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Standards-Based Curriculum for English Language
Words: 1551 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 51554388
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(Farah and idge, 2009)

The successful shift from textbook, memory-based curriculum to a standards-based curriculum is therefore dependent on three things: the development of national standards and goals for curriculum; the development of corresponding assessment tools; and the re-education of teachers towards the objective of altering teachers' attitudes and views of their role in the education system. ather than simply drilling memorized facts, words or phrases into a student's consciousness-as is the case with a memory-based curriculum-teachers in a standards based, student-centered curriculum are responsible for helping students to apply such knowledge to practical situations for social success, over and above academic success.

eferences

English as a Second Language. (2010). etrieved December 30, 2010, from http://www.rong-chang.com/

English Teachers Network. (2010). Why Have a Standards-Based Curriculum and What are the Implications for the Teaching-Learning Assessment Process?. etrieved December 30,

2010, from http://www.etni.org.il/red/etninews/issue4/whystandard.html

Farah, S., & idge, N. (2009). Challenges to Curriculum…

References

English as a Second Language. (2010). Retrieved December 30, 2010, from  http://www.rong-chang.com/ 

English Teachers Network. (2010). Why Have a Standards-Based Curriculum and What are the Implications for the Teaching-Learning Assessment Process?. Retrieved December 30,

2010, from http://www.etni.org.il/red/etninews/issue4/whystandard.html

Farah, S., & Ridge, N. (2009). Challenges to Curriculum Development in the UAE. Dubai

English in Thailand Teaching English
Words: 4751 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54473182
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2002, 108)." By 1996 the teaching of English in Thailand was compulsory for all primary children from the first grade.

Teaching English as a Second Language in Thailand

Although the teaching of English as a second language has been present in Thailand for quite some time, there are still many issues that arise as it pertains to teaching English in Thailand. In some ways it may appear that English language pedagogy is still in its infancy. For instance many people in Thailand have low degrees of proficiency in English (Laopongharn & Sercombe, 2009). This is particularly true as it pertains to the speaking and writing of English. The problems present in Thailand as it pertains to Teaching English as a foreign language has many different causes (Laopongharn & Sercombe (2009). For the purposes of this discussion, Thai culture will be explored as an impediment to the teaching of English as…

References

Adamson, J., 2003. Challenging beliefs in teacher development: potential influences of Theravada Buddhism upon Thais learning English. Asian EFL journal, 5 (3), 1-21.

Adamson, J., 2005. Teacher development in EFL: what is to be learned beyond methodology in Asian contexts?. Asian EFL journal, 7 (4), 74-84.

Chou, C. 2000. Chinese Speakers' Acquisition of English Conditionals: Acquisition Order and L1 Transfer Effects. Second Language Studies, 19(1), pp. 57-98

Forman R. (2008) Using notions of scaffolding and intertextuality to understand the bilingual teaching of English in Thailand. Linguistics and Education 19-319 -- 332

Language Barrier
Words: 933 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 40791686
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Sometimes students have obstacles to contend with as they enter school. One such barrier can be language. The student I worked with is a Chinese first year student who is attempting to assimilate to AP class schedules. He is a 14-year old interested in learning the English language and is having problems not only learning the language but balancing out the needs of his identity versus the American culture. English Language Learners often must contend with several influences and deal with a new culture that may seem dauting and stressful[footnoteRef:1]. His name is Bo. [1: Larry Ferlazzo, English Language Learners: Teaching Strategies That Work (Santa Barbara, Calif: Linworth, 2010)]
Bo recently immigrated to the United States with his family two years ago. While Bo has learned conversational English and some grammar, he still has problems writing in English. The way to write simplified Chinese is different than English and so…

Language Barriers Among the Karen People
Words: 4083 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38498576
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GAP stands for Guadalupe Alternative Programs and stands to serve St. Paul's Latino youth living on the West Side for the last fifty years. Programs like GAP have existed to promote the wellbeing of St. Paul's, Minnesota's Latino student population by offering services like counseling, educational programs, emergency resources, and job assistance (GAP, n.d.). While GAP still assists the Latino student population, times have changes and the Latino population has decreased, opening GAP services to diverse ethnic backgrounds. This has led to a recent issue of understanding the needs of the current population of GAP students.

The current population consists of English language learners, refugees (Karen refugees), and low income students. Social work interns at GAP recognized external factors that may affect GAP students. This has led to the desire to promote wellness among the current student GAP population. This research study is meant to provide an understanding of what…

Language and Literacy Lesion Plan
Words: 2798 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41760761
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Progression and Foundation of Language

Concept/topic

Learning of primary language complements skills development; this includes learning about language, as well as learning other subjects in the school curriculum via language. Language learning facilitates general literary skills and allows children to revert to, and strengthen skills and concepts studied through their first language (The National Strategies Primary, 2009).

Curriculum is enriched by language learning. Teachers as well as children find it fun and challenging, and display enthusiasm towards language; this leads to creation of interested learners and the development of positive attitudes towards learning languages, all throughout one's life. A natural link exists between language and other curricular areas, and this enriches the overall teaching-learning experience. Proficiencies, understanding, and information learned through language contribute greatly to literacy and oracy development in children, as well as to better understanding of one's own and others' cultures. Language is also integral to community and…

Bibliography

(n.d.). Anticipatory Set/Hook. Weebly. Retrieved from:  http://ed491.weebly.com/uploads/8/4/6/1/8461140/anticipatorysets.pdf 

(2013). Arizona Early Learning Standards. Arizona Department of Education. Retrieved from:  http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED486135.pdf 

(n.d.). Developing Lessons with Technology. Retrieved from:  http://www.pearsonhighered.com/assets/hip/us/hip_us_pearsonhighered/samplechapter/0136101259.pdf 

Huppenthal, J., Stollar, J., & Hrabluk, K. (n.d.). Arizona State Literacy Plan. Arizona Department of Education. Retrieved from:  http://www.azed.gov/standards-practices/files/2012/06/arizona-state-literacy-plan-compiled-doc-9.29.11.pdf .

English as a Foreign Language in America
Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21192317
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Foreign Language Learning

In DeJong's Foundations for Multilingualism in Education, the idea that multilingualism should not be viewed as a specialty but rather treated as a norm is a good one, as Dutta indicates in his experience of growing up using various languages, believing them to be one entity not separate as they are viewed in the West (DeJong, 2011, p. 1). For instance, the UK's tendency to "teach" a separate language in one class but to ignore it in all other occasions does not help to support the actual learning or usage of that language. Yet schools still have a tendency to feel the need to label students and language learners as though they needed to be marked as special or different. It should be the norm for all to learn multiple languages especially at a younger age in order to develop skills and open doors for later careers.…

References

DeJong, E. (2011). Foundations for Multilingualism in Education: from Principle to Practices. Caslon Publishing.

Samway, K and McKeon D. (2007). Myths and Realities: Best Practices for Language

Minority Students. Heinemann.

Language Acquisition and Learning in Education
Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 78735701
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Second language proficiency and academic achievement can be challenging to develop simultaneously. Krashen's (2010) work illustrates the various systems of learning, including the learning that takes place subconsciously and the learning that takes place more by rote methods. Likewise, Gottlieb (2006) differentiates between social and academic language proficiency and academic achievement for students. The acquisition of the language entails different cognitive processes than the acquisition of subject-specific knowledge. Educators armed with a more thorough understanding of academic versus language proficiency can better help their students succeed on both levels.

Krashen (2010) points out that each human being learns language in the same way. Individual differences may be important for current scientific paradigms, but for educators, a more universal approach will be far more helpful in creating a classroom environment and pedagogical approach that will be effective. After all, human biology is universal; so, too are the cognitive processes involved in…

References

Gottlieb, M. (2006). Assessing English Language Learners. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Krashen, S. (2010). On language acquisition. Retrieved online:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiTsduRreug 

"Nebraska: ELL Resources," (n.d.). Colorin Colorado. Retrieved online:  http://www.colorincolorado.org/ell-basics/resources-state/nebraska

Language Proficiency and Content Understanding
Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 18461851
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Seamless Bridge

As language may be viewed as a vehicle by which a student can better achieve academic success (Gottlieb, 2006), language proficiency assessments are ways in which the teacher can review whether or not the student is developing language proficiency rather than just content understanding. Thus the idea that students who are learning an additional or second language will seamlessly bridge into grade-level content once they reach the highest level of proficiency is a simple extension of the reality that language affords the user: it is the means by which understanding and success in a culture wherein that language is used can be obtained. Thus, if an ELL develops a true understanding and grasp of the language, the grade-level content that the student should be able to grasp is made available to him: it opens up because the language proficiency acts as the key what would otherwise be a…

References

AdLit. (n.d.). Building Trust with Families. Retrieved from  http://www.adlit.org/media/mediatopics/ells /

Gottlieb, M. (2006). Assessing English language learners: Bridges from language proficiency to academic achievement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

How Best to Learn a Foreign Language
Words: 1155 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 11722819
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Language Autobiography

What I know about language is that it is essential in life and in learning. We use it to communicate ideas, feelings, needs, and thoughts. Being social creatures, we use language to bond with people, to create bonds of affection, and to create pillars of support for each other and for society as a whole. Language is something that can unite people; but if it is not known, it can also isolate those who do not know it.

How I learned what I know about language has come from my experience as a learner. What I remember learning about learning my native language is a real reticence to actually begin speaking: I was 5 years old before I started actually speaking; I would listen to my two older brothers have conversations and from them I learned both English and Spanish. Since my family and friends mostly spoke in…

References

Adichie, C. (2009). The danger of a single story. TED. Retrieved from  http://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story 

Gottlieb, M. (2006). Assessing English language learners: Bridges from language proficiency to academic achievement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Levien, R. [mediathatmatters]. (2009, June 16). Immersion [Video file]. Retrieved from  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6Y0HAjLKYI 

North Clackamas Schools. (2013). SIOP Components and Features. Retrieved from  http://www.nclack.k12.or.us/Page/1563

Language and Language Practices Language Is the
Words: 1505 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7740802
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Language and Language Practices

Language is the written and verbal method by which people communicate with one another. It employs sounds or written designs that are understood by others to create words, phrases, and sentences. Other species have language, as well, but it is not believed to be as complex as the language used by human beings (loomfield, 1914; Deacon, 1998). There are many facets to language, and there are nuances and subtleties that are often overlooked. This is especially true with people who are just learning a language, whether they are children first learning to speak or second-language learners being exposed to a new and different language for the first time. People who study languages are involved in what is called linguistics. They may study a particular language, but more often than not they study multiple languages and the construction of those languages. What they do is very different…

Bibliography

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1914. An introduction to the study of language. New York: Henry Holt and Company.

Deacon, Terrence William. 1998. The Symbolic Species: The Co-Evolution of Language and the Brain. New York W.W. Norton & Company.

Kandel, ER; Schwartz, JH; Jessell, TM. 2000. Principles of Neural Science (fourth ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Katzner, K. 1999. The Languages of the World. New York: Routledge.

Language Is the Perfect Instrument
Words: 4854 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34736050
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Consider the fact that the Iroquois are said not to have had a strong word for the singular "I," and that they subsequently developed what was arguably the longest lasting communal representative democracy the world has ever known. The Inuit, whose culture revolves around the arctic world, have dozens of words for snow - this sort of technical knowledge allows quick and accurate transmission of conditions and training in survival.

In Western terms, one remembers that Jesus Christ was said to be "The Word," yet in the original Greek this indicates not only a spoken word but also the Logos - the root term for intellectual reason, for Meaning within context (be that the context of a sentence, a life, a history, or a universe); logos was rational order. The difference between saying that a religious figure is the Word (which at its most profound seem to indicate a kind…

Bibliography

Atkins, J.D.C. (1887). Report of the commissioner of Indian affairs. House Exec. Doc. No. 1, Pt. 5, 50th Cong., 1st Sess. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Boston Language Institute. "TEFL FAQ  http://teflcertificate.com/faq.html 

Ethnologue. "English  http://www.ethnologue.com/show_language.asp?code=eng 

Macha, Freddy. "Tanzanian Independence Day Abroad. http://www.unclesamofafrica.com/TanzaniaGuardian.htm

Language Teaching and Learning Methods
Words: 3071 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98946947
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Further, it is in this stage that instructors have the ability to widen the instruction significantly to incorporate many activities that allow students to practice their new knowledge in a variety of different ways and with focus on a variety of different subject matters.

In viewing the basic theoretical and practical-use background of the Natural Approach of Language Teaching and Learning, one can understand that basic functions that allow students the ability to hone new skills in a non-threatening environment. However, despite significant praise in the teaching community regarding the success of the Natural Approach, the method's critics still exist. Due to this, it is crucial to understand the advantages as well as the disadvantages that exist when the Natural Approach is employed in a language learning environment, especially in dealing with English as a second language.

Advantages and Disadvantages

In beginning to understand the overall value of the Natural…

Works Cited

Canale, Michael and Swain, Merrill. 2002. "Theoretical Basis of Communicative

Approaches to Second Language Teaching and Testing," Applied Linguistics: 1(1): pp. 1-47. Retrieved from: https://segue.atlas.uiuc.edu/uploads/nppm / CanaleSwain.80.pdf [Accessed on 17 February 2012].

Clandfield, Lindsay and Meldrum, Nicola. 2012. "One-to-one methodology: advantages and disadvantages for students." Retrieved from: http://www.onestopenglish .com/business/teaching-approaches/teaching-one-to-one/methodology/one-to-one-methodology-advantages-and-disadvantages-for-students/144655.article [Accessed on 19 February 2012].

Gebhard, J., Gaitan, S. And Oprandy, R. 1990. "Beyond Prescription: The Student

Laufer Min Language Acquisition Literature
Words: 1695 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 87480316
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The groups were distinguished by those who participated in language acquisition activities employing enhanced reading with word-based activities and those who participated in what the researcher called 'narrow reading,' which occurred without this supplementary instruction. The two groups were asked to retain the same scope of fifty selected vocabulary words. Min would find that those in the former group, denoted as the "RV" group, performed significantly better than those in the "NR" group. In interpretation, Min tells that "the results show that the RV group demonstrated significantly more knowledge about the target vocabulary than the NR group on the acquisition and retention tests. The researcher concludes that reading plus focused vocabulary exercises are more effective and efficient than the narrow reading approach in enhancing target vocabulary acquisition and retention among EFL secondary students." (Min, p. 75)

Min would go on to suggest that the value in this study rests in…

Works Cited:

Laufer, B. & Rozovski-Roitblat, B. (2011). Incidental vocabulary acquisition: The effects of task type,-word occurrence and their combination. Language Teaching Research, 15(4), 391-411

Min, H.T. (2008). EFL Vocabulary Acquisition and Retention: Reading Plus Vocabulary Enhancement Activities and Narrow Reading. Language Learning, 58(1), 73-115.

Technology to Increase English Vocabulary
Words: 2448 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 72539915
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As a result, the variables that can be extracted from this information, is that there needs to be a wide variety of solutions made available to educators. At the same time, there must be more support in helping them to reach out to these students. Once this occurs, it will provide the greatest amounts of learning comprehension. This helps to make the Action Research Project more effective by: understanding how this can improve the student's grasp of the materials and what are the underlying weaknesses in using this technology. (Zimmerman, 2009, pp. 3356 -- 3362)

This resource that was written by Freeman (2008) is significant, because it is highlighting how using technology to teach English language learners can improve the overall amounts of learning comprehension. The reason why, is because a host of different ideas are being presented in format that is using the various language skills of the student…

Bibliography

Black, R. (2009). English Language Learners, Fan Communities and 21st Century Skills. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy. 52 (8), 668 -- 697.

Freeman, B. (2008). Creating a Middle School Mathematics Curriculum. Remedial and Special Education. 29 (1), 9 -- 19.

Lopez, O. (2010). The Digital Learning Classroom. Computers and Education. 54 (4), 901 -- 915.

Moore, S. (2009). Uses of Technology in the Instruction of Adult English Language Learners. Centers for Applied Linguistics. 1 -- 4.

Linguicism and ELL Learners
Words: 2450 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13927917
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Linguicism and Its Implications for Assessing English Language Learners (ELL) For Suspected Disabilities

(a) Define The Term Linguicism And Explain It In Your Own Words,

Throughout the 1980s, a period of language conservatism resurfaced, with federal officials giving up their proactive position and advocating more decision making be moved to local control. The 1980s in addition saw the increase of the official English or English-only movement, which sparked the contemporary debate around the language and which shaped new tensions for educators teaching linguistically assorted students (Banks, 2006). During the 1990s, the sociopolitical environment became openly antagonistic toward the linguistic rights of non-English speakers with the passage of California Proposition 227 (Doppen & Tesar, 2008). The California proposition made sure that all children be placed in English-language classrooms, despite their English-language ability. Non-English-speaking, immigrant children were permitted to participate in ESL classes for 1 year (180 school days). The proposition's objective…

References

Banks, J. A. (2006). The historical reconstruction of knowledge about race: Implications for transformative teaching. Educational Researcher, 24(2), 15-25.

Banks, J., Cookson, P., Gay, G., Hawley, W., Irvine, J., Nieto, Schofield, J., & Stephan, W. (2001). Diversity within Unity: Essential Principles for Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Society. The Phi Delta Kappan, 83(3), 196-198, 200-203.

Calderon, M. E., & Wasden, R. (2012). Preparing secondary school teachers to teach reading, language and content: A look at professional development programs. In J. Coppola & E. Primas (Eds.), One classroom, many learners: Best literacy practices for today's multilingual classroom (pp. 251-270). Washington, DC: International Reading Association.

Colombi, M. C. & Schleppegrell, M. J. (2002). Theory and practice in the development of advanced literacy. In M. C. Columbi and M. J. Schleppegrell (Eds.), Developing advanced literacy in first and second languages, (pp. 1-19). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Ways to Improve Language
Words: 3384 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 18828215
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Grammar Error Correction

Grammar Correction Best Practices

The art and science of grammar correction has seismic implications on native and new speakers to English alike. The ability to communicate in a clear and cohesive fashion, both verbally and in writing, whilst using the proper syntax, punctuation, sentence structure and spelling is vital for the message to be clear. Further, it is seen as a sign of intelligence or lack thereof for someone to use the obviously wrong words and sentence structure while communicating in writing or via speech. hile grammar and languages teachers are perhaps fighting a losing battle right now given the fairly sloppy nature of many people including supposed language professionals like writers and journalists, there are indeed some verifiable and known best practices that can and should be used to help combat the grammar failures that pervade the sphere of communication in the United States as well…

Works Cited

Chan, Alice Y.W. "An Algorithmic Approach To Error Correction: An Empirical

Study." Foreign Language Annals 39.1 (2006): 131-147. Education Research

Complete. Web. 31 July 2014.

Chodorow, Martin, Michael Gamon, and Joel Tetreault. "The Utility of Article And

Learning Problems vs Language Problems
Words: 1303 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 93484975
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Learning Problems vs Language Problems

The objective of this study is to examine how learning problems and language problems are related. Specifically considered will be the fact that when students who are learning English as their second language and who are experiencing academic or behavioral difficulties that the teacher and the school's problem-solving teams must examine whether these problems are related to learning a new language or whether the problems may be due to cognitive delays or developmental delay or disability.

The work of Fisher ( nd) entitled "Assessing English Language Learners for a Learning Disability or Language Issue" states that English language learners all "with learning disabilities...too often...fall through the cracks." (p.13) The reason stated for this is that these learners are often considered to be "slow English learners, or they may be in a school district that does not have enough resources to test them in their L1…

References

Recommended Practices for Assessment, Diagnosis, and Documentation of Learning Disabilities (2014) Learning Disabilities Association of Ontario. Retrieved from:  http://www.ldao.ca/documents/Assessment%20Protocols_Sept%2003.pdf 

Special Education and English Language Learners: Guidance for LEA Staff

An Overview of the ELL/SPED Programs and the Identification Process

(Webinar #1) (nd) Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Retrieved from:  http://dese.mo.gov/sites/default/files/webinar/documents/ELL-QandA-12-09-13.pdf

Does Using Auditory Computer Files Assist College Level ESL Learners
Words: 1609 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 78530032
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Auditory Computer Files Assist College Level ESL Learners

The objective of this study is to examine whether auditory computer files assist college level ESL learners.

Linda Dwyer writes that text-to-speech readers are not generally available "outside of the disability community and may be prohibitively expensive when obtainable." (Dwyer, nd, p.1) In addition, Dwyer reports that ESL instructors are often not aware of the research or the resources that are available. Dwyer states that reading pens that are able to read line-by-line and other assistive devices that can copy and article and then paste it to the computer for text-to-speech support are useful to students who are ESL students. According to Dwyer, "ESL instructors in higher educational settings have worked primarily with high achieving international students. As such, these instructors have occupied a niche treated as short-term remedial support rather than an academic sub-field within the academy. Many positions in both…

Works Cited

Casidy (1996) in: Kurzweil Educational Systems (2005) Scientifically-Based Research Validating Kurzweil 3000: An Annotated Review of Research Supporting the Use of Kurzweil 3000 in English Language Learner Classrooms. Oct 2005. Retrieved from:  http://www.vocalinks.com/site/vocalinks/assets/pdf/K3000_ELL_Research.pdf 

Chisholm and Beckett (2003) in: Kurzweil Educational Systems (2005) Scientifically-Based Research VAliding Kurzweil 3000: An Annotated Review of Research Supporting the Use of Kurzweil 3000 in English Language Learner Classrooms. Oct 2005. Retrieved from:

Paton G 2010 English Spelling
Words: 1750 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Article Paper #: 33080470
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The author offers some concrete suggestions for creating a literacy-friendly household. The first step offered is to make reading a central household activity. This can be achieved by holding daily reading sessions in which collective reading takes place. Family reading time can consist not just of reading stories aloud but also articles from newspapers or the nutritional information on food containers. When reading is presented as a treat or a reward, rather than as a chore, the young learner is more apt to develop positive associations with literacy.

While the article lacks any scientific analysis or empirical evidence, it does offer helpful tools for parents wishing to improve their child's literacy. When literacy problems are recognized early, the child has a greater opportunity to improve and avoid falling behind in class. Because so many school subjects are reading-dependent, creating a literate household is a primary means of ensuring a child's…

Effects of Mathematics Instruction in English on ELL Second Grade Students
Words: 3174 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74903495
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Mathematics Instruction in English on ELL Second Grade Students

J. Elizabeth Estevez

Educ2205I-Content Research Seminar

Mathematics is a powerful tool for interpreting the world. Research has shown that for children to learn how to use mathematics to organize, understand, compare, and interpret their experiences, mathematics must be connected to their lives. Such connections help students to make sense of mathematics and view it as relevant. There has, however, been controversy with regard to children from non-English backgrounds and the best ways to get them to make those connections. Questions are raised regarding how to instruct these children who are referred to as English language learners (ELL's). Should they initially be taught in their native language with gradual exposure to English in language classes, or should they be immersed in English as early as possible. Based upon ideas presented in research studies and my own ideas as a former bilingual teacher,…

Assessing Oral Language Progress in School
Words: 644 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 44977278
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TESOL: Oral Language

Language form, communicative function, and social context all combine to affect students' oral language performance in the classroom, as each plays a part in applying a certain pressure on the student. For example, in the classroom, a student will naturally want to use the correct language form as it is a formal setting. At the same time, the conscientious student may also be aware that formal language is not typically used by peers, so there may be a reluctance to demonstrate a use of language that is not so common, especially if an ELL is having a hard time to fit in. Communicative function is also a factor in the students' performance in the classroom, as it relates to the concept of conveying meaning in whatever way possible. Just as a child will seek to get what it wants through oral commands that are not necessarily grammatically…

References

Gottlieb, M. (2006). Assessing English language learners: Bridges from language proficiency to academic achievement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Peregoy, S., & Boyle, O. (2013). Reading, writing, and learning in ESL: A resource book for teaching K-12 English learners. Boston, MA: Pearson.

Teaching Young Learners Through Art of Drama Under a Climate of Creativity
Words: 4513 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 58146084
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Climate of Creativity: Teaching English to Young Learners Through the Art of Drama

Several learning and involving learning experiences emerge for the early childhood students when both drama and movement are incorporated in the daily syllabus (Chauhan, 2004). Apart from being "fun" for majority of the kids, kinesthetic activities are capable of assisting the young students, particularly those learning the English language, improve interpretation skills, vocabulary, fluency, speech knowledge, syntactic knowledge, and meta-cognitive judgment (Sun, 2003). When drama and movement are employed in the teaching of language skills, the learners are provided with a framework for listening and significant language production, offers chances for writing and reading improvements (Chauhan, 2004), and engages learners in writing and reading as significant communication procedures. Other than the improvement of resourceful judgment and expression, fine and gross motor organization skills, problem tackling, social dealings, cooperative performance, rhyming, and rhythm skills can be developed (ieg…

References

August, D., Carlo, M., Dressler, C. And Snow, C. (2005). The critical role of vocabulary development for English language learners. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice 20 (1): 50 -- 57.

Brouillette, L. (2012). Supporting the Language Development of Limited English Proficient Students through Arts Integration in the Primary Grades. Arts Education Policy Review, 113(2), 68. doi:10.1080/10632913.2012.656494

Chauhan, V. (2004). Drama techniques for teaching English. The Internet TESL Journal, 10().

Courtney, R. (1980). Dramatic Curriculum. London: Heinemann Educational Books Ltd.

Education for ESL Learners
Words: 339 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 41214866
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Curriculum and Policy

DaSilva Iddings, Combs, and Moll (2012) discuss policies surrounding English language learners in the United States (ELL). The article begins by considering the nature and prevalence of this population, postulating that students from this category have come to outnumber native English speakers in American schools. This emphasizes the importance of effective English language instruction for such learners, since it would empower them to access better opportunities in the future and to become contributing members of society. According to the authors, however, educational policy in certain states hinders the ability of these students to access adequate language learning in English.

In Arizona, for example, the policy is based upon Proposition 203, which was approved for Arizona in November 2000. This initiative essentially replaces bilingual education in the state with what was known as "Structured English Immersion (SEI), by which students are to learn English only by means of…

References

DaSilva Iddings, A.C., Combs, M.C., and Moll, L. (2012). In the Arid Zone: Drying Out Educational Resource for English Language Learners Through Policy and Practice. Urban Education, 47:495

Teaching English to Spanish Speaking Students
Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 27199435
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Post SOLOM Assessment

The student observed for the Student Oral Language Observation Matrix (SOLOM) was a native Spanish-speaking 16-year-old female who was a high school sophomore. Her native country was Mexico; she had two brothers and a sister, all younger; she lived with her siblings and parents in a home near the school, and they had been in the U.S. for three years. Her current language proficiency level is limited English proficiency with her SOLOM score being a 20/25. I have met with her parents who have expressed an interest in becoming more proficient in English so as to help their children improve with the language. This fits in with the theory of Pompa (n.d.) who promotes the concept of parents participating in their children's education and Vera & Israel (2012) observe the same.

Prior to administering the initial SOLOM, my perception of the student's proficiency was that it was…

References

Gottlieb, M. (2006). Assessing English language learners: Bridges from language proficiency to academic achievement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Modern ELL Teacher. (n.d.). Google Sites. Retrieved from  https://sites.google.com/site/themoderndayeslteacher/home 

Peregoy, S., & Boyle, O. (2013). Reading, writing, and learning in ESL: A resource book for teaching K-12 English learners. Boston, MA: Pearson.

Pompa, M. (n.d.). Building trust with families. AdLit. Retrieved from  http://www.adlit.org/media/mediatopics/ells  / .

Speaking in the Target Language Is the
Words: 3146 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76841042
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speaking in the target language is the expectation that a proficient speaker will sound like a native speaker. Is this an appropriate or realistic expectation?

Not a long while after the emergence of the subject of second language acquisition (SLA), which most of the scholars think came around the time of initial years of 1970s, there has been a need to develop ways by which to measure the development of the second language, aside from the usage of detailed homogeneous skill tests which were mostly appropriate to fulfill other objectives.

As per Freeman's (2009) information, the first declaration of this need was made by Kenji Hukuta (1976). Kenji Hakuta was concerned in knowing the path of his subject Ugusiu's English language development over a period of time. Besides the aforementioned practitioners, other L1 acquisition scholars had carried out for the pupils learning English as a national language. In the research…

References

Bardovi-Harlig, K., & Dornyei, Z. (1998). Do language learners recognize pragmatic violations? Pragmatic vs. grammatical awareness in instructed L2 learning. TESOL Quarterly, 32, 233 -- 259.

Bialystok, E. (1991). Achieving proficiency in a second language: A processing description. In R. Philipson, E. Kellerman, L. Selinker, M. Sharwood Smith, & M. Swain (Eds.), Foreign/second language pedagogy research: A commemorative volume for Claus Faerch (Vol. 64, pp. 63 -- 78). Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Bialystok, E. (1993). Symbolic representation and attentional control in pragmatic competence. In G. Kasper & S. Blum-Kulka (Eds.), Interlanguage pragmatics (pp. 43 -- 59). New York: Oxford University Press.

Bouton, L.F. (1988). A cross-cultural study of ability to interpret implicatures in English. World Englishes, 7(2), 183 -- 196.

Opportunities to Help Young Learners
Words: 3322 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65494691
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An orthographic definition is one which is formalistic in the sense of being bound to the form of a word in a particular medium. It is not sensitive to distinctions of meaning or grammatical function. To this extent it is not complete" (1998, p. 4). Therefore, in an effort to help complete the definition, a reference to Webster's advises that a word is simply "something that is said" (1999, p. 2633).

Unfortunately, this formal definition does little to clear the muddied waters with respect to what a word is, and Carter (1998) suggests that, "It may be more accurate to define a word as the minimum meaningful unit of language. This allows us to differentiate the separate meanings contained in the word fair in so far as they can be said to be different semantic units" (p. 5). Furthermore, this definition fails to embrace the polysemous nature of many words.…

References

Carter, R. (1998). Vocabulary: Applied Linguistic Perspectives. London: Routledge.

Cervatiuc, A. (2007). "Assessing Second Language Vocabulary Knowledge." International

Forum of Teaching and Studies, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 40-42.

Flippo, R.F. & Caverly, D.C. (2000). Handbook of College Reading and Study Strategy

Age and Learning a New Language What
Words: 775 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 182326
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Age and Learning a New Language

hat is the ideal age for a person to be able to learn a new language? hat are the dynamics (besides age) that contribute to SLA? This paper delves into those subjects using scholarly articles as resources.

The Literature on Learning a New Language and Age

"…Early beginners, through their longer exposure to L2, reach the necessary competence levels in their two languages sooner to allow transfer in both directions…" (Djigunovic, 2010).

hy are very young students especially gifted to pick up new languages quickly? The scholarship shows that younger learners "…have no awkwardness or inhibitions with the new language" and don't get too upset when they make mistakes (Cenoz, 2003, p. 77). As to whether or not younger learners "…soak up new languages" simply because the soak up information like a sponge soaks up water, Cenoz has his doubts. Indeed studies show younger…

Works Cited

Cenoz, Jasone. (2003). "The Effect of Age on Foreign Language Acquisition in Formal

Contexts. In Age and the Acquisition of English As a Foreign Language, M. Mayo, and M.

Lecumberri, Eds. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Cummins, Jim, and Davison, Chris. (2007). International Handbook of English Language

Student Language Production Difficulties With
Words: 696 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36831899
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com). Having English sound 'stressed' correctly is often a challenge for French speakers.

Compared with some other languages, French and English have fairly similar grammatical structures. Both languages, for example, have auxiliary verbs, participles, active/passive voice, past/present/future tenses. But "there are frequent occasions when French uses a different tense to convey a particular meaning than English. Some common examples are the following faulty sentences: I have played tennis yesterday. I can't play now. I do my homework. I live in London since last year. I will tell you as soon as I will know" (Vu 2008).

Difficulties in English dialects may also pose a challenge to French speakers who have learned English in a 'normalized' fashion, denuded of regional accents. "Variation in English presents considerable challenge to schools, grounded as they are in standard English norms" (Adger 2009). French speakers, who have heard English mostly from television and in school,…

Works Cited

Adger, Carolyn Temple. (2009). Issues and implications of English dialects for teaching English

TESOL Professional Papers #3 Retrieved March 25, 2009 at  http://www.tesol.org/s_TESOL/sec_document.asp?CID=403&DID=1061 

Differences between French and English. (2009). About.com. Retrieved March 25, 2009 at  http://french.about.com/library/bl-differences.htm 

Vu, Nguyen Ngoc. (2008). The differences between English and French. University of Phoenix.

Phonological Rules in Language Phonology
Words: 583 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 9984765
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With insertion, sounds are added to words that are not apparent in spelling or slow pronunciation (Scramm, 2001). This can provide confusion to learners of a new language since the way they are instructed to pronounce certain words do not correspond to how they perceive the words visually. A couple of examples of insertion in the English language are words like "hamster," which is usually pronounced "hamster," or "month," which is usually pronounced with an exaggerated "t" sound - "mon-t-th" (Scramm, 2001).

The final category of phonological rules is deletion. This type of rule deals with processes of pronunciation in which sounds are left out, or deleted (Scramm, 2001). With the process of deletion, confusion may arise when the pronunciation of a word diverges from the way it is spelled and becomes very similar to the pronunciation of another word with completely different meaning. An example of this is the…

References

Johnson, M. (1984). A discovery procedure for certain. phonological rules. In COLING-84, Stanford, CA, pp. 344-347.

Ferguson, R. (2006). Basic processes in reading: Can Functional Phonological Recoding be blocked? Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology.

Schramm, a. (2001). Phonological Rules. Retrieved 6/09/2007 from http:www.hamline.edu/personal/aschramm/linguistics2001/9phonrlz.html.

Perceptions of Interlink Language Center
Words: 1381 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 69964423
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These different perspectives were based upon their language learning experiences from the past, their language proficiency, their current academic needs, and also their future career choices. To bridge the gap, the teachers engaged in dialogue with the students to determine the best ways to engage the students individually (Pazaver, and Wang 35).

In a study in the International Journal of English Studies, the authors used ELT materials in order build of a reliable instrument to help in the potential for the promotion of implicit and explicit components in ESL learning by students. The found that implicitness and explicitness were promoted equally by the ESL teaching units in three different textbooks (Criado Sanchez, Sanchez Perez, and Cantos Gomez 129). In an article in the journal of Applied Linguistics, .W. Schmidt analyzes issues that impact upon explicit learning modalities. He concludes that subliminal language learning is impossible. Also, he notes that it…

References

Akakura, Motoko. "Evaluating the Effectiveness of Explicit Instruction on Implicit and Explicit L2

knowledge." Language Teaching Research. 16.1 (2012): 9 -- 37.

Criado Sanchez, Raquel, Aquilano Sanchez Perez, and Pascual Cantos Gomez. "An Attempt to Elaborate a Construct to Measure the Degree of Explicitness and Implicitness in ELT

Materials." International Journal of English Studies. 10.1 (2010): 103-129.

Concept Learner Centered Curriculum in TESOL
Words: 4782 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63782176
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Learner-centered curriculum' in TESOL

The most important learning processes in any school anywhere in the world involve the use of several different means of communication. The communication methods may be verbal or non-verbal. Verbal communication involves the use of oral and written symbols that can communicate a message to the student, and non-verbal involves the use of, primarily, among other means, body language. Without communication there can be no means of telling the other person what one person wants or needs, and communication is used between teachers and parents, between groups, between the parents and the community, and also for the formation of interpersonal relationships and as the medium of instruction in a school. Any sort of behavioral problems in school would be dealt with by effective means of communication, and it can be stated that without communication there would be no education.

However, the culture or the background of…

References

Bacon, Suzanne. "Communicative Language Teaching" Retrieved From

http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/articles/comlangteach/index.htm Accessed on 15 November, 2004

Counihan, Gerard. (July 1998) "Teach students to interact, not just talk" The Internet TESL Journal, Vol. IV, No. 7. Retrieved From

 http://iteslj.org/Techniques/Counihan-Interaction.html  Accessed on 15 November, 2004

Acquisition of Language Is a
Words: 2064 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 60998297
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Reardless or whther the second language learner is a child or an adult there must be a concerted effort put for the to understand the cultural context of the second language. This responsibility lies with instructors and students. The instructor has te responsibility to teach certain cultural nuances ad habits and the learner has the responsibility of having an open mind so that the culture can be acquired. Failure to do so make it extremely difficult for an individual to acquire a second language. The impact of second language acquisition is that it serves as a conduit between the first culture and the language of the second culture. Once cultural context is understood the individual understands how to use the language and how to understand pothers when they use the language. This ability to communicate is often an aspect of language acquisition that is difficult to understand because the rules…

Works Cited

Bowlin, Carla Mackenzie Culture and language: communication barriers for Hispanic immigrants working in the U.S. And their Anglo-managers. Appalachian State University, 2006. Print

Citron, James L. "Can Cross-Cultural Understanding Aid Second Language Acquisition? Toward a Theory of Ethno-Lingual Relativity." Hispania 78.1: (1995) 105-113. Print

Hidasi .Judit The Impact of Culture on Second Language Acquisition.  http://www.childresearch.net/RESOURCE/RESEARCH/2006/exfile/HIDASI.pdf 

Ilieva, R. . "Exploring culture in texts designed for use in adult ESL Classrooms." TESL Canada Journal, 17.2 (2000):50-63.Print

Acculturation of ESL Learners in
Words: 3390 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 3248697
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, notes at that there has been a "paucity of studies" on the effectiveness of video in teaching culture through foreign-language programs. Herron investigated whether students retain more ("little c") cultural "practices" or ("big C") cultural "products" by watching video in a second-language program (Herron, 1999, p. 522). Thirty-eight students were given a pretest before watching the 10 videos that were part of the French-language curriculum. Immediately afterward they were given a post-test. Interestingly, in terms of their evolving understanding of French culture, in 8 of the 10 total post-video quizzes, the students gave higher scores to their "little c" (understanding cultural practices) than to "big C" (cultural products). And 84.2% of the 38 students believed that the 10 videos showed "a lot or a vast amount" of little c (cultural practices in France) presented and 42.1% believed that "a lot or a vast amount" of big C (cultural products…

Works Cited

Herron, Carol, Dubreil, Sebastien, Corrie, Cathleen, and Cole, Steven. (2002). A Classroom

Investigation: Can Video Improve Intermediate-Level French Language Students' Ability

To Learn about a Foreign Culture? The Modern Language Journal, 86(i), 36-53.

Herron, Carol, Cole, Steven P., Corrie, Cathleen, and Dubreil, Sebastien. (1999). The

Ipa ESL Learners' Attitudes Order
Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 67737727
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Lam (2000) noted that the top-down implementation of technology by administration and senior staff may make teachers resent and avoid its utilization. He added that concern regarding legitimacy of the computer as an effective educational tool has an influence on teacher adoption. He suggested that language teachers are not technophobes, as some believe, but do not incorporate technology because institutions and programs fail to notice the importance of training teachers and matching their goals with the tools they wish to use. Differences in acceptance and adoption of technology also occur in students, with some being more accepting of computer-aided learning than others. According to Na (2001), male students frequently have more confidence in computer technology than females. It is also known that students have different learning styles (VanZile-Tamsen & Livingston, J.A., 1999; Sankaran et al., 2000). There is thus a need to match course formats with students' attitudes and learning…

Chinese as a Foreign Language
Words: 4930 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 68701269
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The pogam pimaily suppots the local Chinese communities to maintain younge geneation's heitage backgound, and speading Chinese cultue in the U.S. The classes ae nomally held two to thee hous on weekends with Chinese language lessons and othe taditional cultual and at activities. Most students have high levels of oal poficiency in Chinese, but needed to enhance skills in liteacy. Chinese heitage schools ae mainly suppoted by two goups: the National Council of Associations of Chinese Language Schools (NCACLS) which is founded by Taiwan o Hong Kong immigant and heitage communities, and the Chinese School Association in the United States (CSAUS) that is connected with immigant and heitage communities fom mainland China. Accoding to Scott McGinnis's (2005) compiled statistics, the combined enollment of NCACLS and CSAUS was aound 150,000 in 2003. The numbe of students in the heitage schools is lage than in othe CFL pogams acoss the U.S.

Many…

references for the researchers and educators that may lead to some recommendations in developing a better learning environment in future foreign language education. The data collected from the surveys will be treated as confidential by me, and all the collected data will be anonymous. The data will be only applied directly to this study and not in other use, nor is it available for other parties. A letter of consent form will be sent to all participants to be aware to the purpose and the use of this study from the collected data. All collected data will be protected by the researcher during the study.

Instrumentation/Materials

A survey developed by the researcher of this study includes two sections of questions which relate to the foreign language learning. The first part of the questions is based on the participants' background and their children's background relating to their cultural and language background. The second section includes questions about the reason of sending their child to CFL program; what level do they want their child to complete Chinese language learning, and what area do they want their child to apply the language. The participants choose from the options provided that applies to them the best. There are three open ended questions, allowing for free comments. (See appendix a).

Research design

The research is a qualitative research design that investigates the similarities and differences between parental motivations towards CFL learning between diverse ethnicities by using an online survey to explore the two essential questions in this research.

Dual Language With the Abundance
Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 76825614
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The graph on figure 2 of Collier and Thomas' article (p. 8) also attests to the efficacy of two way immersion classes, perhaps even more so than the first graph. This is primarily due to the fact that there is a greater disparity in the average test scores for students who were enrolled in these classes, versus those that are not. Furthermore, since the learning of English is the principle objective for dual language learners, this graph attests to the value in students enrolling in two way immersion courses in which they learn both Spanish and English.

Another fact that this second graph alludes to, and which is noted in comparison efforts with the first graph, is that there is a relationship between achievement in Spanish and achievement in English. This is particularly true for non-native English speakers. Learning basic fundamental aspects of their own language naturally correlates to a…

References

Collier, V.P, Thomas, W.P. (2004). "The astounding effectiveness of dual education for all." NABE Journal of Research and Practice. 2:1.

Brain-Based Language Arts Lesson Plan
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Brain-Based Language Arts Lesson Plan:

Grade 2 -- "th" ords

Brain-Based Language Arts Lesson Plan: Grade 2 -- "th" ords

Language Arts

Spelling

"Th" ords

Grade

Cross-curricular link(s): Non-specific

Recommended Usage: Summary, entire class

Intended Learning Outcomes:

Identify common word strings;

Impress students with the fact that "t" and "h" written together make a different sound

State Standards (Perma-Bound, n.d.):

Spell common, frequently used words correctly

Identify and define new words and concepts.

Pronounce most words accurately.

Learning to Read Independently: Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g., root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture and context clues to decode and understand new words during reading.

Anticipatory Set:

Healthy; Thump; Then; Threw; Together; Fifth; Tooth; Thread; Mother; Father; Think; Other; Truth; Seventh; Birthday; Teeth

Teaching/Learner Activities (Olsen, 2004):

a. Activity 1: 10 minutes:

Read a story to the class from their reading book. rite "TH" on the blackboard. Have the…

Works Cited

Hurtova, D. (Winter 2000). Feedback. Retrieved from Dana Hurtova's Web site: danahurtova.sweb.cz/files/kanam3/feedback.rtf

Language Arts Department: Mrs. Knutelsky, Supervisor K - 12. (2010, August 31). Lesson closure. Retrieved from Jefferson Township Web site: http://blogs.jefftwp.org/wordpress/rknutelsky/2010/08/31/lesson-closure/

Olsen, K. (2004). TH words | Smart notebook lesson # 592. Retrieved from Exchange.Smarttech.com Web site:  http://exchange.smarttech.com/search.html?q=+th+words&subject=English+Language+Arts&grade=Grade+2&region=en_US 

Perma-Bound. (n.d.). Pennsylvania state standards for language arts: Grade 2. Retrieved from Perma-Bound.com Web site:  http://www.perma-bound.com/state-standards.do?state=PA&subject=language-arts&gradeLevel=2

American Sign Language Interpreters the
Words: 1748 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45296739
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This program will be offered in the Leadership Development Seminar in which students are offering challenging experiences as well as the areas of higher-level academic pursuits which includes a historical journey through the history of deafness related individuals.

Merrill Lynch has also developed a program targeting deaf students, which was released in a news announcement earlier this month of March 2005. The Merrill Lynch Entrepreneur Leadership Program is offering a program to prepare those interested in entrepreneurial leadership designed for individuals who are deaf and interested in becoming entrepreneurs. Modern technological online modules for learning will be utilized and will simultaneously deliver the information in both ASL and English.

Conclusion:

It is clear that ASL Interpreters in classrooms is much needed for the student who is deaf if they are to experience a normal and successful education in the classroom setting. And as shown the student who is deaf and…

Bibliography

Lawrence, Constance (2001) Using Sign Language in Your Classroom 2001 Apr 19 ED459557.

Belka, Robert W. (2000) 'Is American Sign Language a "Foreign Language" ED339662.

Wallinger, Linda (2000) American Sign Language Instruction: Moving from Protest to Practice ED 449660

Toth, Anne (1999) Improving the Delivery of Sign Language Instruction for Program for Parents of Children Who is Deaf and Receiving Services form a School for the Deaf. ED 437755.

Learning to Read and Write in English
Words: 1349 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21447154
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Learning to read and write in English has been one of my most treasured accomplishments in the recent past. To begin with, learning to read and write in English is in my opinion the very first step towards becoming a fluent speaker of one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. In that regard therefore, I am convinced that fluency in English is a plus as I pursue my career of choice. Given that English is one of the most common languages, corporations and most organizations would ordinarily hire individuals who can relate well with their customers and clients. Being able to read, write, and speak English will therefore give me a distinct advantage in my future job seeking endeavors. It is also important to note that fully aware that the world is increasingly becoming interconnected; the relevance of learning an additional language cannot be overstated. It is…

Works Cited

Baldwin, James. Sonny's Blues. Stuttgart: Klett Sprachen, 2009. Print.

Brinton, Margaret. 100 Little Reading Comprehension Lessons. New York: Lorenz Educational Press, 2004. Print.

Cusipag, Maria, et al. Critical Thinking through Reading and Writing. Philippines: De La Salle University Press, 2007. Print.

Lesson Plan for Kindergarten English Learners
Words: 1537 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 39349117
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Lesson Plan for Pre-School English Learners

Annotated Lesson Plan

Objective of this project is to develop a lesson plan for pre-school English learners using the annotated lesson plan. The paper uses the SIOP model to teach children English language because young children have not yet developmentally ready to learn abstract concepts. Moreover, children are not yet ready to listen to teachers for a long time or carry out a paper and pencil task. In the early school year, the teachers need to engage children to talk about topic of interests, capitalize on their curiosity, singing songs, exploring new things and playing with materials. Thus, pre-school English learners should be taught to use and practice with new words, talking with peers in fantasy and real way. A teacher intending to use a SIOP model should use supplementary materials to teach young learners rather than relying on paper and pencil tasks. The…

Grey, P. (2013). Book Review --Making the Content Comprehensible for the English Learners, SIOP Model. Acta Didactica Norge. 6(22):

Raudenbush, S. (2008). The Brown legacy and the O'Connor challenge: Transforming schools in the image of children's potential. Educational Researcher. 38(3) 169-180

Richard-Amato, P. A. (2010). Making It to Happen: From Participatory to Interactive Language Teaching - Evolving Theory and Practice. Pearson Education.

Foreign Language as the Culture
Words: 4565 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 45712302
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For both teachers, however, Boxer and Cortes-Conde highlight moments where the teacher talk lends itself to greater student interaction. At these moments, the teachers often fostered group discussions by asking students about their own cultural norms. When teachers took on the role of information brokers, students resumed the role of passive learners. The authors argue that open dialogue is crucial to fostering pragmatic and sociocultural competence, and that teachers can create this open dialogue and a place of comfort and still encourage pragmatic awareness. (Hall & Verplaetse, 2000, p. 15)

Stressing among new and existing foreign language educators the importance of classroom interaction as well as cultural expression is essential, as the manner in which context is delivered, as apposed to content lectured upon creates foundational interest and potential independent motivation to learn. Curriculum, must be inclusive and collaborative to engender individual motivation, which is essential to foreign language learning,…

References

Atanda, R. "Do Gatekeeper Courses Expand Education Options?" Education Statistics Quarterly 1:1 Retrieved October 10, 2007 at  http://nces.ed.gov/programs/quarterly/vol_1/1_1/4-esq11-c.asp  www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002451570

Belz, J.A. (2002). Social Dimensions of Telecollaborative Foreign Language Study. Language, Learning & Technology, 6(1), 60. Retrieved October 17, 2007, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002451570 

Christian, D., Pufahl, I., & Rhodes, N.C. (2005). Fostering Foreign Language Proficiency: What the U.S. Can Learn from Other Countries. Phi Delta Kappan, 87(3), 226.

Creswell, John (1997) Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing From Among Five Traditions. New York: Sage Pulications.

Addressing Issues in Language Disabilities
Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 88209388
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Semantics envisages language meaning and the term focuses on the interpretation of individual words and the denotations that arise from word combinations (Chapter 7, n.d.). The word 'song' can elucidate on this definition. The latter refers to a composition of words or a poem that individuals can sing. Additionally, the word 'song' can be used to show the element of possession, for example, ihanna's song. Semantics can be classified into two namely, receptive and expressive facets. eceptive dimension points to the understanding of language. On the other hand, expressive semantics denotes production of meaningful discourse (Chapter 7, n.d.). The classification of semantics engages the generality in objects, actions, and relations between objects.

Pragmatics alludes to the use of language. The term incorporates rules that dominate the engagement of language for social interaction (Chapter 7, n.d.). The rules of pragmatics are centered on influencing the actions and attitudes of the listener.…

Breda O'Hara-davies 2010 The Paradox of English
Words: 893 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Paper #: 8475952
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Breda O'Hara-Davies (2010): The paradox of English, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural

Development, 31:2, 107-118

In this article the author explores the contradictions present as a result of teaching English within the Brunei society. The study is important because it examines the vestigial influences of colonization. Deep currents of nationalistic fervor run counter to the need to fit into the wider global environment. Additionally, the study examined the question of the existence of a "colonized consciousness" and sought to understand the spread of the English language through Brunei. The author examines the theoretical framework of English as a colonizing tool, as opposed to English as a medium to preserve otherness and segregation. Using a qualitative research design the author found a multiplicity of themes that pointed to a movement of students towards a more centrist position. Many of the young persons were not unconsciously subsumed into the English culture. They…

Use of Technology to Support ADD and ADHD Learners K-8
Words: 1498 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 51163306
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nology to Support ADD and ADHD Learners (K-8)

Research Paper

November 6, 2005

Use of Technology to Support ADD and ADHD Learners (K-8)

Abstract

The student with AD/HD is one that requires more specialized and individualized instruction. Technological possibilities present great potential in providing these instructional needs for the AD/HD learner. Technology implemented in the school and in the classroom is critically dependent upon collaboration in development and implementation which is inclusive of the participation of students, teachers, parents and the community at large. Some of these technological methods that are included in the curriculum are use of video, networking, PDAs, email, Internet access and other various technologies. The objective of this work is the research and review of technologies that have been effective as well as ineffective and finally the technologies that offer new promise to the teaching and learning initiative for students with disabilities in learning such as…

Works Cited 00- [HIDDEN] -291 4-01 2M.

ADHD: Interventions for Elementary School Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (2005) ADDinSchool.com Online available at:  http://www.addinschool.com/elementary.htm 

SNR Network Resources Copyright 2005

Students Classified as ESL English
Words: 3060 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 73472556
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The components can be ranked by level of importance or relevance to the subject.

Sequential Graphic Organizers: Sequential organizers allow the educator to assess the ability of the student to logically link ideas and concepts together. Cause/effect and problem/solution are common types of sequential organizers.

Cyclical Graphic Organizers: According to Struble, cyclical graphic organizers help educators evaluate the ability of students to comprehend natural cycles.

In reviewing the application of graphic organizers to the science classroom, Struble (2007) further reports that these tools can provide a clear understanding of student learning at any given point in time. In addition, these tools can be used to assess student learning over the course of a lesson or unit. Because graphic organizers allow individual assessment of student learning, Struble also argues that these tools can be effective for "assessing student with limited English skills or with learning disabilities" (p. 71). Because these tools…

References

Craig, D.V. (2007). Alternative, dynamic assessment for second language learners. ERIC Database, (ED453691), 1-17.

Barlow, L., & Coombe, C. (2000). Alternative assessment Acquisition in the United Arab Emirates. ERIC Database, (ED448599), 1-8.

Bybee, R.W., & Van Scotter, P. (2007). Reinventing the science curriculum. Educational Leadership, 64(4), 43-47.

Fitch, G.K. (2007). A rubric for assessing a student's ability to use the light microscope. American Biology Teacher, 69(4), 211-214.

Meeting Learner's Needs
Words: 1466 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Application Essay Paper #: 71682771
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TEKS

Identify your content area and grade level

My content area is English with an emphasis on grades 7 through 12.

Create a tiered assignment (at least 7) for that content level. Example within module

The classroom is now becoming very heterogeneous. Students due in part to cultural influences are now becoming more diverse. This diversity, although a benefit to the class, also provides opportunities in regards to tiered assignments. I will use tiered assignments particularly to help motivate and engage students who are at varying levels of comprehension. These assignments will ensure that students explore ideas the foster continued growth while also building a solid foundation of knowledge (1).

I would begin a classroom session with an entry question. This question is designed to review particular concepts from the prior day's lesson. This entry question will be tiered incorporated two questions. One question will be "At grade level." The…

References

1) Scharrer, Gary. "In schools, a peek at Texas' future." Houston Chronicle. March, 20 2015. Retrieved on May 17, 2010

2) Student Assessment Division." Texas Education Agency. 2007-10-02. Retrived on March 20, 2015

3) "What is TEKS?." Texas A&M University. 20 July 2011. Archived from the original on 20 March 2015

4) Texas Education Agency - Welcome to the Texas Education Agency -  http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index .

Language Teaching and Learning in
Words: 1321 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27270341
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As an analytic method it varies from the syntactic syllabus in simliar way as the practical and procedure syllabi, particularly in the supposition that the learner learns best when using language to converse about something. TBLT also is different from the two other logical curricula in a lot of ways. It differs from the procedural syllabus in that it stresses the importance of carrying out a needs analysis prior to instruction.

Identifying likely bases of task complexity certainly is an essential precondition for making ethical choices regarding the grading and sequencing of functions, upon which many of the worth of the TBLT will rest. Grading and sequencing of pedagogic errands is certainly a chief test for the task-based syllabus creators.

Principles and features of task-based language teaching.

Prabhu's observations, stated at the beginning of the project, guide to the first belief of task-based interaction that "language is a basically just…

Works Cited

Alex, J., 2001. Recognizing Task Designs. Journal of Education, 2(5), pp. 23-34.

Breen, M., 2004. Process syllabus for the language classroom.. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

Breen, M., 2005. Learner contributions to task design.. Chicago: Penguin.

Candlin, C.N., 1984. Syllabus design as a critical process, ELT Documents. Cambridge: Pergamon & the British Council.

Ells Elsa Is an Eager
Words: 1558 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 80873512
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The word layer is a figurative one in this case, as layers generally refer to more concrete items as in layers of cake or clothing. Similarly, the question about where the tree house landed is also an abstract one. The author never spells out exactly where the tree house landed. That information must be inferred from the text and places an extra burden on the ELL. Ms. Smith asks Elsa why the chapter is titled "Yikes!" when "Yikes!" is a slang word that is rarely used in the spoken language.

To foster Elsa's overall literacy development, Ms. Smith should consider the specific issues raised by this case study. A text like this one using past participle verb forms should be read aloud for better comprehension. Ms. Smith might also consider the advice offered by Lucas et al. (2008) to emphasize "communicative competence over formal accuracy." Because Elsa thrives in social…

Reference

Lucas, T., Villegas, A., & Freedson, M. (2008). Linguistically responsive teacher education. Journal of Teacher Education. 59(4). P. 1-9.

Connected Immigrant Communities Chaney 2010
Words: 4201 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 69242488
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Meng and Meurs (2009) examine the effects of intermarriage, language, and economic advantage. They find that immigrants who have some skill in the dominant language of the country to which they immigrate tend to intermarry and earn more income (Meng and Meurs). Marrying outside of one's culture may influence language acquisition due to social and economic needs to advance within the adopted culture.

Moua and Lamborn (2010) note that ethnic socialization practices by parents of immigrant adolescents strengthen the ethnic heritage connection between adolescent, parent, and ethnic community. These include native language use, marriage ties, taking part in cultural events, sharing history, and preparing traditional foods (Moua and Lamborn). As noted previously, immigrant parents tend to congregate in ethnic communities, where they are essentially immersed in the ethnic culture. The native language is often the most utilized if not the exclusive language in the home. However, children are acculturated into…

Bibliography

Akresh, I. "Contexts of English Language Use among Immigrants to the United States." International Migration Review (2007): 930-955.

Bacallao, M and P. Smokowski. "The Costs of Getting Ahead: Mexican Family System Changes After Immigration." Family Relations (2006): 52-66.

Blatchley, L and M. Lau. "Culturally Competent Assessment of English Language Learners for Special Education Services." Communique: Newspaper of National Association of School Psychologists May 2010: 1-8.

Bleakley, H and A. Chin. "Age at Arrival, English Proficiency, and Social Assimilation Among U.S. Immigrants." American Economic Journal of Applied Economics (2010):  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2813069/pdf/nihms-132959.pdf .

Pedagogic Grammar Written and Spoken
Words: 3597 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 92431990
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e. cursing, swearing) and not using discriminatory language or language that is "racist, sexist, ageist" (Caldwell, 2004) or so forth. The concept of 'communicative competence" (Caldwell, 2004) is described as grammar that "relates to the nature of language teaching" in an approach." (Caldwell, 2004) that is fairly universally advocated in L2 teaching." (Caldwell, 2004) the mistakes that are made may either be in "form" due to lack of knowledge or through use of irregular past tense forms implying that grammar should be descriptive or mistakes in 'use" or knowing when the present perfect or the simple past tense should be used implying that grammar should be descriptive.

It is suggested by Tomlin (1994, pp. 141-42) that teaching communicative language in inclusive of (1) systematic attention to functional and structural aspects; (2) Situational and contextualized use of language in class; (3) Teaching and Learning being made transparent through representational support; (4)…

References

DeRolf, Judith D. (1995) English Communication Through Practical Experiences Kanto Gakuin Univeristy, Yokohama Japan 1995 March No. 24.

Brotoluzzi, Maria (2005) Blurring the Boundary Between Spoken and Written Language in EFL. Online available at http://iteslj.org/Lessons/Bortoluzzi-Boundary.htm.

Chou, Yen-Lin (nd) Promoting Learner's Speaking Ability by Socioaffective Strategies. Online available at  http://iteslj.org/Articles/Chou-Socioaffective.html .

Greenbaum, S. (1996) the Oxford English Grammar, Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Music on Vocabulary Competence Writing Reading Comprehension
Words: 7250 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 1305508
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Music on Vocabulary ompetence, Writing, Reading omprehension and Motivation in English Language Learning in High-School

EFFETIVENESS OF MUSI ON VOABULARY

The Effectiveness of Music on Vocabulary ompetence, Writing, Reading omprehension and Motivation in English Language Learning in High-School

Most English language learners in high schools show poor vocabulary competence. The main reason for this is the limited level of exposure to the language. It is generally understood and practically acknowledged that words form the basic unit of language structure. Therefore lack of sufficient vocabulary constrains students from effectively communicating and freely expressing their ideas.

Vocabulary competence is critical to developing reading comprehension skills. Lack of vocabulary development is detrimental to the development of metacognitive skill that is important in comprehending advanced texts. omprehension is a major component of development of vocabulary, reading to learn. Therefore, reading comprehension it is quite challenging for students lacking adequate knowledge of meaning of words.…

Chapter IV: Results and Evaluation

The main purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of using music on vocabulary competence, writing, reading comprehension and motivation in English Language Learning in High school students as a part of the learning process in the classroom. Many teachers of English as a second language as well as the learners consider vocabulary as a critical factor in learning the language. Therefore it is important to develop creative and interesting ways of teaching vocabulary in English class. A qualitative study was appropriate for the research for the reason that the objective was exploratory (Creswell, 1998). The significance that was recognized to the singularities of teaching was examined with hermeneutic methods (Creswell, 2002).

In order to give a reply to the answer of the three research questions, mean scores and standard deviations were computed for each of the two groups on each of the three dependent measures at the ending of study. All three of the dependent measures are considered to be the evaluation of the sight-reading, the evaluation of the playing abilit, and the