Declaration Of Independence Essays (Examples)

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Declaration of Independence
It is obvious, if we look at things today, that Jefferson's revolutionary vision has been achieved in America. Even more so, it has been achieved to a degree that we assume has never been reached elsewhere. On the other hand, we must admit that any such questions can also be answered "yes, to a certain degree" and we must acknowledge that this is the case for America as well. However, we can sustain that this degree of achievement is extremely high and we will examine why in the lines below. In order to do so, we must have a closer look at the three fundamental rights that Jefferson envisioned and evaluate the degree to which they were reached.

The third right seems to be the easiest to defend. Indeed, Jefferson's vision does not actually engage the government to support the pursuit of happiness, but, practically, only to allow anybody….

Declaration of Independence
The Theory of Government presented in the Declaration

The author of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson was greatly influenced by the political thoughts of the 17th century English philosopher John Locke and other thinkers of the European Age of Enlightenment. The theory of government presented in the Declaration is largely based on the political philosophy of Natural Rights that maintains that each individual enters a society with certain basic rights that no government can deny. The Declaration terms these Natural Rights as unalienable rights given to them by God, including the right of "Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness."

The document goes on to assert that all men are created equal and in order to acquire and keep these natural rights, they have a right to form a Government that derives its powers only from the consent of the people. It closely reflects John Locke's argument that the….

Declaration of independence it was determined that thirteen of the countries were Free states and independent of England.
Initially even under the government of England there were hardly any serious problems for the thirteen colonies. Even though it was England that hired the government holders and other main officials, colonies had very limited representation (U.S. History.Org, 1995)

However England went heavily into debt. This was mainly due to the war with the Indians. The debt was also due to another war that was with the French .A major part of that war took place between the colonies, having England to dispatch its troops. Hence, the British held the colonists responsible and felt that they should bear the brunt of their actions. The British Parliament started working towards making the tax laws more stringent and passing different laws that were a major source of displeasure for the colonist.

In 1774, delegates belonging to the….

In fact, many of the ideas are taken directly from John Locke's theories, specifically the statement of the right to "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness."
Specifically, the declaration that "it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume...the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature...entitle them..." is a statement of both republicanism and Natural Law.

The preamble states, "when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security." This is a statement of justification of revolution to create self-government.

The statement that people are created "with certain unalienable Rights" is reflective of the natural rights of humans, which evolved into the Bill….

" hen that Amendment was put in, the country was very young and it was wild, with Native Americans often hostile (with good reason), with wild animals posing a threat, and with various wars (the French & Indian ar; the Civil ar) taking place. People needed to feel like they were protected, and the new government didn't want to take their personal means of physical protection away from them. The times have changed very dramatically.
I'm not suggesting that guns be taken away from honest hunters, gun collectors, or others who actually need a weapon for protection in proven instances. Today, we have a militia, we have the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force - and those people are all well armed.

But the number of guns in America is getting totally out of control. Kids get guns and get involved in gangs and start killing people. Criminals buy assault weapons, steal, rob,….

Independence and Constitution
Declaration of Independence to the Constitution

When the American colonies declared their independence from Great Britain the Declaration of Independence stated a number of specific violations of the colonist's rights that British King George III that committed against the colonies. These were stated as the reason behind the American's right to rebel and replace the British government with one of their own. Several years later, after the Americans had won their independence through a long and bitter war, they achieved their goal of forming their own permanent government. After a period of experimentation, the Americans finally formulated a Constitution which would be the basis of the new country. In the Constitution of the United States, the Founding Fathers specifically addressed the abuses of King George III by inserting provisions that would make it impossible for any American government to repeat those abuses. What the Founding Fathers created was a….


Due to these acts, and because of the many others that followed, the colonies proclaimed their independence. On July 2 the Philadelphia Convention had its motion of independence implemented. The state's representatives wanted to emphasize their decision of breaking from the Mother Country, so they presented the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Jefferson was the one who drafted this act. His ideas were not new; he was inspired in his political philosophy by the John Locke and a series of other continental philosophers. He was only responsible for sorting out the philosophy in obvious truths, and made a list of complaints against the king, for this action to be justified before the world (http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration.html).

Its main content was about George III's legislation. In the Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson is saying that England's legislation is null. New settlers were no longer allowed to come to America or take over a Native American….

Declaration of Independence which was drafted by Thomas Jefferson between June 11 and June 28 in 1776 is one of the most cherished symbols of liberty of the nation as well as the most enduring monument of Jefferson. In unforgettable and exalted phrases, convictions are expressed in the heats and minds of people of America by Jefferson. It was not a new political philosophy of the Declaration, John Locke and Continental philosophers had already expressed its ideal of individual liberty. Whatever was done by Jefferson was to summarize this philosophy in "self-evident truths" hence setting forth grievances against the King so that there was justification to the world over the break of ties between the colony and the mother country.
During the campaign of revising Congressional instructions, most of the Americans expressed their support for separation from Great Britain officially in whatever was state and local declaration of independence. Pauline Maier,….

They hoped to create a nation where there was a representative government, and taxation was for the good of the people not the whims of a government that had no motivation to care for all of its people.
The dream of the founding fathers was also to establish a nation where the individuals of America could and would be able to protect themselves from tyrannous government. In the Declaration of Independence they state that people in America will no longer bow to the oppressions of a government that can take their homes, demand services (including military service for colonial power that does not benefit the people), and demand taxation without democratic representation. They hoped -- and encouraged -- a nation of people to be vigilant for such abuses and to not stand for it. In all, the dream of the founding father was for the American people to be the….

Sign the Declaration of Independence
I am a loyal Englishman, like my father before me; all the way back to the time of William the Conqueror. The King is the King and deserves my loyalty for no other reason that he is the King. Those who complain about the taxes being imposed upon the Colonies should remember that we pay less here that than the average person back home. And the violent reaction to reasonable taxation only deepens my fear that our land may become a place of mob rule. While the government's reaction to the recent Tea Act trouble was reasonable and proper for the incitement caused. We, who enjoy the protection of the British Empire, owe our loyalty to it's King. And as a loyal Englishman, I cannot act in a manner that is treasonous to our King, George III. I cannot sign the Declaration of Independence

In John….

The Declaration of Independence was a product of Enlightenment philosophy and specifically of the theories of John Locke. Underlying assumptions of the Declaration include that government is a social contract, only valid with the explicit approval of the people who are governed but not lorded or ruled over. Jefferson recognized also that historical changes enable the emergence of new systems of governance and political culture: “in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another.” Grounded in reason and rational thought, the Declaration also lists reasons for “the separation” of the former colonies from the Crown. Locke’s writings demonstrate an “anti-authoritarian” streak, one that allowed him and other Enlightenment philosophers—and also the Founding Fathers—to take the great leap towards self-governance (Uzgalis, 2017, p. 1). John Locke’s affirmation of liberty, freedom, and equality continue to resonate in the….

John LockeLocke believed in the law of liberty and held that an ethical system for society should strive to maintain the law of liberty. He wrote in his Second Treatise that a society had a right to overthrow a government if that government did not serve the cause of liberty: For liberty is to be free from restraint and violence from others which cannot be, where there is no law(p. 57). Indeed, the government of the US made liberty the cornerstone of its foundation in the Declaration of Independence (1776): We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. The US government was essentially built on the ideas of Enlightenment philosophy, which is where Lockes views came from: like Rousseau in The Social Contract,….

Which Direction, America?There have been several court cases and executive decisions that have shaped the interpretation of the US Constitution. Some examples include Brown v. Board of Education, a landmark case, in which the Supreme Court ruled that segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. The decision was based on the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment, which guarantees equal protection of the laws to all citizens. Another big one was Citizens United v. FEC (2010), in which the Supreme Court held that corporations have the same free speech rights as individuals and can spend unlimited amounts of money on political campaigns. Or there is Korematsu v. United States (1944), which challenged the legality of Executive Order 9066 (1942), signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II, and which authorized the internment of Japanese Americansi.e., basically concentration camps on the West Coast for American citizens who were of….

All these cruel behaviors of the King forced these thirteen colonies to declare Independence from the King in order to get their basic rights like liberty and happiness. Hence, in June 1776, Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence of these 13 colonies from the British King. As a token of approval, the representatives of these states signed this declaration.
eferences

Declaration of Independence" National Archives Experience. etrieved at http://www.archives.gov/national_archives_experience/charters/declaration.html. Accessed on 12 February 2005

The Declaration of Independence of the Thirteen Colonies" Indiana University School of Law. etrieved at http://www.law.indiana.edu/uslawdocs/declaration.html. Accessed on 12 February 2005

In Congress, July 4, 1776: The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States of America" retrieved at http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/document/. Accessed on 12 February 2005

Declaration of Independence" National Archives Experience. etrieved at http://www.archives.gov/national_archives_experience/charters/declaration.html. Accessed on 12 February 2005

The Declaration of Independence of the Thirteen Colonies" Indiana University School of Law. etrieved at http://www.law.indiana.edu/uslawdocs/declaration.html. Accessed on 12 February 2005.

Still the voice is based out of a solid religious belief of a Creator.
Assessment, Culture and Institutions general assessment of American Declaration regarding this selection is simple. It outlines clearly the intentions and plans for a free governing state created by its people for its people. The Declaration shouts, "e are here to stay!" It implores people if these intentions are fulfilled, happiness will result. This is a bold statement for its time. The culture of this document is very much engrained in the concept of a Creator or God. This is inherent of the time. America's creation is based out of religious freedom because of persecution elsewhere. This makes this document not only social but also deeply personal. A person's view of God or the Creator is an emotional connection and personal decision. By putting this in the foundation of government, the Founding Fathers were hoping to gain….

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Women's Issues - Abortion

Declaration of Independence

Words: 635
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Declaration of Independence It is obvious, if we look at things today, that Jefferson's revolutionary vision has been achieved in America. Even more so, it has been achieved to a…

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4 Pages
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Government

Declaration of Independence the Theory of Government

Words: 1292
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Declaration of Independence The Theory of Government presented in the Declaration The author of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson was greatly influenced by the political thoughts of the 17th century…

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Essay

American History

Declaration of Independence it Was Determined That

Words: 686
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Declaration of independence it was determined that thirteen of the countries were Free states and independent of England. Initially even under the government of England there were hardly any serious…

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Government

Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson

Words: 468
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

In fact, many of the ideas are taken directly from John Locke's theories, specifically the statement of the right to "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." Specifically, the…

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2 Pages
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Law - Constitutional Law

Declaration of Independence & Bill

Words: 837
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

" hen that Amendment was put in, the country was very young and it was wild, with Native Americans often hostile (with good reason), with wild animals posing a…

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3 Pages
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American History

Independence and Constitution Declaration of Independence to

Words: 1248
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Independence and Constitution Declaration of Independence to the Constitution When the American colonies declared their independence from Great Britain the Declaration of Independence stated a number of specific violations of the…

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American History

Declaration of Independence the Issuing

Words: 761
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Due to these acts, and because of the many others that followed, the colonies proclaimed their independence. On July 2 the Philadelphia Convention had its motion of independence implemented.…

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6 Pages
Research Paper

American History

Declaration of Independence Which Was Drafted by

Words: 2239
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Declaration of Independence which was drafted by Thomas Jefferson between June 11 and June 28 in 1776 is one of the most cherished symbols of liberty of the nation…

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1 Pages
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Government

Declaration of Independence the American

Words: 372
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Term Paper

They hoped to create a nation where there was a representative government, and taxation was for the good of the people not the whims of a government that…

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2 Pages
Essay

Government

Declaration of Independence

Words: 672
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Sign the Declaration of Independence I am a loyal Englishman, like my father before me; all the way back to the time of William the Conqueror. The King is…

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Essay

American History

The Declaration of Independence Influence on History

Words: 700
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

The Declaration of Independence was a product of Enlightenment philosophy and specifically of the theories of John Locke. Underlying assumptions of the Declaration include that government is a social…

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4 Pages
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Philosophy

Locke the Declaration of Independence and Today's Government

Words: 1333
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Research Paper

John LockeLocke believed in the law of liberty and held that an ethical system for society should strive to maintain the law of liberty. He wrote in his Second…

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1 Pages
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American History

Problem of Idealism and Illusion in the Declaration of Independence

Words: 351
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Essay

Which Direction, America?There have been several court cases and executive decisions that have shaped the interpretation of the US Constitution. Some examples include Brown v. Board of Education, a…

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2 Pages
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American History

Declaration of Independence Was Drafted

Words: 722
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

All these cruel behaviors of the King forced these thirteen colonies to declare Independence from the King in order to get their basic rights like liberty and happiness.…

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3 Pages
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Government

Declaration of Independence Because it

Words: 914
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Still the voice is based out of a solid religious belief of a Creator. Assessment, Culture and Institutions general assessment of American Declaration regarding this selection is simple. It…

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