Death Of Ivan Ilyich Essays (Examples)

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Death of Ivan Ilych Sum

Words: 1469 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78218548

He likes the power he is afforded with each new position and loves knowing he can crush others.

7. Does the narrator sympathize with Ivan's attachment to his possessions?

The tone of the passage (paragraph 104) is deeply empathetic. This entire portion of the story displays Tolstoy's sympathy and empathy for Ivan. Ivan is a reflection of every man who has placed all his interest in this world only to realize too late that he is not made for this world but for the other. Ivan's horrible attachment to his possessions is shown in order to illustrate for the reader the uselessness of forming such attachments -- yet it is not depicted satirically but with great insight, patience and understanding, even if it is at times critical.

8. What elements of a full life, what higher satisfactions, does Ivan's routine omit?

Ivan's routine consists solely of paying strict observance to…… [Read More]

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Death of Ivan Ilych and

Words: 1633 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24429496

Both characters found ways to avoid living through isolation. They alienated themselves from practically everyone and this resulted in severe pain. The message here is to think about the things that consume us and then consider how important those things will be at the end of our lives or when our lives become difficult.

The Death of Ivan Ilych" and "ard No. 6" are compelling stories that force us to think of life and death through the most painful experience of others. The search for the meaning of life becomes significant with these men who have lived rather aloof lives until they are stricken with a confounding truth. Ivan must face the truth that his life was not lived the best way that it could have been. Andrey must come to terms that he has been living has been terribly misguided. Both men realize that to some extent, their lives…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chekhov, Anton. Ward No. 6." Read Print Online Library. Information Retrieved February 27, 2009. http://www.readprint.com/work-356/Anton-Chekhov

Tolstoy, Leo. "The Death of Ivan Ilych." The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction R.V. Cassill, ed. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1981.
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Gulliver's Travels Tartuffe Madame Bovary The Death

Words: 861 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88069453

Gulliver's Travels," "Tartuffe," "Madame Bovary," "The Death of Ivan Ilyich," & "Things Fall Apart"

The purpose of this paper is to introduce, discuss, and compare how the theme(s) of "Things Fall Apart" by Achebe relate to the theme and/or storylines of "Gulliver's Travels," by Swift, "Tartuffe," by Moliere, "Madame Bovary," by Flaubert, and "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" by Tolstoy. All these authors use their works to "expose and alter the fundamental moral codes that determine political systems and social mores" (Levine 136).

POLITICAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL MORES

Things Fall Apart," by Chinua Achebe is a novel about an African family named Okonkwo, who try to fit in to the white man's society. However, their own society was balanced, happy, and complete, and they did not really need to fit in with the white man. hen they did, it ultimately destroyed their society, and way of life.

Gulliver's Travels," by…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Flaubert, Gustave. Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town. Trans. Gerard Hopkins. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Grossman, Debra. "SparkNotes on Gulliver's Travels." SparksNotes.com. 2002. http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/gulliver

Levine, Alan. "Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart as a Case Study in Nietzsche's Transvaluation of Values." Perspectives on Political Science 28.3 (1999): 136-141.

Moliere, Jean Baptiste Poquelin. "Tartuffe." Project Gutenberg. 2002.  http://digital.library.upenn.edu/webbin/gutbook/lookup?num=2027
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Tolstoy and Chekhov Death Is the Only

Words: 1391 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 242308

Tolstoy and Chekhov

Death is the only true inevitability in a person's life. Once born, the only thing that is guaranteed is that one day that life will be extinguished. People live their whole lives with a death sentence hanging over their heads. For some people, death is terrifying and they rail against it and do whatever they can to avoid it. Others see death as a kind release, excusing them from the world of men, where they toil. Each person reacts differently to their own impending death and to the deaths of their loved ones. There is no single right or wrong way to react to someone's death or to react around someone who is in the process of dying. In both Anton Chekhov's "Rothschild's Fiddle" and Leo Tolstoy's "The Death of Ivan Ilych," the authors explore the ways that a man may deal with the death of those…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Chekhov, Anton. "Rothschild's Fiddle." The Chorus Girls and Other Stories. 1920. Print.

Tolstoy, Leo. "The Death of Ivan Ilych." 1886. Print.
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How Tolstoy S Ivan and Ibsen S Hedda Are Different

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23284841

Hedda and Ivan: The Struggle of the Willful Self

Hedda Gabler and Ivan Ilyich are both willful individuals. However, Ivan on his deathbed converts from a life of selfishness to a vision of selflessness and thus, it is presumed, saves his soul. Hedda, on the other hand, pursues a selfish existence to the very last and when she realizes that she no longer has absolute control over her life, she shoots herself. The two are very different characters in this way: Ivan submits to the realization that he is not in control, that he is in fact a burden to others, and that there is a beauty in the act of compassion to which he wants to attach himself at the end of his miserable life. Hedda does not interact with this beauty nor does she submit to the realization of loss of control. She instead "opts out" of her…… [Read More]

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Quality of Life an Analysis of a

Words: 1765 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50151004

Quality of Life

An Analysis of a Life ell Lived

The world is in a constant flutter of change. In the past few decades alone such inventions as cellular phones and the Internet have drastically altered many lives. Globalization is indeed, global, and with it, everything changes. Because of these facets, and sometimes perhaps in spite of them, humanity's definition of a good life, or a life well lived changes constantly as well. Today, one's ability to simply connect to the Internet opens, literally, a world of possibility. For many, such a simple connection represents an ideal life.

Yet there are still others who believe in wealth and power as the primary definitions of a good life, which are more classical ideals. There are a number of pieces that also elucidate these ideas, and portray this wish of a good, beautiful, easy and satisfying life at various times in history,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Ali, Monica. "Brick Lane Book Review." Book Reviews. 2010. Web. 09 May 2012. .

Joyce, James. "The Dubliners." Project Gutenberg. 2010. Web. 9 May 2012. .

Schneider, Jessica. "Book Review: Snow Country by Yasunari Kawabata." Blogcritics Books. 31 Mar. 2010. Web. 09 May 2012. .

"To Be, or Not to Be, That Is the Question." The Phrase Finder. Web. 09 May 2012. .
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Healing Growing Dying in Chapter a Broader

Words: 730 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21846232

healing, growing, dying in chapter "A broader view healing" Margaret Coberly argues dying a healing process -discovery. We find a similar claim coming Mwalimu lmara essay "Dying Last Stage Growth" asserts: "dying stage life experienced profound growth event total life's experience.

According to Mwalimu Imara's essay "Dying as the Last Stage of Growth," rather than rejecting death as abnormal (for death comes to us all) or fearing death, death should be viewed as simply another stage of life. Imara recounts the experience of a woman who said that she lived more fully in the last months of her life than she did throughout her entire existence, because only then was she able to appreciate the goodness in people and open herself up enough to be emotionally vulnerable (Imara 1975: 154). The same could be said of Leo Tolstoy's character Ivan Ilyich.

Throughout most of his life, Ilyich is an ambitious,…… [Read More]

Q3. In Ira Byock's book Dying Well, Byock chronicles the painful process of watching his father die. At first, it was inconceivable to him that his father could pass away, and he met the first stages with a denial of the severity of his father's condition. "It was incomprehensible how all this could be lost" (Byock 1998: 5). This parallels the story of "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" by Leo Tolstoy, in which the title character first sees many doctors who give him conflicting diagnoses about his terminal condition and his family tries to ignore the fact that his condition is worsening, despite the treatment he is receiving. However, unlike Ivan Ilyich, Byock stresses that his father Seymour's life was a life 'well lived,' and his father ended his life surrounded by caring family members. Being with the dying person and tending to their needs, believes Byock, can be a powerful way to ensure that the dying process has a component of 'healing.'

However, Ivan Ilyich does experience flashes of insight. For example, he asks the peasant Gerasim to hold his legs to relieve his pain at times. Although this probably has no physical effect, instinctively Ilyich finds that Gerasim's compassion and matter-of-fact attitude towards illness and death is healing for him. He forms his first simple, human connection with someone else. Even though he is at first angry at his wife and children for their materialism, he dies forgiving them.

Ilyich is literally 'killed' by the house he has so carefully decorated -- he dies as a result of the accident he sustained while hanging curtains. However, after feeling anger about the way he is dying and the fact that someone who has tried to 'make it' in the world for so long must die, in death he finally comes to understand the meaningless nature of all of the things he has been striving for and can appreciate simple goodness and kindness. Although Ilyich may not have 'lived well' in the terms defined by Byock, at the very end he can be said to have 'died well' in the sense that he learned from the experience.
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Victims of Social Mores or

Words: 1238 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77004709

He alone knew that with the consciousness of the injustices done him, with his wife's incessant nagging, and with the debts he had contracted by living beyond his means, his position was far from normal." (Tolstoy, Chapter III). Not everyone thinks Ivan Ilyich's salary is meager, and he chooses to live beyond his means, thus although he is ordinary, his world is not absent of examples of how it is possible to live differently. Likewise, the married lovers of "The Lady with the Dog" could theoretically leave their spouses, although divorce is difficult in 19th century Russia. hat impedes them seems to be the fact that openly leaving their spouses and children will make them societal pariahs, and result in a loss of financial and social status. At the end of the tale, their resolve to begin their life anew rings hollow, and they may very well remain willing to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chekhov, Anton. "The Lady with the Dog." Online Literature E-text. [23 Jul 2007]

 http://www.online-literature.com/anton_chekhov/1297/ 

Ibsen, Henrik. "Hedda Gabler." Project Gutenberg E-text. [23 Jul 2007]

http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext03/hddgb10.txt
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Characters Struggling Authenticity Character Authenticity the State

Words: 762 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16263496

Characters Struggling Authenticity

Character Authenticity

The state of being authentic in our lives, in our personalities, and in our actions can be a difficult, but important concept to come to terms with. As we grow, events and people in life can shape who we are, and we can choose to be true to ourselves or succumb to pressures and assume an inauthentic identity. In the stories "Signs and Symbols," "The Lady with the Dog," and "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" (written by Vladimir Nabokov, Anton Chekhov, and Leo Tolstoy, respectively), we can examine characters influenced into inauthenticity, and the realization of their example can help us reflect upon the authenticity of our own lives.

Each of the characters in these stories is influenced by a different motivator. Through their judgment of their circumstances, they choose to react in the way they see fit. In "Signs and Symbols," for example, a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chekhov, Anton. "The Lady with the Dog." 26 March 2011. .

Nabokov, Vladimir. "Signs and Symbols." 26 March 2011.
/nabokov.html>.

Tolstoy, Leo. "The Death of Ivan Ilyich." The Classical Library. 2001. 26 March 2011.
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Transformations and Realizations Every Human

Words: 1029 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5624953



In the Metamorphosis, it is the image of the main character's family and those around him that is transformed. However, in the Death of Ivan Llyitch it is the main characters image of himself that is transformed. Gregor is the same person on the inside in his cockroach form that he was when he was a salesman. However, his family fails to see him the same. Gregor was happy, but becomes depressed as his family isolates themselves from him more and more. In the Death of Ivan Llyitch the main character moved from depression to joy. The characters in these novels occupy different ends of the emotional spectrum. Their emotional spectrum moves in the opposite direction.

The emotional transformation of the two main characters is opposite as well. Ivan's is an inner transformation. His physical world changes little, it is his emotional world and inner sense of self that changes.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kafka, Franz the Metamorphosis and Other Stories, trans. Donna Freed. New York:

Barnes & Noble. 1996.

Tolstoy, L. The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Master and Man. Slater, Ann (trans.). New York,

Modern Library. 2004.
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The Antonym of Life

Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35058751

Recurring Western Preoccupation

One of the most frequently recurring themes in Westernized culture is that of death. This motif is certainly evinced in a number of forms of literature -- particularly those esteemed to possess literary value -- including Leo Tolstoy's "Death of Ivan Ilyich" and in Henrik Ibsen's "Hedda Gabler." Death dominates the plot of both of these works of literature. There are multiple deaths in Ibsen's work, whereas the protagonist in Tolstoy's realizes early on that he is fated to die and the proverbial shadow of death looms over the ensuing pages. An analysis of the thematic device of death and its importance in both of these works reveals that it largely functions as a petty escape in Ibsen's text, and is a means to a more profound level of transcendence in that of Tolstoy.

There is a point of despair that accompanies both of the deaths portrayed…… [Read More]

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Authors Who Write Alike and

Words: 880 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59866246

While we are shown the fact that Sammy, ogles the girls and makes a queen of the leader. On one hand while he feels no pang in doing so he is disgusted by the butcher's lustful gaze. (Saldivar, 214)

There is rebellion when the manager who is a puritan rebukes the girls. The only outrage that the manager, Lengel, seem to have done is to make the queen blush. Thus Sammy quits his job against an authority that demeans people. The girls seem neither to have noticed the managers' consternation or admonition nor have they noticed Sammy standing up for them. Sammy gains nothing but loses his job in the bargain. (Saldivar, 215)

There was parody of other works for which Updike is noted. Here in this story too, apart from Araby we find the parody of the classic Vanity Fair. Parody of the Vanity Fair can be seen in…… [Read More]

References

Saldivar, Toni. The Art of John Updike's "A&P." Studies in Short Fiction, vol. 34, no.

2, 1997, pp: 212-216.

Walker, Michael. Boyle's "Greasy Lake" and the Moral Failure of Postmodernism.

Studies in Short Fiction, vol. 31, no. 2, 2002, pp: 245-251.
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Geographically and Culturally Worlds Apart

Words: 1308 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18127419

"

Ivan Ilych and Marlow share much in common in terms of their dutiful service to an external bureaucracy, feeling stymied by that bureaucracy, and desiring deeper more meaningful spiritual experiences. At the same time, though, Ilych remains far more traditional than Marlow, whose open-mindedness earns him Kurtz's trust. Ilych is open-minded in terms of his willingness to see through superficiality and social facades, but he rarely sees beyond the mundane until the illness sets in. In fact, Ilych remains completely caught up in the rat race that defines ussian government work to the extent that promotions and salary raises make him "completely happy." Marlow, on the other hand, stares death in the face each day. He also encounters the faces of African people who shock him out of his mundane existence: "I could see every rib, the joints of their limbs were like knots in a rope; each had…… [Read More]

References

Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. Retrieved May 14, 2008 at http://historyofideas.org/etcbin/toccer-new2?id=ConDark.sgm&images=images/modeng&data=/texts/english/modeng/parsed&tag=public&part=1&division=div1

Tolstoy, Leo. The Death of Ivan Ilych. Retrieved May 14, 2008 at http://www.geocities.com/short_stories_page/tolstoydeath.html
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Keats Dickinson Keats and Eliot

Words: 921 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59364683

However, in line with the Paz prompt at the outset of this discussion, Keats merely uses this tradition as a bridge on which to extend toward motivation on behalf of the evolving form. The subject matter is where this work takes a step toward modernity. The manner in which Keats describes the reality of dying is startling for its time primarily because it lacks religiosity. In describing death, the poet tells, "where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies; / here but to think is to be full of sorrow / and leaden-eyed despairs; / here beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes, / or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow."

The notion of discussing death from a decidedly humanistic rather than spiritual perspective is more daring and innovative than perhaps we are won't to give credit for. It is remarkable that the poet would invert a steadfastly traditional form…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Dickinson, E. (1862). #303 (the Soul Selects Her Own Society). Poets.org.

Eliot, T.S. (1917). The Love-Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. University of Virginia. Online at  http://people.virginia.edu/~sfr/enam312/prufrock.html 

Keats, J. (1819). Ode to a Nightingale. Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. 1919. The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250 -- 1900.
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Family Tree of the Writer The Writer

Words: 868 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90814401

family tree of the writer. The writer details his family's routes through immigration to America from Germany and the trail of building a new life based on that immigration.

To look at my family today, one might assume that my relatives traveled over on the Mayflower and broke bread at the first Thanksgiving feats, but that is not the case. The true story of my family lies in the success that we have had in acclimating to the wonders of America in only three generations.

My family was among the hundreds of thousands of families that flocked to the states years ago to seek their fortune and begin a new life in the land of opportunity. My father's family hailed from Germany, while my mother's family was of Dutch decent in Holland. When the VonNess family came through Ellis Island from Germany they were prepared to whatever it took to…… [Read More]

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Alienation in Kafka Franz Kafka Published One

Words: 1168 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70127239

Alienation in Kafka

Franz Kafka published one of his famous works, "The Metamorphosis," in 1915. Gregor Samsa is the principal character in the story. Samsa is the character whose metamorphosis is the primary subject of the story. The story is not a happy one. One of the primary themes upon which the story meditates is alienation. The paper will examine and explore the instances of alienation in "The Metamorphosis." Gregor Samsa experiences alienation before and after he transforms into a very large insect; it is only after his transformation that the others around him notice him and his alienation.

Gregor Samsa is miserable in his career as a salesman. He does not have much privacy because he has a room in an apartment occupied by his parents and sister. Gregor's supervisor is an unpleasant and disagreeable man who does not favor Gregor. One morning, Gregor awakes in his bed in…… [Read More]

References:

Kafka, Franz. "The Metamorphosis." The Project Guttenberg, 2012, Web, Available from: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/5200/5200-h/5200-h.htm. 2013 March 20.

Kohzadi, Hamedreza, Azizmohammadi, Fatemeh, & Nouri, Mahboubeh. "A Study of Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis. Journal of Basic Applied Science Research, 2(2), 1600 -- 1607. 2012. 2013 March 20.

Provan, Alexander. "An Alienation Artist: Kafka and His Critics." The Nation, Web, Available from: http://www.thenation.com/article/alienation-artist-kafka-and-his-critics#. 2013 March 20.