the discursive act of assigning a name to a given location does much more than merely denote an already existing place. ather, as scholars from various fields have suggested, the act of naming is itself a performative practice that calls forth the 'place' to which it refers by attempting to stabilize the unwieldy contradictions of sociospatial processes into the seemingly more 'managable' order…… [Read More]

References

Rose-Redwood, R., Alderman, D., & Azaryahu, M. (2010). Geographies of toponymic inscription: new directions in critical place-name studies. Progress in Human Geography, 34(4), 453-470.
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Elbrus Geologic Formation and History

Words: 1417 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90283591

Culturally, Mt. Elbrus represents an immovable beast of a mountain, and the ussians and Soviet Union have taken full advantage of this image when using it in propaganda campaigns (Shklarov, 2010). After the Nazi's captured Priut 11 in 1942, the ussians sent a bomber to destroy the structure, which was a few thousand feet below the summit. The Nazi's that took the Priut had climbed Elbrus and hoisted a giant Nazi flag at the summit, further emboldening the ussians to take back the mountain and the hut as both a propaganda action as well as a way to visibly defeat the Germans. According to official records, the only bomb to have landed near the hut destroyed the fuel tank (Shklarov, 2010). But the Nazi's and later, archaeologists studying the event disagreed that the fuel depot was even significantly damaged during the bombing. The ussian pilot was none the less awarded…… [Read More]

References

Helman, Adam. (2005). The Finest Peaks: Prominence and Other Mountain Measures.

Trafford Publishing: Victoria, Canada.

Horton, Patrick; Simon Richmond; Mark Elliott; and Steve Kokker. (2006). Russia and Belarus. Lonely Planet: New York.

Hurley, Michael. (2009). The World's Most Amazing Mountains. Raintree: Chicago.
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Analytic and Application-Based Exercise in Nest by

Words: 610 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54543825

Analytic and Application-Based Exercise

In "Nest," by the Chinese-Australian artist John Young (2003), a traditional image of a Chinese mountainous landscape is transposed with an image of a naked human torso and an image of a snowy mountain that looks like a photograph taken from the contemporary era. The effect is a kind of collage or pastiche. The peaceful beauty and tranquility of the Chinese landscape in the background is still within the visual scope of the gazer. But the jarring images of modernity juxtaposed upon the mountain create a sense of discord that would not be present had the harmonious Chinese mountain been rendered without the superimposed, contemporary images.

The modern images are cool and bright, particularly the icy mountain depicted in the upper left corner of the painting, in contrast to the sepia tones of the background. The fact that the modern mountain is snowy and cold, in…… [Read More]

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Global Business Analysis on Brazil

Words: 5554 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41963007

Global Business Cultural Analysis: Brazil

Cultural backgrounds reflect the ways and standards of living, which is unique and different for each country. In fact, the business world is also profoundly influenced by the cultural differences of the counties. This focus of this research paper, in this regard, is to analyze the cultural perspectives of doing business in Brazil. Therefore, major elements and dimensions of Brazilian culture such as business structures, management styles, communication, ethics, values, and customs are discussed comprehensively.

Moreover, the discussion has also been made on how the local businessmen integrate these cultural dimensions and elements. Indeed, a detailed comparison United States business has been made with that of Brazilian culture and business elements by means of Hofstede's dimension tool (that is particularly used for measuring cultural differences). Finally, the paper concludes with the implications for the U.S. businesses that plans and desires to conduct business in Brazil.…… [Read More]

References

Aswathappa. (2010). International Business 4E. India: Tata McGraw-Hill Education.

Beekun, R.I., Stedham, Y. & Yamamura, J.H. (2003). Business Ethics in Brazil and the U.S.: A Comparative Investigation. Journal of Business Ethics, 42(3), 267-279.

Boraas, T. (2001). Brazil. USA: Capstone.

deVries, A. & Blore, S. (2010). Frommer's Brazil. 5th Edition. USA: John Wiley & Sons.
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Thoughts on Book Readings

Words: 1021 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97292282

American Culture)

Thoughts on Book eadings

All of the readings included in Beyond Borders: Thinking Critically about Global Issues help us appreciate American culture and U.S. history from several diverse perspectives. The book urges us all to reach beyond comfortable representations of the United States -- who we are, what our role has been in shaping the world, and how we have exercised power through our actions and interactions with others across the globe -- and embrace more complex truths. In short, we should challenge traditional interpretations.

History Lessons: How Textbooks from Around the World Portray U.S. History by Dana Lindaman and Kyle Ward helps expose how many American texts are biased in portrayals of the United States' role in world history. By examining the historical record of American history in English translated foreign texts, it is clear that other countries challenge the American depiction of itself in major events…… [Read More]

References

Romanowski, Michael H. "Excluding Ethical Issues From U.S. History Textbooks: 911 And The War On Terror." American Secondary Education 37.2 (2009): 26-48. Academic Search Premier. Web. 9 Oct. 2012.

Shaffer, Robert. "History Lessons: How Textbooks From Around The World Portray U.S. History By Dana Lindaman And Kyle Ward." Peace & Change 32.1 (2007): 114-117. Academic Search Premier. Web. 9 Oct. 2012.

Williams, William Appleman. "Empire as A Way of Life." Nation 231.4 (1980): 104-119. Academic Search Premier. Web. 9 Oct. 2012.
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Dutch Culture

Words: 3736 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46326726

Dutch Culture

Introduction to Cultural Differences

It is obvious that differences in cultures are very important, though these differences are difficult to handle. The failure to understand and appreciate that differences in cultures bring variety to lifestyles leads to embarrassment, uneasy relationships, and failed businesses. Culture permeates both life and death. Take, for instance, the high rate of plane crashes in Korea from the year 1970 to 2000. The discovery made from the analysis of the black boxes from the crashed planes show that the flight engineers and the co-pilots in the cockpits carry out actions only in deference to the captains. Even at the wake of the possibility of a crash, the flight engineers and the co-pilots rarely made suggestions that would go against the good judgment of the captains.

In this presentation, culture is seen as a shared system of values, beliefs, assumptions and projections which are imbibed…… [Read More]

References

Agar, M. (1994). Language Shock: Understanding the Culture of Conversation. New York: Quill.

Aggarwal, R., Kearney, C. And Lucey, B. (2009). Gravity as a cultural arteface: Culture and distance in foreign portfolio investment.

Argentina mental health (2009). Its GDP Is Depressed, but Argentina Leads World in Shrinks Per Capita. Wall Street Journal. Accessed from: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125563769653488249.html

Benassy-Quere, A., Coupet, M. And Mayer, T. (2005). Institutional Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment. CEPII Working Paper No. 2005-05.
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Archaeological Interpretations of Upper Paleolithic Cave Paintings

Words: 2661 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63401088

Archaeological Interpretations of Upper Paleolithic Cave Paintings

There are many questions related to the chronological spread of Paleolithic tool production and paintings due to geographical differences in the progress of the spread of such tool production. While radiocarbon dating has furthered the ability to identify specific time period information there are still limitations to this type of data. There has been loose identification of chronological periods of production and in cave paintings the more complex paintings are not always those most recently created. Difficulty exists in the establishment of regional progressions of development. While the combination of radiocarbon, thermoluminescence, and electron spin resonance dating techniques assisted investigators for the upper Paleolithic period in the reconstruction of "a reasonably coherent global chronology." (Bar-Yosef, 2002) At the same time there are still significant standard deviations along with other limitations in this dating of archaeological findings. This study examines these issues and limitations…… [Read More]

References

Bar-Yosef, O. (2002) The Upper Paleolithic Revolution. Annu. Rev. Ahtropolog. 2002.

Bicho, et al. (2007) The Upper Paleolithic Rock Art of Iberia. Journal of Archeological Method and Theory. Vo. 14, No.1. March 2007.

Cave Art Interpretation II (2006) Guest Editorial Essay. Perception 2006, Vol 35.

De Leo, Guilio A. et al. (2001) Evolution of Prehistoric Cave Art. Brief Communications. Nature Vol. 413, 4 Oct 2001.
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Penokee Range in Wisconsin We

Words: 4206 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86159333

Since taconite iron ore can be attracted by magnets, it is called a magnetite. Magnetite is abundant in the Minnesota Iron ange as well as the Michigan Iron ange that is located next to Marquette as well as in the Penokee ange in Wisconsin, Minnesota. In Wisconsin-Minnesota's Gogebic-Penokee ange, the taconite iron ore deposits are concentrated on the bands that run from the Mellen area in Ashland County up to the area near Upson in the Iron County.

The taconite iron ore extraction process

The mining of taconite iron ore in the Gogebic-Penokee ange is carried out by means of open-pit mining methods. The mining process commences by the drilling of a hole into the ground in order to determine the exact location and quality of the iron ore deposit. The drilling also reveals the characteristics of the rocks that surround the ore. For the rather large modern mines, there…… [Read More]

References

Broman, A (2011)'Silent Majority' Backs Penokee Mine: Gogebic Taconite President

http://ashlandcurrent.com/article/11/11/15/silent-majority-backs-penokee-mine-gogebic-taconite-president

Cannon, W.F., (1973)The Penokean orogeny in northern Michigan, in Young, G.M., ed., Huronian stratigraphy and sedimentation: Geological Association of Canada Special Paper

Clements, B and Sack, C (2008)Introduction to Mining in the Penokees
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Mountain Man and American Anguish Journal of

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95214965

Mountain Man and American Anguish. Journal of Popular Film & Television (Winter 1997).

The author's primary argument/thesis is that the "mountain man" in popular cultural media represents several conflicting aspects of "the extreme West" in the American psyche, including: hero; villain; pariah; and scapegoat. In support of his argument/thesis, the author refers to numerous examples of popular cultural representations of the "mountain man," including 60 films; 20 documentaries; filmstrips; beer commercials; radio programs; music; paintings; drawings; sculptures and books. The author also refers to Jung's theory of the "shadow" - "the thing a person has no wish to be" -- the pariah onto which Americans project their darker characteristics. Though the author briefly discusses the "mountain man" as pariah and savior on television in the 1950's, he concentrates on representations of the "mountain man" from the early 1970's to the mid-1990's. According to the author, the "mountain man emerged largely…… [Read More]

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Mount Rainier Washington Is One

Words: 1730 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44451390

ac.wwu.edu/~bgoebel/members/bbarcott.htm>.

"Historical Notes - Vancouver's Voyage." 7-14 December 1929. Mount ainier Nature Notes. .

"Mount ainier Volcanic Hazards eponse Plan." July 2009. .

Parchman, F. "The Super Flood." 19 October 2005. Seattle Weekly. .

Service, U.S. Forest. "Eruption: May 18, 1980." January 2010. Mount Saint Helen's National Volcanic Monument. .

Signani, L. "The Height of Accuracy." 19 July 2000. Point of Beginning. .

U.S. Geodynamics Committee and the National esearch Council. Mount ainier: Active Cascade Volcano. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 1994.

University, Dept. Of Geological Sciences - San Diego State. "Stratovolcanoes." January 2004. How Volcanoes Work. .

Watson, J. "Principal Types of Volcanoes." 6 Feburary 1997. United States Geological Survey. .

Wood and Kienle, eds. Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

"World Top 50 Mountains By Prominance." January 2009. Peakbagger.com. .

Zimbelman, ye and Landis. "Fumeroles in Ice Caves on the Summit of Mount ainier." Journal…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan." August 2006. Pierce County Washington. .

Driedger, C. "Glacier Flow - Mount Rainier." January 1993. U.S. Geological Survey. .

Drieger and Scott. "Mount Rainier - Living Safeluy With a Volcano in the Backyard." 2008. Cascades Volcano Observatory - USGS. .

Duncan and Burns. The National Parks: America's Best Idea. New York: Knopf, 2009.
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Water and Sustainability Economic Approaches

Words: 3130 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85679247

Although the Murray-Darling River covers only about 14% of Australia's irrigated land, 50% of Australia's sheep and 25% of Australia's cattle rely on this source. Also, 40% of the nation's rice crop and 80% of its canned fruit product relies on the Murray-Darling River Complex. In all, three-quarters of Australia's water comes from the Murray-Darling River (Hussainy, p. 205).

Of course there are conflicts when so much is at stake. For one, the river carries about 2.5 tons of sale into South Australia "every minute," Hussainy writes. Inflows of saline groundwater are attributable to the problem -- and also, the removal of "native vegetation" and irrigation causes the salt to become a problem. hen the native vegetation is replace with shallow rooted crops, it is bad ecologically. The authors say that "sustainable development ecology should be regarded as part of economics" but the "myopic view of technocrats" views ecology and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brown, F. Lee. "Water Markets and Traditional Water Values: Merging Commodity and Community Perspectives." Water International Vol. 22 (1997): 2-5.

Global Water Partnership / Technical Advisory Committee. "Integrated Water Resource

Management. TAC Background Papers No. 4.

Gopalakrishnan, Chennat, Tortajada, Cecilia, and Biswas, Asit K. Water Institutions: Policies,
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Country Profile Hungry

Words: 1936 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98840944

Hungary

Geography

Hungary is located in Central Europe, northwest of Romania (CIA 2012, EEA 2012). It measures 93,000 square kilometers. It is bordered by Romania, Croatia, Austria, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Ukraine. Its capital is udapest (CIA, EEA).

Government

Hungary has a Republican form of government (FCO 2012). Its Constitution was adopted on April 18 last year and took effect in January this year. Its four branches of government are the executive, legislative, judicial and a Constitutional court. The President is the head of state. The Prime Minister is the head of government. A cabinet is also part of the executive branch. The legislative branch consists of a National Assembly of 386 members with a four-year term. The judicial branch is a Curia or a Supreme Court. The President since August 6, 2010 is Pal Schmitt and the Prime Minister since May 29, 2010 is Viktor Orban. Hungary has 19…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BEEA. Hungary. Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs: U.S. Department of State,

2012. Retrieved on March 24, 2012 from http://www.sate.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/36566.htm

CIA. Hungary. The World Fact Book: Central Intelligence Agency, 2012. Retrieved on March 24, 2012 from http://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/hu.html

EOE. Hungary. The Encyclopedia of Earth: Central Intelligence Agency, 2012. Retrieved
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Kant's Transcendental Aesthetic the Transcendental

Words: 979 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40664382

Thus, as I encounter a rock on the ground, outside, among other rocks, I have a sense of its space and of the space in relation to all other objects in it. A rock found floating in the air, nowhere near other rocks, inside a jar gives a completely different sense of the space of a rock and how it relates to the world around it. We intuit our understanding of space as it is merely an arbitrary designation we use to create further categorizations of the objects in our universe. Space, then, in its relationship to objects is both arbitrary and natural, but neither is real in and of itself.

We experience objects in the context of time as well as space. Time too is a non-entity. It cannot be measured in any real way other than the arbitrary and non-empirical measurements we have placed upon the concept of…… [Read More]

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Commodity Chain -- Carpets in

Words: 1707 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44522198

Once the design is completed, the textile materials will be processed by either hand knitting, machine woven, tufting, or bonding fibers.

Manufacturers and retailers integrate the concepts of both traditional as well as modern marketing in order to place their carpets onto the market in a way that is appealing to customers. Throughout the recent past, reductions have been observed in demand for rugs, generally due to modifications in social, cultural and economic statuses. The industry strives to sustain an increased demand by adapting to the emergent needs and by focusing on the benefits of the rugs -- heat, design, and more recently, increased indoor air quality.

orks Cited:

Kopley, R., Poe's Pym: Critical Explorations, Duke University Press, 1992

Mitchell, S., Rutenberg, L., Secret Toronto: The Unique Guidebook to Toronto's Hidden Sites, Sounds and Tastes, 2nd Edition, EC Press, 2002

Carpet and Rug Distributors and Manufacturers in North York, Ontario,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Kopley, R., Poe's Pym: Critical Explorations, Duke University Press, 1992

Mitchell, S., Rutenberg, L., Secret Toronto: The Unique Guidebook to Toronto's Hidden Sites, Sounds and Tastes, 2nd Edition, ECW Press, 2002

Carpet and Rug Distributors and Manufacturers in North York, Ontario, Canadian Business Directory http://www.canpages.ca/business/on/north-york/carpet-and-rug-distrs-and-mfrs/3527-137200.html last accessed on April 3, 2009

Carpeting Improves Indoor Air Quality, Explore Canada's Textile Industry, http://www.exploretextiles.ca/media/mediafiles_e.aspx last accessed on April 3, 2009