Filter By:

Sort By:

Reset Filters

Cultural Practices Essays (Examples)

Having trouble coming up with an Essay Title?

Use our essay title generator to get ideas and recommendations instantly

Cultural Schemata Theory Together With Formal Schemata
Words: 1631 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74524173
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Schemata Theory:

Together with formal schemata and linguistic schemata, cultural schemata are some of the main types of schema theory, which is a hypothesis on how knowledge is gained and processed. Actually, schema is a technical word used by cognitive supporters to explain how people arrange, process, and store information in their brain. Notably, schemata focus on how people arrange information to long-term memory in relation to experiences, attitudes, values, strategies, skills, and conceptual understanding. The schema theory is founded on the belief that every act of an individual's understanding includes his/her knowledge of the world. The received knowledge is in turn organized into units that contain stores information.

Understanding Cultural Schemata Theory:

Cultural schemata is also known as abstract, story, or linguistic schema and is developed on the basis of people's basic experiences ("Schemata Theory in Learning," n.d.). Cultural schemata theory is described as the pre-existing knowledge about…

References:

Fuhong, T. (2004, April 10). Cultural Schema and Reading Comprehension. Retrieved December 5, 2011, from  http://www.celea.org.cn/pastversion/lw/pdf/TanFuhong.pdf 

Gilakjani, A.P. & Ahmadi, S.M. (2011. June). The Relationship between L2 Reading

Comprehension and Schema Theory: A Matter of Text Familiarity. Journal of Information and Education Technology, 1(2), pp. 142-149, Retrieved from  http://www.ijiet.org/papers/24-K002.pdf 

Gudykunst, W.B. (2005). Theorizing about intercultural communication. Thousand Oaks:

Cultural Representation of Social Class Social Class
Words: 704 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56897648
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural epresentation of Social Class

Social class is a reflection of more than the material conditions of the lives that people live. Objective resources such as income are responsible for shaping up some cultural practices as well as behaviors which signal social class. These signals end up creating cultural identities among the people in the upper and those in the lower classes. This makes people get rooted perceptions that are subjective in terms of social classes. The paper will look at how culture which is related to social class impacts identity and pride within individuals within specific social classes.

Social classes have a great influence on people thoughts, feelings and their actions. Social class is a form of cultural identity which is constituted in various processes. First of all the social class that someone belongs to is determined by symbols such as wealth, preferences and social behaviors such as the…

References

Gabrenya, W.K. (2003).Culture and Social class. Retrieved June 26, 2013 from  http://my.fit.edu/~gabrenya/social/readings/ses.pdf 

Menon, D. (2011).Social class as culture. Retrieved June 26, 2013 from  http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/social-class-as-culture.html

Cultural Environment China Is Now
Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99777653
Read Full Paper  ❯

"9.8% in urban areas; substantial unemployment and underemployment in rural areas; an official Chinese journal estimated overall unemployment (including rural areas) for 2003 at 20% (2004 est.)" (CIA orld Factbook "China") the occupation breakdown for the nation is also rather simplistic, with a large protion of the population still being engaged in agricultural industries: "agriculture 49%, industry 22%, services 29% (2003 est.)" (CIA orld Factbook "China")

Cultural habits of China are relatively universal as the nation has relatively few national minorities and limited immigration from other nations due to its communist legacy. The majority ethnic group Han Chinese constitutes 91.9% of the total population with the significant minorities including Zhuang, Uygur, Hui, Yi, Tibetan, Miao, Manchu, Mongol, Buyi, Korean, and other nationalities, constituting only a total of 8.1%. There is though a significant social and cultural disparity between urban and rural populations. Urban China is relatively modern, with many conveniences…

Works Cited

CIA World Factbook "China" at  http://www.umsl.edu/services/govdocs/wofact2005/geos/ch.html 

Goldberg, Jonah. "10 Million Missing Girls." National Review 30 Jan. 2006: 8.

Cultural Competancy Recent Awareness About
Words: 596 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 11083706
Read Full Paper  ❯

The study reveals the ways culture and religion intersect with gender, and in fact the authors base their research on the theory of intersectionality. White privilege, gender, and any other issue related to social justice and personal consciousness is situational. Each individual will experience race, class, gender, power, religion, and ethnicity in different ways.

When reading the three articles, I first note their similarities. All three articles address white privilege. The problem with white privilege is that it is built into the social institutions upon which societies are built. White privilege can also be extended to refer to gender privilege and patriarchy, which is why Greenwood & Christian (2008) note that women from whatever culture or religion tend to gloss over their differences to bond together in sisterhood. Sisterhood might trump experiences such as racial prejudice and bias. However, when faced with the problem of the hijab, women who are…

Cultural Interaction and American Revolution
Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38695040
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cross-Cultural Differences and Communication

Cultural identity is a significant force that shapes the interaction between people from different cultures. The contemporary globalization has made intercultural interactions inevitable in the contemporary society. People draw conclusions about other people's culture depending on a wide range of observations about the individual's way of live, values and behavior. For instance, understanding what people from specific cultural values helps in drawing about that culture in that specific aspect of value or behavior (Byram, 2015). For example, I have drawn the conclusion that martial art is a significant cultural practice in the Chinese culture. This conclusion is informed by the several Chinese films that I have watched that have largely been characterized by Martial Arts. This predominance of martial arts in these films informed the conclusion I have drawn from the Chinese culture.

UNIT 4 DISCUSSION

I am visiting a new country within a different culture…

Cultural Beliefs and Religious Values Related to HIV AIDS
Words: 1352 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91057210
Read Full Paper  ❯

Collaborative Learning Community on Issues elated to HIV / AIDS

Culture refers to a complex set of material, intellectual, spiritual and emotional characteristics that define a social group or a society. It comprises of fundamental rights, ways of life, traditional beliefs, and value systems in society. Some cultural beliefs, practices, and norms related to sexuality contribute to the spread and increased risk of HIV acquisition. Cultural beliefs such as negative attitudes towards the use of protective mechanisms such as condoms as well discussing its use among societies is one among the contributing factors. For example, men in some communities do not prefer using condoms because they consider flesh-flesh sex with masculinity and promotion of health.

Practices such as the male circumcision influence the risk of HIV disease. Studies show that the social practice significantly reduces the risks of HIV disease among them male during penile vaginal sex. Social practices embedded…

References

Hall, J.C., Hall, B.J., & Cockerell, C.J. (2011). HIV / AIDS in the post-HAART era: Manifestations, treatment, and epidemiology. Shelton, CT: People's Medical Pub. House- USA.

Jenkins, C.L. & Robalino, D.A. (2003). HIV / AIDS in the Middle East and North Africa: The costs of inaction. Washington, DC: World Bank

Stolley, K.S., & Glass, J.E. (2009). HIV / AIDS. Santa Barbara, Calif: Greenwood Press

World Bank (2001). HIV / AIDS in the Caribbean: Issues and options. Washington, DC: World Bank

Cultural Influence among Immigrant Women from Sub Saharan Africa in Canada
Words: 2723 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 51475943
Read Full Paper  ❯

Culture among Immigrant Women from Sub-Saharan Africa Diagnosed with Chronic Diseases, Living in Grande Prairie, Alberta

The concept culture is defined as learned beliefs revealing the method people interact with their physical and social environment generally shared among a large segment of the population and transmitted from one generation to the other. These beliefs can include body size, habit and food habit. This proposal discusses the impact culture among immigrant women from Sub-Saharan Africa diagnosed with chronic diseases, living in Grande Prairie, Alberta. The review of the literature and its outcomes reveal that SSA women in Canada still prefer using the traditional medicine rather than western medicine. Moreover, African women in Canada diagnosed with chronic disease continue indulging unhealthy lifestyle that includes overeating to gain body weight because of the cultural beliefs that overweight is associated with wealth and prestige. Moreover, many women from Sub-Saharan Africa still rely on traditional…

Cultural Diversity Refers to the Diverse Varieties
Words: 1102 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48954019
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural diversity refers to the diverse varieties of human cultures that exist in a certain region, society or in the world as a whole. The characteristics of diversity may include ethnicity, traditions, geographic background, language spoken, religious beliefs, race or physical features. This term is also based on the idea that different cultures should respect each other's differences. With the global integration, the need for communication in accordance with other person's cultural awareness has intensified. Many times, any gesture that is considered offensive in one culture is completely accepted in the other culture. Hence, people sometimes develop misunderstandings when communicating with someone from a different culture. Therefore, it is essential that differences are appreciated for an effective communication.

I am a Christian man who is originally from Ukraine. My mother tongue is Ukrainian and I came to United States some 10 years ago. I am very moderate in my religious…

Bibliography

Newsom, D., Turk, J.V., and Kruckeberg, D. (2004). This is PR: The Realities of Public Relations. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth.

Rosener, J.B. (1990) "Ways Women Lead," Harvard Business Review, Vol. 68, No. 6, pp. 119-25

Cultural Competency in Nursing
Words: 1874 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 29513439
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Competency in Nursing

The basic knowledge in nursing or medical studies needs substantial facilitation in order to be effective and appropriate towards addressing the needs and preferences of the patients. Watson notes the need to integrate humanistic aspect into the career or nursing profession. He also believes on the need for the establishment of the caring relationship between the patients and nurses thus demonstration of unconditional acceptance of the patients in any condition. Nurses should integrate holistic and positive treatment with the aim of promoting health through knowledge and interventions thus elimination of interruptions during treatments or 'caring moments'. Modern patients have diverse problems and issues because of the cultural differences, races, and ethnicity thus the need to enhance the operations of the nurses. There is need to ensure that the nurses obtain cultural competencies with the aim of enhancing their ability to address diverse issues and problems faced…

References

Anderson, N.L.R., Calvillo, E.R., & Fongwa, M.N. (2007). Community-based approaches to strengthen cultural competency in nursing education and practice. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 18(1), 49S-59S.

Beach, M.C. (2005). Cultural competency: A systematic review of health care provider educational interventions. Cultural Competency, 43(4), 356-373.

Campinha-Bacote, J. (2002). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare services: A model of care. The Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 13(3), 181-185.

Rosswurm and Larrabee, (1999). A Model for Change to Evidence-Based

Cultural Tourism Culture Tourism Research
Words: 2802 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 53178335
Read Full Paper  ❯

The Balinese seem to be coping with the tourist invasion as well as they have coped with others, that is they are taking what they want, but they are not allowing themselves to be any the less Balinese. This appears to have been the story throughout Bali's history, outside cultures came, perhaps as conquerors, perhaps only as visitors and traders, but Balinese society and culture have remained distinctive, accepting outward forms, but molding them to its own different purposes." (Pickard, 1996)

These insights are showing how the changes in tourism are having an effect on Bali by developing the industry. However, for most local residents, they are maintaining their basic cultural traditions. This is despite the fact that there are added pressures to continually adopt these practices (in spite of the transformations). (Pickard, 1996)

However, many local officials feel that an influx of tourism is having an adverse impact on…

References

Bali Weather and Climate. (2011). Indonesia Point. Retrieved from:  http://www.indonesiapoint.com/tourist-attractions/bali/bali-weather.html 

Botetar, R. (2012). The Beauty of Bali is under Pressure. ABC News. Retrieved from: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-01-05/over-development-of-bali-feature/3760496 

Fiegenbaum, E. (2012). The Impact of Tourism in Bali. E How. Retrieved from: http://www.ehow.com/list_7195825_impact-tourism-bali.html

Hitchcock, M. (2009). Tourism in Southeast Asia. Copenhagen: NAIS.

Cultural Observation
Words: 1013 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 26981494
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Observation

In any culture, the way someone dresses will have an impact in identifying who they are and the traditions which are embraced. The Indian civilization has their own form of dress that is holding onto various social customs in the form of the sari. To fully understand how this is impacting society requires carefully examining the cultural context of the dress ensemble, providing a description of it and discussing various influences (such as: somatotypes). Together, these elements will highlight the impact of these styles on different segments of society. (Katiyar, 2009)

Briefly describe the cultural context of the dress practice or ensemble.

The Indian sari is a strip of indistinct cloth which is worn by women. It is from four to nine yards in length and is draped over the body in various styles. The outfit is worn based upon historical traditions which are dating back to the…

References

The Classification System of Dress. (2013).

The Three Somatotypes. (2013). University of Houston. Retrieved from:  http://www.uh.edu/fitness/comm_educators/3_somatotypesNEW.htm 

Eicher, J. (2008). The Visible Self: Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society. New York, NY: Fairchild Books.

Katiyar, V. (2009). Indian Saris. New Delhi: Wisdom Tree.

Cultural Counselor Being a Counselor Can Sometimes
Words: 2185 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 34235489
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Counselor

Being a counselor can sometimes be a really tough job. Counseling can only be effective and beneficial when the counselor places himself or herself in the shoes of his or her client. If he or she is unable to do so, he or she will never become an effective counselor. Placing oneself in the circumstances of someone else is not easy, let alone placing oneself in the shoes of a person who is of a different race, religion or culture. That is the real test of a counselor. In this paper I shall discuss what is required to understand the cross-cultural relationships in counseling to help the client get over their problem easily. All the dimensions pertaining to counseling (of a client of a different background that the counselor) will discussed with the case scenario.

Case Scenario

When clients and counselors have different cultural (or ethnic or racial)…

References:

Cannon, E.P. (2008). "Promoting moral reasoning and multicultural competence during internship." Journal of Moral Education, 37(4), 503-518.

Crethar, Hugh C. And Ratts, Manivong J. (2008). "Why Social Justice is a Counseling Concern?"

Gilbert, Jane. (2002). "Cross-cultural issues in counseling skillstraining: lessons from Lesotho."

Journal of Social Development in Africa. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons.

Cultural Blending That Occurred When the British Colonized India
Words: 864 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 83098896
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Blending That Occurred hen the British Colonized India

Throughout the course of history, the British were known as the world's conquerors. This is because they established a series of colonies around the globe that supported the nation and its self-interest. During their occupation of India, there was focus on blending different cultures to create a unique society. (Bingham)

This transformed India from being a backward region to one that was able to improve its standard of living and make steps towards joining the modern world. The result is that a new social identify was developed. To fully understand the way that this occurred requires examining cultural blending, how it shaped their identity, if it was permanent, what caused it to change and if it was beneficial. These different factors will illustrate the way this occurred and the impact it had on India's development. (Bingham)

Description

The British first arrived…

Works Cited

Bingham, Jane. Indian Art and Culture. Hoboken: Wiley, 2005. Print.

Kasbekar, Asha. Pop Culture in India. Oxford: ABC CLIO, 2006. Print.

Cultural Experience Description the Event Is More
Words: 2391 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26516045
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Experience

Description

The event is more a series of events. I went on vacation with some friends to Miami, and while not everything I experienced on that trip would count as a cultural experience, there is little question that there were some very different experiences. There was the visit to the Haitian restaurant, for example, but the event that stands out the most was my visit to Calle Ocho, the old Cuban neighborhood. As Korean student I find it challenging enough to deal with mainstream American culture, but Hispanic culture is completely different again, so this experience provided me with an interesting counterpoint to my usual experiences in the United States.

In this neighborhood, if people can speak English they do not admit it. There are coffee windows where strong, sugary shots of Cuban coffee and cafe con leche are dispensed to passers-by in a hurry. There are old…

Works Cited:

Devine, P. (1989). Stereotypes and prejudice: Their automatic and controlled components. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol. 56 (1) 5-18.

Geert Hofstede.com (2012). National culture. Geert-Hofstede.com. Retrieved May 7, 2012 from  http://geert-hofstede.com 

Hofstede, G. (1983). The cultural relativity of organizational practices and theories. Journal of International Business Studies. Vol. 14 (Fall 1983) 75-89.

Mallol, C., Holtom, B. & Lee, T. (2007). Job embeddedness in a culturally diverse environment. Journal of Business Psychology. Vol. 22, 35-44.

Cultural Distance: How Is it Measured, And How it Impact on Global Marketing Operations

The persistence of cultural distances is relevant for the global multinational marketing operations exposed to multiple cultures in their everyday activities. This indicates that marketing across border introduces complexities because it forces global marketers to tailor their approaches and practices to each cultural context they carry out their business activities. As a result, this paper will discuss concepts applicable to different aspects of cross-border operations. The primary focus of the paper is on multinational business corporations (Baumann, 2007).

This study shows how Hofstede's model is still the most relevant piece of reference for a successive cross-cultural analysis despite it being a widely criticized. The paper compares and contrasts Hofstede's famous concepts with Turner and Schwartz, Trompenaars and Hampden's valued inventory. It will attempt to provide empirical evidence of how cultural diversity influences the global markets by…

References

Baumann, A. (2007). Influences of culture on the style of business behavior between Western and Arab managers. Mu-nchen: GRIN Verlag GmbH.

Baumu-ller, M. (2007). Managing cultural diversity: An empirical examination of cultural networks and organizational structures as governance mechanisms in multinational corporations. Bern: Lang.

Cavusgil, T. & Ghauri, P.N. (2009). New challenges to international marketing. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Curry, J.E. (2009). A short course in international marketing: Approaching and penetrating the global marketplace. Petaluma, CA: World Trade Press.

Cultural Identity We Are All
Words: 1516 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35389105
Read Full Paper  ❯

" Taking into consideration these three stages, I would position myself in the second stage - that of cultural identity search. I am aware of my cultural background and I always have been, but the fact that I live in the multicultural American society made it hard for me to fully embrace my cultural heritage. I am at a stage in my life when I feel the need to understand my culture in order to better understand who I am. The fact that I am aware of my cultural appurtenance does not mean that I completely embrace my cultural identity. Learning about my cultural heritage is the path towards better understanding who I am and identifying myself with the cultural group that I belong to.

ibliography

Culture of Pakistan, available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_Pakistan;

Sharmeen, Hassan, the Pakistani identity crisis, available at http://www.pakistanlink.com/Letters/2004/oct04/08/04.html;

Chapter 4, Cultural Patterns andCcommunication: Foundations.

Chapter 6, Cultural…

Bibliography

Culture of Pakistan, available at  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_Pakistan ;

Sharmeen, Hassan, the Pakistani identity crisis, available at http://www.pakistanlink.com/Letters/2004/oct04/08/04.html;

Chapter 4, Cultural Patterns andCcommunication: Foundations.

Chapter 6, Cultural Identity, Cultural Biases, and Intercultural Contact.

Cultural Diversity Interview Narrative Cultural
Words: 4850 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8522541
Read Full Paper  ❯

While in high school, she worked as a waitress at a local diner. Most of the population was black, therefore there was little contact with white customers or employees. Margaret feels that she was socially isolated until the 1950s. She was not exposed to white culture; it was foreign to her. She was only exposed to black culture of the time. They were not allowed in certain stores, restaurants, or other places of business. She remembers "white only" restrooms and "black only" fountains. This cultural isolation was oppressive.

Margaret feels that the oppressive attitudes and discrimination that she experienced as a child determined much of how her life proceeded in adulthood. The idea that she could only go so far was ingrained as a child. She never really broke free of this feeling. In her 40s, she moved to upstate New York. Here, she found that many women had succeeded…

References

Diller, D. (1999). Opening the dialogue: Using culture as a tool in teaching young African

American children. Reading Teacher, 52(8), 820-828. [Available electronically through ERIC/EBSCOhost]

Moll, L.C., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching:

using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. Theory into Practice, 31 (2), 132-141.

Cultural Transmissions by the Italian
Words: 2492 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82728048
Read Full Paper  ❯

Indeed the Germans, the French, and the rest looked back to an antiquity in which their ancestors had been subjugated by the legions. Nothing is more remarkable therefore than the rapid and irrevocable penetration of Italian ideas and practices among the "barbarians," as the Italian writers referred to them, some of whom were currently invading the peninsula." (Wiener, 124) it's also important to note that influence of antique classicism typical for Italian architecture of the 14-16th centuries is not observed in the north. Classical style of Italian cathedrals and churches, typical for Ancient Greek and oman pagan temples is usually not observed in buildings of enaissance epoch in Germany, Britain or France, where architecture was influenced by Gothic style, which got earlier spread in Europe.

eformation and Counter eformation

The spread of Protestantism over Europe, which is considered to be one of the most historically significant achievements of enaissance and…

References

Hileman, Tony Living on the Creative Edge of Our Culture available at www.americanhumanist.org/about/messageED1.php

Wiener, Philip P. The Dictionary of the History of Ideas: Studies of Selected Pivotal Ideas available at  http://etext.virginia.edu/DicHist/dict.html 

Kohl, Benjamin G., and Witt, Ronald G., eds., the Earthly Republic: Italian Humanists on Government and Society (1978)

Cultural Observation of Dress
Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 383010
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Observation of Dress

Why do all humans engage in the act of dressing the body? Consider how dress relates to both the physical and the social needs of the wearer.

Everyone dresses according to social factors and to make themselves more physically appealing to other. This helps them to be seen as hip and enhance their appearance. These variables ensure that the social and individual needs of the person are met. This is when they will have greater amounts of self-confidence. (Eicher, 2008)

f all humans dress themselves for the same basic reasons, why do we look so different from each other? Consider the influences of culture, age, gender, and other factors that distinguish people from one another.

People look different based upon their cultural background, age and gender. These elements are combined together to provide the person with a unique sense of style. This is used to make…

Inside a corporate atmosphere everyone is expected to dress in a suit and tie. This helps them to appear to be more professional. These cultural variations are different from what I wear in normal society. They require distinct ensembles and do not overlap into these areas. (Eicher, 2008)

Update Miner's article on Nacirema (Reading I.2), and describe a currently popular and familiar grooming or dressing activity using Miner's technical writing style. Avoid ordinary words -- that is, lay terminology -- where a more abstract or scientific word will more accurately describe the activity to someone who is totally unfamiliar with the activity. Next, read what you've written and write down your reactions to how this changes your perception of the dressing activity.

Miner's article is discussing the appearance

Cultural Difference This Proposed Study
Words: 1388 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 46835309
Read Full Paper  ❯



There can be several reasons behind this enduring practice. Men and women feel that if parents have chosen someone for them, they would also support them through hard times. We understand that all marriages go through rough patches and some more than others. In these trying times, parents and other family members normally intervene to resolve problems. This is a common practice in India and all countries where arranged marriages are still in practice. However if a person chose to marry someone of their choice, it is very likely that during hard times, others would distance themselves saying; "didn't we already warn you." The fear of being left alone to ride out the tide might actually push some people in favor of arranged marriages.

The second reason is the ease and convenience that comes with having a partner chosen for you. In the western world, getting married doesn't come easy.…

References

Serena Nanda. Arranging a Marriage in India. From Stumbling Toward Truth: Anthropologists at Work, edited by Philip R. Devita, 2000, pp. 196 -- 204. Published by Waveland Press.

Jodi O'Brien in Robert Kupla edition. "Arranged marriages." Encyclopedia of Gender and Society. Volume 1, 2008

Cultural Diversity in Organizations Organization
Words: 4681 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 71138902
Read Full Paper  ❯

The solutions are numerous and more diversified.

Knowledge is crucial for business success. There are two types of knowledge: explicit or tacit. The explicit type is easily codified, stored and transmitted to other individuals. As opposed to the former, the tacit one is embedded in people. The size of the tacit knowledge is proportional to the diversity of the workplace. Therefore, organizations face the increasing challenge today of finding ways to grasp into the pool of tacit knowledge they own in order to create competitive advantage. This is the type of knowledge to which competition doesn't have access because it's embedded in unique individuals belonging to a give organization.

Knowledge can be enhanced by the learning process. Its final objective is to be materialized into products and services. This final stage of the process refers to the innovation part. Innovations are the most important tool an organization has in hand…

Reference list:

Brittan, S. (1996, June 6). Keynes and globalization. Financial Times, p. 12.

Hofstede, G. & McRae, R.R. (2004). Personality and Culture Revisited: Linking Traits and Dimensions of Culture. Cross Cultural Research, vol. 38(1), pp. 52-88.

Hofstede, G. (2001). Culture Consequences, 2nd ed. London: Sage.

Hofstede, G. (1984). Cultural Dimensions in Management and Planning. Asia Pacific Journal, pp.84-99.

Cultural Artifact Mental Health Drugs as Panacea
Words: 2205 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 95196658
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Artifact

Mental Health Drugs as Panacea

A culture is made up of people who have developed the same language (or at least dialect of a larger language), art forms, religion, and other means of distinguishing one group from another. It can be said that all groups have a certain culture that they have established by which they are constrained. For example, a company develops a culture that is specific to it, and that culture governs everyone who works at, or is affiliated with, that company. In ethnic terms, a culture will define the ways in which one ethnic grouping is different from another. Although certain groupings may have similar languages, religions and ways of doing things, they will also have differences which distinguish them. In the same way that different species of birds are characterized by slight differences in appearance or location, people are grouped by the culture from…

References

Cottone, R.R. (2007). Paradigms of counseling and psychotherapy, revisited: Is social constructionism a paradigm? Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 29(3), 189- 199.

Haylock, B. (2004). Resilience education and drug information. Australian Screen Education, 38, 142-144.

Sharav, V.H. (2005). Screening for mental illness: The merger of eugenics and the drug industry. Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, 7(2), 111-121.

WebMD. (2005). Major depression (clinical depression). Retrieved from  http://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/major-depression

Cultural Empowerment
Words: 779 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57264674
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Empowerment

When planning a health promotion program, we should consider the positive (empowerment process) and the negative behaviors. As we begin to understand our intended audience we can assure the most culturally-appropriate educational intervention. In doing so, we are more likely to create partnerships that help people successfully achieve lasting change and truly promote health.

One of the most common issues that are not discussed in the armed forces is military sexual trauma (MST). This is when an individual will face unnecessary amounts of sexual pain from others they are serving with. A few most common forms include: unwanted sexual touching / grabbing, threating / offensive remarks about someone's body / sexual activities and unwarranted sexual advances. This has begun to occur so frequently that the Veteran Administration conducted a study, where they found that the total amounts of MST affected: 1 in every 5 women and 1 in…

References

Coping Skills for Trauma. (2004). Ibiblio.org. Retrieved from:  http://www.ibiblio.org/rcip/copingskills.html 

Military Sexual Trauma. (2011). VA. Retrieved from:  http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/military-sexual-trauma-general.asp 

Robins, A. (1992). Awaken the Giant Within. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster.

Cultural Impact on Politics Political
Words: 5093 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 96410547
Read Full Paper  ❯

4). This idea has since been abandoned. The mythology of the Amazons, a matriarchy of warrior women, has been discounted as no more than a myth, one deriving from the deep-seated fear on the part of males that they might lose their power and authority. In matrilineal societies, men tend still to monopolize the rights of power. Some Chinese anthropologists believe the stories of true matriarchal societies in some regions of China in the past, but this is uncertain. A matriarchy would be presumed to be less warlike and more nurturing as a social order and would not subordinate men in the way men have done to women in the patriarchal society.

The formulation and operation of power in the largely patriarchal social order in the world today divides along other line than gender, with political action influenced most by ideology, religion, divisions of power, and other aspects of group…

References

Adler, F. (1983). Nations Not Obsessed with Crime. Littleton, Colorado: Fred B. Rotham and Co.

Berry, J.M. (1997). The interest group society. New York: Longman.

Crapo, R.H. (1993). Cultural anthropology. Sluice Dock Guilford, Conn.: Dushkin.

El-Awa, M.S. (1982). Punishment in Islamic Law. Indianapolis, Indiana: American Trust Publications.

Cultural Epoch Theory The Shift
Words: 1276 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 44463486
Read Full Paper  ❯

At the same time, it considerably increased the number of books that would reach the masses, allowing them to see outside the teachings of the Church or of the religious preachers. Moreover, the printing machine offered the possibility for those opposing the rule of the Catholic Church to spread their beliefs and convictions. Thus, Gutenberg's invention was the main tool for what would later be called the Reformation, the religious movement which is often associated with the Renaissance and which influenced the artistic movement in the same manner as the Renaissance affected the emergence of the reformist churches.

The hallmarks of the previous era were rather obvious and contrasted to the ones the Renaissance promoted. They manifested themselves at all the levels of the society. Thus, during the middle Ages, the Church represented the highest institution of the state which had as its subjects all political and land owners (Berstein…

Works Cited

Berstein, Serge, and Milza. Pierre. Histoire de l'Europe. Paris: Hatier, 1994

Braunstein, Florence, and Pepin, Jean Francois. Les Grandes Doctrines. Paris: Ellipses, 1998

Culture-Epoch Theory: The fact of Ceaseless Change. N.d. 20 May 2008 http://iws.ccccd.edu/mbailey/culture_epoch_theory.htm

Hispanic Society. Paintings from the Middle Ages. 2006. 20 May 2008  http://www.hispanicsociety.org/hispanic/paintings_medieval.htm

Cultural Diversity Interviewed a Co-Worker
Words: 1099 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 49107987
Read Full Paper  ❯



Unlike the culture of my interviewee, African-American isn't really broken into subgroups. I was born and raised in Buffalo, New York, which is very close to the Canadian Border and the "U.S. Peace Bridge." I grew up speaking English, and it is the only language I speak.

My religion is not typical of most African-Americans, who tend to be Baptist, Methodist, or Lutheran. I was raised as a Catholic and still practice that religion today. I'm not the only African-American I know who is Catholic, but it's not common in my subculture.

Like my interviewee, I think the media is generally doing a good job of representing African-Americans in the media. However, I still see instances when African-Americans seem to be portrayed as being ruthless and slovenly, which in my opinion makes all African-Americans appear to be the same way (association assimilation).

I believe that all cultures have something that…

Cultural and Ethnic Differences the Importance of
Words: 718 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75721303
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural and Ethnic Differences

The Importance of Understanding Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Differences by Managers and Professionals in a Business Setting.

The proceeding essay explains the role managers can play in managing cultural, ethnic and gender diversity in an organization and why it is important for the managers to understand it in a professional environment.

The Importance of Understanding Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Differences by Managers and Professionals in a Business Setting.

It is usually evident and practiced in many organizations that although diversity is considered highly important part of organizational culture but in practice the culture is biased (negatively) towards women and minorities. (Australian Multicultural Foundation, 2013)

The working and communication styles (more friendly and less dominating when it comes to conversation styles) used by women are usually not acceptable and less popular throughout the organization. Because of this they are not the top priority when promotions are considered.…

References

Australian Multicultural Foundation (2013). Managing Cultural Diversity. Australia: Australian Multicultural Foundation and Robert Bean Consulting.

FIRN (2008). Tips for Working in a Culturally Competent Manner. Maryland: FIRN.

Gardenswartz, L. And Rowe, A. (2013). Understandingthe Evolving Role Of Cultural Diversity In the Workplace. California: Sage Publications.  http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/26078_pt2.pdf  [Accessed: 5 Sep 2013].

Cultural Profile of Danny Below Is the
Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53226579
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Profile of Danny

Below is the profile of a college Freshman using the ADRESING format by Hays (Hays; Hays 309-315) This method of assessment of cultural awareness is used by many clinical psychologists in order to guarantee cultural sensitivity during therapy and to provide culturally relevant care:

Age or generational differences:

Danny is 19, and a Freshman in college

Disability:

He has no visible disabilities and none of which he is aware.

Religion:

He is a Christian, but is not currently attending any local church.

Ethnicity:

Danny is Han Chinese.

Social status:

At home in Beijing, Danny is upper middle class. His parents have good jobs and are party members, though they are not rich.

Sexual orientation:

Unknown

Indigenous heritage:

He is a member of the majority culture in Beijing, but is Asian minority in America.

Nationality:

Citizen of the PRC

Gender:

Male

Profile:

Danny is a college freshman…

Works Cited

"China - Chinese Geert Hofstede Cultural Dimensions Explained "Web. 11/23/2010 .

"China today "Web. 10/31/2010 .

Hays, Pamela A. "

Multicultural Applications of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy." Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 26.3 (1995): 309-15. Web.

Cultural Sensitivity in Nursing 1
Words: 330 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88621784
Read Full Paper  ❯

First, they can avoid cultural stereotyping simply by becoming aware of the issue in principle. Generally, the mere awareness of the issue and of its importance is likely to reduce any practitioner's tendency to succumb to cultural stereotyping. econd, nurses and other healthcare professionals can avoid cultural stereotyping by committing themselves to learning about different cultures and corresponding cultural sensibilities and expectations that are functions of cultural differences. In principle, professional practitioners who make that commitment tend to learn the most about different cultures and make the most conscientious effort to apply that knowledge in their everyday nursing responsibilities and practice.

ources Consulted

Mixer, .J. "Use of the culture care theory and ethnonursing method to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care." Contemporary Nurse, Vol. 28 (April 2008).

Taylor, C., Lillis, C., and LeMone, P. (2005). Fundamentals of Nursing: The Art and cience of Nursing Care. Philadelphia, PA:…

Sources Consulted

Mixer, S.J. "Use of the culture care theory and ethnonursing method to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care." Contemporary Nurse, Vol. 28 (April 2008).

Taylor, C., Lillis, C., and LeMone, P. (2005). Fundamentals of Nursing: The Art and Science of Nursing Care. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins.

Cultural Audit of St Cloud State University
Words: 677 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67767827
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Audit of St. Cloud State University: HR Analysis and Critique

To address the deficits highlighted the cultural audit, St. Cloud University has resolved to address issues of demographic isolation, namely the sense of students that they do not have a 'connection' to the university, and the persistent problems regarding minority tensions and institutional discrimination. Perhaps the most telling survey comment came from a student, criticizing the survey structure: "I think that this survey was bogus. I can't believe you wasted $50,000 on this thing. e already know that SCSU is a hub of institutional racism" as noted in the Qualitative Analysis Section of the report. Another telling detail was that some faculty, administration and staff felt there was a notable lack of African-American and Jewish faculty members on campus, and that some felt the presence of a 'glass ceiling" regarding promotions of women. Also, disability services were perceived as…

Works Cited

St. Cloud Cultural Audit." Nichols and Associates, Inc.. Washington, D.C. October 2002. 24 Mar 2008.  http://www.stcloudstate.edu/documents/nichols/default.asp

Cultural Differences in Professional Setting
Words: 555 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87880823
Read Full Paper  ❯

"

As the saying goes, 'two heads are better than one' so teams working together can find solutions better than a person working alone. Collective wisdom is important in business and as such, given the diversity in the workforce, professionals are required to be adaptable and willing to evaluate the way they conduct business. According to the Anti-Defamation League diversity has a direct impact on the marketplace, talent, and organizational effectiveness.

Moreover, according to them, when companies value diversity and effectively manage it, they can build better relationships, improve decision-making, stimulate effective team building, expand the ability to change problems into opportunities, provide employees with skills that promote organizational effectiveness, increase employee initiative, camaraderie and morale, and reduce conflict among many other benefits. In today's economy, successful organizations "recognize that managing diversity is an opportunity to increase productivity and create effective business strategies." (Anti-Defamation League, 2003).

eferences

Anti-Defamation League. (2003).…

References

Anti-Defamation League. (2003). The Business Case for Diversity. Retrieved from  http://www.adl.org/education/edu_awod/anti-Bias_in_workplace.pdf 

Kelly, E., Young, A., Clark, L. (1993). Sex Stereotyping in the Workplace: A Manager's Guide -- Women in Business. Business Horizons, March-April. Retrieved from  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1038/is_n2_v36/ai_13815063/?tag=content;col1 

Taggart, A. (2007). Beyond Diversity: Becoming a Culturally Competent Organization. Ivey Business Journal, September-October. Retrieved from  http://www.iveybusinessjournal.com/article.asp?intArticle_ID=712 

Workman, D. (2008). International Trade Communication: Smart Business Negotiators Adapt to Audience Cultural Styles. Retrieved from  http://internationalbusiness.suite101.com/article.cfm/international_trade_communication

Cultural and Construction History of
Words: 5800 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2908770
Read Full Paper  ❯

Charles Van Doren has concluded that the Copernican Revolution is actually the Galilean Revolution because of the scale of change introduced by Galileo's work.

The technological innovation of the Renaissance era started with the invention of the printing press (the Renaissance). Even though the printing press, a mechanical device for printing multiple copies of a text on sheets of paper, was first invented in China, it was reinvented in the West by a German goldsmith and eventual printer, Johann Gutenberg, in the 1450s. Before Gutenberg's invention, each part of metal type for printing presses had to be individually engraved by hand. Gutenberg developed molds that permitted for the mass production of individual pieces of metal type. This permitted a widespread use of movable type, where each character is a separate block, in mirror image, and these blocks are assembled into a frame to form text. Because of his molds, a…

Cultural Perceptions of Time in Africa Time
Words: 6951 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52859355
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Perceptions of Time in frica

Time is a foundational factor in every culture. The perception of time is different for most cultures and the determining factor to those differences is often based on the means of production. "Most cultures have some concept of time, although the way they deal with time may differ fundamentally." (Kokole 1994, 35) Tracing the perception of the concept of time in frica can be seen as tracing the European racial prejudices of the intellect of the indigenous populations in the colonized regions of frica. Much of the information regarding the development of time concepts in frican culture is colonial and based on the European interlopers recorded ideas.

Some of those recorded ideas are those of missionaries and others are those of capitalist adventurers, with the intermittent mark of a very few true historians.

In Mali, as in many other parts of frica, there are…

Akan" is an ethnographic and linguistic term used to refer to a cluster of culturally homogenous groups living in central and southern Ghana and parts of the adjoining eastern Cote d'Ivoire. The Akan constitute two broad subcategories: the inland Asante, Bono, Akyem, Akwapem, and Kwawu, who speak the Twi, and the coastal Fante, who speak a dialect of the same name. The Akan dialects are, for the most part, mutually intelligible. Most of these ethnic groups constituted autonomous political systems in the pre-colonial period. www.questia.com/PageManagerHTMLMediator.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=55458430" (Adjaye 1994, 57)

Studies of Akan time perceptions and calendrical systems have been limited despite the fact that the existence of institutions and mechanisms for time-reckoning have been noted in the literature on the history and ethnography of the Akan for nearly two centuries. Beyond early sparse references by Rattray (1923) and Danquah (1968), a full-length monograph on the subject did not appear until Deborah Fink "Time and Space Measurements of the Bono of Ghana" (1974); however, the author's primary concern was with the applicability of Bono terminologies for measuring volume, weight, and time to formal education, rather than with time-marking systems P.F. Bartle brief five-page paper, "Forty Days: The Akan Calendar" (1978), was an exploratory essay into a single calendrical framework, the 40-day (adaduanan) cycle. Its treatment is consequently restrictive and limited to the 40-day calendrical structure. Similarly, Tom McCaskie "Time and the Calendar in Nineteenth-Century Asante: An Exploratory Essay" (1980) and Ivor Wilks ' "On Mentally Mapping Greater Asante: A Study of Time and Motion" (1992) are concerned primarily with a specific aspect of time: the scheduling of diplomatic and other governmental business in Asante.

(Adjaye 1994, 57)

Cultural Differences in Management Styles
Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 12392752
Read Full Paper  ❯

In a large measure, these concepts reflect the problems that have accompanied increased diversity as both a consequence and a cause of a great many social problems" (1999, p. 1). In this regard, Naylor defines culture as being "the learned way (or ways) of belief, behavior, and the products of these (both physically and socially) that is shared (at least to some degree) within human groups and serves to distinguish that culture group from another learning different beliefs and behaviors" (1999, p. 2). It is important to note as well that "cultural diversity is not restricted to particular nationalities; it includes issues of gender and individuals with disabilities" (Russell & McLean, 1999). Because there are some fundamental differences between cultural beliefs and behaviors, it is not surprising that cross-cultural differences can have a profound effect on organizational performance, and these issues are discussed further below.

Effect of Cultural Diversity on…

Cultural Influence in Education Culture
Words: 3232 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76073622
Read Full Paper  ❯

A woman can be neither a political leader nor a judge; she must only appear in public modestly dressed, and her natural and sacred task is to keep the household smoothly functioning and to raise and instruct her children to be good Muslims. Men, for their part, must shoulder the burden of providing for the family in material ways. Liberation for a woman does not mean being like a male, or taking up male tasks, but rather being herself and fulfilling the destiny Allah created for her. (Waines, 1995, P. 255)

Feminine education is therefore one of the most extreme of all issues with regard to the influence of the Islamic culture on education, and as has been stated earlier there is significant diversity in the educational role inclusion of women. (Weil, 2004, p. 142) for many one of the biggest reasons for immigration is the offer of greater educational…

References

Bin Talal, E.H. (2004). Musa Ibn Maymun and the Arab-Islamic Education. European Judaism, 37(2), 5.

Buetow, H.A. (1991). Religion in Personal Development: An Analysis and a Prescription. New York: Peter Lang.

Collins, D. (2006). Culture, Religion and Curriculum Lessons from the 'Three Books' Controversy in Surrey BC. The Canadian Geographer, 50(3), 342.

Elnour, a., & Bashir-Ali, K. (2003). Teaching Muslim Girls in American Schools. Social Education, 67(1), 62.

Cultural and Construction History of
Words: 3190 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30043809
Read Full Paper  ❯



Crusaders were able to implement feudal states throughout their travels during this period of warfare, many of which have been termed Crusader states and which were erected throughout the Holy Land and in parts of Asia Minor as well as Greece. The most famous of these, of course, was the establishment of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, which took place in 1099 and reigned until its fall in 1291.

Kingdom of Jerusalem

It should be remembered that for the vast duration of the reign of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, European settlers were widely outnumbered by Franks and Muslims, and only comprised approximately 15 to 25% of the entire population (Kedar 148). The Europeans lived in areas which were both rural as well as urban, and despite attempts to integrate with the surrounding foreigners, they did not infiltrate areas which were predominantly Muslim and which had never had many Christian dwellers (Ellenblu…

Cultural Attitude Towards Animals in India
Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59314762
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Attitudes Towards Animals in India

India has long held the cow to be a sacred animal (hence the famous phrase 'sacred cow'). But the attitude of Hindus towards cows has often been described as perplexing and irrational by esterners, particularly given the high rates of poverty in the nation. It is not uncommon to see cows wandering through the streets while starving people beg, causing observers from other ethnicities and faiths to wonder why Indians do not slaughter the cows for food. Even an Indian anthropologist, M.N. Srinivas, an Indian stated: "Orthodox Hindu opinion regards the killing of cattle with abhorrence, even though the refusal to kill the vast number of useless cattle which exists in India today is detrimental to the nation...the large animal population is more a liability than an asset in view of our land resources" (Harris 1)

According to Orthodox Hindu doctrine: "the cow is…

Works Cited

"Animals in Indian culture." Sri.Venkateswara Zoological Park [24 Apr 2012]

http://www.svzoo.org/html/anicult.htm

Harris, Marvin. "India's sacred cow." Sociology 101. [24 Apr 2012]

 http://sociology101.net/readings/Indias-sacred-cow.pdf

Cultural Differences New Mexican History
Words: 1406 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 73696118
Read Full Paper  ❯

Before Anglos came to dominate the land, Cabeza de Baca portrays a kind of paradise-like environment, where even the sheepherders were like "musicians and poets" and "the troubadours of old," and every person had a story (Cabeza de Baca 11). This has been called a method of "preserving the culture" against the dominant discourse of Anglos: Cabeza de Baca, along with other writers of her generation are portrayed as trying to "get it [their culture] right" in an effort to transcend the overwhelming discourse of the Anglo "other" (Cabeza de Baca xx). Using Hispanic phrases and names, blurring historiography and biography, and the view of the past as a kind of lost "Eden" are all aspects of the authors 'agenda' (Cabeza de Baca xx). Cabeza de Baca deliberately uses English as a way of communicating with the Anglo reader and 'setting the record straight.'

Yet while Cabeza de Baca strives…

Work Cited

Cabeza de Baca, Fabiola. We fed them cactus. UNM Press, 1954.

Cultural Intonation Cultural Differences in
Words: 3430 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 73347025
Read Full Paper  ❯

2009). Othe studies had peviously concluded that English infants developed a pefeence fo tochaic wods, the dominant stess constuct of English wods, ove iambic stess pattens within the fist yea of life (Hohle et al. 2009). A compaison of Geman and Fecnh infants in fou distinct expeiments confims and even naows down the timefame in which this diffeentiation of pefeence occus, and also shows (though the Fench language expeiments) that the ability to distinguish the two opposing stess pattens does not necessaily esult in the development of pefeence, if the taget language itself lacks a dominant stess stuctue (Hohle et al. 2009). Even at six months, a specific language begins to mediate peception.

An ealie study suggests that the timing of stess and intonation pefeence development is even soone than six months. While citing evidence suggesting that language-independent phonetic contasts and melodic vaiations ae ecognized within the fist fou months…

references during the first half year of life: Evidence from German and French infants." Infant behavior and development 32(3), pp. 262-74.

Laroche, M.; Pons, F. & Richard, M. (2009). "The role of language in ethnic identity measurement: A multitrait-multimethod approach to construct validation." Journal of social psychology 149(4), pp. 513-40.

Nguyen, T.; Ingrahm, C. & Pensalfini, J. (2008). "Prosodic transfer in Vietnamese acquisition of English contrastive stress patterns." Journal of phonetics 36(1), pp. 158.

Turk, a. & Shattuck-Hufnagel, S. (2007). "Multiple targets of phrase-final lengthening in American English words." Journal of phonetics 35(4), pp. 445-72.

Wyatt, J. (2007). "Skinner 1, Chomsky 0." Behavior analysis digest 19(4), pp. 13-4.

Cultural Ethical Variances With Gifting
Words: 750 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24539456
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cultural Ethical Variances

The author of this report has been asked to complete a short essay about the differing ethical dimensions that are present in different situations. One can compare and contrast among many different group types and locations. Indeed, the ethics of doing business and giving gifts can vary greatly from country to country, from region to region, from state to state, from city to city or even from business to business in the same general vicinity. The reasons for these variances typically vary based on things like religion, ethnicity, race, age and family status. This report shall explore the differences that exist all within the United States because even the differences in a single country can vary quite a bit. While there are some standards and practices in business that are pretty consistent, not everyone is singing from the same proverbial hymnal when it comes to what is…

References

Gilman, S.C. (2005). Ethics codes and codes of conduct as tools for promoting an ethical and professional public service: Comparative successes and lessons.

Retrieved from  http://www.oecd.org/mena/governance/35521418.pdf 

National Conference of State Legislatures. (2013). Ethics: Legislator gift restrictions overview. Retrieved November 19, 2013, from  http://www.ncsl.org/research/ethics/50-state-table-gift-laws.aspx

Emerging Standards of Care Mental Health Cultural Competence
Words: 2289 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2653470
Read Full Paper  ❯

Standards of Care/Mental Health/Cultural Competence

EMEGING STANDADS OF CAE/MENTAL HEALTH/CULTUAL

Sometime in 1999, the Surgeon General released Mental Health: A eport of the Surgeon General. Inside this report, it acknowledged that not every Americans, particularly minorities, are getting the equal mental health treatment, a discovery that provoked the Surgeon General to give out a supplemental report on differences in mental health care for individuals of color (Donini-Lenhoff, 2006). The addition, which was available in 2001, sends out one obvious message: culture does actually count. Cultural competency is considered to be one the vital ingredients in closing the differences hole in health care. It is looked as the way patients and doctors are able to come together and then talk about health issues without cultural differences stopping the conversation, nonetheless improving it. Fairly simply, health care services that are deferential of and receptive to the health beliefs, practices and cultural and…

References

Choi, H.M. (2006). ETHNIC DIFFERENCES IN ADOLESCENTS' MENTAL DISTRESS, SOCIAL STRESS, AND RESOURCES. Adolescence, 41(126), 263-83.

Donini-Lenhoff, F. (2006). HEALTH: Cultural competence in the health professions; insuring a juniform standard of care. The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, 65(45), 45.

Furler, J. & . (2012). Mental health: Cultural competence. Australian Family Physician, 39(5), 206-8.

Sawrikar, P. & . (2013). The relationship between mental health, cultural identity and cultural values in non-english speaking background (NESB) australian adolescents. Behaviour Change, 21(3), 97-113.

Cross Cultural Age of Globalization the Quickening
Words: 589 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51562225
Read Full Paper  ❯

Cross Cultural Age of Globalization

The quickening pace of globalization continues to force varying cultures, their expectations, norms, value and practices together at a pace that is much faster than had been the case in the past. This presents a unique series of challenges for managers who must navigate the task of creating an agile enough organization to compete, yet still provide enough structure and stability for objectives to be attained. National political culture is a critically important foundation to guiding the definition of a globalization strategy in that it encompasses citizenship practices (Bird, Fang, 2009). The intent of this analysis is to critically evaluate if the concept of a theoretical framework is sufficient to support globalization strategies aligned to the nuances and specific considerations of a given region. Appraising the legitimacy of management strategies in the context of cross-cultural citizenship practices is central to this analysis (Chevrier, 2009).

How…

References

Bird, A. & Fang, T. (2009) 'Editorial: cross cultural management in the age of globalization', International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, 9 (2), pp. 139 -- 142, Sage Premier Database [Online]. DOI: 10.1177/1470595809335713 (Accessed: 21 December 2009).

Chevrier, S. (2009) 'Is national culture still relevant to management in a global context? The case of Switzerland', International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, 9 (2), pp. 169 -- 181, Sage Journals [Online]. DOI: 10.1177/1470595809335723 (Accessed: 23 December 2009).

Hofstede, G., & McCrae, R.R. (2004). Personality and culture revisited: Linking traits and dimensions of culture. Cross - Cultural Research, 38(1), 52-88.

Global Business Cultural Analysis
Words: 8186 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 23504537
Read Full Paper  ❯

business culture and expansion trends that exist for American companies in India. The paper focuses on answering the following questions: 1. What are the major elements and dimensions of culture in this region? 2. How are these elements and dimensions integrated by local conducting business in the nation? 3. How do both of the above items compare with U.S. culture and business? 4. What are the implications for U.S. businesses that wish to conduct business in that region? The paper also tackles the following aspects: Dimensions of Culture, Communication. Different Meaning of Words across Languages, Verbal, Nonverbal, High Context vs. Low Context and eligion -- Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Shinto and Ethics; Definitions, The Issue of Corruption, Corporate Social esponsibility, Values and Attitudes, Variances in Attitudes across Cultures, Concept of Time, Dealing with Change, The ole of Gender, Social Status, Business Manners and Customs across National Cultures, Social…

References

Bose, P. And Lyons, L.E. (2010). Cultural Critique and the Global Corporation. Tracking Globalization, Bloomington, IN.

Butler, Patty. (2012). India Business Etiquette, Manners, Cross Cultural Communication, and Geert Hofstede Analysis. International Business Etiquette and Manners. Cyborlink  http://www.cyborlink.com/besite/india.htm 

Doh, J., and Luthans, F. (2009). International Management: Culture, Strategy, and Behaviour. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Doh, J., and Luthans, F. (2009). International Management: Culture, Strategy, and Behavoir. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Globalisation Leading Cultural Damage Exploitation Uderdeveloped Nations
Words: 3420 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30290134
Read Full Paper  ❯

Globalisation leading cultural damage exploitation uderdeveloped nations peoples." It include (a) Definitions "Globalisation" (b) Logic linking globalisation free market processes liberal creed.

Negative effect of globalization to under developed countries

Globalization has been a widely discussed topic among various authors, economics and business analysts and its' from the studies and research that the essay has been built on.

First the essay will explain what globalization is and some of the characteristics of globalization; secondly essay will try and relate globalization to free market process and the liberal creed after which it explains why social responsibilities need to be integrated to the economic policies of a country, thereafter the essay embark on the topic of study and looks at the negative impact of globalization in under developed countries and the way it has caused irreparable damage to this countries' environment, society and culture without even closing the gap in terms of…

Reference

Amaladoss, M. (1999)"Towards Global Community," in Globalization and its Victims as Seen by the Victims, Idem, ed., New Delhi: ISPCK,, 217-32.

Anthuvan, V.L., (2000) "Globalization - Disturbing Facts & Shocking Insights," in Vaiharai, Vol.5, no. 1 5-19.

Arokiasamy, S., 2000) "Globalization in the Light of Church's Social Teaching," Vaiharai, Vo.5, no.1 (49-65.

A.G. Hopkins, (2004), "Globalization in World History." Norton. aksd[ s pp. 4-8

Lebanese and Middle Eastern Cultural Beliefs Regarding Health Care
Words: 646 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68029225
Read Full Paper  ❯

The Lebanese and the overall middle easterners are known to be strict to their cultural beliefs and practices. Such beliefs and practices dictate every aspect of their lives and how they interact with other people from other cultures across the world as well as other aspects of life that are widely applicable in the contemporary world. This culture has a great impact on the structure and nature of health care that is appreciated among the Lebanese and other middle easterners (Shiloh, 2007). It is imperative to understand their cultural perception on care presentation, accommodation, and repatterning to offer a more effective healthcare under this cultural setting.

The Lebanese have a unique perception on culture care presentation. The cultural practices in Lebanon emphasize the importance of both nuclear and extended families. Moreover, the family members rely heavily on each other. During illnesses, the family members offer the primary care and support…

Historical Particularism and Cultural Ecology
Words: 1302 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 61289804
Read Full Paper  ❯

Particularism vs. Cultural Ecology

Franz oaz defined the concept in anthropology, which is known by the name of "Historical Particularism." oas was a champion of this theory, which, although it did not by any means totally ignore the greater theoretical framework that surrounded an event, focused directly on the event itself and attempted account for this event by tying it in some way to a theory that could explain the creation of the cultural variables in the event by tying it in with environmental and historical factors. oas gives his own account of this development:

The new historical view also comes into conflict with the generalizing method of science. It imposed upon the older view of nature in which the discovery of general laws was considered the ultimate aim of investigation. According to this view, laws may be exemplified by individual events, which, however, lose their specific interest once the…

Bibliography

Boaz, Franz. A Franz Boaz Reader. George W. Stocking Jr., ed. Chicago: U. Chicago

Press, 1974.

Cultural Ecology." Apr. 30, 2003.  http://archaeology.about.com/library/glossary/bldef_culturalecology.htm 

Marquette, Catherine. "Some Notes on the Development of Cultural Ecology.' Apr. 30, 2003.  http://www.indiana.edu/~wanthro/eco.htm

Globalisation and Business Cultures and Practices
Words: 3107 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58262781
Read Full Paper  ❯

Globalisation Led to a Convergence of Business Cultures and Practices?

Globalisation, generally defined as the economic, political, and cultural convergence of the world, is undoubtedly a major hallmark of the modern world (French, 2010). The world has increasingly become interconnected in terms of economic activities, communication, technology, social aspects, as well as politics. Indeed, the once diversified and distanced world has converged into a small global village because of globalisation. Globalisation has led to the interdependence of not only politics and economic activities, but also culture (Grewal, 2008). Cultural convergence is now a widely-recognised phenomenon (Cojocaru, 2011). Owing to increased contact amongst people from diverse cultural backgrounds, cultural practices have become ever more similar, consequently resulting in the convergence of business cultures and practices. Organisations now experience lesser cultural difficulties when doing business across cultures. As a result, the study of comparative business cultures may be becoming less relevant. While…

Analyzing Healthcare Cultural Assessment
Words: 5773 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 24073629
Read Full Paper  ❯

cultural diversity issues and its impact on nursing professionals' practice. It assesses a client hailing from a different culture, and employs information derived from the assessment determining and reflecting on health practices and beliefs of the client's culture. Lastly, nurses' role in the care of patients hailing from diverse backgrounds care is analyzed, and a conclusion is drawn.

Client Interview Data

Client's health beliefs in relation to cultural diversity

The client comes from a family-focused background, in which she plays the role of chief household organizer and attends to her family and their needs. She believes one ought to lead a life of a good and virtuous individual, and support one's family, particularly in times of need. In her opinion, sickness must be tended to, for preserving life. She believes in healthcare professionals and services they offer, for leading a healthy life. She is comfortable having healthcare professionals take care…

References

American Nurses Association. (1998). Discrimination and Racism in Health Care. Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.

Anderson, L. (2012, October 10). Cultural Competence in the Nursing Practice. Retrieved from Nurse Together:  http://www.nursetogether.com/cultural-competence-nursing-practice 

Coe, S. (2013, January 15). Cultural Competency in the Nursing Profession. Retrieved from Nurse Together:  http://www.nursetogether.com/cultural-competency-nursing-profession 

Graue, M., Dunning, T., Hausken, M. F., & Rokne, B. (2013). Challenges in managing elderly people with diabetes in primary care settings in Norway. Scand J Prim Health Care, 31(4), 241-247.

Madeleine Leinegers Cultural Care Theory
Words: 1445 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 38102238
Read Full Paper  ❯

Madeleine Leineger's Cultural Care Theory

Theories are made of interrelated ideas that systematically give a systematic view about a certain phenomenon (an event or fact that is observable) that can, then, be predicted, and explained. Theories entail definitions, concepts, propositionspropositions, and models. Theories are created on the basis of assumptions. There are two ways in which theories are derived; inductive and deductive reasoning. The theory of nursing is meant to describe, explainexplain, and predict the nursing phenomenon.

It should give the bases of the nursing practice a strong foundation, thereby assisting in further creation of knowledge and show the future direction that for nursing should take. Theory is of great significance as it guides us in our decisions of what we already know as well as what we ought to know. Theory describes the nursing practice, hence giving us the foundation of nursing. The merits of a definite theory body…

References

Current Nursing. (2012, January 28). Application of Theory in Nursing Process. Retrieved from Current Nursing:  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/application_nursing_theories.html 

McFarland, M., & Eipperle, M. (2008). Culture Care Theory: a proposed practice theory guide for nurse practitioners in primary care settings. Contemp Nurse, 28(1-2), 48-63.

Raudonis, B., & Acton, G. (1997). Theory-based nursing practice. J Adv Nurs, 26(1), 138-45.

Wayne, G. (2014, August 26). Madeleine Leininger's Transcultural Nursing Theory. Retrieved from Nurse Labs:  http://nurseslabs.com/madeleine-leininger-transcultural-nursing-theory/

Analyzing Cultural Competence in the Criminal Justice System
Words: 1646 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45537562
Read Full Paper  ❯

Culural Competence |

Cultural Competence in the Criminal Justice System

Culture determines people's experiences of their world. It is important in the reception and delivery of services. Cultural competence starts with knowing your cultural practices and beliefs, and recognizing the different practices and values of people from different cultures. This goes beyond speaking a different language, or just acknowledging a different group's cultural icons. Cultural competence involves changing your biases or prejudgments on a different people's cultural traditions or beliefs (Continuing Education Online, 2002-2016).

Cultural competence, therefore, can be described as a group of attitudes and behavior within a culture. These attitudes and behavior are incorporated into the methods of practice of an agency, system or its experts, and helps them work productively under cross-cultural circumstances. To successfully achieve cultural competency, knowledge about groups and individuals must be incorporated and translated into certain practices and rules applied in suitable cultural…

REFERENCES

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. (1998). Case Management for Clients With Special Needs. Retrieved August 7, 2016, from National Center for Biotechnology Information:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov 

Continuing Education Online. (2002-2016). Cultural Competency and Diversity. Retrieved August 7, 2016, from Continuing Education Online:  http://www.getceusnow.com 

Otu, N. (2015). Decoding Nonverbal Communication In Law Enforcement. Salus Journal, Issue 3, No. 2, 1-16. Retrieved from Salus Journal:  http://www.salusjournal.com 

Patel, S. (2016). Cultural Competency Training: Preparing Law Students for Practice in Our Multicultural World. Retrieved August 7, 2016, from UCLA Law Review:  http://www.uclalawreview.org

Culture on Health Disparities and Health Related Practices
Words: 2135 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50848154
Read Full Paper  ❯

Culture and Health Care |

A eview of Culture on Health Disparities, Health elated Practices and Healthcare Outcomes

Social Status

The social status of an individual refers to the rank one holds within a group or community; and requires conformance to such rights, lifestyle, and duties as understood by prestige and social hierarchy (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2016). Status may be attained or ascribed in different ways. One, for instance may inherit such status at birth as it happens in monarchies and Kingships. This kind of status climb has nothing to do with one's innate abilities or skills. Ascribed status is based on such factors as age, family relations, lineage, birth, sex, and similar considerations while acquired status is earned. It may be based on such factors as the level of education, marital status, occupation and similar factors that come with accomplishment of certain feats that required some practical effort.

Status is…

REFERENCES

Asu, O. T., Gever, I. D., & Joshua, N. P. (2013). African Cultural Practices and Health Implications for Nigeria. International Review of Management and Business Research, Vol 2, Issue 1, 176-183. Retrieved from  http://irmbrjournal.com/papers/1367572222.pdf 

Artiga, S. (2016, August 12). Disparities in Health and Health Care: Five Key Questions and Answers. Retrieved September 7, 2016, from Kaiser Family Foundation:  http://kff.org/disparities-policy/issue-brief/disparities-in-health-and-health-care-five-key-questions-and-answers/ 

Encyclopedia Britannica. (2016). Social Status. Retrieved September 7, 2016, from Encyclopedia Britannica:  https://www.britannica.com/topic/social-status 

Mhame, P. P., Busia, K., & Kasilo, O. M. J. (2010). Clinical practices of African traditional medicine. African Health Monitor, Vol 13. Retrieved from African Health Observatory: https://www.aho.afro.who.int/en/ahm/issue/13/reports/clinical-practices-african-traditional-medicine

Health-Related Interviews Cultural Difference
Words: 1217 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 88200289
Read Full Paper  ❯

Heritage Assessment Tool

Benchmark assessment

Heritage Assessment Tool: Cultural values and health beliefs

Cultural sensitivity is an integral part of effective nursing. Although the definitions of concepts such as 'health' and 'wellness' might seem on their surface to be self-evident, these notions are, in fact, highly mutable and particular to the individual and his or her culture. Cultural insensitivity can result in patients becoming alienated from the medical system and this results in poorer, ineffectual care. One of the reasons instruments such as the Heritage Assessment Tool can be so useful is that it can be a clear and efficient way to establish the culturally-contextual health beliefs of a patient whose experiences and values that are different those of the physician, nurse, or other healthcare provider treating the patient.

The first family I interviewed was a Chinese-American household. Although the family was relatively assimilated and the children were second-generation residents…

Cross Cultural Impact of China on Vietnam Today
Words: 2893 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50709393
Read Full Paper  ❯

Vietnam and China: Acculturation's Apparitions And Certain Realities Behind Them"

The Vietnamese people have a lengthy history that dates back at least two millennia. The ancestors of modern Vietnamese people lived in the Red River delta of northern Vietnam and were subsequently conquered by the Chinese, becoming part of the early Chinese empire. By the first century CE, Vietnam succeeded in becoming a suzerainty of the Chinese empire and it remained in this capacity for the next 900 years. During these ten centuries, the Vietnamese people were heavily influenced by several aspects of Chinese culture and society, including its political theories, academic standards, administrative practices for government operation and religious orientations. As a result, Vietnam became sinicized long before other regions in Southeast Asia that are now a part of China.

It is important to note, though, that this dependency on China also served to create a sense of national…

Navigating Cultural Differences Between East
Words: 616 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89219118
Read Full Paper  ❯

A loud burp in one setting can be a high compliment, but in others it will be considered enormously offensive. Confronting law enforcement figures over perceived transgressions of their authority is a highly prized tradition in the West, but these confrontations are actively avoided in the East. Likewise, standing for women entering a room is de rigueur in Western cultures, but such practices would be viewed as incongruent with the cultures of many Eastern countries. Then there is the matter of which hand to use and when, because these issues are significant in the East where the right hand is used for contact with others and the left hand reserved for other purposes, but such considerations never enter the minds of people in the West because this practice is not followed.

Despite these fundamental differences in religion, language, worldviews and cultural practices, it is possible to navigate these differences if…

Medieval Cultural Exchange Contrasting Medieval Religious Expression
Words: 706 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43048774
Read Full Paper  ❯

Medieval Cultural Exchange

Contrasting Medieval eligious Expression:

An analysis across Christian and Islamic Civilization

In Chapters 7, 8 and 9 of John McKay's A History of World Societies, the similarities and differences of medieval Christian and Islamic civilization across Europe, the Middle East and Africa are detailed as the rise and fall of political and religious actors are presented. One fascinating subject that stands out from such a tremendous amount of material and which returns the student of history to the human scale is how the two civilizations influenced each other in developing new perspectives on religious expression through art, ranging from architecture to calligraphy to even everyday objects such as religious clothing. An understanding of how these two civilizations influenced one another contributes to a more complete understanding of the broader issues of politics, religion and geopolitical competition that defined this historical epoch.

One of the most prominent areas…

References:

Goskar, T. (2011). Material Worlds: The Shared Cultures of Southern Italy and its Mediterranean Neighbors in the Tenth to Twelfth Centuries. Al-Masaq. Vol. 23, No. 3.

Hoare, T. (2005). Introduction to World Humanities. Johnson County Community College. Date Retrieved 12/27/11. URL: http://staff.jccc.net/thoare/145byz.htm

Mango, C. (1972). The Art of the Byzantine Empire. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

McKay, J.P. (2008). A History of World Societies: Volume A: From Antiquity to 1500. New York, NY: Beford Publishers.

Multi-Cultural Management What Are the
Words: 2957 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57630463
Read Full Paper  ❯

(Buhalis, 2008) at the same time, the Internet is helping to bring many regions closer together. This means that some of the challenges which were mentioned earlier are exposing people in specific areas to different ideas. (Hase, 2007) Over the course of time, they will become more accepting and interested in learning about new cultures. (Hase, 2007) This is when multiculturalism management strategies can be effective in creating a unique work environment that is embracing all of the various attributes. (Buhalis, 2008) (Hase, 2007)

This is positive because it is changing the mindset of everyone for the better and dealing with cultural barriers (which were difficult to address in the past). (Brennan, 2007) the way that this can be maximized is to use new technology to introduce cutting edge ideas to someone. This can occur by having them work with particular devices that will discuss specific attributes (which can take…

References

Brennan, R. (2007). TQM Marketing Perspectives. Quality Assurance in Education, 15 (1), 44 -- 60.

Buhalis, D. (2008). Progress in Information Technology. Tourism Management, 29 (4), 609 -- 623.

Canen, a. (2008). Multicultural Leadership. International Journal of Conflict Management, 19 (1), 4 -- 19.

Devine, F. (2007). Managing Cultural Diversity. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, (19) 2, 120-132

Cultures You Selected Then Describe Two Cultural
Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69693550
Read Full Paper  ❯

cultures you selected. Then describe two cultural attitudes, two cultural beliefs, and two cultural practices regarding HIV / AIDS in the cultures you selected. Finally, explain two factors that may impede the success of an HIV / AIDS prevention program in the cultures you selected and why. Support your response using the literature provided.

Attitude towards AIDS: Cultural differences

Although AIDS is an illness that knows no cultural barriers, the ways that cultures interpret the illness can be profoundly different. In the United States, when the illness first began to spread, there was a tendency to 'ghettoize' the disease. During the early years it was referred to as 'the gay plague' and the focus was solely upon its impact in the gay community. But as the illness grew more widespread to other populations, it became clear that this was not a useful paradigm through which to view AIDS. Additionally, the…

Within Japanese culture the taint of 'foreignness' remains regarding AIDS, in stark contrast to the United States The Japanese public still regards AIDS as something that 'cannot happen here,' despite the fact that alone of all the major industrial powers Japan's AIDS rate is still climbing. There is no widespread testing campaign in Japan, nor are there government-led awareness-raising campaigns as exist in the United States. The Japanese sense of cultural uniqueness and separation from the rest of the world is seen in the cultural attitudes expressed in the Japanese AIDS policy by public officials, by the media, and most unaffected citizens.

This refusal to acknowledge AIDS may seem puzzling to an outsider, given that Japan is not known as a particularly prudish culture (the use of love hotels by couples is common) and tends to be quite aggressive in using its public health resources to raise awareness and education about disease. For example, regarding lifestyle-related dietary diseases, "In Japan, public health nurses (PHNs) are traditionally employed by local governments. Each PHN is in charge of a specific geographical area and provides community residents with various health services, such as health counseling and home visits" (Marutani & Miyazaki 2010: 392).

PHNs have been widely credited as one of the reasons Japan has such a long lifespan for its elders and relatively low diabetes and obesity rates. There have been efforts to ensure that the advice