Dissociative Disorder Essays (Examples)

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DSM IV Disorders DSM IV-TR - Anxiety

Words: 1010 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84488286

DSM IV Disorders

DSM IV-T - Anxiety, Somatoform, and Dissociative Disorders

American Psychological Association has compiled and published DSM IV-T, which is a diagnostic manual of mental disorders. This manual not only categorizes mental enormities but also provide guidance and assistance to medical practitioners about the suitable and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of the included mental illnesses. Moreover, specific codes have been assigned to each disorder in DSM IV-T with a purpose of providing an effective method for medical documentation. Additionally, this manual serves as a valuable resource for teaching the technicalities of psychopathology. DSM IV-T extensively discusses wide range of mental disorders such as anxiety, somatoform, and dissociative disorders.

The person who experiences frequent fear and panic about different things is believed to be suffering from anxiety. Acute state of anxiety is conducive to various other mental disorders such as obsessive-compulsion disorder, panic disorder, phobia, and so forth. Furthermore,…… [Read More]

References

Weiten, W, Dunn, D & Hammer, E.Y. (2010). Psychology Applied to Modern Life: Adjustments in the 21st Century. Tenth Edition. USA: Cengage Learning.
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Diagnosis in Children

Words: 1668 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6767069

Attention Deficit HyperactivITY Disorder DIAGNOSIS IN CHILDEN

Historical ecords

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a diverse behavioral set of symptoms described by the hub indication of impulsivity, hyperactivity and inattention. Even as, these symptoms have a tendency to gather together, some individuals are for the most part hyperactive and impetuous, even as others are predominantly inattentive. This disease affects both toddlers and adults of all ages and should be taken seriously. When this disease is being diagnosed in children, doctors often make quick decisions to make a diagnosis and handing out prescriptions. This should not be the case as doctors are supposed to take enough time to well analyze the condition of the children before offering prescriptions.

About Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

There are two main diagnostic decisive factors that are currently in use. These are the International Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders uses the initials (ICD-10) and the…… [Read More]

References

Honos-Webb, L. (2010). The gift of ADHD: How to transform your child's problems into strengths. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.

Kushner, T.K. (2010). Surviving health care: A manual for patients and their families.

Cambridge England: Cambridge University Press.

Nass, R.D. & Leventhal, F.,. (2011). 100 questions & answers about your child's ADHD: From
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Questions OCD and PTSD

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48316131

ABC/123 Version X

Week Five eview Worksheet

PSY/203 Version

Week Five eview Worksheet

Choose two categories of psychological disorders and outline the main symptoms associated with the disorders.

The old classification system for psychological disorders only had two kinds, neurosis and psychosis with people suffering from neurosis experiencing anxiety and people with psychosis suffering from hallucinations. Now psychological disorders are categorized even further. The two selected are from the category of anxiety disorders. The first is PTSD or post-traumatic stress disorder. The second is OCD or obsessive-compulsive disorder. There are other classifications, the somatoform disorders and dissociative disorders. The three main symptoms of PTSD revolve around re-experiencing the traumatic scenario. The afflicted person will experience nightmares, upsetting memories, flashbacks, including feels of distress (Barlow, 2001). The person will also experience intense physical reactions like nausea, sweating, and pounding heart. They will also try to avoid any remind of the trauma.…… [Read More]

References

Antony, M. & Barlow, D. (2002). Handbook of assessment and treatment planning for psychological disorders. New York: Guilford Press.

Barlow, D. (2001). Clinical handbook of psychological disorders. New York: Guilford Press.

Copyright © XXXX by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.

Copyright © 2015 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Alcoholism Addiction

Words: 4543 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57309421

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Alcoholism/Addiction

Narrative

Alcoholism and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Overview

PTSD and Co morbidity of Alcoholism: The ole of Trauma

Childhood Abuse and Gender Differences in PTSD

Association Between Alcoholism and Emotion

Genetic and Environmental Influences

Models of Assessment/Conclusions

Abstract TC "Abstract" f C l "1"

This study will examine the relationship between post traumatic stress disorder and alcoholism/addiction. The author proposes a quantitative correlation analysis of the relationship between PTSD and alcoholism be conducted to identify the influence of trauma on subsequent alcohol abuse in patients varying in age from 13-70.

A survey of the literature available on PTSD and alcohol/substance abuse on patients is conducted leading to a conclusion that a direct relationship does exist between Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Alcoholism/Addiction. This conclusion coincides with a large body of evidence and prior studies which link the prevalence of traumatic disorders with alcohol and substance…… [Read More]

References" f C l "1":

Brady, S.; Rierdan, J. Penk, W; Losardo, M; Meschede, T. (2003). "Post traumatic stress disorder in adults with serious mental illness and substance abuse." Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, 4(4): 77-90

Brown, P.J. (2001). "Outcome in female patients with both substance use and post-traumatic stress disorders." Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 18(3):127-135

Bulijan, D.; Vreek, D.; Cekic, A.A.; Karlovic, D.; Zoricic, Z; Golik-Gruber, V. (2002).

'Posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol dependence and somatic disorders in displaced persons." Alcoholism: Journal on Alcoholism and Related Addictions, 38(1-2)35-40
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Bipolar II Disorder

Words: 2688 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79340844

Bipolar II

In the United States alone, a staggering number of people suffer from some sort of mental illness and many more are at high risk of developing a mental condition. Worldwide, the number is even greater, especially in countries without the resources to provide the care needed by such people. Some mental conditions are more prevalent and easier to develop than others. Whereas a serious disease that manifests various forms of psychosis like schizophrenia is mostly prevalent in those who inherit it from family members, those who have abused drugs long-term and consistently, or those with brain injuries, milder conditions like bipolar disorder can be developed by virtually anyone. In the United States, about 2.5% of the population has some form of bipolar disorder (WedMD, 2014). This translate to about 6 million people.

Because of this high number of sufferers, increasing research attention in the psychiatric and medical fields…… [Read More]

References

Cusin, C., Hilton, G.Q., Nierenberg, A.A., and Fava M. (2012). Long-Term Maintenance With Intramuscular Ketamine for Treatment-Resistant Bipolar II Depression. American Journal of Psychiatry. Retrieved from: http://journals.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=1268250

Mayo Clinic. (2014). Bipolar Disorder. Retrieved from: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bipolar-disorder/basics/symptoms/con-20027544

PsychCentral (2014). The Two Types of Bipolar Disorder. Retrieved from: http://psychcentral.com/lib/the-two-types-of-bipolar-disorder/000612?all=1

Sole, B., Martinez-Aran, A., Torrent, C., Bonnin, C.M., Reinares, M., Popovic, D., Sanchez-Moreno, J., and Vieta, E. (2011). Are bipolar II patients cognitively impaired? A systematic review. Psychological Medicine. Retrieved from:  http://diposit.ub.edu/dspace/bitstream/2445/52283/1/587142.pdf
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Christian Counseling

Words: 3353 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90557897

Christian Counseling

Presenting Problems

Diane seems to be undergoing many different problems that are present today because of her past. The way she was treated by her family and her husband now has gone to affect her psychologically and emotionally. The combination of post traumatic stress disorder, schizoaffective symptoms and previous satanic ritual abuse is very severe and psychological intervention is greatly required.

One of her presenting complaints is post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) PTSD is a form of anxiety disorder that occurs as an emotional reaction to something that occurred in the patient's life. This trauma could be pain, injury, threat, or death of a loved one. (Valente, 2010) Some common examples of traumatic disorders are natural disasters, military combat or terrorist incidents. It is normal to have an adverse or a stressed response to a traumatic event. Normally, people come to back to their usual state of mind…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual (4th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Brewin, C. And Holmes, E. (2003). Psychological theories of posttraumatic stress disorder. Clinical psychology review, 23 (3), pp. 339 -- 376.

Clark, D. And Ehlers, A. (2004). Posstraumatic stress disorders from cognitive theory to therapy. In: Leahy, R. eds. (2004). Contemporary cognitive therapy: Theory, research, and practice. New York: Guilford, pp. 141-160.

Clohessy, S. And Ehlers, A. (1999). PTSD symptoms, response to intrusive memories and coping in ambulance service workers. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 38 (3), pp. 251 -- 265.
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Validating the Effectiveness of Participation in a

Words: 7348 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2865324

Validating the Effectiveness of Participation in a Time-Sensitive Closed Therapeutic Group for Preschool Aged Children Allegedly Sexually Abused

This paper will review existing research on allegedly sexually abused preschool aged children. The traumatic psychological effects of the abuse including low self-esteem, poor peer relationships, behavior problems, cognitive functioning and physical/mental health will also be evaluated.

The author notes the paucity of available material on sexually abused children. Very little therefore is known of the effectiveness of psychotherapy to assist in the treatment of the problems of this particular group of abused children - a population of 40 selected children with a mean age of 45, with their parents (either father or mother) and/or caregivers attending sessions in another session hall at the same time the children are undergoing therapy.

This proposed study will therefore focus on how mental health services are provided to preschool children with ages ranging between 4…… [Read More]

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Stigma of Mental Illness

Words: 1007 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45220145

Schizophrenia, Dissociative Disorder and Bipolar Disorder
While some symptoms of schizophrenia, dissociative disorder and bipolar disorder might seem similar, prompting individuals to suspect that the three different mental health disorders are interchangeable, the reality is that these three problems are quite distinct. This paper will discuss the broad differences between them as well as way to educate the client about his or her disorder, his or her family about it, and ways to reduce stigma.
As the DSM-5 points out, schizophrenia a mental disorder that causes the patient to experience hallucinations, delusions, irrational speech patterns, anti-social behavior, a loss of willpower/motivation, or even a possible catatonic state at times. Symptoms include incoherent speech, paranoia, distorted perceptions, confused or disordered thinking, and an inability to concentrate. This broad spectrum of symptoms should be seen for at least a month, with behavior being monitored for up to six months (American Psychiatric Association,…… [Read More]

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Canadian Public Policy Education Learning Disability D

Words: 2563 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23922217

Canada Public Policy: ADHD and Education

Canadian Public Policy, Education Learning disability A.D.H.D

Struggle by Human ights Groups and Parents

Public Policy Canada: An Overview

Policy Implications

It has been estimated that almost five percent of School aged children out of population of 2.1 Million in Ontario are suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Contrasting other disabilities like autism or learning disabilities the ADHD was not in the special education previously. The students with ADHD were not included in the special education policy and thus the students and parents were suffering as they could not get the necessary interventions at School suggested by the doctor. (Andrea Golden, 2012)

ecently Education Minister of Ontario has announced to accommodate the students with ADHD and thus relaxed the parents as previously parents were spending from their pockets on theirs children with ADHD. A memorandum has been posted on the Ministry of Education…… [Read More]

References

Andrea Golden. (2012) Students with ADHD have legal right to supports in school Accessed online at http://www.thestar.com/living/article/1112930 -- students-with-adhd-have-legal-right-to-supports-in-school?bn=1

Castellanos, X.F. And Tannock, R. (2002). Neuroscience of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: The search for endophenotypes. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, 617-628.

Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The Constitution Act, 1982, being Schedule B. To the Canada Act 1982 (U.K.), 1982, c. 11. Ottawa, ON. Government of Canada.

Dryer, R., Kiernan, M.J., and Tyson, G.A. (2006). Implicit theories of the characteristics and causes of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder held by parents and professionals in the psychological, educational, medical and allied health fields. Australian Journal of Psychology, 58, 79-92
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Cognitive and Behavioral Techniques Therapy

Words: 1586 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9470176

Cognitive and Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive and behavioral techniques / therapy

Cognitive Therapist Behavioral Techniques

Case of the Fat Lady

Cognitive behaviorist therapy is a blend of two therapies; cognitive therapy and behavioral therapy. Cognitive therapy first developed by Aaron Beck in 1960 has its focus on individual beliefs and their influences on actions and moods. Its core aims are to alter an individual mindset to be healthy and adaptive (Beck, 1976; athod, Kingdon, Weiden, & Turkington, 2008). Behavioral therapy focuses on individual aims and actions towards changing patterns in unhealthy behaviors (athod et al., 2008). Cognitive behavioral therapy assists an individual to focus on their current difficulties and relate on how to resolve them. Active involvement of both the therapist and the patient helps in identification of the thinking patterns in distort bringing into foresight a recognizable change in thought and behavior (Leichsenring & Leibing, 2007). Exploring and encouraging discussions…… [Read More]

References

Beck, A.T. (1976). Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders. New York: International Universities Press.

Burns, Kubilus, Breuhl, Harden, R.N., & Lofland, K. (2003). Do changes in cognitive factors influence outcome following multidisciplinary treatment for chronic pain? A cross-lagged panel analysis. . Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 71, 81-91.

Leichsenring, F., & Leibing, E. (2007). Psychodynamic psychotherapy: a systematic review of techniques, indications and empirical evidence. Psychology and Psychotherapy, 80(2), 217-228.

Rathod, S., Kingdon, D., Weiden, P., & Turkington, D. (2008). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for medication-resistant schizophrenia: a review. Journal of Psychiatric Practice, 14(1), 22-33.
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Effects of Domestic Violence on Children

Words: 4184 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6389413

Domestic Violence on Children

Many people throughout the world have traditionally believed that women's natural roles were as mothers and wives and considered women to be better suited for childbearing and homemaking than for involvement in the public life of business or politics. This popular belief that women were somehow intellectually inferior to men, based in large part on religious authority, has led many societies throughout the world to limit women's education to learning domestic skills and relegating them to a second-class citizen status. By and large, the world has been run by well-educated, upper-class men who controlled most positions of employment and power in these societies and to a large extent continue to do so today. While the status of women today varies dramatically in different countries and, in some cases, among groups within the same country, such as ethnic groups or economic classes, women continue to experience the…… [Read More]

References

Bagley, C. (1992). Development of an adolescent stress scale for use of school counsellors. School Psychology International 13, 31-49.

Beitchman, J., Zucker, K., Hood, J., DaCosta, G., Ackaman, D. & Cassavia, E. (1992). A review of the long-term effects of child sexual abuse. Child Abuse and Neglect, 16, 101-118.

Belsky J. & Vondra J. (1989). Lessons from child abuse: The determinants of parenting. In D. Cicchetti & V. Carlson (Eds.), Child maltreatment: Theory and research on the causes and consequences of child abuse and neglect (pp. 153-202). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Briere, J.N. (1992). Child Abuse Trauma. Theory and Treatment of the Lasting Effects. Newbury Park, CA:Sage.
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Metropolitan Development Affect Rates of

Words: 1924 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81802379



Contrary to what is often seen on the nightly news programs, there are still many people in this country and throughout the world who want to live in safe places and who would be interested in making their town better. Often, they do not know what they can do to improve the poorer parts of town, so they simply choose not to live or work there. This only leads to the decay of those areas and the rising crime rate. While unfortunate, it is not entirely unexpected. However, urban revitalization has begun in a lot of cities and towns, both big and small, in recent years. Although the economy has slowed some of that, there are still many areas where it is moving forward. This will, in time, lower the number of sexual assaults and other crimes in those revitalization areas. If more people would help to improve their neighborhoods,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chu, James A. (1990). Dissociative symptoms in relation to childhood physical and sexual abuse, Am. J. Psychiatry.

Coons, P.M. (1994). Confirmation of childhood abuse in childhood and adolescent cases of multiple personality disorder and dissociative disorders not otherwise specified. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 182, 461-464.

Finkelhor, D. (1990). Early and long-term effects of child sexual abuse: An update. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 21, 325-330.

Jarvis, T.J., & Copeland, J. (1997). Child sexual abuse as a predictor of psychiatric co-
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Diagnose or Not to Diagnose

Words: 2826 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19828979



Discuss the criteria used to define abnormality (abnormal behavior / mood disorders)

There are no established criteria to define what is abnormal. On the other hand, every individual trait can be said as abnormal on some social plane. (Oracle think quest, 2010) Some of the preferred ideas to define abnormality are as given below:

Statistical Norms Deviation: Certain population facts such as height, weight and intelligence are measured and recorded. Most of people come in the middle range of intelligence. Those who fail in general terms and falls below the so-called intelligence scale are termed as abnormal. But then, the people with extra intelligence also become abnormal. Furthermore, intelligence is a subjective issue. (Oracle think quest, 2010)

Social Norms Deviation: People going again social norms and trying to make their idiosyncratic identity are also termed as abnormal. Galileo was abnormal and he was brutally punished for his abnormality, he suggested…… [Read More]

References

Baker, B.L., Blacher, J., & Pfeiffer, S. (1993). "Family involvement in residential treatment of children with psychiatric disorder and mental retardation" Hospital and Community Psychiatry, vol. 44, no. 6, pp: 561-566.

Chan, Jeffery; Hudson, Colin. (2002) "Individuals with Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness:

A Literature Review," Australian Journal of Social Issues, vol. 37, no. 1, pp: 31-40.

Davidson, P.W., Cain, N.N., Sloane-Reeves, J., Giesow, V.E Quijano, L.E., Van Heyningen, J., & Sholam, I. (1995). "Crisis intervention for community-based individuals with developmental disabilities and behavioral and psychiatric disorders" Mental Retardation, vol. 33, no. 1, pp: 21-30.
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Enforcement of Psychology Treatment for the Mentally Ill

Words: 8451 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95839705

Psychology Treatment

For most of U.S. history up to the time of the Community Mental Health Act of 1963, the mentally ill were generally warehoused in state and local mental institutions on a long-term basis. Most had been involuntarily committed by orders from courts or physicians, and the discharge rate was very low. Before the 1950s and 1960s, there were few effective treatments for mental illnesses like depression, anxiety disorders and schizophrenia, which were commonly considered incurable. Only with the psycho-pharmacological revolution in recent decades and new anti-depressant and anti-psychotic medications has it been possible for the severely mentally ill to be treated on an outpatient basis through community mental health centers. Of course, as the old state hospitals have emptied many of the mentally ill have ended up homeless, since they are unable to hold maintain regular employment or continue on a medication regimen without supervision. According to present-day…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bacon. H. "Book Review: Jonathan Willows, Moving On after Childhood Sexual Abuse: Understanding the Effects and Preparing for Therapy in Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry. (15)1 January 2010, pp. 141-42.

Bartels, S.J., A.D. van Citters and T. Crenshaw (2010). "Older Adults" in Levin, B.L., J. Petrila and K. Hennessy Mental Health Services: A Public Health Perspective. Oxford University Presss: 261-82.

Behar, E.S. And T.D. Borkovec. (2003). "Psychotherapy Outcome Research" in I.B. Weiner et al., eds. Handbook of Psychology: Research Methods in Psychology. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Carron, V.G. And K. Hull. (2009). "Treatment Manual for Trauma-Exposed Youth: Case Studies." Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry 15(1) 13 November 2009, pp. 27-38.
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Protecting the Community From Sex Offenders

Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41400123



Mental health workers offered mixed support for the treatment program. A rape crises advocate and support counselor suggested that diverting offenders out of the criminal justice system denied the victims the closure that they needed to move on with their lives. However, two psychiatrists indicated that they believe that treatment programs can be effective, and that treatment is the appropriate course for mentally ill offenders, rather than incarceration. In addition, because they work with mental commitments, they indicated that both of them have already participated in civil commitments for pedophilic child molesters who offended within the family group, and indicated their belief that the civil commitment process actually made it easier for the victim to begin the work to repair his or her life.

Finally, it is important to consider the criminals. More than in almost any other area, the idea of possibly indefinite civil commitment for those who sexually…… [Read More]

Give the District Attorney the discretion to prosecute the pedophile for any acts of sexual assault, as well as any other crimes committed to further the sexual assault or hide the sexual assault. Any pedophile engaging in torture, aggravated assault, or murder would be subject to criminal prosecution for those crimes.

While conventional wisdom suggests that treatment for sexual offenses against children is ineffective, that simply is not the case. Pedophiles have a horrible disease. While that disease does not give them the right to victimize others, it like other mental illness, becomes more difficult to control when a person is experiencing "fear, lack of trust, low self-esteem, feelings of rejection, inadequate social skills, lack of empathy, isolation from others, and poor communications skills." (Freeman-Longo, 2001). Prison increases these feelings, making it unlikely that treatment in a prison setting would provide the same type of success as hospital-based treatment programs.

Furthermore, one-third of sexual offenses against children are committed by teenagers. (Chaffin, Bonner, & Pierce, 2003). Because many child molesters are, themselves, children, it stands to reason that there are many teenage child molesters who are pedophiles, though most adolescent sexual offenders do not meet the criteria for pedophilia. However, across the board, adolescent sex offenders are more responsive to treatment
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Women Who Were Sexually Abused

Words: 2058 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70236015



We are extremely close.

Amazing - I've found someone I can really trust. I feel really lucky at the moment because all my other relationships have been *****.

Too good. it's really hard to describe. Unreal! I guess I now can't live without him. it's too good. He's grown on me.

I think I need to clarify I'm still married. I feel that in a marriage there ought to be a sexual relationship but in the last four years, I have been unable to give that and nor do I desire resuming it with my husband.

Fairly close but since I broke up with my husband I find it difficult to trust somebody. He tells me I'm a lot closer to him than I realize. I find it difficult to relax and believe it's too good to be true. I'm always looking for something to be wrong.

Excellent. He's very…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Mullen, Paul E. And Fleming, Jillian (1998) Long-term Effects of Child Sexual Abuse. Issues in Child Abuse Prevention. No. 9 Autumn 1998. Online available at http://www.aifs.gov.au/nch/pubs/issues/issues9/issues9.html

Hughes, Karen et al. (1998) the Health Impacts on Adult Women of Childhood Sexual Violence Before the Age of Twelve Years. Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse. A Report on Community Research. Online available at http://www.mincava.umn.edu/documents/report/report.html

Worrell, Judith (nd) Encyclopedia of Women and Gender - Sex Similarities and Differences and the Impact of Society on Gender. Academic Press. Google Books online available at http://books.google.com/books?id=7SXhBdqejgYC&printsec=frontcover&dq=women+and+childhood+sexual+abuse:+self-esteem,+intimacy,+friendship+in+adulthood&source=gbs_summary_s&cad=0#PPP1,M1
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Legalizing Prostitution in New York

Words: 2669 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48806062

Streetwalkers are generally the lowest-paid of all prostitutes. They are also in the most danger. As a result, those who work as streetwalkers are likely to be more desperate than other prostitutes, suggesting that, regardless of chosen profession, they would experience greater levels of mental distress than the normal population.

hat is fascinating is that when research does not look at streetwalkers, but at higher status prostitutes, prostitutes do not seem to suffer from a greater rate of mental health issues than women in other professions. Ine Vanwesenbeeck examined burnout levels of indoor sex workers in the Netherlands and compared them to nurses and to mental health patients. Her results suggested that prostitution did not necessarily lead to psychological issues. "Female indoor sex workers in the Netherlands do not exhibit a higher level of work-related emotional exhaustion or a lower level of work-related personal competence than a comparison group of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cundiff, Kirby. Prostitution and Sex Crimes. The Independent Institute. N.p. 8 Apr. 2004.

Web. 13 Nov. 2012.

Farley, Melissa. "Bad for the Body, Bad for the Heart: Prostitution Harms Women Even if

Legalized or Decriminalized." Violence Against Women 10.10 (2004), 1087-1125.
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Personal Recovery Journey Recovery for

Words: 2346 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47875360

ut getting back to my supporter, because there is no chance that we will ever become close friends (she lives quite a distance from me), I feel I can open up to her and never fear her being critical of me. She recommends that I read the first-person stories from others who are recovering from various emotional and mental health problems. So, I have followed her suggestion.

An article in the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal tells the story of Yin Fan, who fell into a "deep depression" and "did not understand what was happening to me" (Fan, 2007). She eventually found out she had a bipolar condition, but meantime she gave thoughts to suicide. She thought about "…jumping of tall buildings or walking out into the ocean and letting the water carry me away" (Fan, 313). I have not had such thoughts but I do understand how a person suffering such…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brookes, Nancy, Murata, Lisa, and Tansey, Margaret. 2008. 'Tidal Waves: Implementing a New Model of Mental Health Recovery and Reclamation.' Canadian Nurse. Retrieved May 12, 2013, from http://www.canadiannurse.com.

Buckland, Steve. 2005. 'Sharing Responsibility for Recovery: creating and sustaining recovery oriented systems of care for mental health.' Queensland Government / Queensland Health. Retrieved May 12, 2013, from http://www.health.qld.gov.au.

C Chu 2008. 'My Personal Journey: Schizophrenia.' Hong Kong Journal of Psychiatry. Vol.18, 39-40.

Cleary, Anne. 2009. 'The road to recovery.' Mental Health Practice, vol. 12, 28-31.
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Creative Case Identifying Information Lisa

Words: 961 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93153295

Lisa finds it hard to meet other kids her age who are like her. Most of her peers "do not care about school" and don't understand anything about the issues she cares about such as environmentalism and Tibet. Lisa worries excessively about external, global events such as global warming and wars in Africa. Many of the people she refers to as "friends" are much older than she is, although she admits most of them are mentors.

A person with generalized anxiety disorder finds it difficult to control worry. Lisa has been unable to control her worry successfully via Buddhist meditation or tai chi. She writes regularly in a journal and claims that this does help but not enough. Although she finds temporary relief in music and schoolwork, her feelings of worry and anxiety creep back into her consciousness as soon as she is doing something else. She experiences the most…… [Read More]

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Bright Light The Story of

Words: 1155 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12543542

As Nick grows older, his symptoms grow worse, and he becomes more and more depressed, even when times are "good." This is also common with the disease. Nick's brain did not see things the way others do, and he was like a confused child in many ways. Lithium helped the disease, which is also common, but it constantly has to be controlled, and so Nick endured highs and lows as the medication altered. He simply could not contend with the lows. The book very accurately portrays the life of a manic-depressive. It is clear to see how difficult it was for Nick, in the middle of it. It is also an accurate depiction of the progression of the disease, and how it affects everyone, from friends to family, and how difficult a disease it is to successfully treat.

Steel clearly indicates how difficult it is to live with this illness,…… [Read More]

References

Steel, Danielle. (1998). His bright light: the Nick Traina story. New York: Delacorte Press.
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DSM-IV Classifications the Diagnostic and

Words: 882 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65050322



Generally, mood disorders are influenced by both biological and environmental factors. In order words, these disorders can be inherited. The bipolar and cyclothmic disorders generally include both euphoric and depressive feelings, while the dysthymic and major depressive disorders only include depressive feelings. The bipolar and major depressive disorders have received most attention in terms of research. These disorders are generally treated by a combination of medication and psychotherapy. Being more severe than the other two mood disorders, they may also at times require hospitalization to ensure the safety of the patient.

The cyclothmic and dysthymic disorders are both less severe than the other two, but can also be disruptive if not appropriately treated. The prognosis for both of these are good in terms of functioning effectively in society. The more severe disorders may hamper functioning effectively in social and workplace situations, although the correct combination of psychotherapy and medication can…… [Read More]

Sources

AllPsych. (2003). Psychiatric disorders. http://allpsych.com/disorders/index.html

Hsiung, Robert. (2008, March 3). DSM-IV Diagnoses and Codes.  http://www.dr-bob.org/tips/dsm4a.html 

Psychnet.uk. (2009). Complete List of DSM-IV Codes. http://www.psychnet-uk.com/dsm_iv/_misc/complete_tables.htm
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Bipolar Student in Math and Science Class

Words: 2846 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22507836

ability of a bipolar student to learn concepts in the subjects of Math and Science in the general classroom setting

According to sources retrieved from the American Medical Journal, bipolar disorder refers to the psychiatric diagnosis for a mood disorder. Individuals who suffer from bipolar disorder undergo various symptoms such as experiencing episodes of a frenzied state whose medical term is mania (or hypomania). This medical condition typically alternates with episodes of depression. Doctor Annabel Hathaway, a senior psychologist at the University of Stanford, children suffering from bipolar disorders have high intelligence quotient and commendable talents. However, they may have difficulties in coordinating their reflexes and reaction time. They also experience difficulties making transitions, and they may as well have co-morbid syndromes that that render them anxious, inattentive, distractible, moody, argumentative, and withdrawn. Likewise, bipolar disorders may render such children acute and perfectionist.

Psychologists explain that children with bipolar disorders…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anglada, Tracy The Student with Bipolar Disorder: An Educator's Guide BP Children Organization <  http://www.bpchildren.org/files/Download/Educator.pdf >

Child & Adolescent Bipolar Foundation Educating the Child with Bipolar Disorder State: Arizona Department of Education

Grier, Elizabeth Chesno, Wilkins, Megan L. And Carolyn Ann Stirling Pender Bipolar Disorder: Educational Implications for Secondary Students Michigan: University of Michigan Press

The Balanced Mind Foundation An Educator's Guide to Pediatric Bipolar Disorder < http://www.thebalancedmind.org/learn/library/an-educators-guide-to-pediatric-bipolar-disorder>
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Psychological Sequelae of Childhood Sexual

Words: 6079 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85748070

It is also interesting to note that the correlation between depression and childhood sexual abuse was found to be higher among females in many studies.

However, the issue of the relationship between depression and sexual abuse may not be as clear-cut as the above studies suggest. Recent research has begun to question this correlation and has produced findings that suggest that there are many other parameters and variables that should be considered. This is especially the case with regard to the view that childhood sexual abuse necessarily leads to depression in adulthood. As one report claims, "...there is accumulating evidence to contradict these claims" (Roosa,

Reinholtz, (Angelini, 1999). However the majority of studies indicate that there is a strong possibility that children who are sexually abused experience symptoms of depression that can extend into adulthood.

PTSD

3.1. What is PTSD?

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a disorder that has shown…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abused Children Face Depression Risk as Adults. Retrieved March 3, 2009 at http://www.healthyplace.com/abuse/abuse-and-depression/abused-children-face-depression-risk-as-adults/menu-id-52/

Association between Childhood Sexual Abuse History and Adverse

Psychosocial Outcomes in controlled studies. Retrieved March 6, 2009, at  http://www.leadershipcouncil.org/1/res/csa.html 

Barker J. Adult Sequelae of Child Sexual Abuse. Retrieved March 6, 2009, at http://www.medicineau.net.au/clinical/psychiatry/SexualAbuse.html
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Carpal Instability Is Any Mal-Alignment

Words: 5543 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72024643

When using open reduction of dorsal displaced fractures of the radius to restore congruency and extra-articular anatomy, the authors recommended the use of their double-plating method. This method is reliable in providing stable internal fixation and in allowing early function. It is, however, and as earlier mentioned, a demanding technique, as ot requires careful; attention to detail.

Carter, P.. And PR Stuart. The Sauva-Kapankji Procedure for Post-Traumatic Disorders of the Distal Radio-Ulnar Joint. Journal of one and Joint Surgery: ritish Editorial Society of one and Joint Surgery, September 2000

Only one surgeon performed all the operations on a total of 37 patients for pain on the ulnar side of the wrist and decreased rotation of the forearm. The authors reported that most of the tested patients were better after the operation, although a significant number had some pain. Relief from pain could not be guaranteed and that residual pain associated…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Atkinson, Larry S. et al. Scapholunate Dissociation. American Family Physician: American Academy of Family Physicians, June 1994

Berdia, Sunjay and Shin, Alexander Y. Carpal Ligament Instability. Orthopedic Surgery. WebMD. eMedicine.Com, Inc., November 22, 2005.

Bozentka, David J. Scapholunate Instability. UPOJ. Vol 12, Spring 1999

Carter, P.B. And PR Stuart. The Sauva-Kapankji Procedure for Post-Traumatic Disorders of the Distal Radio-Ulnar Joint. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery: British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery, September 2000
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Compulsive Hoarding Due to Childhood

Words: 4019 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62247855

" (p. 12) According to Cromer (2005) the literature that addresses the relationship between stressful life events and obsessive compulsive disorders does provide some degree of support implicating traumatic life-stress as being a factor in the onset and maintenance of the obsessive compulsive disorders however the exact relationship between the SLE and OCD "remains an empirical questions" specifically relating to "traumatic negative life events" (2005; p.13) Most of studies in this area investigation the association between SLEs and OCD have held limitations of: (1) small sample sizes; and (2) difficulty of establishing retrospectively the temporal relationship between onset and SLEs; and (3) a limited scope with regard to the effect of SLEs on OCD. (2005; p.13) Cromer relates that "mounting evidence suggests that early life-stress, in particular may preferentially incline individuals to develop adult psychiatric disorders." (2005; p.13) McCauley et al. (1997) states evidence from a large epidemiological investigation that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beamish, Patricia M. And Hill, Nicole R. (2007) Treatment outcomes for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a critical review.(Private Practices) Journal of Counseling and Development 22 Sept 20077. Online available at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-170413211.html

Bechtel, Robert B. And Ts'erts'Man, Arzah (2002) Handbook of Environmental Psychology. John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

Boston University School of Social Work (2007) Online available at http://www.bu.edu/ssw/training/pep/programs/workshops/boston/index.shtml

Cromer, Kiara R. (2005) a Pathoplastic Vulnerability Mode: An Association Between Traumatic Stressful Life Events & OCD. Florida State University 2005. Online available at http://etd.lib.fsu.edu/theses/available/etd-11/unrestricted/Cromer_Thesis_Nov_2005.pdf
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Bpd Is Related to Secure

Words: 10546 Length: 38 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3194760

Attachment was believed by owlby to be a critical aspect of the normal development of human behavior. Attachment is inclusive of the following characteristics:

1) Proximity Seeking - the infant seeks to be near the maternal figure;

2) Separation distress or protests - when separated or distant from the material figure the infant becomes distressed and signals this by vocalizing these feelings and changes in affect.

3) a secure base - when the infant develops a healthy attachment, the mother becomes a 'secure base' from which the child can venture forth into the world and securely explore their surroundings.

Ainsworth is noted as the first to conduct empirical research assessing patterns of attachment behaviors in infant attachment relating to the mother being under stress. Infant attachment behavior was categorized as: (1) secure; (2) avoidant; and (3) ambivalent. Since then the behavioral patterns of infants has undergone intensive assessment and study…… [Read More]

Bibliography

DSM-III-R). Washington, DC: APA. - (1994) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

Aaronson, C.J., Bender, D.S., Skodol, a.E. And Gunderson, J.G. (2006) Comparison of Attachment Styles in Borderline Personality Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Journal Psychiatric Quarterly Vol. 77 No. 1 March 2006. Online available at http://aolsearch.aol.com/aol/search?query=attachment+theory+and+borderline+personality+disorder&page=3&nt=null&userid=9218600308675950091&encquery=431f3e36d133ebdff7537ee6febc11c6eca098f7674f16b90920f3bd5b092d5ab49460504194f6e58ee065b5a3272811bc442682a5c9c059&ie=UTF-8&invocationType=keyword_rollover&clickstreamid=5154621097040471491.

Adalist-Estrin, Ann (1993) Moral Development and Attachment: Disruptions that Create Cycles of Criminal Behavior October 10-12. The Fourth North American Conference on the Family & Corrections Family and Corrections Network. Family Pathway Project. Online available at  http://www.fcnetwork.org/4thnorth/moral.html 

Agrawal, H.R., Gunderson, J., Holmes, B.M. And Lyons-Ruth, K. (2004) Attachment Studies with Borderline Patients: A Review. HARV REV PSYCHIATRY 2004;12:94-104
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Christian Counseling

Words: 818 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80045954

Christian Counseling Scenario

What are the client's most prominent presenting issues (that is, what seems to take priority as being wrong)?

In the case of Leon, a 52-year-old man with a dysfunctional childhood who has been unable to experience life in typical fashion, the most prominent presenting issue is definitely the individual's lack of emotional capacity and general apathy, both of which are obviously symptoms of a deeply repressed psychological trauma. The circumstances described in the introduction to Leon's case, wherein his eventually divorced parents both suffered from chemical dependency and addiction, while the father inflicted sever emotional and physical abuse, is extremely typical in terms of being connected to later symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV Text evision (DSM-IV T), "diagnostic criteria for PTSD include a history of exposure to a traumatic event that meets specific stipulations and…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders

(4th ed., text rev.). Washington, D.C.
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Brother Where Art Thou -

Words: 949 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68550094

He has never liked this name and becomes very angry when it is used. His specialty is car theft, bootlegging and armed robbery. He has already served several years in prison for auto theft and bank robbery charges. Just last year, while being returned to prison from a bank robbery trial, he escaped. That is why he is here in the South. He is seeing me, because the episodes are becoming more often and more severe.

His mother told him that he was always an ill-tempered and spoiled child. Many people say that he is the toughest and most heartless of the gangsters and even other criminals stay away from him. He remembers that even as a young boy he used to have mood swings from being very boisterous and rebellious to sad and even crying, which he had to hide from the gang. Now when he goes into his…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. Bipolar definition. Website retrieved February 8, 2007 http://www.psychiatryonline.com/

Coen, E. And Deakins, R. O Brother Where Art Thou (2000). Comedy/Adventure. Buena Vista Home Entertainment.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (2000). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association.
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Ideal Psychotherapy for Childhood Abuse in Adults

Words: 2724 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79564366

Social Work Practice Within Aboriginal

Building attached case study Lisa, describe discuss social work practice approach aboriginal innovative practice modalities a cultural context. This assignment refining approach practice integrating theories practices learned required readings.

ABOIGINAL AND INNOVATIVE SOCIAL WOK PACTICE APPOACH

Concepts in Social Work Practice within Aboriginal and Cultural Framework

In trying to attend to a client's challenges in psychology, it is imperative to provide an environment that is sufficiently safe where a client can talk and explore their problems (Brave Heart, 2004). This measure is adequate for many clients but not sufficient for all especially so when it comes to cases involving aboriginal persons. For the aboriginal clients, an understanding of adaptation difficulties and the inter-generation aspects is necessary to provide a wholesome resolution to the challenges at hand. This paper presents a discussion on the ideal approach in social work for the case of Lisa, who had…… [Read More]

References

Brave Heart, M.Y.H. (2004). The historical trauma response among Natives and its relationship to substance abuse: A Lakota illustration. In E. Nebelkopf, & M. Phillips (Eds.), Healing and mental health for Native Americans: Speaking in red. Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.

Briere, J. (2002). Treating adult survivors of severe childhood abuse and neglect: Further development of an integrative model. In J.E.B. Myers, L. Berliner, J. Briere, C.T. Hendrix, T. Reid, & C. Jenny (Eds.). The APSAC handbook on child maltreatment, 2nd Edition. . Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

Burns, D. (1999). The feeling good handbook. United Kingdom: Penguin Group.

Burton, L., Westen, D., & Kowalski, R.M. (2012). Psychology. Milton, Qld. Australia: John Wiley and Sons.
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Flashback Episodes Experienced by Vietnam

Words: 1781 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69196632

It will also attempt to identify average time lengths between episodes. This study will be important not only to the treatment of Vietnam Veteran PTSD but to the treatment of all PTSD sufferers who have flashbacks.

eferences

Coming home from war: a literature review: in the last of three articles, Deidre Wild examines the stressors faced by health professionals returning from the Gulf. (clinical).

From: Emergency Nurse | Date: May 1, 2003 | Author: Wild, Deidre | More results for: viet nam ptsd http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/13/1/101

Dissociative Flashbacks After ight Frontal Injury in a Vietnam Veteran With Combat-elated Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Marcelo L. Berthier, M.D., Angel Posada, M.D. And Carmen Puentes, M.D.

eceived March 3, 2000; June 27, 2000; accepted July 7, 2000. From the Department of Medicine and Dermatology, University of Malaga, Spain, and the Service of Nuclear Medicine. Department of adiology, Carlos Haya University Hospital, Malaga, Spain. Address correspondence to…… [Read More]

References

Coming home from war: a literature review: in the last of three articles, Deidre Wild examines the stressors faced by health professionals returning from the Gulf. (clinical).

From: Emergency Nurse | Date: May 1, 2003 | Author: Wild, Deidre | More results for: viet nam ptsd http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/13/1/101

Dissociative Flashbacks After Right Frontal Injury in a Vietnam Veteran With Combat-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Marcelo L. Berthier, M.D., Angel Posada, M.D. And Carmen Puentes, M.D.
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PTSD Treatment Modalities Evidence-Based Recommendations

Words: 4461 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17783376

Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatment

Clinical Presentation of Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatments

On January 13, 2015, Andrew Brannan, a 66-year-old Vietnam veteran was executed in Georgia for killing police officer Kyle Dinkheller in 1998 (Hoffman, 2015). At the time, Brannan had been living in a bunker on his mother's property without water or electricity and had stopped taking his medications. According to the Veterans Administration (VA), he was 100% disabled due to combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). He also suffered from bipolar disorder, had lost two brothers to a military plane crash and suicide, and lost a father to cancer. Veterans groups, death penalty critics, and mental health advocates, all petitioned the Georgia Supreme Court for a stay of execution unsuccessfully. The veterans groups were particularly interested in preventing the death of yet another veteran who developed severe psychiatric problems while serving his or her country.

Trauma in general…… [Read More]

References

APA (American Psychiatric Association). (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association.

Cook, J.M., Dinnen, S., Simiola, V., Bernardy, N., Rosenheck, R., & Hoff, R. (2014). Residential treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in the Department of Veterans Affairs: A national perspective on perceived effective ingredients. Traumatology, 20(1), 43-9.

Dursa, E.K., Reinhard, M.J., Barth, S.K., & Schneiderman, A.I. (2014). Prevalence of a positive screen for PTSD among OEF/OIF and OEF/OIF-era veterans in a large population-based cohort. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27, 542-549.

Ehring, T., Welboren, R., Morina, N., Wicherts, J.M., Freitag, J., & Emmelkamp, P.M. (2014). Meta-analysis of psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder in adult survivors of childhood abuse. Clinical Psychology Review, 34(8), 645-57.
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Faludi Violent Effects of Disassociation

Words: 1938 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71896931

What is key about both of these quotations is the loss of identity that is endemic to both of them. The cadets who have survived the fourth-class system and who inflict ritualistic violence in the form of hazing on others have lost something of their true "selves," something that was stripped away to lead them to believe that they could rightfully engage in this sort of behavior to inflict pain upon others. Therefore, the cadets who are guilty of said violence are perpetuating it because they have lost their own identities through disassociation -- in much the same way that Seth lost most of the moments of his life to this same phenomenon.

In conclusion, several of Stout's ideas about disassociation both apply to and help explain the tradition of obedience in the violent, misogynistic rituals that take place at the Citadel. The similarities between the effects of disassociation and…… [Read More]

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Criminal Justice Forensics Undercover Is a

Words: 11198 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97252031

However, as criminals become more aware of undercover tactics, the covert officer is required to provide more and more proof that he is indeed a criminal- which leads to the officer committing acts that compromise his or her integrity for the sake of maintaining cover. y understanding the often conflicting nature of these goals, deception and integrity, we can see how an undercover officer can become confused, lost, and susceptible to temptation (i.e. criminal behavior).

y examining both aspects- environmental factors and personality factors- we take into account both sides of a complex relationship. These two groups of factors, when combined together, shed some light on the exact nature of criminal tendencies amongst police officers.

Definition of Terms

Covert: another term for undercover, meaning the use of deception for the purpose of gathering information or intelligence.

Non-covert: police officers that, even in plain clothes, maintain their own true identity instead…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Choo, A., and Mellors, M. (1995) Undercover Police Operations and What the Suspect Said (Or Didn't Say). Web Journal of Current Legal Issues, Blackstone Press, University of Leicester. Web site: http://wenjcli.ncl.ac.uk/articles2/choo2.html

Girodo, M. (1985) Health and Legal Issues in Undercover Narcotics Investigations: Misrepresented Evidence. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 3(3),299-308.

Girodo, M. (1991) Drug Corruption in Undercover Agents: Measuring the Risk. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 9, 361-370.

Girodo, M. (1997) Undercover Agent Assessment Centers: Crafting Vice and Virtue for Impostors. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 12(5), 237-260.
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Military Retirees Are Entitled to

Words: 12717 Length: 46 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18599361



First of all only a scant few of these Veterans groups will acknowledge the "promise" of free health care; for the most part these groups will tout the benefits already promised by the Veterans Administration and assert that cuts in these benefits are the same a broken promise-or contractual breach in legal terms. The idea of the United States military making a "promise" or forging a legally binding agreement between individual veterans or groups of veterans is barred by the United States Constitution. As will be demonstrated in the Literature eview, specific Constitutional language from Article I give Congress and only Congress the express authority to make laws and regulations pertaining to the armed forces. Therefore, the idea the military breached a contract with service members is, ultimately, inherently inaccurate. Combining the lack of specific language within the materials provided by any governmental agency with the clear language of the…… [Read More]

References

.... (n.d.). The RETIRED MILITARY ADVOCATE. The RETIRED MILITARY ADVOCATE. Retrieved November 29, 2010, from  http://mrgrg-ms.org/ 

Best, R. (2003, August 7). Military Medical Care Services: Questions and Answers. Congressional Research Service, 1, 1-17.

Birkey, a. (2010, July 21). Fraudulent vets charity raised big money in Minnesota. The Minnesota Independent, p. 3.

Burrelli, D. (2008, August 12). Military Health Care: The Issue of Promised Benefits. Congressional Research Service, 1, 1-14.
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Self-Harm Treatment Self-Harm Classification and

Words: 1467 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27672759

' A cognitive behavioral therapist might ask, what will harming yourself do to improve your grades on the test? Cognitive therapies in general have been shown to be more effective than traditional supportive talk therapies when treating anxiety conditions because they offer concrete steps for self-improvement on a continuing basis (Reeves 2003, p1.). Patients are also asked to identify things they would like to do in which current behavior patterns prevent them from engaging, such as wearing short-sleeved shirts.

Cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapy shows a higher success rate in anxiety disorders and OCD than traditional psychotherapy, likely because of its behavioral component. The fact that many DSH patients are diagnosed with BPD may complicate treatment, but BPT responds well in some instances to these therapies, too. BPT patients manifest disordered patterns of relationships, thinking, behavior, and coping mechanisms that contribute to unstable life patterns as well as contribute to the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bland, Ann R., Georgina Tudor & Deborah McNeil Whitehouse (2007, October). Nursing care of inpatients with Borderline Personality Disorder.

Perspectives in Psychiatric Care.

Retrieved from FindArticles.com on February 16, 2009 http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3804/is_200710/ai_n21099913?tag=content;col1

Mangnall, Jacqueline & Eleanor Yurkovich. (2008). A literature review of deliberate self-harm.
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Black Swan

Words: 1307 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72710878

Black Swan: A Study in Hollywood Psychology
The film Black Swan was noteworthy in the way it explored the dark side of ballet, including eating disorders, psychological manipulation, and how the pressures of achieving perfection can wreak havoc with the developing psyche of a young woman. The central protagonist Nina is a rising star in a prestigious city ballet company. She is given the task of dancing the lead role of Swan Lake. This is one of the most technically and emotionally demanding of all roles in ballet. The White Swan Odette, is supposed to embody purity, while the Black Swan Odile, embodies all that Odette is not and thus temporarily seduces the prince and the audience with her sexuality and bravado. Nina is told early on in the film by the ballet company director that while she is technically proficient she lacks the qualities needed to embody the Black…… [Read More]

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Self-Injurious Behavior

Words: 5019 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41574937

Deliberate self-harm (DSH) or self-injurious behavior (SI) involves intentional self-poisoning or injury, irrespective of the apparent purpose of the act. (Vela, Harris and Wright, 1983) Self-mutilation is also used interchangeably with self-mutilation, though self-mutilation is one aspect of DSH. Approximately 1% of the United States population uses physical self-injury as a way of dealing with overwhelming feelings or situations, often using it to speak when no words will come. There are different ways in which DSH is manifested: cutting, burning, and abusing drugs, alcohol or other substances. This occurs at times of extreme anger, distress and low self-esteem, in order to either create a physical manifestation of the negative feelings which can then be dealt with, or alternatively to punish yourself. Extremely emotional distress can also cause DSH -- this is sometimes linked with hearing voices, particularly as a way of stopping the voices.

DSH is also often called parasuicide,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Vela, J., Harris, J., and Wright, J.K. "Self-Mutilation." Journal of Trauma 23 (1983): 165-67.

Favazza, A.R. "What Do We Know About Affective Disorders?" Am J. Psychiatry 143.10 (1986): 1328.

Why Patients Mutilate Themselves." Hospital Community Psychiatry 40 (1989): 137-45.

Pies, R.W., and Popli, A.P. "Self-Injurious Behavior: Pathophysiology and Implications for Treatment." J. Clin Psychiatry 56.12 (1995): 580-8.
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PTSD Study Treatment

Words: 1075 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99570478

Dorrepaal, Thomaes, Smit, van Balkom, et al. (2010) address the topic of Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD) which often occurs following a history of child abuse. Complex PTSD has associated features in addition to the normal symptoms of PTSD that make it much more difficult to treat. As social workers will most likely encounter clients/patients suffering from PTSD symptoms and patients suffering from child abuse this topic is relevant to social work practice.

The researchers are primarily interested in knowing if stabilizing treatment normally used for PTSD and other psychiatric disorders is effective for patients with Complex PTSD, particularly women with PTSD and childhood sexual abuse. The research question is evaluative.

Literature eview

As this study is in the brief communications section does not contain an in depth literature review. The literature review in this study simply describes the features associated with Complex PTSD and presents the questions of…… [Read More]

References

Dorrepaal, E., Thomaes, K., Smit, J.H., van Balkom, A.J., van Dyck, R., Veltman, D.J., & Draijer, N. (2010). Stabilizing group treatment for complex posttraumatic stress disorder related to childhood abuse based on psycho-education and cognitive behavioral therapy: A pilot study. Child abuse & neglect, 34(4), 284-288.

Runyon, R.P., Coleman, K.A., & Pittenger, D.J. (2000). Fundamentals of behavioral statistics

(9th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Tabachnick, B.G., & Fidell, L.S. (2012). Using multivariate statistics (6th ed.). New York:
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article analysis on PTSD treatment

Words: 314 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99544187

EMD combined with TAU will lead to a significantly greater reduction of PTSD symptoms than TAU alone, when comparing PTSD symptoms from baseline to 6-month follow-up. There are also secondary concerns that the research sought to answer, the research examined the effectiveness of EMD on substance use-related outcomes, depressive symptoms, dissociative symptoms, emotion dysregulation and quality of life.

To investigate the hypothesis, this study will take a rater-blinded 2-arms CT. Assessments for the participants were scheduled at the pre-treatment (T0), post-treatment (T1), at 3-month (T2) and at 6-month (T3) follow-up. Participants are meant to be randomly assigned to either the EMD plus TAU group or the TAU group. Data will then e assessed at an inpatient rehabilitation center in Germany (AHG Clinic Dormagen). The research intends to recruit 158 adult patients with SUD and comorbid PTSD attending inpatient rehabilitation treatment from September 2015…… [Read More]

Reference

Schafer I., (2017). Effectiveness of EMDR in patients with substance use disorder and comorbid PTSD: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. BMC Psychiatry.
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Compare and Contrast Psychological Impact of Katrina and Lusitania

Words: 2352 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88239008

psychological impact of Katrina & Lusitania

Hurricane Katrina which took place in the year 2005 is said to be one of the worst storm disaster that took place in the history of the United States. It led to loss of many lives, and it was unavoidable. The winds both from Louisiana to Alabama caused the level of water to arise at about 80% of the New Orleans and neighborhoods. The tragedy left many people with worries asking how the tragedy like that could happen to threaten the lives of many Americans (Brinkley, 2006).

The sinking of Lusitania on the other hand, contributed to various impacts on America as well as, the World War One. However, the Americans were never interested in joining the war unless they had finished another two years. The Lusitania sinking also enraged many Americans as well as, hastening the people from United States' entrance into the…… [Read More]

References

Brinkley, D. (2006). The great deluge: Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. New York: Morrow.

Guterman, P. (2005). Psychological preparedness for disaster. Retrieved October 10, 2012 from  http://www.academia.edu/233646/Psychological_preparedness_for_disaster 

Gant, P.G., & Gantt, R. (2011). Disaster Psychology. October 10, 2012 from http://www.asse.org/professionalsafety/pastissues/057/08/042_049_F1Gan_0812.pdf.

Ballard, R.D., & Dunmore, S. (2003). Exploring the Lusitania: probing the mysteries of the sinking that changed history. New York: Warner Books.
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Diagnosis of S Johnson Diagnosis

Words: 1526 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52374485

Therefore, she should be assessed for any possible medication that may help her depression or anxiety. But she also needs a therapeutic approach that addresses her isolation and her needs for healthy and appropriate attachment.

A excellent therapeutic for this need is a ogerian approach that incorporates the positive regard of Carl ogers. The following describes the approach that such a therapist would take:

ogers' strong belief in the positive nature of human beings is based on his many years of clinical experience, working with a wide variety of individuals & #8230; the theory of person-centered therapy suggests any client, no matter what the problem, can improve without being taught anything specific by the therapist, once he/she accepts and respects themselves & #8230;.the resources all lie within the client. (Pescitelli, n.d.)

While critics argue that ogerian therapy is not sufficiently rigorous, it remains extremely effective as a long-term approach for…… [Read More]

References

Anorexia nervosa. Retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/anorexia-nervosa/anorexia-nervosa-topic-overview?page=2

Pescitelli, D. Rogerian therapy. Retrieved from http://www.pandc.ca/?cat=carl_rogers&page=rogerian_therapy
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CSA Child Sexual Abuse Is

Words: 4327 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61552509

Rankin (2003) affirmed that the purpose of art therapy is to address the major affects of trauma on the child's life. Additionally, Rankin (2003) stated that art interventions begin with self-management, then proceed with safety planning, telling the trauma story, grieving traumatic losses, self-concept and world view revision and finally ends with self and relational development. Treatment progress and outcomes will vary from patient to patient, as therapy is an individualized process.

Although the amount of empirical research regarding art therapy is limited, the use of art therapy has been confirmed as a means for victims to express how they feel and find some closure. Art therapy has also become a type of intervention that is used in combination with other interventions. ith this understood, the preceding section of this discussion will focus on play therapy as an intervention.

Play Therapy

Play therapy is a long-established and highly effective treatment…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arcus, D. (2008). Child abuse, sexual and emotional. Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence.

Brooke, S. (1995) ART THERAPY: AN APPROACH TO WORKING WITH SEXUAL

ABUSE SURVIVORS. The Arts in Psychotherapy, Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 447-466, 1995

Brown, E. (2005). Correlates and treatment of stress disorder in children and adolescents. Psychiatric Annuals. 35 (9).
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Hypnotherapy Effectiveness

Words: 1863 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7248091

People experience trauma, addiction, mental breakdowns every day. Whether it is obsessive behavior, trying to make one's self fit into a model mystique so worshipped by the masses, or even just breaking the cycle of abuse, people time and time again have needed assistance in facing their demons. Hypnotherapy, before commercials and the movies that hyped it turned it into what is perceived as a "faux science," was actually once thought of as a useful form of treatment. "Hypnosis was once a viable treatment approach for addictions. Then, due to hypnosis being used for entertainment purposes many professionals lost confidence in it" (Potter, 2004, pp. 21). It is, to some extent. In fact doctors have found hypnotherapy useful in conjunction with traditional therapies such as cognitive-behavioral therapy. New research suggests that although hypnotherapy may not be a viable singular treatment option, it can help in a host of mental disorders…… [Read More]

References

Golabadi,, M., Tabad, H., Yaghoubi, M., & Gholamrezaei, A. (2012). Hypnotherapy in the Treatment of Opium Addiction: A Pilot Study. Integrative Medicine, 11(3), 19-22.

Gruzelier, J.H. (2006). Frontal functions, connectivity and neural efficiency underpinning hypnosis and hypnotic susceptibility. Contemporary Hypnosis, 23(1), 15-32.

Huynh, M.E., Vandvik, I.H., & Diseth, T.H. (2008). Hypnotherapy In Child Psychiatry: The State Of The Art. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 13(3), 377-393.

Kankaanpe, A., Liukkonen, R., & Ariniemi, K. (2007). Determination of g-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and its precursors in blood and urine samples: A salting-out approach. Forensic Science International, 170, 133-138.
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Child Abuse in Adults Some

Words: 2155 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24536863



Director Martin Teicher of the Developmental iophsychiatry Research Program at McLean said that maltreatment in childhood can effect changes in brain function and structure. A child's brain continues to develop throughout childhood and adolescence. His interactions with the environment create effects, which stabilize in puberty and adulthood. These experiences determine how the child will be wired. The four types of cranial abnormalities, which are permanent, are limbic irritability, arrested development of the left hemisphere, deficient integration between the left and the right hemispheres, and increased vermal activity.

The McLean researchers investigated 253 adults in an outpatient mental health clinic. More than half of them reported a history of physical or sexual abuse in childhood. The researchers found that those who were abused as children scored higher in the Limbic System Checklist. The finding provided evidence that abuse in childhood caused electrical impulses when limbic cells communicate. This results in seizures,…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Business Wire (2000). McLean Researchers document brain damage linked to child abuse and neglect. Business Wire: Gale, Cengage Learning. Retrieved on April 16,

2009 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_mOEIN/is_2000_Dec_14/ai_68013850/?tag=content;col1

Lapp, K.G.; Bosworth, H.B.; Strauss, J.L.; Stechuchak, K.M., et al. (2005). Lifetime

sexual and physical victimization among male veterans with combat-related Post-
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Angel Dust Phencyclidine or PCP

Words: 1988 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87155582

This can result in legal complications or an increase in these complications. And the last stage is dependence. He can no longer thrive or survive without drugs, yet he denies having the problem. His physical condition gets worse by the day. He loses control over the use of the drug itself. He can turn suicidal and financially broke. He may be confronting legal consequences for the use. Ties with his family and friends may break at this point (University of Maryland Medical Center).

Treatment includes comprehensive residential programs to monitor and address possible withdrawal symptoms and probable unpleasant behaviors (University of Maryland Medical Center 2008). They consist of behavior modification methods, aimed at getting the user to recognize his behavior. They also include counseling for both the user and his family, held individually and as a group. The programs are usually long-standing and persist long after the user is released…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hess, Ronnie. PC/Angel Dust. Cumberland Mountain Community Services Board, 2003.

Retrieved on May 27, 2008 at http://www.cmcsb, co/pcpangel.htm

National Institute on Drug Abuse, et al. PCP. Partnership for a Drug-Free America, 2008.

Retrieved on May 27, 2008 at http://www.drugfree.org/Portal/Drug+guide/PCP
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Psycho 1960 Film Movie Analysis

Words: 617 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23661421

Movie Analysis: Psycho (1960 film)

The movie's most relevant cast for this discussion includes Norman, Norman's mother (Mrs. Bates), and Marion. After the death of his dad, Norman becomes entirely dependent on the love, attention, and support of his mother. It is for this reason that when she (Norman's mother) takes in a lover, Norman feels as if he is no longer a priority in his mother's life -- he feels as if he has been replaced. Apparently, he can't stand sharing her and as a result of his intense jealousy, he ends up killing not only his mother's lover but also his mother, through poisoning. However, he elects to preserve the corpse instead of having it buried -- in what could be seen as an attempt to perpetuate the illusion that his mother is not dead but is, instead, still alive. As a consequence, he begins to not only…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hickey, Erick W. Serial Murderers and their Victims. 6th ed. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning, 2013. Print.

Jenkins, Philip. Using Murder: The Social Construction of Serial Homicide. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 2009. Print.
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Personality Assessment Inventory PAI Personality

Words: 1199 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1198736

The two interpersonal scales are Dominance and Warmth. Many of the clinical scales, as well as the aggression scale, also have a number of subscales to provide more nuanced information bout each of the clinical conditions. For example, the Borderline Features scale has four subscales: Affective Instability, Identity Problems, Negative elationships and Self-Harm.

The resulting score profiles can be compared to either normative or clinical populations. aw scores are converted to T-scores using tables provided in the scoring manual. These tables were generated using either normative or clinical samples that were census matched and standardized (Morey, 2007). The manual provides average scores for each of the subscales, for example, the average T score for Borderline Traits is 59, indicating that individuals falling below this number are emotionally stable and do not reflect borderline traits. The individual mean scores for each scale vary and are presented within the testing manual (Morey,…… [Read More]

References

Blais, M.A., Baity, M.R., & Hopwood, C.J. (2010). Clinical applications of the Personality Assessment Inventory. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis Group.

Butchner, J.N. (2010). Personality assessment from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first century: Past achievements and contemporary challenges. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 6, 1-20.

Morey, L.C. (2007). The Personality Assessment Inventory: Professional manual 2nd Edition. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

Morey, L.C. & Hopwood, C.J. (2007). Casebook for the Personality Assessment Inventory: A Structured Summary Approach. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.
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Spousal Violence and Abuse Effects on Children

Words: 1497 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68247745

Spousal and Child Abuse

Child and spousal abuse is an intentional act that results in physical and/or emotional or psychological injury on a child or spouse (or partner) by a parent or a mate, respectively (Gelles 2004). In a child, abuse more often takes the form of neglect. Child and spousal abuse and violence are major social concerns today.

The extent that children are abused by their parents or adult caretakers is difficult to measure, although it appears to occur most frequently among lower-income communities and certain ethnic and religious minorities. Abuse of children ranges from physical and emotional abuse and sexual abuse to physical and emotional neglect (Gelles). Effects of physical abuse are varied and visible: unexplained bruises, fractures and burn marks. Emotional abuse destroys the child's sense of security and self-esteem. Sexual abuse includes all acts that expose them to the sexual satisfaction of the parent or adult…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boudreau, Diane. Damage: the Health Effects of Abuse. ASU Research: Arizona:

State University, 2002. http://researchmag.asu.edu/stories/abuse.html childabuse.org. Child Abuse and Child Sexual Abuse. For the Love of Our Children, 2002. http://www.fortheloveofourchildren.org/statistics.html childabuse.com. Why Child Abuse Occurs and the Common Criminal Background of the Abuser. Arctic Originals, 2002.  http://www.childabuse.com 

Gelles, Richard. Child Abuse. MSN Encarta. Microsoft Corporation. http://encarta.msn.com

Hopper, Jim. UChild AbuseU, 2004. http://www.jimhopper.com/abstats
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Biopsychosocial Analysis of Nina Sayers

Words: 1400 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18992263

Nina Sayers

Biopsychosocial Analysis of Nina Sayers

Academic Institution

Nina Sayers, the protagonist in the film the Black Swan, displays a plethora of dysfunctional symptoms and a dissent in the psychosis in the film. The following is a biopsychosocial analysis of the character as she is betrayed in the film.

Biological. The film offers very little in the way of direct biological evidence to build a case that there is a significant biological component to Nina's difficulties; however, biological factors can be inferred based on the symptoms she displays. Perhaps the strongest indicator of biological contributions to Nina's problems is the film's portrayal of Nina's mother, Erica. Erica presents as being a borderline psychotic herself. In order to ward off her own anxieties, insecurities, and the loneliness of age she identifies with her daughter's youth, beauty, and drive. Erica's sense of herself and daughter is fused into a single entity…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

Disorders -- V. Washington, DC: Author.

Sadock, B.J. & Sadock, V.A., (2007). Kaplan and Sadock's Synopsis of Psychiatry:

Behavioral Sciences/Clinical Psychiatry (10th edition). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams.
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What We Use to Recognize People

Words: 2147 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22799953

FFA & STS COMBINED

The concepts and use of the Fusiform Face Area (FFA) in terms of facial recognition and the Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS) in terms of voice recognition are not new on their own. However, those individual technologies and concepts have evolved on their own and now they are being analysed in terms of how they are perhaps used concurrently when one person does (or tries) to recognize another person. This report will cover what the FFA and STS are in general, prior ideas, frameworks and outcomes that have informed and influenced current research and what the future holds, at least based on current trends for the use of FFA and STS in combination or on their own.

FFA & STS Combined

Subject of Discussion

There is a great amount of debate with the circles that exist in the neuro-psychological field regarding the direct integration, or lack thereof,…… [Read More]

References

Belin, P., Bestelmeyer, P., Latinus, M. And Watson, R. (2011). Understanding Voice Perception.

British Journal of Psychology, 102(4), pp.711-725.

Blank, H., Anwander, A. And von Kriegstein, K. (2011). Direct Structural Connections between

Voice- and Face-Recognition Areas. Journal of Neuroscience, 31(36), pp.12906-12915.
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How Sexual Child Abuse Can Effect the Child's Psychological Development

Words: 2187 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25023031

Sexual Child Abuse

Child sexual abuse involves a broad range of sexual behaviors that take place between a child and an older person. These sexual behaviors are planned to erotically stir the older person, commonly without concern for the consequences, choices, or outcome of the behavior upon the child. efinite conducts that are sexually offensive frequently involve bodily contact, such as in the state of sexual kissing, touching, fondling of genitals, and oral, anal, or vaginal contact. Nevertheless, behaviors might be sexually abusive even if they do not entail contact, such as in the case of genital exposure, verbal force for sex, and sexual abuse for purposes of prostitution or pornography.

For efinitions propose four main types of child abuse (physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and child neglect), but seldom if ever does one form of abuse happen alone. The suggestion in itself is illogical. Physical abuse and sexual…… [Read More]

Diagnostic and Treatment Guidelines on Mental Health Effects of Family Violence. American Medical Association Web Site.

McClendon, Patricia D. November (1991). MSSW candidate. Incest/sexual abuse of children. Internet. p.23. Available:  http://www.clinicalsocialwork.com/incest.html 

National Association of Social Worker News. (1997, February). States eye domestic abuse welfare option. NASW News, Volume 42, #7, pp11.
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Real-Life Case Study the Research Informant Selected

Words: 2434 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67730139

eal-Life case study

The research informant selected is a soldier who was deployed in Iraq who is 35 years of age and who was in the army for 15 years. He suffered from drug and alcohol addiction along with post traumatic stress syndrome. At this time he is still battling both of these conditions. When interviewing him, the clear purpose of this project was stated without a doubt, and he was informed of his voluntary participation, along with the fact that he was allowing us to use all the data that he provided. He was reassured of the complete and utter privacy of his responses and how all of his data was going to be kept confidential. For example, he was told that he name was never going to be recorded, none of the researchers would ever have it; instead he was going to be given a number. Furthermore, while…… [Read More]

References

Berger, K. (2009). Invitation to the Life Span. New York: Psychology Press.

Ptsd.va.gov. (2013). Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Retrieved from Ptsd.va.gov:  http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/assessment/adult-int/caps.asp 

Schmal, C. (2004). Psychophysiological reactivity to traumatic and abandonment. Psychiatry Research, 33-42.

Walker, P. (2013). Managing Abandonment Depression in Complex PTSD. Retrieved from peter-walker.com:  http://www.pete-walker.com/managingAbandonDepression.htm
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School Violence Essay

Words: 2542 Length: Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37942868

What Methods Can Schools in the United States Implement to Prevent Violence in Schools?

Introduction

Statement of the problem

The recent upswing in high-profile violent incidents in the United States has focused increasing attention on the causes of this public health threat and what types of response are most appropriate. The debate over the most appropriate responses to increased violence in American society has also extended to the nation’s schools. Although it has always been present to some extent, violence has become a major problem in the nation’s schools in recent years (Kelly, 2010; Killam & Roland, 2014). While the potential for enhanced awareness of the problem and improved reporting mechanisms may account for some of the reported increase in school violence in recent years (Blosnich & Bossarte, 2011), the research that follows will clearly show that any level of violence in the schools can be enormously harmful to students and…… [Read More]

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Amnesia Trauma Emotional Trauma and

Words: 486 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94787522



However, through a review of the clinical history and the semantic debate over the relationship between trauma -- especially sexual abuse -- during childhood and the surfacing of psychologically distressing consequences in adulthood, it is evident that the diagnosis of repression is often misapplied. "The term 'dissociative." As applied to these disorders, is better construed as a descriptive label (referring to loss of conscious access to memory) than any pathological process instigated by trauma." (Kilstrom, 36) This means that the 'amnesia' triggered by such events can accurately be regarded as the involuntary mode of memory loss rather than the intentional psychological conditioning to 'block out' negative experiences. To an extent, this verifies the claim that amnesia may be caused by emotional trauma, even though this is empirically elusive in a case by case basis.

orks Cited:

Barrett, J. (2002). Amnesia. Health, a to Z. Online at http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/ency/amnesia.jsp

Gleaves, DH, Smith,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Barrett, J. (2002). Amnesia. Health, a to Z. Online at http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/ency/amnesia.jsp

Gleaves, DH, Smith, S.M.,Butler, L.D., & Spiegel, D. (2004). False and recovered memories in the laboratory and clinical: A review of experimental evidence. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 11, 3-28.

Kilstrom, J.F. (2004). An unbalanced balancing act: Blocked, recovered and false memories in the laboratory and clinic. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 11, 34-41.

LEF. (2003). Amnesia: Online Reference. Life Extension. Online at
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Generational Boundary Dissolution Among Adoptive

Words: 5932 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43913994

The research will address the following research questions, in addition to the central hypothesis.

How malleable are generational boundaries? In other words, how willing are teens to adapt to new generational boundary styles?

Are generational boundaries set during the early childhood years?

How frequently do teens assume a parental role in dysfunctional families?

What techniques could help tends and their adoptive parents reach a compromise that results in the development of healthy generational boundaries within the new family unit?

These research questions, in addition to the research hypothesis will help to contribute to the existing body of knowledge in the field of family therapy.

Contribution of This esearch

This research will play an important role in the field of family therapy. It will be specifically targeted towards helping develop new techniques and methods for helping adoptive families and their teens establish healthy generational boundaries within the new family. This is…… [Read More]

References

Barber, B. (2001). Intrusive Parenting: How Psychological Control Affects Children and Adolescents. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Beckett, C., Castle, J., & Groorhues, C., et al. (2008), the experience of adoption (2): association between communicative openness and self-esteem in adoption. British Association for Adoption and Fostering. 32 (1): abstract. Retrieved 15 January 2009 at http://www.baaf.org.uk/res/pubs/aandf/abstracts/08_1.shtml

Benson J. & Fanshel, D. (1970) How They Fared in Adoption: A Follow-Up Study. New York: Columbia University Press: 311-313. Retrieved 15 January 2009 at http://www.uoregon.edu/~adoption/archive/JaffeeHTFA.htm

Berzonsky, M. (2004). Identity Style, Parental Authority and Identity Commitment. Journal of Youth and Adolescence. 33 (3): 213.
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Psychedelic Therapy Psychedelic or Hallucinogenic

Words: 2192 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95412737

" Long-term use may develop psychoses, like schizophrenia and severe depression. The use of MDMA may produce psychological difficulties, like confusion, depression, sleep problems, drug craving, severe anxiety and paranoia, even weeks after the use of the drug. MSMA develops symptoms, such as muscle tension, nausea, blurred vision, rapid eye movements, faintness, chills, sweating, and increased heart rate and blood pressure. it, therefore, poses a special risk for those with heart disease. Overuse can lead to death (Kurtzweil).

West Africans used ibogaine as a stimulant and aphrodisiac in the early 1900s (Kurtzweil 1995). Native Americans used mescaline from peyote cactus in religious rituals. LSD was first synthesized in 1938. Throughout history, it was considered a source of many types of medications. Its psychedelic effects were first discovered in 1943. Two decades after World War II, LSD was used to determine its effects on patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Kotler, Steven. Drugs in Rehab. Psychology Today: Sussex Publishers, Inc., April 2005

Klotter, Jule. End-of-Life and Psychedelic Research. Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients: The Townsend Group, July 2005

Kurtzweil, Paula. Medical Possibilities for Psychedelic Drugs. FDA Consumer: U.S. Government Printing Office, September 1995

Luke, David P. And Marrios Kottenis. A Preliminary Survey of Paranormal Experiences with Psychoactive Drugs. Journal of Parapsychology: Parapsychology Press, 2005
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Advocacy Strategy Anti-Violence Work Anti-Violence Work Is

Words: 2355 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3148198

Advocacy Strategy: Anti-Violence ork

Anti-violence work is really about helping a lot of women discover their strong areas and their they consider the truth for their lives. Most women contemplate should they stay, should they go or even if they need to go, whatever it maybe the movement is to make sure that women are safe. The author makes the point that it is so much easier doing the work over the years because it has given her the confidence needed with the gained experience. This essay discusses the issue of how the anti-violence work needs some support and help in aiding violence against women. Also finding solutions to violence and abuse on a level that is broader and societal.

Critique of an Advocacy Strategy

Introduction

Domestic Violence denotes to the use of emotional or physical force or danger of physical force, which does comprise of sexual violence in close…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arvay, M.J. (2001). Secondary Traumatic Stress and Trauma Counselors: What Does the Research Say?." International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling, 15-17.

Brzozowski, J.A. (2004). Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile. Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

Figley, C.L. (2002). Treating Compassion Fatigue. New York: Brunner-Routledge,.

Martin, S. (2006). Bearing Witness: Experiences of Frontline Anti-Violence Responders. Canadian Woman Studies, 11-15.
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Counseling Sessions

Words: 1589 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14135301

Bereavement-Counseling Group

Bereavement group

The bereavement groups are social gatherings that most people need and belong to since there is no way to tell when bereavement may come by. However, these groups come in handy when such unforeseen sad situations come by and the affected individuals need support emotionally to go through the sad times. In as much as it is a voluntary group, in most parts people find that it is of great help to be engaged in one of these groups always.

While designing a bereavement-counselling group, there are several ways that can be used to market or publicize it. The first would be to have a brochure that the potential members are served with within the community that will be targeted. This brochure is a sure way of having the individuals who received it have a point of reference as frequently as possible incase they need details…… [Read More]

References

American Cancer Society, (2014). Coping with Loss of a Loved One. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/emotionalsideeffects/griefandloss/coping-with-the-loss-of-a-loved-one-intro-to-grief-mourning-bereavement

Carneley B.K., et.al., (2006). The Time Course of Grief Reactions to Spousal Loss: Evidence From a National Probability Sample. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from  http://www.psychology.sunysb.edu/cwortman-/papers/Carnelle_Wortman_Bolger_Burke_2006_article.pdf 

Johnson J., (2010). Honoring the Memory of a Deceased Loved One. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/judith-johnson/the-power-of-bearing-witn_1_b_736710.html 

Peck and Stephanics, (1987). Learning to say Goodbye: Dealing with Death and Dying. Library of Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from http://books.google.co.ke/books?id=EjtY2WtamJcC&pg=PA53&lpg=PA53&dq=outcomes+for+Learning+how+to+say+goodbye&source=bl&ots=LeIlhpSwap&sig=9bG0SBXyVPoewYTUAhpyE_rwwms&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ZJwgVPrCG4HnygOE84HYAg&ved=0CGoQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=outcomes%20for%20Learning%20how%20to%20say%20goodbye&f=false
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Case Study on Mental Health

Words: 762 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95643598

Mental Health

Presenting Problem

The patient is a 25-year-old male, single, unemployed, living with parents. The person seeking treatment in this case has been experiencing some extreme problems that have developed somewhat rapidly over the course of six months. The problem is very severe and has interfered with all of his personal relationships. He was recently fired from his janitorial job at a school for scaring the students with his words and actions. The patient has not sought treatment before but is now due to his parent's concern and him becoming much more violent and demonstrating strange and odd behavior. The patient claims to be hearing many voices in his head urging him to do strange acts. The patient has also recently taken up a hobby of collecting dead animals and placing them in mailboxes and other public places.

History of the Problem

The patient has described his life becoming…… [Read More]

Works Cited

National Institute of Mental Health. What are the symptoms' of schizophrenia? Veiwed on 22 Feb 2013. Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/schizophrenia/what-are-the-symptoms-of- schizophrenia.shtml