Early Childhood Education Essays (Examples)

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Early Childhood Edu the Importance

Words: 620 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47514862

Porch (2002) points out that research unequivocally shows that early childhood education paves the way for later educational success.

As of now, few states offer fully funded early childhood education programs. As of 2002, only three states offered fully-funded pre-kindergarten programs (Porch 2002). The fundamental purpose of the Early Childhood Development Initiative was to increase awareness of the importance of early childhood education. Yet more work needs to be done to ensure government support of early childhood development programs and not just lip service.

Kagan (2004) suggests some possible solutions to the lack of comprehensive funding for early childhood education programs for every American. Urban areas should be the number one recipient for federal and state funding, given that most of the nation's disadvantaged students live in urban centers and attend urban schools. Furthermore, wise investments into appropriate early childhood education programs will ensure that the taxpayer funds are spent…… [Read More]

References

Early Childhood Cognitive Development." The White House. Retrieved May 15, 2008 at http://www.whitehouse.gov/firstlady/initiatives/education/readingprograms.html

Kagan, S.L. (2004). Improving Urban Student Achievement Through Early Childhood Reform: What State Policymakers Can Do. Early Childhood Reform. Retrieved May 15, 2008 at http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/50/07/5007.htm

Porch, S. (2002). Early Childhood Education Issues. Educational Research Service. Spring 2002. Retrieved May 15, 2008 at http://www.ers.org/spectrum/spg02a.htm
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Early Childhood Issues Since the

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44176235

Findings from several research studies show that when computer software and classroom manipulatives were compared, "the computer software was found to be the more effective means of skill building in young children" (Hitchcock and Noonan, 2000). The key, it appears, is the judicious use of technology and the timeframe in which computers are used. Computer software can be used as a learning tool, but disguised as a game. Further research found that computers are motivating and promote teacher-student interaction, which allows the teacher to encourage, prompt, and point to display items. While more research is clearly needed, the computer can be programmed to meet individual learning needs and to adapt regular curriculum issues in a more robust manner (Spencer and Baskin, 1997).

Part 4 -- The literature shows us that there are five major ways in which computers enhance learning in early childhood education:

Enhancing Learning -- There is a…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Cesarone, B. (2000). Computers in Elementary and Early Childhood Education. Childhood Education. 77 (1): 54-63.

Department of Education. (2003). Benefits of Technology use. Retrieved from:

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/os/technology/plan/national/benefits.html

Hitchcock, C. And Noonan, M.J. (2000). Computer-Assisted Instruction of Early Academic
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Education - Early Childhood Early

Words: 2839 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14816495

Conversely, where the exhibit is actively incorporated into a lesson on the moral basis for sensitivity to animals, the existing educational environment contributes to the formation of a moral conscience even where direction of that kind is lacking at home.

In very much the same way, the preschool and primary grade school environment is conducive to teaching other important moral values that are often postponed until much later, despite the fact that early introduction to those concepts is much more likely to result in their absorption than later introduction. acism, sexism, and other forms of bias that are no longer condoned in American society are also capable of being addressed in the preschool years so that those important lessons take root before contradictory messages are received from the external environment.

Informal Assessment of Social and Emotional Well-being in Children:

All too often, educators and other caregivers perform their professional responsibilities…… [Read More]

References

Bimonte, R. (2005) "If your class were optional, would anyone attend?" Momentum, 36(4), 6.

Byerly, S. (2001). "Linking classroom teaching to the real world through experiential instruction." Phi Delta Kappan, 82(9), 697.

Cookson, P. (2005). "The enriched classroom." Education Module, 35(4), 10.

Gerrig, R, Zimbardo, P. (2005) Psychology and Life. 17th Edition.
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Early Childhood Literacy

Words: 1706 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7586266

Alternative Methods in eading Assessment for Young Learners

eading is one of the arduous tasks to teach in the early childhood subject. At the same time, it is also a very interesting process. As mostly believed, the beginning of the language learning process always involves enthusiasm and the joy of the subject going through trial and error, recognizing the closest parts of their life. It goes through that way - until one day the process becomes a real and conscious workshop.

As children start getting their formal education, they need to go through the development process with a series of goals, which mostly are carefully set up for them, in order to obtain an addressed achievement in a given time schedule. As the result, they may look a little bit nervous and reluctant to show their real competence, as the process of assessment considered threatening.

This issue has been a…… [Read More]

References

Beck, J.W. (1999). How to Raise a Brighter Child: The Case for Early Learning. Pocket Books. 352

Katz, L.G. (1997). A Developmental Approach to Assessment of Young Children. Retrieved November 6, 2002 from ERIC Digest. ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education Urbana IL. Web site: http://ericps.ed.uiuc.edu/eece/pubs/digests/1997/katz97.pdf.

Latha, R.H. (1999). A Reading Programme for Elementary Schools. The English Teaching Forum. Vol. 37. No. 4. pp. 12-15.

Meisels, S.J. (1995). Performance Assessment in Early Childhood Education: The Work Sampling System. Retrieved November 6, 2002 from ERIC Digest. ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education Urbana IL. Web site: http://www.ed.gov/databases/ERIC_Digests/ed382407.html.
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Early Childhood Special Education Lesson

Words: 2192 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91801311

[I also had my students write how they would say it out loud when naming it. Example: "Line AB or line segment AB is perpendicular to line segment CD."] Below is information on how students should label rays, lines, etc.

1. ay - the endpoint letter first, then a second point with a line ending in an arrow over the two letters, pointing to the right.

2. Point - a dot and then the point's letter.

3. Line - Two points on the line with a line with arrows in both directions above the letters.

4. Segment - the two endpoint letters of the segment with a line, no arrows, above the two letters

5. Intersecting - (AB x BC) the AB and BC would have a line or a line with arrows above them to show what figures they were. The x stands for intersects.

6. Parallel - (AB…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Baiker, K. And J. Robinson. (2004). Origami Math: Easy-to-Make Reproducible Activities that

Build Concepts, Skills, and Vocabulary in Geometry, Fractions, measurement, and More.

Minneapolis: Scholastic Books.

Bedford, M. (2007). Memorization: The Neglected Key to Learning. Efficacy Institute. Retrieved from: http://www.efficacy.org/Resources/TheEIPointofView / tabid/233/ctl/ArticleView / mid/678/articleId/84/Memorization-the-Neglected-Key-to-Learning.aspx
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Early Childhood Intervention Promising Preventative for Juvenile Delinquency

Words: 1021 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13538397

seminar was revolving more around why childhood education is important and the various credentials that support increased effort in this arena. Even though there were many related topics covered in this seminar, the major objective and goal is the relevance of early childhood education. It has been stated that early childhood development is a time when the child not only develops physically but socially, emotionally and cognitively as well. The infants enter into this world with a certain group of abilities and talents. They have many potentials that need to be worked on and brought out by the parents.

When looking into this subject through the perspective of a psychologist, many different theories can be used For instance; Sigmund Freud talked about the three essays sexuality and the different stages that a child must pass through in the right way. If a child does not successfully finish a stage, he…… [Read More]

References

Bornstein, D. (2013). Protecting Children from Toxic Stress. New York Times.

Felitti, M., Vincent, J., Anda, M., Robert, F., Nordenberg, M., & Williamson, M. et al. (1998). Relationship of childhood abuse and household dysfunction to many of the leading causes of death in adults: The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. American Journal Of Preventive Medicine, 14(4), 245 -- 258.

Lazar, I., Darlington, R., Murray, H., Royce, J., Snipper, A., & Ramey, C. (1982). Lasting effects of early education: A report from the Consortium for Longitudinal Studies. Monographs Of The Society For Research In Child Development, --151.

Zigler, E., Taussig, C., & Black, K. (1992). Early childhood intervention: a promising preventative for juvenile delinquency. American Psychologist, 47(8), 997.
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Early Childhood

Words: 753 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98796047

Fairness

When data collection is reliant on teacher reporting and therefore the "...perception and rating of the Kindergarten teacher" (uhn, uderman, & Zumbo, 2007, p. 456), how would you suggest best controlling for or adjusting for perception bias?

Teacher reporting is understandably used in studies like that of uhn, uderman & Zumbo (2007). In the uhn, ederman & Zumbo (2007) study, the Kindergarten teachers rated their own students on the EDI. It is difficult to conceptualize other means by which the students could be evaluated. Researchers could use third-party observers, such as Kindergarten teachers from other schools. This might reduce perception bias in that teachers are somewhat likely to develop personal likes or dislikes during the course of instructing their students. A teacher from another school who has not been in contact with the students might have less personal bias toward the population being measured, but would be lacking in…… [Read More]

Guhn, Guderman and Zumbo (2007), Oliveri, Ercikan and Zumbo (2013), and readings from the text all illuminate some of the ways diverse classrooms function. Early childhood educators face a multitude of issues during the course of their work. One of the greatest challenges to early childhood educators is assessment, and finding the most appropriate, least biased, and least invasive methods of assessing students from diverse populations. Assessments should certainly be comprehensive and refer to the whole child, as Guhn, Guderman and Zumbo (2007), Oliveri, Ercikan and Zumbo (2013), and readings from the text all show. Behavioral issues need to be taken into account, as to issues related to social learning and emotional maturity. Yet concrete learning tasks, ranging from language development to specific knowledge, also need to be measured in ways that are sensitive to different learning styles. One way to ensure a fair assessment is simply to use multiple methods of assessment for each child, and to assess for as many factors as possible to avoid overlooking key areas of strength or weakness. Moreover, administrators or coworkers can monitor assessments or perform independent ones to correct for and address potential biases related to gender or ethnicity. Ideally, observing children in a naturalistic setting over a long period of time would help provide a comprehensive picture of their development. Video recordings might also come in handy for review purposes.

3. Does the prospect and understanding of differential item functioning (DIF) change your perception of reported scores and rankings on tests such as the PISA? Explain how DIF may have changed your perception or did not and why?

Measurement biases like differential item functioning (DIF) has changed my perception of reported scores and rankings on tests like the PISA. The plethora of learning that takes place at home and in communities can often supplant or enhance the learning that takes place in the classroom. Social learning in diverse communities also complicates matters related to DIF. Understanding DIF enhances my personal appreciation for early childhood education methods. Many tests do take place in settings that might enhance DIF, whereas more naturalistic assessments might minimize DIF. Specific methods of controlling for DIF can also be used in more complex data analyses. While I understand the need for assessments, I do believe that standardized systems like PISA can be seriously flawed in their design and interpretation. Learning more about DIF has helped me envision how to design more appropriate assessment methods while still recognizing the role that specific learning plays in education. Assessments that acknowledge cultural bias, allowing more nuance and greater reliance on holistic teacher observations, will be preferable in early childhood education. In many cases, multiple assessment methods can be combined to provide a complete picture of a child's development.
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Early Childhood Norm-Referenced vs Criterion-Referenced Test a

Words: 699 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50992852

Early Childhood

Norm-referenced vs. criterion-referenced test

A norm-referenced test is an assessment that usually brings out an estimate of the position of the person who is being tested in a population that is predefined with the focus being the trait that is being measured. The estimate is normally obtained from analyzing the test scores as well as other data which is got from the population and is relevant .in this type of assessment there is identification of whether the person who is taking the test is better or worse than the other people who are also taking the test. However this assessment is not used to determine whether the person who is taking the test knows more or less than the requirement. Criterion referenced test is an assessment involves translating test scores into statements regarding the expected behavior of an individual who has attained a particular score or how they…… [Read More]

References

Dannielle.(2008). Norm-Referenced vs. Criterion-Referenced Testing.Retrieved Novemeber 10,2013 from http://www.altalang.com/beyond-words/2008/05/22/norm-referenced-vs.-criterion-referenced-language-tests/

Robert, C.(2013). Differences Between Standardized & Non-Standardized Assessments. Retrieved Novemeber 10,2013 from  http://classroom.synonym.com/differences-between-standardized-nonstandardized-assessments-4442.html 

Klotz, M.B & Canter, A.(2013). Response to Intervention (RTI): A Primer for Parents. Retrieved Novemeber 10,2013 from http://www.readingrockets.org/article/15857/
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Early Childhood Development -- Curriculum

Words: 322 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1457222

Another important strategy is that of exploring spatial relations. In such activities, children gain a better visual and practical sense of the spatial relations within mathematics. Scholastic's article portrays two girls discussing the appropriate spatial placement of a couch in a dollhouse. Such thinking methods can be influenced utilizing activities asking the children to map their house, their school, or their neighborhood in proportions. This will help open the child's mind to a more organized way of approaching spatial relations.

Using such strategies help lay the foundations of mathematics essential for later higher levels of learning. It is important to introduce elementary topics and concepts as early as possible, without boring young children to loose their interest. Early math lessons should include engaging activities which help keep the child moving and the learning environment active.… [Read More]

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Early Childhood Activities My Creative Activities Portfolio

Words: 1170 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69682406

Early Childhood Activities

My Creative Activities Portfolio

My Name

CE230 Creative Activities for Young Children Final Project

Activity #

Creating a Leaf Character

Ehlert, L. (2003). Leaf man. New York: Harcourt Children's Books.

Age(s):

wks-1 yr ages 2-4

ages 5 -- 7

ages 8 -- 10

ages 10-12

Time equired:

minutes

After completing this activity, students will be able to sort leaves by attributes (shape, color, size) and assemble them to create an original art project which they can then use as a story prompt for a subsequent writing lesson.

Materials/Equipment:

Brown paper lunch bags, assorted autumn leaves, collected outdoors by students, 9X12 sheets of construction paper, white school glue, plastic "google" eyes

Highlight (all) elated Developmental Area(s):

Drama

Creative Play

Art

Music

Movement

Individual

Small Group

Large Group

Cognitive

Linguistic

Physical

Sensorimotor

Social-emotional

Procedure: Explain in detailed narrative form using complete sentences how this activity is accomplished. Include the…… [Read More]

Resources/Developing_Estimation.pdf

"Responsive Classroom morning meeting activities." (2008). Northeast Foundation for Children. Retrieved April 15, 2013 from http://www.responsiveclassroom.org/sites/default/files

/pdf_files/videos/mmactivities_directions.pdf
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Early Childhood

Words: 859 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78825660

Early Childhood

The educational setting I have selected in my community to deconstruct within this document is called Thriving Minds (formerly Muskal Assessment and Learning Clinic). I was able to contact two long-term staff members of this organizations for a fairly candid interview revolving around their educational philosophy as specifically applied to parental involvement. Since this particular learning clinic exists outside of the formal constructs of any public or private school educational system, parental involvement is integral to the relationship fostered between clinicians, parents and students since it is usually the parents who decided to enroll their children. As such, the degree of parental involvement actuated at Thriving Minds is perhaps considerably more than that at traditional educational institutions such as schools or learning academies.

Parental involvement is defined at Thriving Minds in a variety of ways, all of which relate to the basic concept of keeping parents informed about…… [Read More]

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Early Childhood Ages 3 To 7

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74119411

Early Childhood (Ages 3 to 7)

Early childhood (3-7)

Development of prefrontal cortex

By early childhood, areas such as sensory areas of the brain are already myelianated and after that the motor areas begin myelination. During childhood, myelination of the prefrontal cortex takes place and the pattern of development goes on until adolescence. The prefrontal cortex is at the front of the brain that is involved in complex and cognitive regulatory behaviors. This rate of development and myelination differs from one child to another hence the differences in their skills and abilities. This part of the brain is evidently one that has the most prolonged development period as its development occurs throughout childhood and into adolescence.

This section of the brain plays a role in different types of functions; goal setting and the planning of a sequence of actions, inhibiting inappropriate reposes and working memory meaning that it keeps information…… [Read More]

References

Tsujimoto1, S.(2009).The Prefrontal Cortex: Functional Neural Development During Early Childhood. Retrieved February 15, 2014 from  http://nro.sagepub.com/content/14/4/345.abstract 

Bergen, D.(2002). The Role of Pretend Play in Children's Cognitive Development. Retrieved February 15,2014 from  http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v4n1/bergen.html
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Standards for Early Childhood Professionals Early Childhood

Words: 951 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59718816

Standards for Early Childhood Professionals

Early Childhood

There have been a great number of advances, strides, and changes in the field of Early Childhood or Early Childhood Development. Perhaps one of the most overt changes in this field is the nomenclature and jargon. This field was not always called Early Childhood. The field of Child Development is fairly recent as well. Expansion in perspectives on education and human development sparked the invention and subdivisions of stages of development. The stage dedicated to infants, toddlers, and children that have not yet reach the age for formal education is called Early Childhood. Since the existence of Early Childhood, there have become a number of degree and certification programs for Early Childhood. Early Childhood was not always available as a major or degree concentration. Some of the changes and increased formality in Early Childhood have changed the way Early Childhood professionals are educated…… [Read More]

References:

Ackerman, D.J. (2004). What do teachers need? Practitioners' perspectives on early childhood professional development. Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, 24(4), 291 -- 301.

Sheridan, S.M., Edwards, C.P., Marvin, C.A., & Knoche, L.L. (2009). Professional Development in Early Childhood Programs: Process Issues and Research Needs. Early Education Development, 20(3), 377 -- 401.
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Infancy Early Childhood Include Explain Families Affect

Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57382789

infancy early childhood. Include: Explain families affect

Early Childhood and Adulthood

There are a number of key facets and processes that occur during infancy and early childhood that profoundly affect an individual's growth and development. Some of these factors include early childhood education, a variety of parenting styles, as well as familial involvement in cognitive and physical development. All of these factors indicate that parents and surrounding family members play a highly important role in the development of infants and young children.

One of the most eminent ways in which families produce a direct influence on their children is through the establishment and implementation of rituals or routines. The repetitive nature of these daily constructs provides a valuable structuring for activities that has been linked to cognitive and emotional processes in children and infants -- most discernibly when there is a break or a shifting in a particular ritual that…… [Read More]

References

Spagnola, M., Fiese, B.H. (2007). "Family routines and rituals: a context for development in the lives of young children." Infants and Young Children. 20 (4): 284-299.
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American and Japanese Early Childhood

Words: 14069 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63412707

Generally, it works by either giving a reward for an encouraged behavior, or taking something away for an undesirable behavior. y doing this, the patient often increases the good behaviors and uses the bad behaviors less often, although this conditioning may take awhile if the rewards and removals are not sufficient to entice the patient into doing better.

Existentialism is important to discuss here as well, and is often seen to be a very drastic way to examine human behavior. There are two types of existentialism. One is Atheistic Existentialism, and the other is Theistic Existentialism.

Atheistic existentialism has its basis in the statement that the entire cosmos is composed only of matter, and human beings see reality in two forms. Those forms are subjective and objective. People who believe in Atheistic Existentialism do not believe that anyone or anything specific made the world. They do not know whether it…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adams, M.J., Treiman, R., & Pressley, M. (1998). Reading, writing, and literacy. In W. Damon (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology: Child psychology in practice, 4, 275-355. New York: Wiley.

Albertson, L., & Kagan, D. (1988). Dispositional stress, family environment, and class climate among college teachers. Journal of Research and Development in Education, 21(2), 55-61.

Amidon, E. (1980). Personal Teaching Style Questionnaire. Philadelphia: Temple University, College of Education.

Allison, Anne. (1996). Producing mothers. In Anne E. Imamura (Ed.), Re-imaging Japanese women (pp. 135-155). Berkeley: University of California Press.
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Male Teacher Retention in Early Childhood Programs Why They Stay

Words: 1509 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78386095

Male Teacher etention in Early Childhood Programs: Why They Stay.

quick glance into any elementary, preschool or child care center quickly reveals that very few men work with young children. This cursory observation is solidly supported by the fact that fewer than five percent of all early childhood teachers in the United States are male (U.S. Department of Education, 1994).

There are a wide variety of reasons why so few men remain in the field of early childhood education. These reasons include suspicion, subtle discrimination, social isolation, pressure to move into administrative position away from children, and a double standard for behavior and performance (Sargent, 2001).

Importantly, the recent upsurge of reports of sexual and physical abuse in schools has made many male teachers feel vulnerable to unfounded charges of sexual or physical abuse against children in their care. Certainly, our societal tendency to see males as perpetrations of violent…… [Read More]

References

Kennedy, N.M. 1991. Policy issues in teacher education. Phi Delta Kappan, 72: 658-665.

Neugebauer, R. 1994. Recruiting and training men in your center. Child Care Information Exchange, May: 8-11.

Robinson, B. Vanishing Breed: Men in Child Care Programs, Young Children, Sept 1988.

Sargent, P. 2001. Real men or real teachers: Contradictions in the lives of men elementary school teachers. Harriman, TN: Men's Studies Press.
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Effective Communication Skills for Early Childhood Educators

Words: 1201 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35663435

Effective Communication Skills for Early Childhood Educators

In any organizational setting, there is an overarching need for effective communication, making the need for effective communication skills an important asset in virtually any workplace setting. Consequently, some practitioners maintain that effective communication skills are the most essential skill for early childhood educators as well. To determine the accuracy of this assertion, this paper provides a review of the relevant peer-reviewed and scholarly literature concerning the importance of effective communication skills for early childhood educators, followed by a summary of the research and important findings in the conclusion.

eview and Discussion

Because all organizations are comprised of people, the need for effective communication skills is clear but this need is even more acute for early childhood educators. In her text, Leadership in Early Childhood, odd (2006, p. 70) reports that, "Effective communication skills are the tools that underpin the ability to act…… [Read More]

References

Beck, I., & McKeown, M. 2001. 'Text talk: Capturing the benefits of read-aloud experiences for young children.' The Reading Teacher, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 10-20.

Curtis, A. & O'Hagan, M. 2003. Care and Education in Early Childhood: A Student's Guide to Theory and Practice. London: RoutledgeFalmer.

Harms, L. 2007. Working with people: Communication skills for reflective practice. Melbourne,

Vic.: Oxford University Press.
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Images and Ideas Using Videos and Reflections to Guide Instructional Change in Early Childhood Classrooms

Words: 1656 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13650977

Disrupting by Imagining: ethinking Early Childhood esearch

Early Childhood esearch

This research highlights four teachers who work in early childhood classrooms who have chosen to implement the use of video-observations of their teaching in conjunction with the reflective process. Each teacher profile will include discussions and interviews about their teaching and change implementation. The ideas for change will be based upon their own knowledge, skills, and dispositions along with evidence from the recorded and observed videotapes. After viewing their own instruction, practitioners began the process of implementing change for individual students as well as for their class overall. Teachers shared this experience with others in their school and provided information regarding their results based on the following three areas: 1) Analysis: individuals and/or groups in the process of reflection (grade level teams); 2) Strategies: offers other teachers and/or programs ways to introduce concepts to a group of teachers and/or school;…… [Read More]

References

Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: the exercise of control. New York: Freedom.

Brophy, J.E. (2004). Using video in teacher education. San Diego, CA: Elsivier.

Copa, A., Lucinski L., Olsen, E, & Wollenburg, K. (1999). Promoting professional and organizational development: A reflective practice model. Zero to Three, 20(1), 3-9.

Cross, N. (2011). Coaching: Seven reasons to go to the tape. ASCD Express, 7(1).
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Diversity Into Early Childhood Despite

Words: 2164 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45794893

35). Information can also be added that relates to families, parents, and others whose primary culture and language are not in the mainstream.

Using children's literature to teach diversity: It is not a new idea for teachers to use literature to educate young children. But because Gillian Potter and colleagues assert that teachers are being challenged "as never before" to create experiences that are culturally meaningful to all children -- literature has come under a new and vitally important focus. And for those purposes, children's literature is a "powerful resource" to aid children in the knowledge of their known world, and literature allows them to travel to other worlds and "explore the unfamiliar" (Potter, 2009, p. 108).

For children of diverse cultures literature enhances their development of language, it fosters intellectual development and supports the growth of the child's personality and moral development as well, Potter goes on (p. 2).…… [Read More]

Reference List

Biles, Barbara. (2008). Activities that Promote Racial and Cultural Awareness. KCET. Retrieved

January 26, 2011, from  http://www.pbs.org/ .

Corso, Robert M., Santos, Rosa Milagros, and Roof, Virginia. (2002). Honoring Diversity in Early Childhood Education Materials. Teaching Exceptional Children.

Gonzalez-Mena, Janet, and Pulido-Tobiassen, Dora. (1999). Teaching "Diversity": A Place to Begin. Early Childhood Today. Retrieved January 26, 2010, from http://www2.scholartic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3499&print=1.
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Teacher of Early Childhood the

Words: 598 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19229411



II. DEVELOPMENT TIMING VARIED AMONG INDIVIDUALS

It is necessary that the teacher of early childhood individuals understand that different individuals develop at different rates and that this is due to "differing physiological factors and differing experiences." (Growth Stages 1: Infancy and Early Childhood, nd) in a 2005 news report of the National Academies Education & Research entitled: "Timeout for Child Policy" relates that the United States "has not made the most of scientific knowledge about children's development between birth and age 5 - a period that sets the stage for their intellectual and emotional growth. y and large, what currently exists for America's children is a mixed bag of policies and practices...." (National Academies, 2005)

III. RESULT WHEN TEACHERS DOES NOT UNDERSTAND

In the case where a teacher does not understand the stages of development of children and where the teacher fails to understand that children develop at different rates…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Growth Stages: Infancy and Early Childhood - Science for All Americans (nd) online available at http://www.sciencenetlinks.com/pdfs/growth1_teachsheet.pdf

What Early Language Teachers Need to Know About Language (2000) Center for Applied Linguistics? November 2000. online available at http://www.cal.org/resources/digest/0007bredekamp.html

Timeout for Child Policy (2005) NewsReport Online. The National Academies. Online available at  http://nationalacademies.org/onpi/newsrpt/fal00edr.htm
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Australian Early Childhood Literacy

Words: 2098 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29105209

Curriculum Early Childhood Education

Literacy is considered to be a fundamental human right and is considered to be "essential to social and human development," used for exchanging knowledge and ideas" (UNESCO, 2015).

The development of literacy is critical to learning, in particular the development of communication skills, critical thinking and fostering the ability to analyse and comprehend material (Australian Curriculum, n.d.). While basic reading and writing skills are the foundation of literacy, the concept of multiliteracies reflects that there are many different purposes for which students must become literate. Literacy is not simply about learning the mechanics of a language, but about being able to function in a society. Multiliteracies recognizes this, in particular that language is used for business, for social purposes, and for the performance of everyday tasks. The concept has emerged in light of the realization that simply being able to read and write is insufficient for…… [Read More]

References

Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Authority [ACARA]. (n.d.). English: Rationale. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Rationale

Australian Institute or Teaching and School Leadership [AITSL]. (2012). Multiple literacy outcomes [video file]. Retrieved from http://www.aitsl.edu.au/australian-professional-standards-for-teachers/illustrations-of-practice/detail?id=IOP00179

Meiers, M. & Department of Education and Training, Victoria. (2006). A Chronological Review of Literacy Policies and Programs of the Western Australia Department of Education & Training, Victoria, 1980-2005. Retrieved from https://www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/edulibrary/public/publ/research/publ/Literacy_Chronology_Paper_9-rpt-v1.01-20060830.pdf

Connor, J. (2011). Foundation for Learning: Relationships between early years learning framework and the Australian curriculum [An ECA-Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Authority paper]. Early Childhood Australia: Canberra.
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Gap Early Childhood Intervention and the Development

Words: 6336 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82658447

Gap: Early Childhood Intervention and the Development of the Disabled Child

Children with special needs include those who have disabilities, developmental delays, are gifted/talented, and are at risk of future developmental problems. Early intervention consists of the provision of services for such children and their families for the purpose of lessening the effects of their condition. Early intervention may focus on the child alone or on the child and the family together. Early intervention programs may be center-based, home-based, hospital-based, or a combination. Early intervention may begin at any time between birth and school age; however, there are many reasons for it to begin as early as possible. Early Intervention is the key to achieving the most positive outcome in aiding the disabled child to develop as normally as possible.

There are three primary reasons for intervening early with an exceptional child: to enhance the child's development, to provide support…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bayley, N. (1970) "Development of mental abilities." In P.H. Mussen (ed) Carmichael's manual of child psychology, 1, New York: Wiley.

Bayley, N. (1955) "On the growth of intelligence," American Psychologist, 10, 805, Dec.

Burts, Diane C.; Hart, Craig H.; Charlesworth, Rosalind; DeWolf, D. Michele; Ray, Jeanette; Manuel, Karen; & Fleege, Pamela O. (1993). "Developmental appropriateness of kindergarten programs and academic outcomes in first grade." Journal Of Research In Childhood Education, 8 (1), 23-31. EJ 493-673.

Cooper, J.H. An Early Childhood Special Education Primer. Chapel Hill, NC: Technical Assistance Development System (TADS), 1981.
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Education NAEYC Accreditation What Is

Words: 1584 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6227990

d.).

The idea of developmentally appropriate practices was made popular by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) when the published their Position Statement on Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Early Childhood Programs in 1987. NAEYC developed this position statement in order to support its early childhood program accreditation system, which recognizes and sanctions programs that offer appropriate early childhood practices. Because of this system, early childhood educators can have a clear idea of suitable early childhood practices. This way they might not use inappropriate developmental and academic expectations to prepare children for public school kindergarten programs (Houser and Osborne, n.d.).

Having regulations such as the CA State licensing egulations, Title 22, helps to make sure that all of the fundamental elements of DAP and NAYEC are in place and are supporting the early childhood programs philosophies. These regulations are needed in order to make sure that quality…… [Read More]

References

Accreditation of Programs for Young Children. (n.d.). Retrieved May 12, 2010, from NAEYC

Web site:  http://www.naeyc.org/academy/ 

Bolen, Ed. (2008). Analysis of Title 22 and Title 5 Regulations Affecting Preschool Programs.

Retrieved May 12, 2010, from Web site:
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Early Childhood and Literacy

Words: 1522 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99088721

Language Development in Young Children

Early Childhood and Literacy

Language is a physical link of a child to his outside world. Language acquisition is essential for a child's social, physical and cognitive development. It plays a vital role in developing an individual who would be able to express himself adequately to his family, friends and the world around him. A vast majority of the children can develop linguistic skills effortlessly, whereas some have difficulty in developing these essential skills. They are slow to learn a language and eventually struggle with academic and literacy skills throughout their educational career. The first few years of a child's life are important and critical for their performance.

This project examines the issues related to language development in first two years of a child's life. It also discusses the importance of the language and the role linguistics play in preparing a child for his academic…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Byrne, M. (1978). Appraisal of child language acquisition. Diagnostic methods in speech pathology, 102-177.

Clark, B.A. (1991). First- and Second-Language Acquisition in childhood. Retrieved from http://ceep.crc.uiuc.edu/pubs/katzsym/clark-b.pdf

CLLRNet. (2007, June). Early Childhood Learning. Retrieved from http://www.ccl-cca.ca/pdfs/ECLKC/bulletin/ECLKCBulletinLanguage.pdf

fund, O. o. (2007). The Language of Babies, Toddlers and preschoolers. . Retrieved from http://www.ounceofprevention.org/research/pdfs/LanguageofBabies.pdf
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Education of Young Children John

Words: 626 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2363274

" [EU: I.III, 3]

Locke consistently favored the role played by parents in early childhood education for he argued that children learn best when they are exposed to knowledge from an early age by their parents. Nurturing by adults was thus an essential component of Locke's education philosophy.

However ousseau did not agree with such intervention. He felt that a child could develop his mental capacities best when allowed to use his own reason without supervision of a guide. The role of nature is more important in ousseau's education philosophy and hence he opposed Locke's views on nurturing. ousseau felt a child had the natural capacity to make sense of his surroundings, gain knowledge from it on his own and hence self-educate himself. He thus doesn't need to depend on adults but rather only on his own reasoning faculty. He thus encouraged freedom and non-habitual learning: He explained that a…… [Read More]

References

Locke, John. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Edited by Peter H. Nidditch. New York: Oxford UP, 1975.

Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. Emile, Julie and Other Writings. Edited by R.L. Archer. New York: Barron, 1964.

Rousseau, Emile, Julie and Other Writings, 80.
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An indepth analysis of Early Childhood Special Education Curriculum

Words: 9575 Length: 32 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48996400

Early Childhood Special Education Curriculum, Instruction and Methods Projects

This beginning chapter delineates education to the young children with special needs. In particular, early childhood special education mirrors impact and acclaimed practices resultant from the special education and early childhood fields. In the present, emphasis that is laid on early childhood does not encompass whether these young children can be provided with special needs service in typical settings but focus is rather on how the design of these inclusive programs can be most efficacious. Therefore, taking this into consideration, it is necessary to have early intervention for children with disabilities. However, an important element that is delineated in the chapter is that in as much as these children have special needs, they ought not to be treated in a dissimilar manner. The programs of early intervention for kids and preschoolers with special needs have to be centered on the similar…… [Read More]

References

Blackwell, W. H., & Rossetti, Z. S. (2014). The Development of Individualized Education Programs. Sage Open, 4(2), 2158244014530411.

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. (2011). Inbrief: The Science of Early Childhood Development. Retrieved from: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/index.php/resources/multimedia/videos/inbrief_series/inbrief_science_of_ecd/

Cook, R. E., Klein, M. D., Chen, D. (2012). Adapting Early Childhood Curricula for Children with Special Needs, 8th Edition. New York: Prentice Hall.

Edutopia. (2007). Smart Hearts: Social and Emotional Learning Overview. Retrieved from: http://www.edutopia.org/social-emotional-learning-overview-video
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Earlier Child

Words: 950 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20434408

Social Change and Positive Outcomes for Young Children and Families

As an individual who has been involved in learning about and enacting various measures to implement early childhood education, I have entertained several different philosophies and methodologies on this subject. Therefore, I believe that I am more than qualified to identify what the aims of early childhood education are. Prior to denoting what those aims are, I believe it is relevant to discuss some of my experience within this field, which has encompassed working with small and large groups, individuals, and partaking in a number of conferences and conversations with both teachers, administrators and parents, which is a part of "school accountability" (Wong and Wang, 2010, p. 163). What I have learned from my experience within this field is that the principle objectives of this particular discipline are to provide the foundation for children to effectively mold and shape the…… [Read More]

References

Hardin, B.J., & Hung, H.F. (2011). A cross-cultural comparison of services for young children with disabilities using the ACEI Global Guidelines Assessment (GGA). Early Childhood Education Journal, 39(2), 103-114.

Wong, M.N.C., Wang, X.C., (2010). Accountability and quality in early childhood education: Perspectives from Asia. Early Education and Development, 21(2), 163-166.

World Forum Foundation
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Education and Spiritual Development of Children

Words: 1185 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87810501

Spiritual Development of Children and Education

Ruth Wilson (2010) in the work entitled "The Spiritual Life of Children" writes that there is an expanding body of evidence which "indicates that children have spiritual capacities and experiences which shape their lives in powerful and enduring ways." (p. 24) Included in these capacities and experiences are those of: (1) wonder; (2) wondering; (3)relational spirituality; and (4) wisdom. (p. 24) It is suggested in the theories relating to development of cognition that young children do not have the necessary "intellectual capacity for meaningful reflection and thus cannot have a genuine spiritual life." (Wilson, 2010, p. 24)

In countries such as England, Australia, the United States and New Zealand there is a growth in the interest of ensuring that "spirituality is addressed within the curriculum of both primary and secondary education in both state and church related settings." (Hyde, 2008, p. 16)The National Curriculum…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Grajczonek, J. (2010) Spiritual Development and Religious Education in the Early Years: A Review of the Literature. Queensland Catholic Education Commission. Retrieved from: http://www.qcec.catholic.edu.au/upload/publicsite/Education/Final_Spiritual%20Development%20%20Religious%20Education%20in%20the%20Early%20Years_A%20Review%20of%20the%20Literature.pdf

Hyde, B. (2008) Children and Spirituality: Searching for Meaning and Connectedness. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. 15 Jan, 2008. Retrieved from: Jhttp://books.google.com/books?id=dcPuw2pwqQgC&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Myers, Joyce Eady (nd) Children's Spiritual Development: Analysis of Program Practices and Recommendations for Early Childhood Professional. Early Childhood Education.

Richardson, R. (2010) Spirituality and Education. Mills River Educational Cooperative. Italy, Jan 2010. Retrieved from:   http://www.campcaravan.org/d_about_us/ed_and_spirituality.html
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Education Training for Teachers in Technology

Words: 1274 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57526392

integration of computer technology (and especially reading software) into classrooms vis-a-vis improvement of reading development in early childhood education. For the purpose of this study, reading development includes a range of skills, including letter recognition, sound identification and basic comprehension and retrieval. The age ranged focused on in this study is birth through age eight, and is focused on a range of educational setting.

The primary source of information on this topic came from a survey of the literature, but this secondary information was supplemented by observation and surveying of two teachers with different approaches to teaching reading. The results of this observational study that I performed are somewhat inconclusive, due in large measure to the significant limitation placed on the story by the size of the group being studied.

However, while certainly more could have been learned if the sample had been larger than two (the sample had originally…… [Read More]

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Early Education

Words: 814 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42111953

Once this occurs, is when their horizons are expanded from taking this kind of focus. (Harcourt, 2012) (Howes, 2010) (Burger, 2010)

Authentic inclusion of children with varying abilities

The educator will take into account the child's abilities and will steer them in a direction that enhances them. This takes place by sparking their interest in a variety of areas. When this happens, the student will have a desire to want to learn more. (Harcourt, 2012) (Howes, 2010) (Burger, 2010)

Building parent / family relationships

Family relationships are built by working with the parents and children to create curriculum which is supporting these objectives. (Harcourt, 2012) (Howes, 2010) (Burger, 2010)

How do you think your findings on this research compare with Global Quality Guidelines?

Why is it important to be critical about the research you read, especially as it relates to the experiences of young children and families who cultures may…… [Read More]

References

Global Guidelines. (2014). World Forum Foundation. Retrieved from:  http://worldforumfoundation.org 

Burger, K. (2010). How does Early Childhood Care and education affect cognitive development? An International review of the effects of early interventions for children from different social backgrounds. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 25(2), 140-165

Harcourt, D. (2012). Standpoints on quality: Listening to children in Verona, Italy. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 37(2), 19-26

Howes, C. (2010). Culture and Child Development in Early Childhood Programs. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
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Education Childhood

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1069022

family probably feels occasional loneliness and isolation due to the parents being migrant workers. To strengthen family and community bonds in a way that respects the family's privacy, I would first approach them to offer a warm welcome gift. If the family seemed receptive to socializing and integrating with the community, then I would be able to take the relationship a step further. Otherwise, it would be wrong to assume that the family is interested in immediately engaging in social activities that are artificial, structured, and potentially of no interest to them. It is important to understand the cultural variables that are at stake too. If the family speaks different languages than the ones already spoken in our community, it might be helpful to find some way of learning about that family's language and culture. The children should be encouraged to talk about their background, their way of life, and…… [Read More]

References

National Education Association (2014). Code of ethics. Retrieved online:   http://www.nea.org/home/30442.htm  

"Twelve Principles of Child Development and Learning that Inform Practice," (n.d.). NAEYC. Retrieved online: https://www.naeyc.org/dap/12-principles-of-child-development
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Special Education & Early Childhood Special Education

Words: 1100 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30541908

SPECIAL EDUCATION & EALY CHILDHOOD

Special Education

Tasks in Special Education and Early Childhood

Defining Intellectual Disability and Degrees Thereof

Language is a powerful tool or a powerful weapon. The language used to described non-normative populations is often accompanied by a vigorous and often difficult discussion regarding what kinds of words are academically, professionally, and medically describing abnormal populations. One such term with an interesting history is the term "mental retardation." Within the recent years of the 21st century, there has been a shift away from the term mental retardation and more toward the phrase intellectual disability. The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) has been an influential party with respect to this linguistic, conceptual, and social shift. Dunlap (2009) elaborates upon the definition of mental retardation that the AAIDD proposes, stating that it is "a disability characterized by significant limitations both in intellectual functioning and in adaptive…… [Read More]

References:

Dunlap, L.L. (2009). An introduction to Early Childhood Special Education. NJ: Pearson.

Schalock, R.L., Luckasson, R.A., Shogren, K.A., Borthwick-Duffy, S., Bradley, V., Buntinx, W.H.E., Coulter, D.L., Craig, E.M., Gomex, S.C., Lachapelle, Y., Reeve, A., Snell, M.E., Spreat, S., Tasse, M.J., Thompson, J.R., Verdugo, M.A., Wehmeyer, M.L., & Yeager, M.H. (2007). The Renaming of Mental Retardation: Understanding the Change to the Term Intellectual Disability. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 45(2), 116 -- 124.

Schalock, R.L., Luckasson, R.A., Shogren, K.A., Borthwick-Duffy, S., Bradley, V., Buntinx, W.H.E., Coulter, D.L., Craig, E.M., Gomex, S.C., Lachapelle, Y., Reeve, A., Snell, M.E., Spreat, S., Tasse, M.J., Thompson, J.R., Verdugo, M.A., Wehmeyer, M.L., & Yeager, M.H. (2008). The Intellectual Disability Construct and Its relation to Human Functioning. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 46(4), 311 -- 318.
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Development in Early Childhood Play Years

Words: 954 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19394624

Early Childhood: Play Years

Early childhood is a time of rapid mental, physical and emotional growth. As children move past infancy, they begin to explore their surroundings and to build relationships with other children. Four areas of early childhood will be explored; the differences between male and female brain development, pretend play in early childhood, conflict negotiation, and the male and female approaches to relationships and problem solving.

Biology and Language

Scientists have been aware for many years that there are physical differences between the physiology of male and female brains, especially in the way that language is processed. Experts generally tend to agree that women are superior at language skills, while men are stronger in spatial skills. The reason women are better at language is because females have a larger and thicker corpus callosum, which is a bundle of neurons that connects the two hemispheres of the brain and…… [Read More]

References

Bergen, D. (2002). The role of pretend play in children's cognitive development. Early Childhood Research and Practice, 4(1), 193-483.

Block, C. (2003). Literacy difficulties: diagnosis and instruction for reading specialists and classroom teachers. (2nd ed.). Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.

Church, E. (n.d.) The importance of pretend play. Scholastic Parents. Retrieved January 30, 2010 from http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=10175

Slavin, R. (2009). Education psychology: theory and practice. New Jersey: Pearson.
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Literacy Development for Early Childhood Learners

Words: 987 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30823033

Literacy Experience

CE310 Children's Literacy

Comprehensive Early Literacy Experience

Teachers and educators are constantly faced with the need to make instructional decisions depending on their knowledge of every learner. The process entails consideration of every learner's entry point into a certain instructional experience, evaluation of the learner's experience, and constantly changing the instruction to enhance the learner's achievement. This has led to the development of different instructional measures in attempts to enhance students' achievements. A comprehensive approach to literacy instruction means that students or learners must be good readers and good writers. This approach incorporates aspects of meaning-based and skills-based techniques through two components i.e. reading and written expressive language (Neuhaus Education Center, n.d.). The benefits of this blended approach include providing students opportunities to read and write, ensure learners have direct instruction, ensures necessary skills are taught, and enables students to develop accuracy and authenticity.

Parts of the eading…… [Read More]

References

Ford, K. (n.d.). 8 Strategies for Preschool ELLs' Language and Literacy Development. Retrieved January 20, 2016, from http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/8-strategies-preschool-ells-language-and-literacy-development

Neuhaus Education Center. (n.d.). A Comprehensive Approach to Literacy Instruction. Retrieved January 20, 2016, from http://library.neuhaus.org/lessonets/comprehensive-approach-literacy-instruction

Newingham, B. (2009, October 17). Reading Workshop: What it Looks Like in My Classroom. Retrieved January 20, 2016, from http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top_teaching/2009/10/reading-workshop
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Effects on Poverty of Young Families Children and Early Childhood Field

Words: 853 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68472239

ising Poverty in the Nation's Young Families

My goal is to make a positive change in the lives of young children, families, and the early childhood field by targeting childhood poverty.

Concepts

Poverty is increasing most rapidly in families with young children. While poverty only rose by 1.3% in the childless 30-64 age bracket, it rose by nearly 8% in families with a head under 30 years old with one or more children in the home (Sum, 2011). In fact, young families with children are more than six times as likely to be impoverished as older families (Sum, 2011). This marks a shift in communities at-risk for poverty, from the elderly to children (Sum, 2011). In addition, this wealth disparity is not only visible among the impoverished. "By 2010, slightly more than one-third of the nation's young families were poor or near poor, up by nearly 10 percentage points from…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2013). Effects of poverty, hunger, and homelessness on children and youth. Retrieved October 2, 2013 from: http://www.apa.org/pi/families/poverty.aspx

Engle, P. & Black, M. (2008). The effect of poverty on child development and educational outcomes. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1136, 243-256. Retrieved October 2, 2013 from Digital Commons website: http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1002&context=psycd_fac

Salopek, J. (2010). Homelessness: Creating a welcoming classroom for homeless students.

Association for Staff and Curriculum Development, 52(6).
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Planning and Implementing Early Childhood Assessment

Words: 2704 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95492768

EC Assessment & Intervention

Mission Statement

Partial Portfolio

Background Information elated to Diagnostic Test

Diagnostic Test -- Developmental Area of Concern

At the Playground.

At Home.

Developmentally Appropriate Instructional Goals

Cognitive Instructional Goal

Motor Instructional Goal

Physical Instructional Goal

Language Instructional Goal

Mission Statement

The purpose of early childhood assessment is to document the present status of the child with regard to developmental milestones and to identify any developmental areas that require follow-up assessment or follow-along. Assessment of very young children needs to be integral to their daily activities. Children change very rapidly and it is too easy to assume that they have reached developmental milestones in all areas: marked development in one area can distract caregivers and therapists from a deficit or an area in which development is occurring at a slower rate than typical. ecording the developmental progress of children is not an onerous task if it is…… [Read More]

References

____. (2010, May). Developmental Checklists Birth to Five, The Early Childhood Direction Center. ASQ-SE-Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. Retrieved http://ecdc.syr.edu/wpcontent/uploads/2013/01/Developmental_checklists_Updated2012.pdf

____. (2014). The HighScope Difference. HighScope. Retreived  http://www.highscope.org/ 

Vygotsky, L.S. (1987). Thinking and speech. In R.W. Rieber & A.S. Carton (Eds.), The collected works of L.S. Vygotsky, Volume 1: Problems of general psychology (pp. 39 -- 285). New York: Plenum Press. (Original work published 1934.) Retreived  http://www.simplypsychology.org/vygotsky.html
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Common issues during early childhood

Words: 1399 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42630316

Child Psychology

The author of this brief report has been asked to answer a number of questions relating to child psychology and the development thereof as a child ages and grows. The primary source of answers that shall be used for the answers shall be the tenth chapter of the Berger book. However, the text itself offers other sources and there is a wealth of information on the topics to be discussed in the scholarly sphere. While every child is different and thus develops in their own way, there are tried and true patterns and standards that most children are held to based on the development and progress of millions of prior children.

Emotional development is indeed something that is very strong and in motion when it comes to the early childhood time. As a young child grows, this is when their emotional regulation comes into focus and this in…… [Read More]

References

Berger, K. (2012). The developing person through childhood. New York: Worth Publishers.

Enright, T. (2015). Encouraging Your Child's Socio-Dramatic Play. Child Development Institute. Retrieved 23 October 2016, from https://childdevelopmentinfo.com/child-activities/encouraging-your-childs-socio-dramatic-play/

McLeod, S. (2016). Psychosexual Stages - Simply Psychology. Simplypsychology.org. Retrieved 23 October 2016, from http://www.simplypsychology.org/psychosexual.html

Snow, K. (2016). Bullying in Early Childhood - National Association for the Education of Young Children - NAEYC. Naeyc.org. Retrieved 23 October 2016, from http://www.naeyc.org/blogs/bullying-early-childhood
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Education Theories Knowledge of Learning

Words: 3781 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93366223



Dr. Frank Pajares, writing in Reading and riting Quarterly (Pajares 2003), points out that in his view of Bandura's social learning theory, individuals are believed to possess "self-beliefs that enable them to exercise a measure of control over their thoughts, feelings, and actions."

As has been mentioned earlier in this paper, but put a slightly different way by Pajares ("Self-Efficacy Beliefs, Motivation, and Achievement in riting: A Review of the Literature") based on Bandura, behaviorists can better predict what individuals are capable of based on "their beliefs about their capabilities" than by what they are actually capable of accomplishing.

This aspect of self-efficacy carries over into a student's writing abilities; and a writer with a "strong sense of confidence" may excel while writing an essay because there will be less apprehension over the quality of what the writer is trying to express. The writer may have some doubts about whether…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brandon, Thomas H.; Herzog, Thaddeus a.; Irvin, Jennifer E.; & Gwaltney, Chad J. (2004).

Cognitive and social learning models of drug dependence; implications for the assessment of Tobacco dependence in adolescents. Addiction, 99(1), 51-77.

Center on English Learning and Achievement. (2002). Scaffolding Student Performance of New and Difficult Tasks. Retrieved March 10, 2007, at http://cela.albany.edu/newslet/fall02/scaffolding.htm.

Demant, Meagan S, & Yates, Gregory C.R. (2003). Primary Teachers' Attitudes Toward the Direct Instruction Construct. Educational Psychology, 23(5), 483-489.
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Education Is Important Aspect and

Words: 1235 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55624359

This task can be performed with the support of animated movies. The teacher can introduce a certain character within the documentary, and seek the participation of the students for understanding of the traits and behavior of the particular character, and at the end of the day; the teacher can relate those traits with the essence of moral and ethical values. (Aristotle: (http://www.infed.org/thinkers/et-arist.htm)

It is also important that the rights of the teachers are protected, and this can be achieved only if the teachers under their limited capacity are able to make and understand the students their importance and significance, not only within the premises of the school, but also in the society. This is an important aspect that has to be handled and treated with due diligence, because unless the teacher is successful in making their students respect them, it will be difficult to communicate and teach the students, otherwise.…… [Read More]

References

Margot Kaplan-Sanoff, Renee Yablans. Exploring Early Childhood: readings in theory and practice. 1963. Collier Macmillan. pp.63

Robert James Havighurst, Hilda Taba, University of Chicago Committee on Human Development. Adolescent Character and Personality. 1986. University Publications. pp.54

California Committee for the Study of Education Subcommittee on the Development of Moral and Spiritual Values in the Schools. Developing Moral-spiritual Values in the Schools. 1957. University Publications. pp.254

John R. Meyer, Brian Burnham, John Cholvat. Values education: theory, practice, problems, prospects. 1979. Longman. pp.54
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Education Factors Relating to the

Words: 5961 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66368684

According to a British Study conducted on all students born in the first week of March 1958, and following them through adolescence and on until the age of twenty-three:

There were no average differences between grouped and ungrouped schools because within the grouped schools, high-group students performed better than similar students in ungrouped schools, but low-group students did worse. Students in remedial classes performed especially poorly compared to ungrouped students with similar family backgrounds and initial achievement. With low-group losses offsetting high-group gains, the effects on productivity were about zero, but the impact on inequality was substantial." (Gamoran 1992)

As Gamoran points out, grouping or "tracking" tended to accentuate a student's skills or lack thereof. High-ability students benefited from segregation, but low-ability students did even worse than before. And while low-ability pupils received no benefit whatsoever from the tracking system, neither did their schools. The net gain in performance among…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000952855

Barth, R.S. (2001). Teacher Leader. Phi Delta Kappan, 82(6), 443.

Brown Center on Education Policy, the Brookings Institution. (2000). "Part 2: A Closer Look at Mathematics Achievement." How Well are American Students Learning? Brown Center Report on American Education: 2000.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104861000
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Early Morning Business

Words: 908 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98138478

Early Child Learning

What is the basic meaning of the term data-supported (or data driven) instruction?

The basic meaning of the term data-supported instruction is that individuals should utilize practices that are supported by data as the foundation for their teaching methods to use with students. There are a number of different teaching methodologies that one can employ that are either corroborated or unsubstantiated by quantifiable data. Data-driven instruction is largely based on analytics and various forms of analyzing data. Many of these different forms are based on statistics. However, the point of these analytics is that instructors can actually determine -- in advance to using them in their own classrooms -- best practices for teaching that are demonstrable due to findings that are rooted in data. As such, there is less need to rely on instinct and it is becoming mor readily available to utilize data to influence any…… [Read More]

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Education for Hispanic Students in

Words: 1774 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66130596

colostate.edu/guides/research/casestudy/pop2a.cfm.

3. Hispanic, White Communities Forge Ties in Alabama (2003) a UA Center for Public Television and Radi9o Production. Online available at:

4. McDade, Sharon a. (2002) Definition of a Case Study. Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning - North Carolina State. Online available at http://www.ncsu.Edu/fctl/Programs/Instructional- Development/Teaching _Materials / CaseStudies/Materials / Case studyDefintion.pdf# search =%22 CASE%20STUDY % 3A%20DEFINIT ION%20OF %22.

5. UAB Wins $389,000 in Grants to Help Teachers Educate Non-English Speaking Children (200) UAB Media Relations. 27 Nov 200. Online available at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=46333.

6. English Language Development and Multicultural Education (2005) University of Alabama. Berkeley University Online available at http://crede.berkeley.edu/tools/directory2-/PDF/esl.pdf#search=%22Alabama%3A%20Elementary%20ESL%20SERVICES%22.

7. English as a Second Language (ESL) (2004) Baldwin County Public Schools; Bay Minette, Alabama. Online available at http://www.bcbe.org/Default.asp?DivisionID='824'&DepartmentID='958'.

8. UAB Wins $389,000 in Grants to Help Teachers Educate Non-English Speaking Children (200) UAB Media Relations. 27 Nov 200. Online available at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=46333.

9. Alabama (2006) KYTESOL Newsletter Vol.…… [Read More]

11. Alabama: Featured Facts (2005) From the SREB Factbook on Higher Education. Online available at http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:Mb3MWbM-0b4J:www.sreb.org/main/EdData/FactBook/2005StateReports/Alabama05.pdf+Alabama+Hispanic+education&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=6

12. Alabama Education Policy Primer: Chapter 2 Achievement (2005) Education Foundation - Online available at; http://www.aplusala.org/primer/ch2.asp

Education for Hispanic Students in the Elementary Schools of Alabama
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Education No Child Left Behind

Words: 1716 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55968121

What works for one child is not necessarily going to work for the next. So how can one promote the use of standardized tests as the only way to measure educational learning and success? The premise of the No Child Left Behind Act is very honorable. Each child should be taught by the best teachers that there are and each school should be held accountable for making sure that this occurs. But the measuring device that this act relies on is faulty. It places so much emphasis on the scores of the tests that all of the other educational ideas are being lost among the numbers.

eferences

Beveridge, Tina. (2010). No Child Left Behind and Fine Arts Classes. Arts Education Policy

eview. 111(1), p4-7.

Caillier, James. (2010). Paying Teachers According to Student Achievement: Questions

egarding Pay-for-Performance Models in Public Education. Clearing House. 83(2),

p58-61.

Derthick, Martha and Dunn, Joshua M.…… [Read More]

References

Beveridge, Tina. (2010). No Child Left Behind and Fine Arts Classes. Arts Education Policy

Review. 111(1), p4-7.

Caillier, James. (2010). Paying Teachers According to Student Achievement: Questions

Regarding Pay-for-Performance Models in Public Education. Clearing House. 83(2),
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Early Childhood Reading Education

Words: 922 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36866626

common core state standards are a set of standards that have been adopted for K-12. States have the ability to adopt the federal CCSS. The CCSS intended to provide new expectations for each grade level.

There are a number of different instructional approaches for language. Meaning-based approaches are based on the idea that children learn about literacy mainly through activities, interaction and observation, with little need for formal education. Skills-based approaches are those rooted in five core skills that are related to literacy: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension, and fluency. Students learn to read by learning skills related to these elements. The blended approach combines the two, where teachers help the students to build on the base that they acquire via the meaning-based approach.

Meaning-based and skills-based perspectives need to be interwoven to provide effective preschool and elementary school education. There are several traits of effective teachers that go along…… [Read More]

Reference

Christie, J., Enz, B., Vukelich, C., & Roskos, K. (2013). Teaching language and literacy: Preschool through the elementary grades, fifth edition. Pearson.
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Education - NCLB Problems Reconsidering

Words: 3693 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51968001



Fifth, the NCLB is devoid of any meaningful consequences for failing to achieve federal objectives other than the publication of such failures in conjunction with the rights of parents to request transfers of their children to better-performing academic institutions (Darling-Hammond 2004). Critics have suggested that the most likely result of enforcement of such limited consequences for noncompliance is the overcrowding of institutions who fulfill the federal requirements to their detriment by virtue of diminution in their ability to meet the educational needs of increased enrollment of low-achieving students (Sonnenblick 2008). Likewise, the NCLB Act authorizes increased federal funding of home schooling and for-profit institutions that further reduces necessary funds to public institutions.

Sixth, whereas George H. Bush articulated the connection between adequate nutrition and access to healthcare and preparedness to learn in school, the NCLB Act ignores this element entirely. Many critics and career educators believe that any proposed educational…… [Read More]

References

Adams, D. & Hamm, M. (1994). New Designs for Teaching and Learning: Promoting Active Learning in Tomorrow's Schools. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Caillier, J. (2007) No Child Left Behind Act: Are States on Target to Make Their Goals?; Journal of Negro Education, Fall 2007 Issue. Retrieved June 26, 2008, at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3626/is_200710/ai_n25139930/pg_10

Crawford, J. (2004) No Child Left Behind: Misguided Approach to School Accountability for English Language Learners. National Association for Bilingual Education. Retrieved June 26, 2008, at http://www.nabe.org/documents/policy_legislation/NABE_on_NCLB.pdf

Darling-Hammond, L. (2004) NCLB Implementation Challenges: The Local Superintendent's View; Peabody Journal of Education, 80, 156-169. Forgary, R. (1997) Brain Compatible Classrooms. Andover, MA: Skylight Publishing.
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Education Can Urban Inner City Regular

Words: 3366 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10018193

Transitions occur in many different educational, societal, and familial situations. Among the more common situations where problems of adjustment might be encountered are changing from one school to another, a change in grades, the shift to regular participation in afterschool programs and childcare, and going from school (non- special education) into the workplace.

(Taylor & Adelman, 2003, p. 122) Various programs have been devised, and services provided, that meet each of these import transitional needs. Children with emotional or behavioral disorders may be as much in need of transition services and programs as those challenged by physical or cognitive disabilities. Children with such conditions are frequently moved from school to school, or form program to program, either through the actions of their own families, or in an attempt to find the right form of treatment for the difficulties they face. These constant changes may, in and of themselves, result in…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002099972

Benz, M.R., Lindstrom, L., Unruh, D., & Waintrup, M. (2004). Sustaining Secondary Transition Programs in Local Schools. Remedial and Special Education, 25(1), 39+.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000731321

Field, S., & Hoffman, a. (2002). Lessons Learned from Implementing the Steps to Self-Determination Curriculum. Remedial and Special Education, 23(2), 90+.
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Education Project Proposal Nursing

Words: 1712 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41691571

Education Project Proposal (Nursing)

This study is intended to educate the patients (within the age group of 8-12) about the post operative treatment approaches and to prepare them to face the situation. As the main audience is the pediatric patients who have gone trough a kidney transplant, we will focus on the recovery issues with respect to this audience. This study will help these patients to learn about the general issues related to recovery of their wounds, the nutrition they are supposed to adopt during the recovery stage and the physical activity that is expected to be maintained by them. This educational activity is important for the patients because a thorough understanding of the recovery process is very important for the patient.

With an understanding of the process the patient will be able to cooperate with the nursing staff and will more actively participate in the process. From this program,…… [Read More]

References

Barbara A. Nilsen: Week by Week: Plans for Observing and Recording Young Children: Delmar Learning, January 1997

Evelyn A. Petersen: Practical Guide to Early Childhood Planning, Methods and Materials, A: The What, Why and How of Lesson Plans: Allyn & Bacon, November 1995

Linda M. Bambara & Tim Knoster: Designing Positive Behavior Support Plans: Amer Assn Mental Retardation: January 1998

Barbara Stevens Barnum: Teaching Nursing in the Era of Managed Care: Springer Publication Company, March 1999
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Education Politics Factors That Mitigate

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36907660

2009).

his is largely due to the eating patterns established in poverty; lack of food during childhood has the tendency to increase over-eating when food is available, and instills a strong compulsion to avoid food insecurities in adulthood, leading to unhealthy eating habits (Olson et al. 2007). Such habits obviously cause health deterioration, which limits productivity and creates bigger expenses, and so assists in the intergenerational perpetuation of poverty and the likely creation of similar or related issues in the children of the adult overeaters. his also ties into other social factors of adult life that stem from issues related to childhood poverty.

Employment in adulthood can be heavily affected by poverty in childhood, as noted above. here are several complex and interrelated ways in which this can occur. First, there is a strong indication that childhood poverty creates a pattern of psychological stress that becomes all but inescapable in…… [Read More]

This is largely due to the eating patterns established in poverty; lack of food during childhood has the tendency to increase over-eating when food is available, and instills a strong compulsion to avoid food insecurities in adulthood, leading to unhealthy eating habits (Olson et al. 2007). Such habits obviously cause health deterioration, which limits productivity and creates bigger expenses, and so assists in the intergenerational perpetuation of poverty and the likely creation of similar or related issues in the children of the adult overeaters. This also ties into other social factors of adult life that stem from issues related to childhood poverty.

Employment in adulthood can be heavily affected by poverty in childhood, as noted above. There are several complex and interrelated ways in which this can occur. First, there is a strong indication that childhood poverty creates a pattern of psychological stress that becomes all but inescapable in adulthood (Evans & Kim 2007). The prolonged stress that this can lead to has been linked to many health problems, like any other form of prolonged stress, but the cumulative effects of continued conditions of poverty often exacerbate the problem still further (Evans & Kim 2007). It can even lead to a lack of ability to fully regulate stress, and this leads to many issues in the employment world, including memory issues, the ability to handle work-related stress including deadlines and other common features of modern jobs, which simply leads to more stress and again, reduced productivity (Evans & Schamberg 2009). The problems of childhood poverty easily become self-perpetuating due to the reduced productivity of adults that grew up in poverty.

This is not merely evidenced from a medical and psychological perspective, but by direct economic research as well. Writing in the New York Times, Eckholm (2007) details recent findings that adults who were raised in poverty not only end up less productive, but typically also have higher costs associated with health problems and other issues. Intervention, then, must occur early and must come form an outside source if the cycle is to be broken. It is, of course, unfortunately impractical to think that poverty could simply be alleviated, but there are ways to mitigate the effects of childhood poverty so that they are not as exposed to risks either in childhood or in adulthood, giving greater
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Early Childhood Dynamics

Words: 548 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92603023

children whose parents are alcoholics shows those children are at risk for many problems, and that is of great interest to me. It is a very worthy bit of research because it has to do with alcohol abuse and how that condition impacts the ability of children to lead normal healthy lives.

a) The article references the issues children experience when their parents are alcoholics including "…socioemotional" and "behavioral" problems (Edwards, et al., 2006, 409).

b) Edwards, P.E., Eiden, R.D., Colder, C., and Leonard, K.E. (2006). The Development of Aggression in 18 to 48-Month-old Children of Alcoholic Parents. Journal of Abnormal

Child Psychology, 54(3), 409-423.

Part TWO -- Article Summary

ONE: Introduction

This research paper zeros in on the problems that children have whose parents are alcoholics. The study involved 226 families. While it comes as no surprise that children whose parents are alcoholics have problems adjusting to life and…… [Read More]

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Designing an Early Years Learning Framework for

Words: 1503 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91225801

Designing an Early Years Learning Framework for Kindergarten and Preprimary Pupils

The Australian Government's Department of Education, Employment and Workplace elations has launched an Early Years Learning Framework initiative that is designed to facilitate universal access to early childhood education resources. The initiative has been incorporated in the National Quality Standard in an effort to ensure consistent delivery of high quality educational services to young learners across the country. The Early Years Learning Framework initiative is also explicit in its guidelines concerning the need for respect of children from diverse and Indigenous backgrounds. This paper uses the Early Years Learning Framework to describe a literacy rich learning environment for kindergarten to preprimary year pupils that draws on Boori Monty Pryor and Jan Ormerod's children's book, Shake a Leg. A description of the learning environment is followed by a discussion concerning how the learning experience engages young learners to draw on…… [Read More]

References

Elliott, S. & Berlach, R.G. (2010, January-December). Conceptualizing planning in kindergarten

and preprimary settings: An exploratory study with preservice teachers. Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue, 12(1-2), 67-71.

Murray, J. & Bamblett, L. (2011, Spring). Shake a leg. Australian Aboriginal Studies, 1, 113-115.

Pryor, B.M. & Ormerod, J. (2010). Shake a leg. London: Allen & Unwin.
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Progressive Education Philosophy

Words: 1369 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93517775

Education

In the U.S. The conflict between progressive and traditional education has been going on for over 100 years, and E.D. Hirsch and John Dewey are polar opposites in this pedagogical and philosophical conflict. Dewey was indeed a support of the Left in politics who wanted the U.S. To become a social democracy and move away from more traditional conservative ideas. He thought that democratic socialism would be the wave of the future in urban, industrial society, and that the traditional education system was not preparing students to participate as active citizens in this new society. It was rigid, authoritarian and hierarchical, with teachers acting like dictators in the classroom and often dispensing plenty of corporal punishment. ather than follow a rigid, old-fashioned curriculum, the teacher had to allow students to participate in designing lessons that were relevant to their lives and experiences. Only this way could the public schools…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Dworkin, M.S. (1961). Dewey on Education. Classics in Education No.3.

Dewey, J. (1938/1997). Experience and Education. Macmillan.

Hirsch. E.D. (1996). The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them. Doubleday.

Fernandez, R. (2003). Mappers of Society: The Lives, Times and Legacies of Great Sociologists. Praeger.
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Developing a Personal Philosophy of Inclusion for Young Children Special Education

Words: 592 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7677535

Belief Statement

Developing A Personal Philosophy Of Inclusion For Young Children, Special Education

Inclusion: Early childhood education

Belief statements

I believe that every child has a right to an education. This education must be adapted to every child's individual needs. These needs encompass a wide range of biological, sociological, and psychological differences. Although every child is entitled to an equal education, giving every child the same education is not the same thing as equality. For a child who is blind, it is necessary that the child have access to a talking book or Braille to enable him or her to comprehend the same material as his or her peers. Similarly, a child who is dyslexic or has a sensory processing disorder requires additional support to keep up with other students.

I believe that teachers must be flexible when dealing with children. Teaching is more than simply writing out a lesson…… [Read More]

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Offering Pre K Education for All

Words: 413 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27011280

Universal Preschool Education

Importance of Universal Preschool Education

Many countries including the US and the UK consider the provision of universal preschool education an aspect that should be adopted for better social and economic development. The preschool education entails the government funding educational programs for all children who are below six years of age. The increased need for this provision is highly attributed to the rapid globalization where countries perceive education as the cornerstone for their development (Swiniarski, 2007). Some scholars argue that providing the education does not add any good to the society due to the limited time that children have in bonding with their parents and community and developing the necessary social skills. However, I believe that preschool education is necessary and all countries should adopt.

Providing preschool education contributes to their social and learning development (Swiniarski, 2007). In this case, children are introduced earlier to the learning…… [Read More]

References

Doggett, L., & Wat, A. (2010). Why PreK for All?. Phi Delta Kappan, 92(3), 8-11.

Hustedt, J. T., Barnett, W. S., Jung, K., & Figueras, A. (2008). Impacts of New Mexico PreK on children's school readiness at kindergarten entry: Results from the second year of a growing initiative. National Institute for Early Education Research, Rutgers University.

Swiniarski, L. B. (2007). Starting school early in Britain: A model for universal preschool education. Early Childhood Education Journal, 35(1), 19-24.
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Increasing Number of Students in Special Education

Words: 10876 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30150873

Special Education

Since the introduction of PL-142 the Special education system has received both praise and criticism. Special Education Programs are an essential component to our educational system. The current special education system has aided many people but improvements are desperately needed as rates of enrollment increase and the number of special education teachers' decrease. The growth in the number of special education students is the topic of conversation among educators all across the country.

The purpose of this investigation is to discuss the increase in the American special education population. We will discuss the factors that have contributed to the increase including; the effect of PL-142 on the growth of the special education population early identification of special needs, the additional conditions that qualify students for special education, the placement of low achieving students in special education programs, accountability reforms, pressure from parents, the disproportionate amount of minorities that…… [Read More]

References

Digest of Education Statistics. (2001) U.S. Department of Education.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=5001314786

Educators Should Require Evidence. (1999). Phi Delta Kappan, 81(2), 132. Retrieved May 30, 2003, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Presidents Commision on Revitalizing Special Education. 2002. United States Department of Education. Retrieved May 28, 2003, from.  http://www.ldonline.org/ld_indepth/assessment/Pres_Rep.pdf
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New York State Education Department's

Words: 3703 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99623760

Based on these findings, a number of assessment tools are used to evaluate students' abilities and the most appropriate level of participation in general educational settings (A Parent's Guide, 2002).

Early childhood education programs in District 75 have been affected by other federal mandates, including the Governmental Performance eporting Act (GPA) and the Program Assessment ating Tool (PAT); both of these initiatives require that all federal programs (e.g., Head Start, childcare, and programs for children with disabilities) must provide performance data concerning the progress that has been made toward meeting the goals of the program, which in turn are used to formulate federal budget allocations (ous et al., 2007). Current performance data for District 75 is presented at Appendix A.

Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP). In those cases where the District 75 assessment committee finds that children require services and a special education setting, they are provided with an Individualized…… [Read More]

References

About us. (2011). New York City Department of Education. Retrieved from http://schools.nyc.

gov/AboutUs/funding/overview/default.htm.

Annual yearly progress. (2011). New York State Department of Education. Retrieved from   http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/ spp/2011/ind3.htm .

Boettcher, J.V. (2008). Finding their voice: Via an online debate program that models the use of technology to foster collaboration, special needs students are discovering a thing some doubted they had-potential THE Journal, 35(3), 28-30.
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Rethinking Curriculum in Education for

Words: 3030 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73299583

253). Based on their review of 20 existing education for sustainability initiatives, Ferreira and her associates identified three primary models that exist along a continuum from local to more broad-based approaches as follows:

1. Collaborative esource Development and Adaptation model: This model seeks to bring about change through the development and adaptation of high quality curriculum and pedagogy resources. It does not usually seek to bring about change across a whole teacher education system;

2. Action esearch model: This model aims to build capacity by engaging the initiative participants in a 'deep' process of reflective action. This model thus targets change at the practitioner and institutional level; and,

3. Whole-of-System model: This is a radically different model from the other two in that it seeks change in a multi-faceted and system-wide manner (2007, p. 46).

An analysis of these three models by Ferreira et al. showed that while each model…… [Read More]

References

Companion, M., Laurie, J. & Shaw, G. (2002, Summer). Education for sustainability: an ecological approach. Green Teacher, 68, 6-7.

Davies, J., Engdahl, I., Otieno, L., Pramling-Samuelson, I., Siraj-Blatchford, J. & Vallabh

(2009). Early childhood education for sustainability: Recommendations for development.

International Journal of Early Childhood, 41(2), 113-115.
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Culturally Sensitive Education as Change

Words: 3626 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71078302

This emphasis will build culturally sensitive curriculum. (Oakes, Quartz, yan & Lipton, 2000, p. 77) Though the importance of cultural identity, and even the dreaded sources of nationalism, such as independent cultural identity and linguistic heritage must not be ignored in an attempt to universalize education. With some of the world's most influential organizations in a serious bid to establish universal education the goals of the economists may be essentially answered, but educators must take care to make sure that universalization does not include an element of whitewashing that reduces the importance of individual cultural/linguistic heritage.

A directly related to the world's economic needs. Education and the global economy are envisioned as having an interdependent relationship. Competition in the global economy is dependent on the quality of education, whereas the goals of education are dependent on the economy. Under these circumstances, education changes as the requirements of the economy change.…… [Read More]

References

Anicich, Maggie; Kirk, Rea. (1999) "Cultural Awareness Education in Early Childhood Education.." 14 pp. (ED433928) at http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&an=ED433928&loginpage=reflogin.asp&site=ehost-live.

Darder, a. (2002). Reinventing Paulo Freire: A Pedagogy of Love. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Freire, P. Ramos, M.B. (2000). Pedagogy of the Oppressed. 30-year anniversary Edition. New York, NY: Continuum International.

Giroux, H.A. (1981). Ideology, Culture and the Process of Schooling. Philadelphia: PA: Temple Press.
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Pedagogical Affordance ICT and Education

Words: 3338 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15351055

This perspective suggests the necessity of distinguishing between the intended use (and real affordances) of an object and its perceived affordances. For instance, affordances presented by a knife are defined by the individual who uses it, not necessarily by its designer. More specifically, although a designer envisaged the knife as a cutting tool, the user might not utilize the knife for cutting. While Gibson (1979) suggests that the knife does not have any affordance on its own, except when an individual has attributed a meaning to it, Norman suggests that the designer's real or intended affordance for the knife was for cutting purposes. Although there are debates in the field of ecological psychology about the nature of affordances (distinction and overlays between intended and perceived affordances), affordance perspectives are a crucial area in the study of usability (Sadler & Given, 2007).

3. Pedagogical Affordance and ICT

Peter and osamund (2005)…… [Read More]

References

American Library Association 2006. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. Retrieved on December 27, 2011, from http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm

American Library Association 2007. Intro to Info Lit. Retrieved on December 27, 2011, from http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlissues/acrlinfolit/infolitoverview/introtoinfolit/introinfolit.cfm

Barrett, A. 2005. The Information-Seeking Habits of Graduate Student Researchers in the Humanities. Journal of academic librarianship, 31(4), 324-331.

Beile O'Neil, P.M. 2005. Development and validation of the Beile Test of Information Literacy for Education (B-TILED). Doctoral dissertation, University of Central Florida, Florida, United States. Retrieved December 27, 2011, from ProQuest Digital Dissertations database. (Publication No. AAT 3193465).
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Special Education Concepts the Concept

Words: 545 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6625695

As the civil rights victories of the Civil Rights era develop in ways that help shape the long-term social culture of the nation, cultural diversity considerations are becoming the standard rather than the exemplary exception to the routine as may have been true throughout much of the last decades of the 20th century. Naturally, as cultural diversity becomes a dominant social theme, it has also impacted all aspects of American education, including special education (Burton, Moore, & Magliaro, 2004; Lascarides & Hinitz, 2000). Naturally, the important need of accommodating cultural diversity within special education programs is at least as important as achieving that objective in traditional education programs. That is because the detrimental effect of every additional barrier to learning and social development is magnified in special education.

Likewise, cultural diversity also entails corresponding lingual diversity. In that regard, the importance of mitigating the potential barriers represented by language issues…… [Read More]

Sources Consulted

Brehony, K. "Montessori, individual work and individuality in the elementary school classroom" History of Education; Vol. 29, No. 2; (2000): 115-128.

Burton, J., Moore, D., and Magliaro, S. (2004). Behaviorism and Instructional

Technology. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Lascarides, V. And Hinitz, B. (2000). History of Early Childhood Education. New York:
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Socio Dramatic Play in Early

Words: 2354 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5953260

At the same time, the pet shop influence should also be measured in terms of who takes the lead and who comes with the new play ideas.

3) the children will be placed in an environment where they can be exposed to elements from reality that can easily be taken into their dramatic play. One will favor elements to which children are susceptible at this age: puppets, dogs and pets in general, cartoons characters etc. Most likely, the best choice is something that will contain both a puppet theater (especially since puppets are inanimate objects) and a pet shop, due to the behavior of children with pets and the capacity to analyze how they will be integrating both the animals and the actual pet shop activity into their dramatic play.

4) the trips to the puppet theater and the pet shop will not be done during the same day. For…… [Read More]

References

Berk, L.E., and a. Winsler. 1995. Scaffolding children's learning: Vygotsky and early education. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children

Byrne, M., K. Deerr, and L.G. Kropp. 2003. Book a play date: The game of promoting emergent literacy. American Libraries 34(8): 42-44

Dickinson, David K., & Tabors, Patton O. (2001). Beginning literacy with language. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

Katz, Jane R. (2001). Playing at home: The talk of pretend play. In David K. Dickinson & Patton O. Tabors (Eds.), Beginning literacy with language (pp. 53-74). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes
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Primary Education

Words: 2786 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76056487

Managing the Transition of Starting Primary School in England - Policies and Practices

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Education for the English child is compulsory from the age of five through the age of sixteen. This compulsory primary education consists of two cycles (i.e., 'stages') which are identified as key stages.

Key stage 1 includes children in Years 1 and 2 of compulsory education (ages five to seven), and key stage 2 includes children in Years 3, 4, 5, and 6 (ages seven to eleven).

Throughout England, these key stages are the same; regardless the local school's organization or transfer ages.

Curriculum Format

The statutory requirements of the compulsory National Curriculum are laid down by central government, via the Department for Education and Skills (DfES). Generally, all publicly-funded primary schools must provide the National Curriculum to their students.

The National Curriculum does not, however, constitute the whole curriculum for schools, even though it…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, Karl L., Doris R. Entwisle, and Susan L. Dauber. 1994. On the Success of Failure: A Reassessment of the Effects of Retention in the Primary Grades. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Alexander, Karl L., Doris R. Entwisle, and Susan L. Dauber. 1996. "Children in Motion: School Transfers and Elementary School Performance." Journal of Educational Research 90:3-12.

Baker, David P. And David L. Stevenson. 1986. "Mothers' Strategies for Children's School Achievement: Managing the Transition to High School." Sociology of Education 59:156-166.

Catterall, James S. 1998. "Risk and Resilience in Student Transitions to High School." American Journal of Education 106:302-333.
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Culture and Community Impact on Education Language

Words: 1093 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66260055

nation continues to grow in diversity, our education system will have to deal with problems associated with language and cultural differences. The purpose of this discussion is to analyze the impact of language, culture and community on education. The main focus of our analysis will be the importance of a common language in the classroom. e will begin our discussion by providing the definition of language.

Defining Language

According to the American Heritage Dictionary, language is defined as the "Communication of thoughts and feelings through a system of arbitrary signals, such as voice sounds, gestures, or written symbols." (The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language) Language can be share amongst people in a particular culture, ethnic group or people that are members of the same generation. Language allows individuals to express their thoughts and feelings and is essential to success in academics.

Importance of Common Language in the Classroom…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition

Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Bata et al. 1999. "Creating Crisis": How California Teaching Policies Aggravate Racial Inequality in Public Schools." June 18, 2003. Applied Research Center. http://www.arc.org/Pages/ECC_print.html