Ecology Essays Examples

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Are There Keystone Species in Information Ecologies That Might Affect Knowledge Management Processes

Words: 1504 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61951133

Keystone Species

In mid-1800's, telegraphy was invented. This invention was revolutionary because it decreased all the hurdles in communication of information. This type of invention or any innovations that connects two or more people and acts as a survival tool for a particular group i.e. ethnic or technological group is known as Keystone specie. Even though Specie is a term mostly used for living organisms, here in a larger context keystone specie is referred to as "a system of people, practices, values, and technologies" that is essential for the survival of anything. (Johnson, 2010)

The keystone species concept has been a mainstay of the ecological and conservation biology literature since its introduction by UW zoology professor Robert T. Paine in 1969. His seminal paper extended the conclusions of a field experiment published three years earlier. The research resulting in the keystone species concept was done on Makah Tribal lands on the outer coast of Washington State, with the Makahs' permission. It involved the sustained removal of a single predator species over a three-year interval and documentation of the resultant changes. (Keystone Species Hypothesis, 1996)

The result was the same as expected, other species slowly died out as a result of…… [Read More]

Sources:
Johnson, S. (2010). Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation. London: Penguins Books Ltd.

Keystone Species Hypothesis. (1996). Retrieved September 24, 2011, from washington.edu:  http://www.washington.edu/research/pathbreakers/1969g.html 
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Georgia's Environment the Ecologies and Environment From

Words: 803 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96262053

Georgia's Environment

The ecologies and environment: From the Atlantic Ocean to the Appalachian Plateau, Georgia is a very diverse state in terms of its ecology and geography. The state is the largest east of the Mississippi River, and its elevation ranges from sea level to more than 4,700 feet. The New Georgia Encyclopedia reports that there are five distinct "physiographic provinces" in Georgia: the Blue Ridge, the Piedmont, the Appalachian Plateau, the Ridge and Valley, and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. In the extreme northwestern part of the state, the Appalachian Plateau has historically been a region where mining has taken place. That Appalachian Plateau actually connects some parts of Georgia with Tennessee and eastern Alabama.

The cities in Georgia are located in the Piedmont region, which is highly industrialized, and includes the sprawling megalopolis of Atlanta. The "fall line" in Georgia is the place where the coastal plain meets the Piedmont; rivers and streams that flow across the "fall line" create waterfalls. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources reports that about 60% of Georgia is "heavily forested" (mostly pine trees) and hence, the state leads all states east of the Mississippi in lumber production. About 74.4% of the turpentine and…… [Read More]

Sources:
Baxter, Tom. (2012). Georgia becomes Ground Zero for energy, environmental issues. Atlanta Business Chronicle. Retrieved March 3, 2012, from  http://saportareport.com .

Environmental Protection Agency. (2010). Climate Change and Georgia. Retrieved March 4,
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Human Encroachment on Animal Ecologies

Words: 1334 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85813727

Ethiopian Wolf Endangered

The author of this report is to research and answer questions related to the Ethiopian Wolf. Indeed the Ethiopian Wolf, otherwise known as canine simensis, is currently in endangered status according to the IUCN. This paper will discuss the ecological factors, animal behavior factors and the overall current status of the Ethiopian Wolf. While the Ethiopian Wolf is not yet extinct, it is certainly endangered at this time.

Questions Answered

When it comes to the ecology and behavior relating to the Ethiopian Wolf, there are a few factors that were described by Tallents et al. (2012) treatise on the subject. The author gave a few points in her work. First, she notes that human encroachment on Ethiopian Wolf territory increases a rather large amount for each single human that enters it. Indeed, she notes that each person leads to 1.18 kilometers less room for the Ethiopian Wolf and other species specific to an area. Further, wolves are very unwilling to share territory with another pack. As such, they will aggressively defend the areas that they do inhabit and human encroachment on said lands leads to some rather negative situations. Further, the breeding and gender issues surrounding the…… [Read More]