Employee Satisfaction Essays (Examples)

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Employee Relations Financial Crisis Managing Employee Relations

Words: 2413 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53303609

Employee Relations Financial Crisis

Managing Employee Relations in the Event of a Financial Crisis

A Look into Management can Effectively Navigate through Adverse Conditions

Austerity Protests (Dowling, 2012)

Employee relations can often be a difficult aspect of maintaining the overall health of an organization. In general, employee relations often refer to the act of fostering productivity, motivation, and employee morale in an organizations human resources pool. However, there are some circumstances in which it is virtually impossible to maintain high levels of morale. One example of this is during a period of economic turmoil. During the global financial crisis of 2008, the world's economy took a sharp turn for the worse. This economic downturn had many implications for businesses and their employees. The level of unemployment rose quickly in many nations and pressure was also applied to lower employee wages.

In the event of such an economic downturn, it is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

BLS, 2012. The Recession of 2007-2009. [Online]

Available at:  http://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2012/recession/pdf/recession_bls_spotlight.pdf 

[Accessed 12 September 2012].

Business and Marketing, 2009. Consumers in a Recession. [Online]
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Employee Feedback Programs Are Programs

Words: 2835 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85578747

However, it has been a struggle to make employees view that these employee feedback programs are not just a tool for the companies to comply with has been a losing battle eports 12.

The good news of the matter is that these employee feedback programs provide duly needed positive and negative feedback which helps the management re-strategize their decision making process.

Organizational culture and employee feedback programs

The culture of the organization must at the same time reflect these employee feedback programs Gupta, Govindarajan and Malhotra 206.

Organizational culture is the personality that is exhibited by an organization through its employees. Members of the organization slowly come to sense this culture and try their best to express it in their actions in various situations. There are several effects of an organization's culture. These include influencing the technologies applied, image of the organization to the public, strategies, services and products of…… [Read More]

References

Bogardus, A. Phr / Sphr Professional in Human Resources Certification Study Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2009. Print.

Earl, Joanne, Melissa Dunn Lampe, and Andrew Buksin. "What to Do with Employee Survey Results." Gallup Management Journal (2008). Print.

Gomez-Mejia, L.R., D.B. Balkin, and R.L. Cardy. Managing Human Resources. London: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2009. Print.

Gupta, Anil K., Vijay Govindarajan, and Ayesha Malhotra. "Feedback-Seeking Behavior within Multinational Corporations." Strategic Management Journal 20.3 (1999): 205-22. Print.
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Employee Orientation Situational Overview a

Words: 1097 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98119044



On the other hand, the comparative value of the real-time presentation must be considered in relation to the potential technical issues involved. Specifically, whereas pre-recorded presentations and self-directed learning online training programs can be tested and perfected in advance to ensure there are no technical problems with delivery, that is not necessarily the case with real-time presentations, especially those involving two-way communications. No matter how much preparation and troubleshooting is conducted in advance, live two-way presentations are notoriously susceptible to technical problems that can interfere with planning and lesson delivery. Moreover, the more computer terminals and office locations involved, the greater that potential for difficulties in execution.

Anticipated Problems

Beyond technical delivery-of-training issues, other anticipated potential problems associated with online employee training include lower levels of individual engagement and reduced opportunity for meaningful interpersonal exchanges. In that regard, even the best corporate instructors cannot implement all of the same teaching…… [Read More]

References

Leader-Chivee, L., Booz Allen, H., and Cowan, E. "Networking the Way to Success: Online Social Networks for Workplace and Competitive Advantage." Journal of People & Strategy. Vol. 31, No. 3 (2008): 27 -- 45.

Robbins, S.P. And Judge, T.A. (2009). Organizational Behavior. Upper Saddle River,

NJ: Prentice Hall.

Stevens, B. "Corporate Ethical Codes: Effective Instruments for Influencing Behavior."
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Employee Involvement and Workplace Productivity

Words: 1682 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6769762

352).

Lastly, Cummings and Worley (2007) surmise that employee involvement can also "improve capabilities of employees thus enabling them to perform better" (p. 353). The authors give the example that when organizations wish to increase their employee participation in decision making, this strategy must be accompanied by skill training in communication and group problem solving (p. 353).

All three of these facets improve employee satisfaction and well-being, due to an improved work environment and a more rewarding job. In a cyclical nature, improved productivity also increases satisfaction, especially when there are greater rewards associated with this increased productivity. Improved employee satisfaction, that's a result of employee involvement strategies and increased productivity, can have a secondary impact on the organization. This high level of employee satisfaction can further positively affect productivity by attracting the best employees and help ensure the retention of these valuable organizational resources (Cummings and Worley, 2007, p.…… [Read More]

References

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2007). Organization Development and Change (8th ed.). s.l.: Academic Internet Publ.

Rosso, a. (Oct 2010). "Awakening corporate soul." Collector, 76(3). p. 18-20.

The influence of employee involvement on productivity: A review of research -- June 2000. (22 Jun 2006). Retrieved December 6, 2010, from http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/cs/sp/hrsd/prc/publications/research/2000-002584/page03.shtml.

Wolf, E. & Zwick, T. (Apr 2008). "Reassessing the productivity impact of employee involvement and financial incentives." Schmalenbach Business Review, 60(2). o. 160-181.
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Employee Attitudes to Performance Appraisal

Words: 2139 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77114068



Performance appraisal systems are complex and time consuming, especially for managers who supervise extended numbers of employees

Performance appraisal systems can be stressful and ineffective (Clark, 2011).

5. Structure of performance appraisal systems

The construction of a performance appraisal system is a complex endeavor, based on both theoretical as well as practical considerations. John J. Gabarro and Linda a. Hill (1995) for instance argue that managers ought to construct their appraisal systems in a critical manner, based on both pre-existent models and frameworks, but also on internal features within the organization. Cynthia Morrison Phoel (2011) and her co-editors argue that the main criterion to an effective appraisal system is represented by feedback.

Kevin . Murphy and Frank E. Saal (1990) then argue that there exists a triple structure to create frameworks for employee appraisal. The frameworks are constructed based on four criteria: the constituents, the goals, the specific objectives and…… [Read More]

References:

Armstrong, M., 2000, Performance management: key strategies and practical guidelines, 2nd edition, Kogan Page Publishers

Armstrong, M., Baron, a., 2005, Managing performance: performance management in action, 2nd edition, CIPD Publishing

Baruch, Y., Harel, G., 1993, Multi-source performance appraisal: an empirical and methodological note, Public Administration Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 1

Clark, K., 2011, Advantages and disadvantages of performance appraisals, ZeroMillion,  http://www.zeromillion.com/business/advantages-and-disadvantages-of-performance-appraisals.html  last accessed on March 7, 2011
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Employees' Turnover on Human Resource

Words: 1953 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41947941



In this context, a question is being posed relative to the measures which could be taken in order to increase employees' on the job satisfaction and reduce the high turnover rates. The following strategies could be implemented in both Hong Kong vehicle companies, as well as within all companies facing the challenges of high employee turnover rates. Yet, what should be remembered is that the following suggestions are merely theoretical and that they should be customized to fit the specific particularities of each separate entity. These being said, the suggestions to improving employee retention are as follows:

Increasing salaries; higher wages will generally determine people to be more committed to the job and to the employer

Offering other financial incentives, such as premiums and bonuses; these should be offered based on performances, but also based on efforts

Offering various non-financial incentives, such as flexible working schedules or the organization of…… [Read More]

References:

Boyd, C., 2003, Human resource management and occupational health and safety, Routledge, ISBN 0415265908

Droege, S.B., Hoobler, J.M., 2003, Employee turnover and tacit knowledge diffusion: a network perspective, Journal of Managerial Issues, Vol. 15, Issue 1

Han, P., 2008, Survey: Employers in China face worst staff turnover rate in Asia, Embassy of People's Republic of China in the United States of America,  http://www.china-embassy.org/eng/xw/t401165.htm  last accessed on February 23, 2010
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Satisfaction at Work or on Job

Words: 872 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66198229

ork Satisfaction

Nothing is really work," states an old adage, "unless you would rather be doing something else."

In today's times of economic uncertainty, rapid employee turnover and more trade union disputes, the issue of worker satisfaction has become even more important. In addition to salary, many workers point to the need for a good quality of worker life. They need to feel that their personal needs are being met in their professional careers.

This paper examines factors which relate strongly to worker satisfaction. These factors include greater communication, opportunities for advancement and a sense that their work is "meaningful." In the last part, the paper also makes suggestions regarding how employers can both ensure motivation on the job and address factors that give rise to job dissatisfaction.

The question of employee satisfaction has come to gained greater attention especially in this new century. A survey commissioned by the Pitney…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bodek, Norman. "The quality of work life." Industrial Engineer. March 2003. Proquest Database.

Giving employees meaningful work is the best way to keep them." New Hampshire Business Review. December 1, 2000. Proquest Database.

Greater expectations." People Management. September 11, 2003. Proquest Database.
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Employee Employer and Organizational Effectiveness

Words: 1225 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49405014

Organizational Effectiveness

Employee Satisfaction, Employee Engagement and Organizational Culture

It has been stated by Vance (2006) that personnel committed to the company and absorbed in their jobs offer corporations critical competitive advantages; these include decreased workforce turnover and increased productivity. Commitment and engagement are clearly able to potentially bring about valuable business outcomes for a firm. But what does the term engagement imply? Personnel engagement implies that company workers are proud of their company and satisfied with the role they have been accorded in it. Personnel satisfaction or engagement may further refer to how far individuals believe in, and enjoy, their jobs, as well as how far they feel the management of their firm values their contribution and efforts. With increase in engagement of employees, their likelihood to make special efforts for the company's benefit and deliver superior job performance will increase. Moreover, an engaged workforce tends to remain with…… [Read More]

References

Management Sciences for Health. (2012). Designing and Implementing Training Programs. Retrieved February 5, 2016, from World Health Organization: www.apps.who.int/medicinedocs/

Vance, R. J. (2006). Employee Engagement and Committment. Virginia: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).
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Employee Rights Safety

Words: 1665 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16900039

Legal Environment/Total ewards: A Changing Landscape

In the race for profit, employee pay has traditionally been seen by businesses as a competitive liability, and the trend for much of the 20th century was for employers to search for the cheapest, most efficient labor to protect their bottom line. Because of this approach, the U.S. government took several steps during the 20th century to protect employees from extortionary measures by employers to drive down wages and drive up productivity. However, as Chen and Hsieh point out in their 2006 article "Key Trends in the Total eward System of the 21st Century," recent decades have seen a dramatic shift in the way that corporations and human resources professionals view the issue of employee pay. Instead of being viewed as a liability, employee pay is increasingly being seen in a positive light, as a method for securing top talent, stabilizing turnover, and motivating…… [Read More]

References

Atkinson, W. (Nov 2009) Filling in around the edges. HR Magazine, Vol. 54, Iss. 11, 55-59.

Bohlander, G. & Snell, S. (2010) Managing Human Resources. Mason, OH: Cengage Learning.

Chen, H. & Hsieh, Y. (Nov/Dec 2006) Key trends of the total reward system in the 21st century. Compensation and Benefits Review, Vol. 38, Iss. 6, 64-72.

Simon, T., Traw, K., McGeoch, B., & Bruno, F. (Summer 2007). How the final HIPAA nondiscrimination regulations affect wellness programs. Benefits Law Journal, Vol. 20, Iss. 2, 40-45.
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Personality and Job Satisfaction

Words: 2842 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43951078

Employee satisfaction might be one of the most difficult measures in management to quantify. There are so many ways to judge this factor, from self-evaluation to independent evaluation to more concrete numbers like productivity, which has been linked to job satisfaction.

There is no industry-wide standard for assessing employee satisfaction, and yet it is one of the most important factors in a successful work environment. This paper will explore the influence of an individual's personality and character traits on their job satisfaction; instead of seeing job satisfaction as a result of outside influences, I hypothesize that an employee's individual personality and attitude are important factors in his or her job satisfaction. That is to say, an employee who is otherwise unhappy and gloomy will most likely not be happy in his or her workplace either, and conversely, an employee with a positive outlook and an upbeat personality will be satisfied…… [Read More]

Morrison, Reese, "How In-House Managers Can Profit from Diverse Satisfaction Surveys," Of Counsel, 21:3, 2002.

Bernthal, Paul. "Measurement Gets Strategic," T& D, published by American Society for Training and Development, May 2005.

"Management Communication: Unlocking Higher Employee Performance," Communication World, March-April 2005, pp. 18-22.
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Employee Privacy Torts

Words: 7119 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96826900

Employee Privacy Torts

Issues relating to employee privacy have been at the forefront of businesses for many years. This has been fuelled by the dynamic workplace which changes constantly and also by employees and employers being more litigation-conscious. Technology has also spurred on employee privacy issues with e-mail and the internet being related to heightened concerns about vulnerability of employers to litigation. Many employers have thus exacerbated their concerns relating to employee privacy and especially monitoring of employee behavior. Employee privacy is respected in many of the large corporations. However, there still exist some breaches in employee privacy. Small business owners are at most risk as a result of their increased monitoring practices and close employer-employee interaction.

Historical background

oberson v. ochester Folding Box Company

One of the major cases that brought employee privacy to the limelight was oberson v. ochester Folding Box Company

Franklin Mills Co. decided to appeal…… [Read More]

References

Anderson v. City of Philadelphia, 845 F. 2d 1216 (1988).

Borse v. Piece Goods Shop, 963 F.2d 611 (1991).

Burlington Industries, Inc. v. Ellerth, 524 U.S. 742 (1988).

City of Ontario v. Quon, 130 S.Ct. 2619, 560 U.S. (2010).
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Employee Relations

Words: 1315 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41704950

Employee relations belong to employer-employee relationships that give satisfactory productivity, motivation, and self-confidence. Employee relations are involved with preventing and resolving problems related to individuals that occur or change work situations. Supervisors are given advice on how to correct poor performance and employee misconduct (Gennard, 2005). On the other hand, employees are given information on how to promote a better understanding of the company's goals and policies. For this paper we have chosen Tesco plc and its employee relationship. Tesco plc is the largest global grocery store based in UK. This is the second largest retailer in the world when measured in terms of benefits and third when measured in terms of income. The company has employed more than 326,000 employees around the world where 237,000 of them in Europe where it has its largest private employer.

Strategy Integrating Job Performance and Training

Job Performance and training forms the vital…… [Read More]

References

Gennard, John Graham Judge. (2005). Employee Relations. London: The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

Hollinshead, Graham, Peter Nicholls Stephanie Tailby. (2003). Employee Relations. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Lewis, Philip, Adrian Thornhill Mark Saunders. (2003). Employee Relations. London: Financial Times/Prentice Hall.

Roger W. Griffeth and Peter W. Hom, (2001). Retaining Valued Employees, Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, p. 2.
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Employee Performance and His or Her Motivation

Words: 1163 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49132234

Employee performance and his or her motivation is a key issue in an organization. The latter impacts the former: the more an employee is motivated, the better he is likely to perform. An important problem is that motivation is a complex undertaking: it is not always the financial package that is fundamental to an employee's performance.

Studies have shown that employees are also motivated (quite often even more motivated) by other factors. Campion and Thayer (1985), for example, concluded, following their research, that the more jobs are created to include motivational factors, the lower the efforts to complete them and the better the well-being of the employees. As Sager (1978) mentions, "it is essential to determine what an individual likes or needs in his work if motivation is to occur."

This paper proposes an approach based on Maslow's Theory of Needs to understand the role of promotion in an organization…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Sager, Donald, (1978). Leadership and employee motivation. Graduate School of Library Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2. Campion, M.A., Thayer, P.W. (1985). Development and field evaluation of an interdisciplinary measure of job design. Journal of Applied Psychology. pp. 29 -- 4

3. Nohria, Nitin, Groysberg, Boris, Lee, Linda-Eling, (2008). Employee Motivation -- A Powerful New Model. Harvard Business Review.

4. Baack, D. (2012). Organizational behavior. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.
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Employee Relations Develop a Strategy Specific to

Words: 1831 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16192930

Employee elations

Develop a strategy specific to your organization for integrating job performance and training.

Job performance is an integral aspect within the health care services industry's overall. For one, it holds both associates and management accountable for their respective actions. This accountable provides a means of deterring any subpar performance on the part of employees who might otherwise be a detriment to the overall operations of the firm. By linking job performance to training, the organization can train those deficient in certain skills. In many instances training allows a means for personnel to acquire skills deemed necessary by leadership. By integrating both concepts, organizations can minimize waste while also growing talented personnel within the organization. This is particular important in regards to the changing landscape of the health care industry overall. Excessive and meaning regulation has created fundamental change within the industry overall. As such, job training must reflect…… [Read More]

References:

1) Draper, Elaine, Joseph LaDou, and Dan J. Tennenhouse. 2011. "Occupational Health Nursing and the Quest for Professional Authority," New Solutions 21, 47 -- 81

2) Fang, D., Wilsey-Wisniewski, S.J., & Bednash, G.D. (2006). 2005-2006 enrollment and graduations in baccalaureate and graduate programs in nursing. Washington, DC: American Association of Colleges of Nursing

3) Levsey, K.R., Campbell, D., & Green, A. (2007). Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow; Challenges in Securing Federal Support for Graduate Nurses. Journal of Nursing Education, 46(4), 176-183

4) Lucia, Patricia R.; Otto, Tammy E.; Palmier, Patrick A. (2009). "Chapter 1
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Employee Customer Service Training New Employee Customer

Words: 1621 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41521495

Employee Customer Service Training

New Employee Customer Service Training Plan

Justify the use of a needs assessment of your company's proposed employee customer service training, stressing five (5) ways in which such an assessment would expose any existing performance deficiencies.

The employees of an organization act like the 'driving force' which can either lead the organization towards success or can turn out to be the cause of its failure. A company's progress not only depends on an employee's individual performance but the way these employees communicate with the customers has its own significance. Thus, in order to run a successful organization, it is quite essential to monitor the correlation between the outcomes and the employees' input on a regular basis. To ensure employees' effectiveness, organizations usually remain concerned about training their employees.

Training means a methodical intentional process of changing behavior of organizational members in a direction which contributes to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Eisenberger, R., Rhoades, L. & Cameron, J. (1999). Does pay for performance increase or decrease perceived self-determination and intrinsic motivation? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77, 1026-1040.

Gerow, J.R. (1997). Psychology -- An Introduction. 5th Edition. New York: Longman.

Hinrichs, J.R. (1976). Personnel training. In M. Dunnette (Ed.), Handbook of industrial and organizational psychology. Skokie, IL: Rand MsNally.

Miller & Osinski (1996). Training Needs Assessment. Retrieved November 18,
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Employee Handbook Privacy Section ABC Widget Company

Words: 1173 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43580439

Employee Handbook Privacy Section

ABC Widget Company: Employee Handbook Privacy Section

What privacy rights issues should be addressed?

In the Age of Information, there are increasing concerns being voiced about what can legitimately be expected to be kept private, and how these issues affect employees' rights in the workplace. According to Hayden, Hendricks and Novak (1990, most adults spend approximately one-half of their waking hours in the workplace today, and it is therefore not surprising that employment practices affect a broad range of privacy rights. With the sole exception of polygraph ("lie-detector") testing, there are not many areas of workplace activities that are addressed by the U.S. Constitution or national privacy laws. As a result, employers in the United States have a great deal of flexibility in collecting data on their employees, regulating their access to personnel files, and disclosing the contents of employee files to those outside the organization.…… [Read More]

References

Backer, T.E. & O'Hara, K.B. (1991). Organizational change and drug-free workplaces:

Templates for success. New York: Quorum Books.

Hayden, T., Hendricks, E. & Novik, J.D. (1990). Your right to privacy: A basic guide to legal rights in an information society. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.

Muhl, C.J. (2003). Workplace E-Mail and Internet Use: Employees and Employers Beware An
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Employee Comp the Future That Is Fast

Words: 2828 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51091963

Employee Comp

The future that is fast heading our way is often thought to be associated with creative technologies and businesses that do online services. But this is definitely not the full picture. Many traditional businesses are also being impacted in regard to what will be expected about some of their core operations, including in regard to how they treat and motivate their employees. Basic manufacturing is no different. In order for companies like ours to be ready for the future, we have to look seriously at the ways in which we recruit employees and keep them here once they sign on. With 120 employees whose skills encompass a broad range of talents -- some basic skills others tied to quite sophisticated technological abilities -- we have the chance to position ourselves to be ahead of the curve as the entire field of payment, rewards and recognitions is examined yet…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Barton, H. And Laux, J. (2010). Executive pay inefficiencies in the financial sector. The Journal of Applied Business Research. Vol. 26, No. 4.

Carpenter, S. (2007). Design the right compensation plan for your business. Entrepreneur. Retrievable from http://www.entrepreneurship.org/en/resource-center/design-the-right-compensation-plan-for-your-business.aspx.

CompuData Surveys (2009). The real effects of today's economy on the manufacturing industry. Retrievable from  http://www.compdatasurveys.com/Files/News/Manufacturing%20Whitepaper.pdf .

Scott, D. And McMullan, D. (2010). The impact of rewards programs on employee engagement. WorldatWork. Retrievable from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=39032.
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Piney Woods Hospital Satisfaction Is the Pivotal

Words: 3021 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20804499

Piney Woods Hospital

Satisfaction is the pivotal problem for Piney Woods Hospital to address. Satisfaction across all stakeholders has a substantive impact on the other key challenges the hospital is facing. When customers are satisfied with the service and care they receive at hospital, they let others in the community know about it. When hospital employees are satisfied, they provide superior hospital services. When physicians are satisfied, they provide excellent medical care. It is an obvious and intractable cycle. Further, levels of satisfaction are indicators of other symptoms or successes regarding the operations of the hospital and its relationship to the community. This paper will focus on the challenges of increasing patient and employee satisfaction within the Emergency Department at Piney Woods Hospital.

The health care industry has in common with other service industries the pivotal importance of employee engagement on the customer-facing -- or patient-facing, as the case may…… [Read More]

References

Atkins, P.M., Marshall, B.S., and Javalgi, R.G. (1996), Happy employees lead to loyal patients, Journal of Health Care Marketing, 16, 4, 14-23.

Brown, C.L. (2002), A theory of the process of creating power in relationships, Nursing Administration Quarterly, 26, 2, 15-33.

Cunningham, P. (2011, May11). Nonurgent use of hospital emergency departments. Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) [BEFORE THE U.S. SENATE Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging Hearing on ?Diverting Non-urgent Emergency Room Use: Can It Provide Better Care and Lower Costs?]. Retrieved  http://hschange.org/CONTENT/1204/1204.pdf 

Electronic Health Records Overview (2006, April). National Institutes of Health National Center for Research Resources.
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Relationship With Employees Keeping High

Words: 842 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11637310

four financial services organizations have approached the work-life balance agenda and examines the fit between the organizational intentions for work-life policy and actual outcomes for both organizations and employees and found that what managers were being asked to achieve in the business was often incompatible with formal work-life policies (Wise & ond, 2003).

Interview

A human resources professional was interview from a local firm that employed a wide range of different employees that were performing organizational functions at different levels. The manager was responsible for a large number of employees and has a significant amount of experience with work-life initiatives. The human resource manager had somewhat mixed emotions about implanting such policies with many employees. He had both good experiences with a work-life program as well as a number of negative experiences. He seemed to think that the positive ones were about equal to the negative ones.

The problems with…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Akdere, M. (2006). Improving Quality of Work-Life: Implications for Human Resources. The Business Review, 173-177.

Al-Qutop, Mohi-Adden, Y., & Harrim, H. (2011). Quality of Worklife Human Well-being Linkage: Integrated Conceptual Framework. International Journal of Business and Management, 193-205.

MacDermid, S., & Wittenborn, a. (2007). Lessons From Work-Life Research for Developing Human Resources. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 556-568.

Perry-Smith, J., & Blum, T. (2000). Work-family human resource bundles and perceived organizational performance. Academy of Management Journal, 1107-1117.
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Expatriate Employees it Is Common for People

Words: 1523 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5179662

Expatriate Employees

It is common for people to travel far and wide for employment opportunities. It is a difficult task not just for the workers but their families as well. The living conditions, health sanitation and many other difficulties often cause these individuals to regret their choice and quit the job. The paper highlights the expatriate issues and the significant and life altering role that H can play in this respect.

It is very important to understand what exactly an Expatriate Employee is before matters like: problems faced by them and the reasons for their high turnover rates are delved into.

In simple terms the word 'expatriate' refers to any person working in a country other than his or her native or birth country. This individual could be employed by one of their native 'Multi-national Corporations' and then selected to represent them abroad, in which case they can also be…… [Read More]

References:

Expatriate Law and Legal Definition (2012). U.S. Legal. Retrieved June 7th from  http://definitions.uslegal.com/e/expatriate/ 

Gross, A (1997). Pacific Bridge Incorporated: Human Resource Issues in Southeast Asia. Retrieved June 7, 2012, from http://www.pacificbridge.com/publications/human-resource-issues-in-southeast-asia/

Jones, S (2000). Oxford Journals; Medical Aspects of Expatriate Health: Health Threats. Retrieved June 7, 2012, from  http://occmed.oxfordjournals.org/content/50/8/572.full.pdf 

Lockwood, N. R (2006). Maximizing Human Capital: Demonstrating HR Value with Key Performance Indicators. Retrieved June 10, 2012, from http://www.brock.dk/fileadmin/user_upload/brock/pdf/kursusafd/SHRM/Maximizing_Human_Capital.pdf
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Work Motivation and Job Satisfaction

Words: 5392 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49444559

As Moore and Anderson emphasize, "Another driver is that distance education students have as much right to expect effective library services as traditional on-campus students. Therefore, services have been enhanced to ensure easy access and equitable delivery of resources and services" (p. 384).

Clearly, then, although the mission of many university libraries to provide the resources and tools students need to achieve successful academic outcomes has not changed in substantive ways in recent years, technological innovations have demanded that they transform the manner in which they achieve these missions. A survey of university librarians conducted by Moore and Anderson (2003) determined that, "y far the major thrust of the libraries surveyed was the inclusion of information literacy skills into the curriculum, either imbedded into the discipline-specific information or as assessable tests within foundation or first-year subjects" (p. 382). The provision of these types of services, Moore and Anderson suggest, may…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Droege, S.B. And J.M. Hoobler. 2003. "Employee turnover and tacit knowledge diffusion: A network perspective." Journal of Managerial Issues, 15(1): 50.

Finnegan, R.P., F.D. Frank and C.R. Taylor, C.R. 2004. "The race for talent: Retaining and engaging workers in the 21st century." Human Resource Planning 27(3): 12.

Milgate, Michael a. 2004. Transforming Corporate Performance: Measuring and Managing the Drivers of Business Success. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Phillips, Jack J. 2005. Investing in Your Company's Human Capital: Strategies to Avoid Spending Too Little -- or Too Much. New York: AMACOM.
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Work life Balance and Positive Outcomes for Organizations and Employees

Words: 1978 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51989638

In the contemporary business world, employee performance is a fundamental determinant in the attainment of organizational goals and objectives. For this reason, organizations come up with various ways of motivating their workforce so as to ensure there is a high employee performance. Work life balance is a largely significant observable fact that is of considerable concern to different employees in an organization. In delineation, work life balance is expediting and fast-tracking between one's work, which encompasses career and aspiration and one's lifestyle, which encompasses health, leisure and family. This goes beyond emphasizing on the work role and personal life of individuals. It also influences the social, mental, financial and psychological welfare of the individual (Obiageli et al., 2015). This essay will assess the statement as to whether work life balance has a positive outcome for the organization and also for the employees.

Outcome for Employees

One of the positive outcomes…… [Read More]

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Ft Pt Employees to Explore Whether

Words: 4053 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60052034

Hyde reported, however, that part-time professionals tend to accept negative perceptions as part of the territory; they are often willing to accept their marginalised status when they are voluntary part-timers. It is a trade-off they are willing to make for the reduced schedules they choose for whatever reason.

Unfortunately, flexibility for the part-time employee may not always be viewed as flexibility from the viewpoint of the employer. With respect to part-time employees on the police force in the UK, for example, Hyde (2008) found that managers had considered working with part-timers to be an inflexible arrangement, citing difficulties with communication, continuity, and scheduling. Hakim (cited in Hyde 2008) argues that women who choose to work part-time have limited career aspirations and low work-commitment. Although Hakim interviewed women for whom this was the case, pursuing part-time careers with the police force but as a lower priority than home and family, Hyde…… [Read More]

References

Baillie-Ruder S. 2004, 'Sweet devotion', Profit 23, pp. 44-51.

Benson GS 2003, 'Examining employability: effects of employee development on commitment

commitment and intention to turn over', Academy of Management Proceedings, pp. C1-

C6.
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Human Resources - Motivation Employee

Words: 971 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30211558



Modern business has now fully integrated computer technology and Internet connectivity within the professional business environment, but has been comparatively slow to adapt the new reality that many professional business functions are fully capable of being conducted from the home, for at least some significant portion of the typical office employee's work week.

Research Question:

Is it possible to increase employee motivation by providing increased employee input into factors that normally are not subject to employee preference in the professional business environment? Specifically:

To what extent would greater autonomy and individual choice of work shift hours and structure (length of shift, work hours, etc.) improve employee motivation while at work?

To what extent would the opportunity to work from home improve employee satisfaction and therefore, motivation at work?

To what extent is the prospect of improving employee motivation through implementation of greater autonomy in relation to work shift structure and…… [Read More]

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Motivation of Employees

Words: 1861 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95955965

Employment otivation and Engagement: How to Recruit and Retain Top-Quality Talent in a Competitive arketplace

Because employee performance and productivity are closely aligned with corporate profitability, there has been a great deal of research over the years concerning optimal approaches to motivating people in the workplace. The analysis of what motivates people to perform to their maximum effort, though, has becoming increasingly complex as the result of a growing number of theories concerning the antecedents of motivation and optimal job performance and motivational methods to achieve it. While the debate concerning which motivational approaches produce the best results continues, there is a consensus among organizational behavior researchers that pay ranks among the top factors that include employee motivation, perhaps the overarching factor in most cases. Despite these findings, studies have shown time and again that money talks when it comes to employee motivation. When people become convinced that their efforts…… [Read More]

Murphy, C., Ramamoorthy, N., Flood, P. & MacCurtain, S. 2006, July 1. Organizational Justice Perceptions and Employee Attitudes among Irish Blue Collar Employees: An Empirical Test of the Main and Moderating Roles of Individualism/Collectivism. Management Revue, 17(3), 329.

Ibid., 330.

Ibid.
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Staff Morale Is Low Employees

Words: 1433 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26360731



takeholders I might seek input from takeholders are defined as "those key individuals (or groups of individuals) who have an influence over either decision-making or implementation (or both) either directly or indirectly, overtly or covertly" (Begun & Heatwole, p.25). They can be a wide array of individuals, groups, and/or organizations. These are usually individuals within the organization who are decision makers or who are associated with key issues and/or actions being considered.

takeholders may be both external and internal to the organization and with the community health care system -- as in this case -- they may certainly include state and local governments, as well as certain research and pharmaceutical agencies. If implemented wisely, the input of these stakeholders can assist with decision-making.

The concerns for each stakeholder

With stakeholder analysis, I would adopt a retrospective approach where my objective would be to uncover past experience, processes, and patterns (Brugha…… [Read More]

Sources

Begun, J. & Heatwole, K.B. Strategic Cycling: Shaking Complacency in Healthcare Strategic Planning, in Health Services Management, a.R. Kovner and D. Neuhauser, Editors. 2001, Health Administration Press: Chicago.

Brugha, R. & Varvasovszky, Z. Stakeholder Analysis: A review. Health Policy and Planning, 2000. 15(3): p. 239-246.

Chaudron, D. Assessing and Improving your Organization, Organized Change Consultancy, Retrieved on 1/12/2011 from: http://www.organizedchange.com/assess.htm

Eicher, J., Performance Improvement Global Network Chapter Retrieved on 1/12/2011 from: www.pignc-ispi.com
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Relationship Between Individual Characteristics and Job Satisfaction From an Organizational Behavior Perspective

Words: 353 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77256688

Individual

What is the relationship between individual characteristics and job satisfaction?

Individual characteristics, or sometimes referred to as attitudes or behavior, are related to job satisfaction in the sense that they help in defining the goal of an individual within his job. Such goals, defining by the way of how they are achieved, can be used in turn as measures in defining job satisfaction.

The differing characteristics of individuals affect their job satisfaction. For instance, there are those who are positive thinkers and goal achievers, in that despite of the challenges in their job, they remain optimistic. This then causes them not to feel too many negative views about their jobs. Thus, when asked to rate the level of their job satisfaction, they are most likely to say that they are satisfied. On the other hand, there are those who have low fighting spirit. When faced by challenges, they easily…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Managing Job Satisfaction.

Retrieved on 30 Nov 2004, from Bavendam Online.

Web site: http://www.employeesatisfactions.com/

Attitude Defined.
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Production Management How Can Employees

Words: 349 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94259773

Some of the above options (especially on-site daycare) can be provided at a minimal cost to Calls-R-Us.

Another method of increasing employee satisfaction (and in turn, productivity and retention) is to give employees more autonomy-in the form of flexible schedules or a compressed workweek (Schmidt 299). Allowing employees to select their own schedules-if even by half an hour each shift-gives them more flexibility in their personal lives, increases their job satisfaction, and in turn, makes them more likely to stay and perform better.

These options (direct benefits and flexible schedules) will quickly translate into higher levels of employee satisfaction at Calls-R-Us, meaning that employees will be more likely to remain in their current positions. This stability will increase productivity and, soon after, profits.

orks Cited

Alonzo, Vincent (2000). "Throwing Money Away," Incentives 174(8), 8-8.

Schmidt, Diane E. And Duenas, Gilbert (2002). "Incentives…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alonzo, Vincent (2000). "Throwing Money Away," Incentives 174(8), 8-8.

Schmidt, Diane E. And Duenas, Gilbert (2002). "Incentives to Encourage Worker-Friendly Organization," Public Personnel Management, 31(3), 293-309.
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Reward System and Employee Needs Assessment

Words: 1598 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51218219

eward System and Employee Needs Assessment

Employee values and expectations vary from individual to individual, though there are some universal values and expectations that might be generalized to employees across most industries. Among these more generalized expectations include the desire for good pay and benefits, job security and work life balance opportunities.

When developing a reward system it is vital that the organization incorporate these universal employee values and expectations into the reward system so that the outcome of the system is beneficial for the employees involved. It is also in the best interests of organizational planners to assess individual employee values and motivations in order to devise a reward and recognition program that focuses on independent employee needs rather than lumping all employees into the same category. These ideas and more are explored in greater detail below.

Good employee relations and subsequent reward systems are contingent on the ability…… [Read More]

References:

Champion-Hughes, R. "Totally integrated employee benefits." Public Personnel

Management, 30(3), 2001: 287.

Denton, K. "Recruitment, retention and employee relations: Field tested strategies for the 90's." Westport: Quorum Books: 1992

Moses, B. "6 degrees of motivation." Black Enterprise, 31(4), 2001: 155
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Effective Methods of Employee Recognition

Words: 893 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2231004

managers want a healthy and effective workplace. To ensure this, you attempt to hire the right workers and to retain these workers. In order to retain these workers, they need to motivate them. This is particularly so since organizational excellence necessitates employee well-being and to achieve this, you need to motivate your employees. Employees, being individuals, are however motivated in different ways. This is where the Work recognition programs have come into existence and proved popular. The question is: are they effective?

elevance

Employee attrition is at an all-time high in the rapidly changing world of today. Being too that the business world is unprecedented in its competitiveness, managers want to not only hire the right employees, but also retain them. This is particularly so since employees may be easily wood by a job that offers opportunities of better pay or promotion, and their current company cannot compete in these…… [Read More]

References

Grawitch, Matthew J.; Gottschalk, Melanie; Munz, David C. (2006) The path to a healthy workplace: A critical review linking healthy workplace practices, employee well-being, and organizational improvements. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, Vol 58(3), 129-147.

Manzoor, Q. (2012). Impact of Employees Motivation on Organizational Effectiveness. Business Management & Strategy (BMS), 3(1), 1-12.

Worldatwork, (2008) Trends in employee recognition http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=25653

Whitney, M. M (2011). Morgan, Brown & Joy, LLP. Employee Recognition Programs.
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Smaller Company Offer Competitive Benefit Packages Employees

Words: 2817 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91504551

smaller company offer competitive benefit packages employees competing talent large corporations? FYI - School text book The Handbook Employee Benefits, Seventh Edition Jerry S.

Competitiveness of employee benefits in small size enterprises

The global economy is still striving to overcome the tremendous pressures of the economic recession that began in 2007 in the American real estate sector and soon expanded to the rest of the sectors, as well as the rest of the countries. The means in which each country or sector overcome the recession differ from one region to the other and the differences are due to elements such as fiscal policies, strength of the economic sector or the threshold for risk. Generically, more protective countries have proven better able to overcome the threats of the crisis (Bernitz and inge, 2010).

Despite the domestic particularities of each region, fact remains that overcoming the crisis should be a global effort…… [Read More]

References:

Berniz, U., Ringe, W.G.. (2010). Company law and economic protectionism: new challenges to European integration. Oxford University Press.

Dyer, W.G., Dyer, W.G., Dyer, J.H., (2010). Team building: proven strategies for improving team performance. John Wiley and Sons.

Kess, S., Weltman, B. (2005). Individuals and small business tax planning guide. CCH.

Khan, J. Soverall, W., (2007). Gaining productivity. Arawak Publications
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Nonprofit Human Services Employees' Intentions

Words: 4983 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47662238

Additionally, the fact that the training is offered at all levels of the position -- not just entry levels -- and the fact that the training is offered to both employees as well as volunteers, further increases the odds that the individuals will accept the positions in the NFP sector.

"Nonprofit organizations owe it to their staff members to train them and develop their careers. […] the advancement of a nonprofit's mission requires staff training (that includes volunteers) at all levels and in all skills. Human resource development is the only way to sustained viable programming. That makes training an intrinsic component of strategic management, the very best means to changing the skills, knowledge and attitude of staff" (Chehade and Jassemm, 2010).

Employees in the not-for-profit sector often accept the lower salary in exchange for several other non-financial benefits, like the training opportunities, but also for benefits such as flexibility…… [Read More]

References:

Anheier, H.K., 2003, Work in the non-profit sector: forms, patterns and methodologies, International Labor Organization

Boyd, C., 2003, Human resource management and occupational health and safety, Routledge

Brown, H.H., Ruhl, D.L., 2003, Breakthrough management for not-for-profit organizations: beyond survival in the 21st century, Greenwood Publishing Group

Buhler, P., 2002, Human resources management: all the information you need to manage your staff and meet your business objectives, Adams Media
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Requiring Ethnics Training to Employees Is Simply a Dog and Pony Show Why or Why

Words: 2443 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77662360

Ethics Training for Employees

"ecently we have become aware of massive fraud and abuses that are tolerated and even encouraged by executives in large and formerly reputable organizations" (Lee, 2004). The Enron scandal sent ricochets through corporate America, causing literally thousands of people to lose their jobs and sending a major city into a deeper recession than that experienced by the rest of the country. Even seemingly minor corporate scandals have had a tremendous impact on both corporate America and on consumer confidence in corporations. One need only look at the recent media fury surrounding Martha Stewart's recent release from prison to realize that corporate misbehavior is the hot-button issue of the day. As evidenced by the abundance of "Free Martha" t-shirts, the negative impacts of corporate ethical issues are not always apparent on the surface. However, the fact is that abusive and illegal practices that have been permitted, and…… [Read More]

References

Joseph, J., Wan Veer, L., and McFadden, A. (2004). Ethics in the Workplace. Retrieved 12 Mar. 2005 from Executive Update Online

Web site: http://www.gwsae.org/executiveupdate/2000/october/ethics.htm

Lee, W. (2004). Ethics: Compliance vs. Commitment. Retrieved 12 Mar. 2005, from Society for Human Resource Management

Web site: http://shrm.org/hrresources/whitepapers_published/CMS_011027.pdf
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Diversity of Employees and Business Constraints

Words: 1474 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77053924

diversity of employees and the increased constraints on businesses such as international competition and an increasingly fast-paced environment, it is more important than ever that companies have a strong management team in place that promises the results required for success. This necessitates employees that are motivated and satisfied with their work.

All personnel are motivated by a desire to fulfill key specific needs that are essential to the well being of humans in general. It is important that these needs be met for the employees to accomplish their work in the best way possible. According to theorist Abraham Maslov, who designed a needs hierarchy in the mid-1940s, it is necessary to satisfy both physiological and safety needs to fully motivate a person.

Maslov (1968) grouped human needs into five separate categories, from bottom to top: Physiological needs that include the basic human physical requirements such as warmth, shelter, food and…… [Read More]

References Cited

Chawla, S. & and Renesch, J. (Eds.) (1995) Learning organizations: Developing cultures for tomorrow's workplace. Portland: Productivity Press.

Heller, R., & Hindle, T. (1998) Essential manager's manual. New York: DK Publishing.

Herzberg F., Mausner F. & Snyderman B. (1959) The motivation to work New York:

Wiley.
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Techniques to Improve Motivation of Employees

Words: 1266 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12560213

Introduction
Employee motivation is a factor emanating from commitment and creativity to allow workers to pursue work-related goals. One of the continuing challenges at workplaces, especially for managers and supervisors, is employee motivation. It mostly happens in work environments with no emphasis on employee satisfaction as part of a company’s strategy. Managers and supervisors should recognize their powers to draw forth the best that employees can offer. All employees should feel recognized, motivated, rewarded and supported for them to work efficiently. As a manager or supervisor, no work environment always supports individual efforts geared towards motivating employees to work hard. Even the most supportive work environment is capable of posing challenges when it comes to improving the motivation of employees. However, employers can still create appropriate environment for enhancing employee motivation.
Techniques to Improve Motivation of Employees
Communication
Employers need to communicate with employees effectively and responsibly. All employees want…… [Read More]

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Organization Is Now Facing Is the Employee

Words: 545 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45118272

organization is now facing is the employee problems and concerns that emerged from the immediate turn-over of the West Coast operations to our organization after it has closed down. The closure of the West Coast loan center resulted to increased volumes of loans everyday, which inevitably increases the workload, pressure and stress for the employees. It becomes evident that the primary concern of the organization at present is not the increased workload or turn-over of loans, but the increased discontent among the employees, and their inability to adjust to these changes in the organization.

The main problem, as mentioned earlier, is the increasing level of stress while at the same, morale among employees is decreasing. Cause of the problem or forces of influence that may have induced employees to respond inappropriately to stress (leading to low morale) are pressure from the management, increased workload, fear of losing job, and lack…… [Read More]

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Strategies to Enhance Patient Satisfaction

Words: 1288 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56155735

Application: Systems Theory

Healthcare organizations provide nursing services centered on multiple theories. For instance, the Open Systems Theory established in 1978 by Katz and Kahn considers the healthcare organization as social systems divided into interconnected subsystems (Meyer & O’Brien-Pallas, 2010). Meyers and O’Brien-Pallas (2010) provide that these interrelated subsystems include outputs, throughputs, inputs, negative feedbacks and a cycle of events. The primary care hospital environment has various units that handle different cases including the intensive care, intermediate care, medical-surgery, emergency department (ED) etcetera. This paper delves into system theory in the emergency department, identify goals and challenges in this department and establishes an appropriate structural outcome.

Subsystems in Emergency Department

In the emergency department, the inputs include financial resources, supplies, and staffing needed for the unit to be functional. The emergency department is in operation all day and night and needs sufficient nurses and subordinate staff to give a throughput…… [Read More]

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Training and Retaining Quality Employees

Words: 3672 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43933604



On the other hand, Harris suggests that some observers believe high turnover among employees is "not only inevitable, but also desirable… [because] employee mobility within the industry promotes workforce flexibility, allowing employees to acquire and develop new skills as they move through different organizations" (73). Harris takes it one step further when he reports that the "acquisition of transferable skills" has a powerful appeal to the "entrepreneurial aspirations of hospitality employees." Hence, Harris points out on page 73, "turnover is actively encouraged" by some leaders in the hospitality industry, along with ambitious workers, because this high turnover practice helps to "…create future managers for the industry." Moreover, turnover can be seen as a positive dynamic because "new ideas" are thus brought into the workplace -- as a way to "prevent stagnation in creativity" -- although in reality HR managers are often loathe to see highly energized, talented staff leave the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Altarawneh, Lkhlas, and Al-Kilani, Mohammad H. 2010. Human Resource Management and Turnover Intentions in the Jordanian Hotel Sector. Research and Practice in Human Resource Management, vol. 18, 46-73.

Andrews. 2004. Sales & Marketing: A Textbook for Hospitality Industry. India: Tata McGraw-Hill Education.

Furunes, Trude. 2005. Training Paradox in the Hotel Industry. Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, vol. 5, 231-248.

Harris, Peter. 1998. Accounting and Finance for the International Hospitality Industry. Maryland Heights, MO: Butterworth -- Heinemann.
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HR Recruitment Retention and Development of New Employees

Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75826295

LUKE

Human esource within the Company

Human resources: Luke & Associates

Three of the most critical ways in which a human resource department can leverage a competitive advantage for an organization is through the processes of recruitment, retention, and continuing development of new employees. Particularly given the technical demands of Luke & Associates, it is critical that Luke uses innovative strategies to recruit top-flight employees. Successful IT companies such as Google have made recruitment a critical part of their business strategy. For example, "in order to find the right people for the company, Google typically gets candidates to go through four rounds of interviews…During one or more of the interviews, Google presents candidates with a problem and asks them to solve it" (Shead 2014). Google makes a considerable investment in finding the right employees because the cost of having a bad employee far outweighs the expense of finding a good…… [Read More]

References

Kessler, S. (2010). How to start a mentoring program. INC. Retrieved from:

 http://www.inc.com/guides/2010/04/start-mentoring-program.html 

Luke & Associates, Inc. (2015). Luke. Retrieved from:

 http://www.lukeassoc.com/
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Employee Rewards Has Been Increasingly Brought to

Words: 1419 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78696598

employee rewards has been increasingly brought to the forefront. This is because globalization is creating a shift in how firms are operating by requiring the utilization of specialized skills. These individuals are necessary for a firm to be able to adjust with changes inside the marketplace and new competitors. As a result, a number of organizations have begun focusing on transforming compensation strategies to address these needs. To fully understand how this is occurring requires focusing on: the way this can improve competitive compensation plans, how they are tied to specific jobs, the effectiveness of an equity-based rewards system, the key factors for integrating this model with traditional rewards programs and providing recommendations that will streamline these initiatives. Together, these elements will provide specific insights as to how a firm can improve their competitive compensation strategy. (Wilson, 2003, pp. 1 -- 15)

Innovations of Employee Benefits

Innovations in the type…… [Read More]

References

Bauer, T. (2005). Enhancing Career Benefits. Personal Psychology, 58 (4), 859 -- 891.

Griffin, R. (2012). Management. Mason, OH: Cengage.

Kamery, R. (2005). Job Content Salary Surveys. Proceedings of the Academy of Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues, 9 (1), 49-76

Shin, J. (2005). Corporate Governance Reform. Journal of Business Ethics, 62 (2), 101 -- 113.
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Employee Commitment for Anisha Bank Total Respondents

Words: 887 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46036152

employee commitment for Anisha Bank. Total respondents are 600 who consist of 400 males and 200 females. The personal data of respondents are revealed in Table 2, and Fig 1.

Fig 1: Age Groups of Respondents

The data in the Fig 1 reveals that the largest number of respondents is within the age group between 44 and 50. Followed by the age group between 37 and 43. There is no respondents within the age groups 20 or under, 51-56, and over 60.

The employee commitment survey results in Table 1 are categorized as follow:

Participating in Decision Making

Job Involvement

Stress

Administrative Climate

Job Opportunities

Organizational Commitment

Based on the survey results, larger percentages of respondents disagree with the questions posed on participation decision making. However, larger percentages of respondents agree and strongly agree with the survey questions on job involvement, stress, administrative climate and organizational commitment. (The results of…… [Read More]

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Satisfaction Trust and Commitment in

Words: 7853 Length: 29 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 285065



esearch Aim

The purpose of this research is to investigate customer's loyalty throughout the dimensions of satisfaction, trust and commitment for mobile phone industry in Bangkok, Thailand. In addition, this research also provides practical knowledge which customers are dissimilar in satisfaction and look for different levels of relationship with mobile phones. To sum up briefly, it is completely useful for marketers to comprehend which paradigms affect customers to create good relationship with companies in order to sustain the customer's loyalty.

esearch Objectives

These are research objectives which are needed to be accomplished in order to reach the above research aim which are stated as following:

To study the relationship marketing to the mobile phone industry in Thailand.

To study the customer satisfactions factor to the mobile phone.

To identify the relationship between various component satisfaction and trust.

To identify the relationship between various component satisfaction and commitment.

To identify the…… [Read More]

References

Bailey, S. And D.E. Schultz. (2000). "Customer/Brand Loyalty in an Interactive Marketplace." Journal of Advertising Research, 40(3), p. 41.

Bruhn, M. (2003), Relationship marketing: management of customer relationships, Pearson Education, UK.

Chung, Sungmi and Mike Sherman. (2002). "Emerging Marketing: Companies Don't Need State-of-the-Art Tools, Huge Volumes of Customer Information, and Armies of Experts to Use Continuous-Relationship Marketing Effectively." The McKinsey Quarterly, p. 62.

Churchill, G.A. And Iacobucci, D. (2005), Marketing Research: Methodological Foundations, 9th edition, Thomson, USA.
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Employees Use the 360 Degree

Words: 3428 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42868307

A very important point is that online learning can be done individually or in groups (for example video conferences).

6. In general, in order to make a career choice one should be informed about the world of professions. Information about the profession that appears the most interesting and appropriate should be gathered. If possible, it would be important to read interviews or talk to people with similar jobs for a more accurate and realistic image. Another important part in a career choice is to assess individual strengths and weaknesses. Several personality tests are available for such a purpose (for example CPI - California Psychological Inventory, SDS - the Self-Directed Search questionnaire). For the persons in search for a career it is important to identify the skills they have and they most enjoy using. The career identified should be compatible with the interests and skills identified. In conclusion, a person who…… [Read More]

References

Drewes, G., Runde, B. (2002). Performance Appraisal, in Psychological Management of Individual Performance. Sonnentag, S. (Ed.) John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Fletcher, C. (2002). Appraisal: An Individual Psychological Perspective, in Psychological Management of Individual Performance. Sonnentag, S. (Ed.) John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

K.J. Kennedy (2005). Evolution of Employee Benefits as Provided through the Internal Revenue Code, Retrieved from www.taxreformpanel.gov/meetings/docs/KennedyPresentation_fina_2.ppt

Hesketh, B., Ivancic, K., (2002). Enhancing Performance through Training in Psychological Management of Individual Performance. Sonnentag, S. (Ed.) John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Employee Attitudes Absenteeism

Words: 1471 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66405394

employee absenteeism and attitudes. The writer explores the reasons for the absences and some of the ways that a company can promote attendance at work. There were six sources used to complete this paper.

The national economy is sluggish and for businesses to continue moving forward it is imperative that they continue producing at an acceptable rate without incurring many additional costs. One of the chief components to success in this venture is employee attendance. The employee absenteeism can cost the company funds from an already tight budget by way of lost manpower, or hiring temps. Temps generally are not going to be as fast as the employee because they have not been acclimated to the system at the company and if a temp is not brought in the missing employee slows the work schedule regardless of the position the employee holds. The arguments about what causes employee absenteeism abound…… [Read More]

References

Author not available, Employee absenteeism hits lowest rate in '90s-survey., Reuters Business Report, 08-26-1997.

JERRY WARD, CITY HALL BUREAU, ABSENCE MAKES CITY GROW POORER., The Edmonton Sun, 03-06-2002, pp 8.

SHARON LEM, WORK STRESS RUINING HEALTH., The Toronto Sun, 10-30-2000, pp 8.

JASON BOTCHFORD, SUN NEWS, STRESSING THE BOTTOM LINEWORKPLACE ABSENTEEISM COSTS COMPANIES BILLIONS., The Ottawa Sun, 03-18-2001, pp 48.
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Employee Monitoring

Words: 1353 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61517271

Ethical Implications of Employee Monitoring

In recent years information technology (IT) has transformed workplaces tremendously. For instance, employers worldwide have embraced the use of technology to monitor the activities employees engage in during working hours and to increase the amount of work done on online business platforms. This was largely influenced by findings from numerous studies that established that if left unsupervised, employees tend to waste a lot of time and resources online. In fact, one Survey by Websense reported that one third of employees used the internet for personal reasons, which translates to costs of about $85 billion in America due to lost work time (Papini, 2007). Some employees may also use company resources for their own gain, which violates the organization's rules and procedures and decreases their productivity. According to a study done by the Work Surveillance Project of the Privacy Foundation[footnoteef:1], of the 100 million online workers…… [Read More]

References

Papini, J.S. (2007). Big Brother: The Effect of Electronic Employee Monitoring on Electronic Misbehavior, Job Satisfaction and Organiozational Commitment. Ann Arbor, MI: ProQuest Information and Learning Company

Stanton, J.M. & Stam, K.R. (2006) The Visible Employee: Using Workplace Monitoring and Surveillance to Protect Information Assets-Without Compromising Employee Privacy or Trust. New Jersey: Information Today, Inc.

Weckert, J. (2005). Electronic Monitoring in the Workplace: Controversies and Solutions. Heyshey, PA: Idea Group Publishing
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Employee Empowerment

Words: 1531 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43143677

Empowering Cases

What guidelines related to empowerment were violated by Ken Hoffman? By Ruth Cummings?

If you were an outside consultant attending the meeting, what advice would you give Ken? What advice would you give Ruth?

Should this decision be made by you alone? Why or why not?

If you answered the question, "Should I involve others?" affirmatively, which alternative in Figure 8.2 should be used in making a decision? Justify your choice.

What are the most important considerations in deciding whom to involve in this task?

If others are to become involved, how much empowerment should they have? What would you do specifically to achieve the appropriate level of empowerment?

Part

What guidelines related to empowerment were violated by Ken Hoffman? By Ruth Cummings?

As discussed in the case, Hoffman and Cummins seems to have both violated several of the informal guidelines that foster empowerment. The first case was…… [Read More]

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Employees Performance Appraisals at the

Words: 4257 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10158549

The initial recommendation comes from the employee's direct supervisor and is then discussed with the general director and the payroll manager.

At the fourth stage, the performance review, the employee and his direct supervisor come once again face-to-face to discuss the outcome of the performance appraisal process. The employee is informed of the managerial decision regarding future remunerations, and a date for a new meeting is set. The new meeting will establish goals for the following year, ergo the cyclic characteristic of the appraisal system (Grote and Grote).

Aside for meeting the three scopes previously identified, performance appraisals also present the company with several benefits. For instance, they create a context in which the employee is introduced to his own core competencies and limitations, based on which he can better direct his future formation. Then, the employees take an active role in their own evaluation and get to know themselves…… [Read More]

References:

Armstrong, S., Appelbaum, M., Stress-free performance appraisals: turn your most painful management duty into a powerful motivational tool, Career Press, 2003, ISBN 1564146863

Coens, T., Kenkins, M., Block, P., Abolishing performance appraisals: why they backfire and what to do instead, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2002, ISBN 1576752003

Falcone, P., Sachs, R.T., Productive performance appraisals, 2nd edition, AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn, 2007, ISBN 0814474225,

Grote, D., Grote, R.C., the performance appraisal question and answer book: a survival guide for managers, AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn, 2002
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Why They Leave

Words: 531 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97249422

Employee Satisfaction Conclusion

In the hospitality industry, the primary product is the quality of service conveyed through a hotel's personnel. When said personnel harbor negative attitudes toward their employers, the likelihood is that the consequences will ultimately be felt by a hotel's guests. If this is so, Comfort Inn has a serious problem to address according to the concluded research. The literature evaluated and the survey-based research conducted on Employee Satisfaction at the limited service hotel reveals that entry level staff harbored largely negative attitudes toward the chain both in terms of the working environment and the quality of its hospitality.

Among the chief grievances cited by unhappy workers were a sense that the workplace was not a safe one in which to air complains or offer constructive criticism. This problem was compounded by a sense among employees that management was generally ineffective in maintaining day-to-day hotel operations. By contrast…… [Read More]

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Measuring Customer Internal Business Process and Employee Performance

Words: 1153 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82257521

Customer Satisfaction

Importance of customer satisfaction

The effect of customer satisfaction on a firm's profitability

Why measure customer satisfaction

How to measure customer satisfaction

The affective measures of the degree of customer satisfaction

Employee performance

The need for measuring employee performance

The contemporary business environment which is dynamic and highly competitive requires firms to have a high level of business intelligence. In this paper, we explore the concepts of customer satisfaction as other internal business processes such as employee performance. The aim is to explore how these constructs and parameters are measured as well as the need for their accurate measurement.

The contemporary business environment which is dynamic and highly competitive requires firms to have a high level of business intelligence. In this paper, we explore the concepts of customer satisfaction as other internal business processes such as employee performance. The aim is to explore how these constructs and parameters…… [Read More]

References

Aaker, D.A., 1995, Strategic Market Management. 4th ed., New York, John Wiley.

Bhave, A (2011).Customer Satisfaction Measurement

 http://www.symphonytech.com/articles/satisfaction.htm 

Farris, Paul W.; Neil T. Bendle; Phillip E. Pfeifer; David J. Reibstein (2010). Marketing Metrics: The Definitive Guide to Measuring Marketing Performance. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc. ISBN 0137058292
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Life Balance in Effective Employee Management Importance

Words: 2011 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9476963

Life Balance in Effective Employee Management

Importance of Work-Life Balance

The purpose of this paper is to explain the importance of work-life balance in an effective management of employees in contemporary organizations. The paper constitutes a brief introduction to the concept and a comprehensive discussion on how a good work-life balance of employees increases their morale, motivation, and commitment which ultimately contribute towards their superior workplace performance and higher organizational productivity.

Work-life balance means how employees are able to split their time and energy to manage their personal and professional lives in such a fashion that neither of them is negatively affected by the other (Eikhof, Warhurst, & Haunschild 2007). Work-life balance allows them to give time to their family commitments, personal care, community participation, and other personal life activities along with fulfilling the demands of their professional life (Saxena 2009). It is the responsibility of employers to formulate policies…… [Read More]

Resources, 49 (3): 285-307.

Moore, T., Johns, R. & Johnson, C. 2006, "Work-Life Balance Experiences of Women in the Construction Industry," International Employment Relations Review, 12 (2): 67-78.

Pedersen, V. & Lewis, S. 2012, "Flexible friends? Flexible working time arrangements, blurred work-life boundaries and friendship," Work, Employment & Society, 26 (3): 464-480.

Robbins, S. & Coulter, M. 2006, Management. 8th Edition. U.S.: Prentice Hall

Saxena, P. 2009, Principles of Management: A Modern Approach, 1st Edition. India: Global India Publications
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Motivational Theories for Various Employee Groups the

Words: 1149 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2527108

Motivational Theories for Various Employee Groups

The force that initiates certain behavior in a person is also called motivation. Motivational theories have been developed by researchers using various mechanisms like state of mind, basic needs, desires and goals of a person.

Two-Factor Theory (Herzberg)

The two-factor theory was published in 1959 by Herzberg after doing a research on the job attitudes for five years. Two different factors affect job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction, as the theory states. Thus, dissatisfaction and satisfaction should not be measured using the same continuum. The two motivating factors of the theory are motivation and hygiene factors. Motivation factors produce positive satisfaction to an employee, they are mainly intrinsic conditions e.g. responsibility, recognition, challenging work and achievement. Hygiene factors are extrinsic job conditions and absence of these results in job dissatisfaction e.g. working conditions, company policies, pay, supervision, job security, status and fringe benefits Sutaria, 1980()…… [Read More]

References

Gagne, M., & Deci, E.L. (2005). Self-Determination Theory and Work Motivation. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 26(4), 331-362.

Gratton, L.C. (1980). Analysis of Maslow's Need Hierarchy with Three Social Class Groups. Social Indicators Research, 7(1/4), 463-476.

Shore, T., Sy, T., & Strauss, J. (2006). Leader Responsiveness, Equity Sensitivity, and Employee Attitudes and Behavior. Journal of Business and Psychology, 21(2), 227-241.

Sutaria, R. (1980). Personality, Needs and Two-Factor Theory of Work Motivation. Indian Journal of Industrial Relations, 16(2), 219-232.
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Challenges a Manager Faces in Motivating Employees

Words: 1077 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89401545

Motivating Today's Employees

With respect to motivating their workers, today's employers face different challenges than those of fifty years ago. Changes in the way business is conducted, an uncertain economic climate, new expectations of both employers and employees, and a growing and increasingly diverse workforce have made old rules and practices obsolete. Employers need fresh approaches to motivate employers in the 21st century.

Numerous studies have demonstrated that, given satisfaction with their financial compensation, employees are more motivated by non-monetary incentives rather than extra cash (Dewhurst, Gutheridge & Mohr). The economic crisis of the last several years has had a detrimental effect on the general morale of employees who may have legitimate concerns about job loss, cuts in benefits, reduced wages or hours, or failure to get raises or promotions. An economic downturn is precisely the time when organizations need their workers to be motivated and engaged, with the hope…… [Read More]

References

Dewhurst, M,, Guthridge, M, and Mohr, E. (2009). Motivating people, getting beyond money.

McKinsey Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com

/Motivating_people_Getting_beyond_money_2460

Gautschi, T.F. (1989). Hawthorne studies: A workplace classic." Design News 455(20), 180.
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Ethics and Social Responsibilities

Words: 3234 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25820183

Employees as Benefactors of Corporate Philanthropy

Corporate Social esponsibility

The Case for Employees as Benefactors of Corporate Philanthropy

The Case for Employees as Benefactors of Corporate Philanthropy

A United Auto Workers unionization vote recently made the news, in part because the vote was taking place in the Southeastern United States where conservative state legislators have historically treated organized labor with hostility, but what seemed to be most newsworthy about this event was that the corporation, Volkswagen, decided to take a neutral position (Paresh, 2014). The vote took place last week and workers at the Chattanooga, Tennessee plant decided to reject union membership by a narrow margin. The national news media also took note when several conservative Tennessee politicians remained true to their anti-union ideology by threatening to end subsidies for Volkswagen and to push production of a new vehicle to Mexico. Experts in labor law believed these threats were coercive…… [Read More]

References

"2012 Corporate Responsibility Report." (2013). Retrieved 22 Feb. 2014 from  https://corporate.target.com/_media/TargetCorp/csr/pdf/2012-corporate-responsibility-report.pdf .

Barnett, M.L. (2007). Stakeholder influence capacity and the variability of financial returns to corporate social responsibility. Academy of Management Review, 32(3), 794-816.

Dennis, W.J. Jr. (2000). Wages, health insurance and pension plans: The relationship between employee compensation and small business owner income. Small Business Economics, 15(4), 247-63.

Fassin, Y., Van Rossem, A., & Buelens, M. (2010). Small-business owner-managers' perceptions of business ethics and CSR-related concepts. Journal of Business Ethics, 98, 425-53.