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We have over 29 essays for "Dysthymia"

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Isabella's Sleeping Issues Diagnosed

Words: 2281 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56243656

318. However, in this and other studies, it seems that lack of effectiveness may be due to a cessation of the CBT and not due to its lack of effectiveness while in treatment (Belleville, 2011, p. 318). egardless, there are very few, if any, studies that show evidence of negative effects of CBT.

An additional factor that should be taken into account in Isabella's case is that substance use may be involved. Neither the DSM nor the DASS questionnaires address the theory that substance use may exacerbate or may be premorbid to anxiety/depression/stress disorders. Perhaps additional questionnaire(s) regarding substance use should have been presented to her. The Cannabis Expectancy Questionnaire is an example of a questionnaire that directly addresses substance use by assessing use by the patient (Connor, 2010).

An important additional consideration regarding Isabella's case is that in her verbal report she states that her inability to relax and…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

Disorders (4th Ed.) Text Revision. Washington D.C.: American Psychiatric

Association.

Belleville G., Guay S., Marchand a. (2011). Persistence of sleep disturbances following cognitive-behavior therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Psychosomatic
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Depression in Adolescents

Words: 2145 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23764681

Depression in Adolescents

Roughly nine percent of the population - an estimated 18.8 million Americans -- suffers from depressive disorders, illnesses that affect the body as well as the mind.

The effects of depression are magnified in children, who are experiencing depression in greater numbers. An estimated 8.3% of teenagers in the United States are suffering from depression, a significant leap from two decades ago. To compound the problem, researchers like Farmer (2002) found that about 70% of adolescents suffering from depression are unfortunately not receiving adequate treatment.

This paper examines the growing problem of depression among adolescents. The first part of this paper is an overview of teen depression, looking at its causes and contrasting teen depression with depression in adults. The next part then looks at the depressive symptoms among teenagers, contrasting these with the symptoms of depression in adults. In the last part, the paper examines the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beardslee, William R., Tracy Gladstone, Ellen Wright and Andrew Cooper. 2003. "A family-based approach to the prevention of depressive symptoms in children at risk: evidence of parental and child change." Pediatrics. 112(2): 401-412.

Egger, Helen. 2003. "Recognizing and treating depression in young children." The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter. 19(3): 1-3.

Farmer, Terri J. 2002. "The experience of major depression: Adolescents' perspectives." Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 23(6): 567-586.

Koplewitz, Harold. 2002. More Than Moody: Recognizing and Treating Adolescent Depression. New York: Putnam.
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Analyzing Odyssey Dante Frankenstein

Words: 3056 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 95647040

Depression in Adolescence

Depression in Adolescents

The link between symptoms, etiology, core biochemical processes, treatment outcome, and treatment response of affective (mood) disorders is yet to be adequately understood for allowing their categorization, such that it meets universal approval. Still, one has to make an attempt in this regard, and researchers propose a potentially-acceptable one, derived from extensive consultation.

In case of affective disorders, the basic disturbance is an affect (mood) change, typically extreme elation or depression (without or with related anxiety). An overall activity level change generally accompanies this change of mood, and a majority of other related symptoms either will be conveniently recognized in the context of these changes, or will be secondary to them. Most disorders have a tendency of repetition, and the commencement of individual bouts is usually linked to stressful circumstances or occurrences.

The key criteria of classification of affective disorders have been selected for…… [Read More]

References

Algon, S., Yi, J., Calkins, M.E., Kohler, C. And Borgmann-Winter, K.E. (2013). Evaluation and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Psychotic Symptoms. Current psychiatry reports.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500659/ 

Christie, A. (2007). Childhood anxiety: Occupational disruption. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 54(2),31-39. Available at  http://www.cin.ufpe.br/~fbcpf/PAMPIE/childhood%20anxiety%20Occupational%20disruption.pdf 

Halverson, J. L. (1994-2016). Depression Differential Diagnoses. Medscape.  http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/286759-differential 

Lewis, A. J., Bertino, M. D., Skewes, J., Shand, L., Borojevic, N., Knight, T., Lubman, D.I., Toumbourou, J.W. (2013, Nov 13). Adolescent depressive disorders and family based interventions in the family options multicenter evaluation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Available at:  http://trialsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1745-6215-14-384
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Analyzing Depression in Adolescent

Words: 3055 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45960897

Depression in Adolescence

Depression in Adolescents

The link between symptoms, etiology, core biochemical processes, treatment outcome, and treatment response of affective (mood) disorders is yet to be adequately understood for allowing their categorization, such that it meets universal approval. Still, one has to make an attempt in this regard, and researchers propose a potentially-acceptable one, derived from extensive consultation.

In case of affective disorders, the basic disturbance is an affect (mood) change, typically extreme elation or depression (without or with related anxiety). An overall activity level change generally accompanies this change of mood, and a majority of other related symptoms either will be conveniently recognized in the context of these changes, or will be secondary to them. Most disorders have a tendency of repetition, and the commencement of individual bouts is usually linked to stressful circumstances or occurrences.

The key criteria of classification of affective disorders have been selected for…… [Read More]

References

Algon, S., Yi, J., Calkins, M.E., Kohler, C. And Borgmann-Winter, K.E. (2013). Evaluation and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Psychotic Symptoms. Current psychiatry reports.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500659/ 

Christie, A. (2007). Childhood anxiety: Occupational disruption. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 54(2),31-39. Available at  http://www.cin.ufpe.br/~fbcpf/PAMPIE/childhood%20anxiety%20Occupational%20disruption.pdf 

Halverson, J. L. (1994-2016). Depression Differential Diagnoses. Medscape.  http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/286759-differential 

Lewis, A. J., Bertino, M. D., Skewes, J., Shand, L., Borojevic, N., Knight, T., Lubman, D.I., Toumbourou, J.W. (2013, Nov 13). Adolescent depressive disorders and family based interventions in the family options multicenter evaluation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Available at:  http://trialsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1745-6215-14-384
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Psychological Sociological Cultural and Biological Theories on Depression and Treatments That Take These Into Account

Words: 2590 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 91688277

Depression Theories

Various Theories on Depression, and Respective Treatments

Depression is a complex mood disorder that is characterized by various emotions, including sadness, self-blame, absence of pleasure and an overall sense of worthlessness, and by physical responses relating to sleep, appetite and motor symptoms. According to statistics, one in four adults will suffer from a depressive episode at some point in life. With a quarter of the population affected by depression, it is no wonder that one sees so many advertisements both on television and on billboards relating to the disorder. It is also understandable that many intellectual fields of study would give an opinion on what depression truly means and how it can be treated. This paper will thus examine psychological, sociological, cultural and biological theories on depression and will describe various treatments that take into account expertise from these various areas of study to better understand this complex…… [Read More]

Lastly, with respect to biological theory-based treatments, scientific research is vital. A study conducted in 2010 states that the finding of "various structural and chemical abnormalities in the brain through neuroimaging" has been the foundation in depression research in the last year. This study further states that the research combines various brain areas to arise specific symptoms, and that the new data could contribute to further understanding and treating depression. Specific treatments are not given as part of this study, but "biological" treatments will usually include medication, such as anti-depressants. [20: Papageorgiou, G. (2010). Biological theory of depression in the light of new evidence. Retrieved April 11, 2011, from  http://www.annals-general-psychiatry.com/content/9/S1/S47 . ]

Conclusion

This paper has discussed various theories of depression and has expanded upon treatments that take into account these theories. Some treatments have been proven effective, and others have been illustrated simply as examples or as evidence of much needed field research. Depression has been shown to be a complex illness explained by various intelligent minds in different ways, yet in order to treat this disorder, one must take into account all this knowledge, and hope that advances in scientific research, such as that illustrated above, will provide for better treatments and, finally, more effective relief from depressive symptoms.
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Depression the Nature of Depression Depression Exists

Words: 1607 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 7455366

Depression

The nature of depression

Depression exists as a regular mental disorder presented in the form of loss of interest, depressed moods, and feelings of low self-worth, guilt, poor concentration and disturbed sleep. The most common symptoms of depression are manifested in the form of anxiety. The problems could become recurrent or chronic, leading to notable impairments in a person to become responsible. When it reaches its worst stage, depression might lead to suicide. Over one million succumb to depression annually. This translates to at least three hundred suicidal deaths per day (Stark, 2010). A single individual who commits suicide motivates twenty more to attempt suicide.

People can suffer from multiple variations of depression. The most significant difference is depression among individuals who do not have or who have a history of maniac episodes. Depressive episodes draw symptoms like loss of interest, increased fatigability and depressed mood. Depending on the…… [Read More]

References

Joiner, T.E. (2010). Interpersonal, cognitive, and social nature of depression. Mahwah [u.a.: Erlbaum.

Knittel, L. (2013). User's guide to natural remedies for depression: Learn about safe and natural treatments to uplift your mood and conquer depression. North Bergen, NJ: Basic Health Publ.

Stark, K.D. (2010). Childhood depression: School-based intervention. New York: Guilford Press.

Wasserman, D. (2011). Depression. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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Coping With Depression Could Be Well a

Words: 1639 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18902043

Coping ith Depression

Depression could be, well, a depressing subject matter to deal with, over the course of an entire 158-page text. However, by emphasizing positive coping strategies that can be adopted by sufferers of depression and the friends and loved ones of those going through a depressed period in their lives, Coping with Depression by Sharon Carter and Lawrence Clayton. (Hazeldon, 1995), manages to avoid this potential stylistic pitfall. In fact, if anything, it errs on the side of excessive cheerfulness.

Part of the reason the book has such an upbeat tone is because this work is clearly intended for younger, rather than older adults. It attempts to explain the many causes of depression, the different potential courses of treatment for depression (from therapy to chemical remedies), how to personally manage the disease on a daily basis and how to cope if a family member or friend is clinically…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carter, Sharon and Lawrence Clayton. Coping with Depression. New York; Hazeldon, 1995.

Depression may range in severity from mild symptoms to more severe forms that include delusional thinking, excessive somatic concern, and suicidal ideation, over longer periods of time. The DSM-IIIR requires the presence of at least five of the symptoms listed above for a diagnosis of major depressive episode.
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Vanden Bos Gary R 1996

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 82926147

For example, VandenBos cites a study from 1957 in support of psychotherapy: "Fifty percent of the adult U.. population in 1957 could imagine conditions under which they might benefit from psychological services and might avail themselves of such services" (VandenBos 1996, p.1005). Butt simply envisioning a possible scenario is far different from actually praising the practice as personally helpful. Only 14% of adults in 1957 said they had had sought aid from a therapist -- not that such aid had eased any mental suffering. A 1976 replication study of a similar demographic population found "59% of respondents reported that they could imagine life circumstances under which they might benefit from discussing their psychological problems with someone and the percentage of respondents who reported that they had actually utilized such help at some point in their lives had almost doubled -- climbing to 26%" but again did not survey respondent's perceptions…… [Read More]

Secondly, while VandenBos is dismissive of studies focusing on the effects of specific treatments upon specific types of disorders, the appropriateness of treatment important to consider in light of the fact that many psychological illnesses have a profound biological component and may be less responsive to 'talk' therapy than others mental disorders. Some complaints, such as Borderline Personality Disorder, seem to respond much better to certain types of therapy, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy, while they show little response, and may actually be negatively impacted by other types of thereby.

Much of the data cited by VandenBos comes from an earlier era in American culture and understanding of the mind, when psychoanalysis was a popular fad as well as an accepted practice, and antidepressants and other psychological medications were in a rather primitive state. For example, VandenBos cites a study from 1957 in support of psychotherapy: "Fifty percent of the adult U.S. population in 1957 could imagine conditions under which they might benefit from psychological services and might avail themselves of such services" (VandenBos 1996, p.1005). Butt simply envisioning a possible scenario is far different from actually praising the practice as personally helpful. Only 14% of adults in 1957 said they had had sought aid from a therapist -- not that such aid had eased any mental suffering. A 1976 replication study of a similar demographic population found "59% of respondents reported that they could imagine life circumstances under which they might benefit from discussing their psychological problems with someone and the percentage of respondents who reported that they had actually utilized such help at some point in their lives had almost doubled -- climbing to 26%" but again did not survey respondent's perceptions of efficacy (VandenBos 1996, p.1005).

Frequency of use and the helpfulness of treatment are far from the same thing. VandenBos' cited studies merely confirm the increasing cultural acceptance and interest in psychotherapy from 1957 to 1976. Given the cultural dynamic and history of America in the 1960s and 1970s, these findings are hardly surprising. A naysayer of therapy might say a similar interest and acceptance of astrology may have peaked as well. The broadness with which the term 'therapy' was defined, which included self-help groups as well as members of the clergy in the Consumer Reports survey, also may not indicate a greater acceptance of clinical therapy. And finally, how these forms of therapy were combined or not combined with psychotropic drugs in the context of different types of therapy was not surveyed, given the lack of specificity of individual's complaints and the broadness of therapeutic contexts classified as therapy.
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HIV and AIDS

Words: 6090 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28504650



The second session had camera instruction. The third session had each participant given a camera and they were instructed to "(t)ake pictures of the challenges and solution in addressing HIV and AIDS" (Mitchell et al., 2005). The fourth session saw the photos developed and asked small groups to compare and contrast their pictures by creating posters. The authors draw on previous research on photo-voice techniques, as well as memory and photography and self-representation through photography.

In the end, the authors' qualitative research concluded that although many projects use photography to give voice to participants, it is especially significant in the giving a voice to community health workers and teachers in rural South African communities. In these remote areas, the communities do not have to wait for researchers to provide them answers, instead they are able to take action themselves and give a visible face to the HIV and AIDS plight…… [Read More]

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Client Should Be Comfortable With His or

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91337349

client should be comfortable with his or her treatment, the counseling process and what to expect during the process. A counselor should understand the client's needs and immediate situation. In order for a counselor to get the necessary information that will provide guidance for counselor and client an initial intake or assessment will gather all the essential personal information needed such as race, age, sex, marital status, and situation/problems. Through an initial assessment a counselor has to be able to understand the client's background and use that information to guide a client down the right career path. The client interview will focus on obtaining information about Alaina's work history, career aspirations, work role, medical history, education and family history, problems in living, behaviors, and faulty cognitions which lead to employment difficulties. In addition, the counselor will consider Alaina's overall appearance, behavior, and mood at the time of the interview. The…… [Read More]

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Psychological Diagnosis Related Children Topic Generalized Anxiety

Words: 3739 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 71398487

psychological diagnosis related children. TOPIC: GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER. Topics selected Diagnostic Statistical Manual Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR). The research paper discuss: a.

Anxiety disorders are presently responsible for interfering in people's lives and preventing them from being able to successfully integrate society. hen considering the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), matters are particularly intriguing as a result of the fact that many people have trouble identifying it and actually go through their lives thinking that their thinking is perfectly normal. In spite of the fact that there are no motives to provoke the exaggerated worry seen in people with GAD, they are unable to realize that they are overstressed. Millions of people from around the world are currently suffering from GAD, with the malady affecting virtually everything about their lives.

hile some individuals actually acknowledge the fact that their worries are unfounded, it is very difficult for them to put across rational…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Gliatto, M.F. "Generalized Anxiety Disorder." American Family Physician. October 1, 2000.

Kendall, Philip C. Pimentel, Sandra Moira Rynn, A. Angelosante, Aleta and Webb, Alicia "12 Generalized Anxiety Disorder," Phobic and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Clinician's Guide to Effective Psychosocial and Pharmacological Interventions, ed. Thomas H. Ollendick andJohn S. March (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004)

Murray, Megan "Treading Water: Self-reflections on Generalized Anxiety Disorder," Human Architecture 2.1 (2003)

Nutt, David; Bell, Caroline; Masterson, Christine and Short, Clare Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Psychopharmacological Approach (London: Martin Dunitz, 2001)
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Features and Comparison of Various

Words: 1655 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 68980890

e., unreasonable expectations of especially favorable treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations" (DSM-IV, 2000));

d) has no empathy for those he has taken advantage of, such as family members (asking for a loan), landlords (failure to pay rent on time), investors (when the company goes "belly up" (DSM-IV, 2000)).

orks Cited

American Psychiatric Association (2000) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Fourth Edition. Desk Reference. (ashington, DC: American Psychiatric Association).

Assumptions held by BPD Sufferers." BPD Central ebsite. Retrieved November 20, 2003 at http://www.bpcentral.com/resources/basics/assumptions.shtm

Bardi, Jason Socrates. "Molecules on the Mind." News & View section. Vol. 3, Issue 5, Feb. 10, 2003. The Scripps Research Institute eb site retrieved November 24, 2003 at http://www.scripps.edu/newsandviews/e_20030210/sutcliffe.html

Borderline Personality Disorder - Fear: A Roller-Coaster Ride." Retrieved November 20, 2003 at http://www.borderlinepersonality.ca/borderrollercoaster.htm

From the Inside Out by a.J. Mahari)

Diagnostic Criteria for Narcissistic Personality Disorder

http://wave.prohosting.com/healnpd/DSMIV.html

http://www.upcmd.com/dot/diseases/00186/disease_definition.html

Dysthymia Symptoms." Retrieved…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Psychiatric Association (2000) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Fourth Edition. Desk Reference. (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association).

Assumptions held by BPD Sufferers." BPD Central Website. Retrieved November 20, 2003 at http://www.bpcentral.com/resources/basics/assumptions.shtm

Bardi, Jason Socrates. "Molecules on the Mind." News & View section. Vol. 3, Issue 5, Feb. 10, 2003. The Scripps Research Institute Web site retrieved November 24, 2003 at  http://www.scripps.edu/newsandviews/e_20030210/sutcliffe.html 

Borderline Personality Disorder - Fear: A Roller-Coaster Ride." Retrieved November 20, 2003 at  http://www.borderlinepersonality.ca/borderrollercoaster.htm
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MCMI Interpretation the Millon Clinical

Words: 661 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73513451

Finally, the subject scored 93 in major depression, indicating a severe depression that interferes with day-to-day functioning.

Article Summary: Setting Culturally elevant Goals by C.. idley

In Setting Culturally elevant Goals, C.. idley discusses the role of goal setting in the counseling process. There are two types of goals set in the counseling process: process goals and outcome goals. It is important that the goals be tailored to a client's specific needs. Furthermore, it is important that the goals be achievable. idley not only discusses goal setting in the chapter, but also discusses how culture must be considered when setting goals in the counseling process.

Because the article being summarized is a book chapter and not a specific research article, it does not contain all of the components of a traditional research article. It does not have a hypothesis, introductory research findings, methodology, or results. However, the article does have…… [Read More]

References

Ridley, C.R. "Setting culturally relevant goals." Overcoming unintentional racism in counseling

and therapy: A practitioner's guide (2nd Ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications,

Inc.
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Depression Currently Depression Is a

Words: 3040 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91861547

So, although the reverse of these characteristic is not indicative of depression, their expression within the context of grief suggests the lack of clinical depression.

ith the fundamentals of depression outlined, it is reasonable to wonder why such symptoms and behaviors manifest themselves in certain people and why they do not in others. Many different researchers coming from many different scientific backgrounds -- from psychology to biochemistry -- have investigated the fundamentals of depression, and each have constructed models as to what its underlying causes are. Each of these investigations has attempted to explain the causes and symptoms of depression and has offered treatment possibilities.

The psychological models of depression have focused their attention on failed early attachment, inability to obtain desired rewards, impaired social relations, and distorted thinking." This approach to depression has yielded some valuable information regarding the disorder; yet, much of the results make it unclear as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ainsworth, Patricia M.D. Understanding Depression. Jackson: University of Mississippi Press, 2000.

American Medical Association. Essential Guide to Depression. New York: Pocket Books, 1998.

Cherlin, Andrew J. "Going to Extremes: Family Structure, Children's Well-Being, and Social Science." Demography, Vol. 36, Nov. 1999. Pages 421-28.

Copeland, Mary Ellen M.S., M.A. The Depression Workbook: Second Edition. Oakland: New Harbinger Publications, 2001.
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St John's Wort Depression in

Words: 1383 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 96325619

("St. John's ort," 2006, NCAM: National Council of Alternative Medicine)

Research, at present, is inconclusive. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) conducted a 3-year study of 336 patients with major depression of moderate severity. The study randomly assigned patients to an 8-week trial. One-third of patients received a uniform dose of St. John's ort, another third a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) commonly prescribed for depression, and the final group received a placebo. The study participants who responded positively were followed for an additional 18 weeks. At the end of the first phase of the study, participants were measured on two scales, one for depression and one for overall functioning. There was no significant difference in rate of response for depression, but the scale for overall functioning was better for the antidepressant than for either St. John's ort or placebo. ("Depression," 2000, National Institute of Health)

Another study, described in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Depression." (2006) Healthy Place. Retrieved 23 Oct 2006 at  http://www.healthyplace.com/Communities/depression/causes.asp 

Depression." (2000) National Institute of Health. Retrieved 23 Oct 2006 at  http://www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/depression.cfm 

Hypericum Depression Trial Study Group."(2002). Journal of the American Medical

Association. 287(14): 1807-1814. Retrieved 23 Oct 2006 at  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=11939866&query_hl=2
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Paxil in the 35 Years Following Its

Words: 2169 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 38820310

Paxil

In the 35 years following its development, femoxetine, commonly known by its trade name "Paxil," has been the focus of a growing body of research based on its proven harmful effects, most especially an increased incidence of suicide. The fact that the drug's manufacturer concealed evidence of these harmful effects has added further fuel to the investigatory fires and new findings continue to confirm the harmful effects of Paxil today. To gain some current insights into Paxil's use and how it has affected consumers in recent years, this paper provides the history of the drug, representative evidence from the scientific community that confirms its several dangers, as well as the results of two face-to-face interviews with former Paxil users to identify specific points of convergence with the scientific research as well as differences. A summary of the research and important findings are provided in the conclusion.

eview and Analysis…… [Read More]

References

Breggin, P.T. (2006). "How Glaxosmithkline Suppressed Data on Paxil-induced Akathisia:

Implications for Suicidality and Violence." Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry,

8(2), pp. 91-93.

Choate, L.H. & Ginter, G.G. (2011). "Prenatal Depression: Best Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment." Journal of Counseling and Development, 89(3), pp. 373-376.
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Counseling 521 Individual Appraisal

Words: 2261 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71970939

Millon Test Summary

Counseling Test eview

What follows in this report is a summary of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III, often referred to as the MCMI-III. One of the sources (but certainly not the only one) is the creator of the test, Mr. Million himself. Four other sources covering the Millon test are covered as well. There are a number of sections to this report and they are, in order, general information about the test, a description of the test, a technical evaluation of the test, a practical evaluation of the test and a summary evaluation of the test. A conclusion will wrap up the report.

General Test Information

As noted in the introduction, the title of the test involved here is the Millon Clinical Multi-Axial Inventory III. There is a "sister" test that is very similar and is known as the Millon College Counseling Inventory, with the main…… [Read More]

References

Grove, W.M., & Vrieze, S.I. (2009). An exploration of the base rate scores of the Millon

Clinical Multiaxial Inventory -- III. Psychological Assessment, 21(1), 57-67.

doi:10.1037/a0014471

Millon, T. (1994, January 1). Product - Millon® Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III). Welcome to Pearson Assessments & Information / Clinical Assessments. Retrieved March 3, 2013, from  http://psychcorp.pearsonassessments.com/HAIWEB/Cultures/en-us/Productdetail.htm?Pid=PAg505
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Bipolar I Disorder

Words: 4472 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 47788968

Bipolar I disorder is an axis 1 clinical disorder in the DSM-IV and is a serious mental illness that can lead to suicidal ideation or action. The history of bipolar disorder research is a long one, and understanding of the disease has deepened considerably over the last several generations. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder 1 is complicated by its resemblance to other mood disorders, mainly major depression but also psychotic disorders like schizophrenia. esearch is revealing new treatment interventions that are targeted to the biological needs of bipolar patients, as antidepressants are often or usually contraindicated. A Christian worldview suggests that individualized treatment plans take into account the family history and patient's lifestyle when recommending a treatment plan.

History

Bipolar I disorder is a serious mental illness that affects between 1 and 2.5% of the general population in the United States (Ghaznavi & Deckersbach, 2012). The more conservative estimate, 1%, is…… [Read More]

References

"A Brief History of Bipolar Disorder," (2012). Today's Caregiver. Retrieved online:  http://www.caregiver.com/channels/bipolar/articles/brief_history.htm 

Angst, J. & Marneros, A. (2001). Bipolarity from ancient to modern times: Conception, birth, and rebirth. Journal of Affective Disorders 67(1-3): 3-19.

Angst, J. & Sellaro, R. (2000). Historical perspectives and natural history of bipolar disorder. Biological Psychiatry 48(6): 445-457.

Baethge, C. Salvatore, P. & Baldessarini, R.J. (2003). Cyclothymia, a circular mood disorder. Historical Psychiatry 2003/14: 377-399
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Women and Depression

Words: 2214 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 88717040

Women Depression

Women and Depression

Depression is among the most studied psychiatric disorders in the world. While it is known that every person will go through periods of mild, short-term depression (following a death, divorce, etc.), there is a growing number of individuals who are experiencing depression on a much more serious scale. Among the research findings is a curious finding that women suffer the condition at a much greater rate than men. Again, this means that women suffer clinical depression at a much greater rate than men. The research has tried to determine the causes, symptoms and treatments for the condition, and there has been some success in this endeavor. In this paper, depression's causes, symptoms and treatments modalities will be examined as they apply to women as a body.

Causes

It may seem necessary to discuss symptoms before causes since it is easier to delineate what the symptoms…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association (APA). (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th Edition). Washington, DC: Author

Cirakoglu, O.C., Kokdemir, D., & Demirutku, K. (2003). Lay theories of causes and cures for depression in a Turkish university sample. Social Behavior & Personality, 31(8), 795-799.

Craig, C.D. (2009). Depression, sociocultural factors, and African-American women. Journal of Multicultural Counseling & Development, 37(2), 83-91.

Grote, N.K., Bledsoe, S.E., Larkin, J., Lemay, E.P., Jr., & Brown, C. (2007). Stress exposure and depression in disadvantaged women: The protective effects of optimism and perceived control. Social Work Research, 31(1), 19-35.
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Forensic Psychological Evaluation

Words: 1732 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Chapter Paper #: 77865714

Forensic Psychological Evaluation

Confidential Psychological Evaluation

IDENTIFYING INFORMATION:

Gender: Male Date of Report: 05/07/2012

Date of Birth: 10/01/1981 Age

Marital Status: Single Occupation: Unemployed

Race: Caucasian Education: GED

Referred by: Dr., B. Wynter

REASON FOR REFERRAL:

A Psychiatric Evaluation on May 19, 2006 by Barbara Wynter, License psychologist who is

Clinical administrator of Central Treatment Facility ward 1, 2, 3, was requested to further assist in diagnosis.

LIMITS OF CONFIDENTIALITY:

EVALUATION PROCEDURE:

INSTRUMENT-

DR, B. Wynters

MMPI (Spell out the name Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory)

Is a depressive component of scale 6. The items connote extraordinary emotional sensitivity or vulnerability that is dysphonic in tone. These items have a "poor little me" flavor, portraying the self as meek and innocuous, emotionally fragile, incapable of being a threat to others, and perhaps as being entitle to special concern and consideration for one's tender sensibilities. There is an implicit theme of resentment…… [Read More]

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Beck Depression Inventory-Ii Bdi-Ii Is a 21-Item

Words: 4152 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83941983

Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a 21-item clinician administered and scored scale that is designed to measure a person's mood and symptoms related to depression. The BDI-II was designed to conform to the DSM-IV depression diagnostic criteria and represents a substantial improvement over its predecessor, the original Beck Depression Inventory. The BDI-II has been used both as a research measure (its primary intended use) and to assist with the clinical diagnosis of depression. The BDI-II has been subject to numerous empirical studies designed to measure its internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity, criterion validity, and construct validity and the test demonstrates acceptable psychometric qualities, but there have been some concerns with its use. This paper reviews the development of the BDI-II, its psychometric properties, uses, strengths, and weaknesses. Advantages and disadvantages of using the BDI-II and recommendations for future research regarding its use are also discussed.

Title of paper

The…… [Read More]

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PTSD Treatment Modalities Evidence-Based Recommendations

Words: 4461 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17783376

Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatment

Clinical Presentation of Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatments

On January 13, 2015, Andrew Brannan, a 66-year-old Vietnam veteran was executed in Georgia for killing police officer Kyle Dinkheller in 1998 (Hoffman, 2015). At the time, Brannan had been living in a bunker on his mother's property without water or electricity and had stopped taking his medications. According to the Veterans Administration (VA), he was 100% disabled due to combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). He also suffered from bipolar disorder, had lost two brothers to a military plane crash and suicide, and lost a father to cancer. Veterans groups, death penalty critics, and mental health advocates, all petitioned the Georgia Supreme Court for a stay of execution unsuccessfully. The veterans groups were particularly interested in preventing the death of yet another veteran who developed severe psychiatric problems while serving his or her country.

Trauma in general…… [Read More]

References

APA (American Psychiatric Association). (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association.

Cook, J.M., Dinnen, S., Simiola, V., Bernardy, N., Rosenheck, R., & Hoff, R. (2014). Residential treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in the Department of Veterans Affairs: A national perspective on perceived effective ingredients. Traumatology, 20(1), 43-9.

Dursa, E.K., Reinhard, M.J., Barth, S.K., & Schneiderman, A.I. (2014). Prevalence of a positive screen for PTSD among OEF/OIF and OEF/OIF-era veterans in a large population-based cohort. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27, 542-549.

Ehring, T., Welboren, R., Morina, N., Wicherts, J.M., Freitag, J., & Emmelkamp, P.M. (2014). Meta-analysis of psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder in adult survivors of childhood abuse. Clinical Psychology Review, 34(8), 645-57.
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Practice Assessment Clinical Case

Words: 3226 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65358729

Gender: Female

Birthdate: 01/16/1985

Age: 30 years, 11 months

Dates of Evaluation: 10/25/15 -10/30/2015

eason for eferral

This is a 30-year-old right-handed woman referred by Dr. Smith for a psychological evaluation to determine any lingering psychological and cognitive effects as a result of a mild head injury that she suffered on October 15, 2015 as a result of an automobile accident. The client has complained of severe memory problems, being disoriented at times, feeling depressed and anxious, and having nightmares the accident. Her physical complaints consist of headaches, back aches, poor sleep, nausea, and vomiting.

Identifying Information

The client is a 30-year-old, divorced, Hispanic woman who lives with her children in a home that she rents in XXX (client please insert city). She has been married three times and has three children from two of the marriages.

Developmental History

The client grew up in XXXX (insert). She reported that her…… [Read More]

References

Baddeley, A. (1992). Working memory. Science, 255(5044), 556-559.

Black, D. O., Wallace, G. L., Sokoloff, J. L., & Kenworthy, L. (2009). Brief report: IQ split predicts social symptoms and communication abilities in high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 39(11), 1613-1619.

Groth-Marnat, G. (2009). Handbook of psychological assessment. (5th ed.). Indianapolis, IN John Wiley & Sons.

Hogan, T.P. (2015). Psychological testing: A practical introduction . (3rd ed). Hoboken, NJ.
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A Case Study on Rosa Lee

Words: 2833 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 68325344

osa Lee Cunningham. Elements such as the subject's health history, legal history, psychosocial history, and diagnostic impressions will be covered.

osa Lee Cunningham

DOB/Age: October 7, 1936

Date of Interview: October 7, 1994

Evaluator:

eason for Assessment: osa Lee Cunningham was discovered having a fit at Washington's Howard University Hospital, owing to over-consumption of heroin. In spite of being enrolled in an intervention for drug treatment, there did not appear to be any inclination in osa to quit drugs. In fact, she wished she could access methadone, a synthetic drug with heroin-like effects. Some days prior to being interviewed, osa awoke to find herself with fever; her condition had exacerbated. By noon, she was admitted to the emergency room (Dash, 1996 Prologue). osa states that her drug consumption levels hinge on the amount of money in her pocket and heroin accessibility. The subject also had Preludin-use history, a drug she…… [Read More]

References

Chapman, D., & Perry, G. (2008). Depression as a Major Component of Public Health for Older Adults. Preventing Chronic Disease, 5(1).Retrieved, from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2248771/ 

Dash, L. (1996). Rosa Lee: A Mother and Her Family in Urban America. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved from  https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=cc8_CQAAQBAJ&pg=GBS.PA34.w.1.0.349 

(n.d.). Drug Addiction Help. Family Therapy. Retrieved October 3, 2015, from  http://www.addictions.com/family-therapy/ 

(n.d.). Drug and Alcohol Detox -- Body Cleansing -- Best Detox Diet Programs .Drug Detox Rehab Programs -- Drug Detoxification Centers .Retrieved October 3, 2015, from  http://www.detox.net/articles/drug-detox-rehab-programs/
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Cormobidity of Mental Illness and Substance Abuse

Words: 4477 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71299370

Mental Illness and Substance Abuse

Does mental illness cause substance abuse addiction or does substance abuse addiction cause a mental illness diagnosis? Does it go both ways?

A complex relationship exists between substance abuse and mental illness. Those suffering from depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses may use alcohol and drugs as self-medication. Unfortunately, though such options may appear to work temporarily, substance abuse is no treatment for any condition; in fact, it often aggravates the problem during severe intoxication as well as in the course of substance withdrawal (NAMI, 2010).

Furthermore, alcohol and drugs can initiate mental illness in persons who are otherwise mentally healthy, while worsening problems in those who are already mentally ill. Active substance users will tend to not follow-through properly with therapy, and are more vulnerable to serious health complications and even premature death. Those having dual diagnosis will also be more prone to violent…… [Read More]

References

Anderson P, & Baumberg B. (2006). Alcohol in Europe: a public health perspective. London: Institute of Alcohol Studies.

Anderson, M. L., Ziedonis, D. M., & Najavits, L. M. (2014). Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and substance Use Disorder Comorbidity among Individuals with Physical Disabilities: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27(2), 182-191. doi:10.1002/jts.21894

Book SW, & Randall CL. (2002). Social anxiety disorder and alcohol use. Alcohol Res Health; 26:130-5.

Cerda M, Sagdeo A, Galea S. (2008). Comorbid forms of psychopathology: key patterns and future research directions. Epidemiol Rev; 30:155_177.
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Analyzing Katheryn Case Study

Words: 1670 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 17145682

Katheryn Case Study

Clinical vignette

Caucasian girl, Katheryn, aged 10, was referred on account of her increasingly aggressive behavior towards her 8-year-old brother, Carl. Mrs. Smith, their maternal grandma, has been raising the two children. Carl was a baby when she had taken him under her wing. In fact, she was responsible for their upbringing since their infancy; the two kids were taken away from Mrs. Smith's daughter (the children's mother) because of her alcoholism and substance/cocaine abuse behaviors. Katheryn and Carl are the two youngest of eleven children; none of them have been brought up by the mother and each of them struggles in one or other way. In fact, it has been reported that two older siblings of Katheryn had cleft palates at birth, and one sister hadn't spoken till she turned five. Further, many siblings have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); they are all…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-IV-TR. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

Duncan, B. (2010). On becoming a better therapist. American Psychological Society.

Elizabeth A. Newnham, & Page, A. C. (2010). Bridging the gap between best evidence and best practice in mental health. Clinical Psychology Review, 30, 127-142.

Goodheart, C. (2011). Psychology Practice: Design for tomorrow. American psychologist, 66, 39-347.
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Depression

Words: 2302 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39910594

Depression is a state of sadness and gloom where one feels dull and overwhelmed by the challenges of life. People tend to say that they are "depressed' any time they feel very unhappy. More likely than not, it could just be a mere response to fatigue, sad thoughts or events. This improper use of this term causes confusion between an ordinary mood swing and a medical condition. While it is normal for all human beings to experience dejection every now and then, a few people may experience unipolar depression. Ordinary dejection is rarely serious enough to significantly affect a person's day to day activities and does not persist for long. Mood downcasts can even have some benefits. Time spent contemplating can help an individual explore their inner self, values and way of life. They often come out of it feeling stronger, resolved and with a greater sense of clarity.

Unlike…… [Read More]

References

Comer, R. (2013). Abnormal Psychology (8th ed.). New York: Worth Publishers.

Bolton, P., Bass, J., Neugebauer, R., Verdeli, H., Clougherty, K. F., Wickramaratne, P.,. ..& Weissman, M. (2003). Group interpersonal psychotherapy for depression in rural Uganda: a randomized controlled trial. Jama, 289(23), 3117-3124. Retrieved from  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12813117 

Dombrovski, A. Y., Lenze, E. J., Dew, M. A., Mulsant, B. H., Pollock, B. G., Houck, P. R., & Reynolds, C. F. (2007). Maintenance Treatment for Old-Age Depression Preserves Health-Related Quality of Life: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Paroxetine and Interpersonal Psychotherapy. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 55(9), 1325-1332. Retrieved from  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17767673 

Elder, B. L., &Mosack, V. (2011). Genetics of depression: an overview of the current science. Issues in mental health nursing, 32(4), 192-202. Retrieved from  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21355753