Ethical Principles Essays (Examples)

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Ethical Principle

Words: 557 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48485204

Ethical Principle

Fast Food Nation" is an excellent treatise on the growth of the fast food business in North America. Schlosser points out many of the serious concerns that have arisen with our newest eating habits and dietary choices. Today, one of the most dangerous epidemics we are witnessing is growing obesity among the young. This can be directly attributed to our 'fast food' fetish Schlosser also explains the disconcerting 'short cuts' being taken to meet the high-demand for this high-speed "eat-on-the-run" lifestyle. After reading this book, you will think twice before you ever again drop in to that local 'burger' joint for lunch or dinner.

It is interesting how we seem to be prepared to sacrifice every aspect of our requirements for survival. First we polluted the air, then the water, then the soil, and now we are tampering with and threatening our food supply. Maybe humans are actually…… [Read More]

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Ethical Aspects in Research Studies the Essential

Words: 1340 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94884429

Ethical Aspects in esearch Studies

The essential aspects of research are the concern and respect that the researchers offer to the participants. esearch is aimed at producing insights that are beneficial to the society. However, the research should be conducted ethically. The ethical concern in research adduces that it should not advance a society at the detriment of others especially the participants in the research. Ethics in research is vital because it guides the working principles of the researcher for the research to conform to the required standards. This is the case especially when research subjects in health or medical research are often human beings. Therefore, it is vital to respect these individuals. The guiding principles in research ethics focus on preserving the rights and dignity of the research participants. In this regard, ethics focus on ensuring consent is obtained, no harm is done, the participant's privacy is respected, and…… [Read More]

References

Austin, W. (2007). The Ethics of Everyday Practice: Healthcare Environments as Moral Communities. Advances in Nursing Science, Volume 30 - Issue 1 - p 81-88.

Bernadette M.M. & Ellen F.O. (2011). Evidence-based practice in nursing and health care: a guide to best practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Carol J.H. (2013). Professional Issues in Nursing: Challenges and Opportunities. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Corey-L., Patricia M., Anita J., Marlene Z., & Alison M. (1999). Healthcare Reform: Its Effects on Nurses. Journal of Nursing Administration, Volume 29 - Issue 3 - pp 30-37.
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Ethical and Legal Aspects of

Words: 2640 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72101523

Mudra did not act according to this principle when he ignored the warning signs of Daniel's condition.

The best course of action would therefore have been a focus on beneficence/non-maleficence rather than upon respect for autonomy. Daniel's age is also an important factor. Concomitantly with his condition, Daniel's immaturity and a desire to "prove" his independence to his parents, could have contributed to his death. When treating such young persons, it is perhaps advisable to place emphasis upon non-maleficence rather than respect for autonomy. In terms of these two principles, it would be acceptable for the parents to complain.

In terms of scope, the final principle, justice, is not as applicable to Daniel's case itself as it is to his parents. The parents feel aggrieved by the practitioner's lack of in-depth knowledge and action regarding Daniel's condition. They are seeking justice for themselves, but it is too late for such…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Stone, J. (2002) an ethical framework for complementary and alternative therapists.

Routledge.

Applebe, G. & Wingfield, J. (1997) Applebe's Pharmacy law and ethics. The Pharmaceutical Press

Gillon, R. & Lloyd, a. (eds.) (1993). Principles of health care ethics. Wiley.
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Ethical Training Success and Failures

Words: 3400 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79115192

Ethical Training -- Successes and Failures

Ethical Training: Successes and Failures

Ethics are often thought of as black and white, but that is really not the case. There are many shades of grey, and what is ethical in some instances may not be ethical in others. Additionally, there are concerns when it comes to what one person thinks is ethical vs. what another would find ethical. That is often why there are so many discrepancies and issues to consider when one talks about ethics. It is not just a simple issue where a person can say that something is always ethical or not ethical. Instead, the situation must be considered, as well as the people and the circumstances surrounding everything. In many cases, the issue comes down to ethical training, which does not always work out well. The plan is to train people to act ethically, but training someone to…… [Read More]

References

Becker, L.C. & Becker, C.B. (2002). Encyclopedia of Ethics (2nd ed.). NY: Routledge.

Singer, P. (2000). Writings on an ethical life. London: Harper Collins Publishers.
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Ethical Communication

Words: 2175 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20242649

Ethical Communication

The Definition of Ethics

In practically all areas of society ethical subjects are rapidly increasing. Professionals in the health field struggle with ethical questions in relation to abortion, transplants, birth control, informed consent, life-support systems, malpractice suits, patient privacy, human genetics, and high costs of insurance, as well as care on the whole. Ethical matters in relation to nuclear power accidents, oil spills, disposal of industrial waste, defense weaponry, lead and asbestos poisoning, acid rain, as well as ecological balance challenge those in technology, science, and industry. People in the political ground deal with ethical queries in relation to unemployment, homelessness, foreign policy decisions, Social Security, welfare reform, electioneering costs, law enforcement practices, Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) activities, racial and gender discrimination, immigration control, drugs, crime, and lobbying actions. The legal profession is blamed of unethical customs like engaging in doubtful plea-bargaining practices, motivating a harmful litigious spirit,…… [Read More]

Reference

Arnett R.C. (1992). Dialogic education: Conversation about ideas and between persons. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.

Berlo D.K. (1960). Dimensions for evaluating the acceptability of message sources. Public Opinion Quarterly, 33, 563-576.

Bauer R.A. (1964). The obstinate audience: The influence process from the point-of-view of social communication. American Psychologist, 19, 319-328.

Converse E.J., Campbell D.T., Miller R.D. And Stokes L. (1960). Nonreactive measures in the social sciences. (2nd ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
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Ethical Analysis Holding an Ethical

Words: 1005 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81585910

According to research, "Each man deserves respect because only he has had those exact life experiences and understands his emotions, motivations, and body in such an intimate matter," (ainbow 2010). Thus, Broadway was respecting the individual decisions of its players to decide whether or not the game was ok to play.

However, this was only followed outside of the United States. The decision locally was much different. Because of the nature of the young audience, there was the moral dilemma for the insertion of such sexually explicit references. And so, Broadway was not acting ethically when they failed to uphold local ethics abroad. According to research, "A winking tolerance of other's unethical behavior is in itself unethical," (Jennings 2007:14). ather than acting out of ethical obligation to others as they did to their own, Broadway let it slide and moved sales elsewhere, where they knew they could get away with…… [Read More]

References

Alexander, Larry & Moore, Michael. (2007). Deontological ethics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved February 25, 2010 from  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ethics-deontological/ 

Jennings, Marianne Moody. (2007). Business Ethics: Case Studies and Selected Readings. Cengage Learning Publishing.

Newton, Lisa H. (2008). Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in Business Ethics and Society. 10th ed. McGraw Hill.

Rainbow, Catherine. (2010). Descriptions of ethical theories and principles. Davidson College. Retrieved February 25, 2010 from  http://www.bio.davidson.edu/people/kabernd/indep/carainbow/Theories.htm
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Ethical Management in Fictitious Company

Words: 1013 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45108954

In that regard, NatHealth Inc. managers and supervisors are trained to recognize potential ethical conflicts as early as possible, to analyze possible course of action, and to take decisive action by implementing the best possible ethical decisions and corresponding solutions that are the most consistent with organizational ethical values and principles.

In addition, all NatHealth Inc. managers attend a week-long mandatory training retreat every September at which they attend strategic meetings and receive training in several different aspects of their operational responsibilities. Two days are reserved for ethics-specific discussions, policy reviews, and updated training in the full range of ethical issues in the workplace. Subsequent to their return, individual managers conduct an ethics policy review session with their direct reports at which time they provide supplemental ethical instructions to update all employees with respect to any changes in organizational ethics policies and expectations.

Monitoring:

While the organization does maintain scrupulous…… [Read More]

References

Halbert, T., and Ingulli, E. (2007). Law & Ethics in the Business Environment.

Cincinnati, OH: West.

Locker, K. (2006). Business and Administrative Communication 2nd Edition. Boston,

MA: McGraw-Hill.
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Ethical Situations What Does the Patient Have

Words: 882 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4124087

Ethical Situations

What does the patient have the right to know?

What the patient has the right to know (regarding genetic tests) is: a complicated matter and many people, including experts, have varying opinions. The information patients receive from genetic testing can have significant consequences, especially if it leads a pregnant woman to have an abortion. The ethical principles that arise in situations like this are varied and are often in conflict with each other. The ethical decisions in genetic counseling would be fairly cut and dry if the principle of autonomy was the only one that was considered. However, by doing this a counselor may be ignoring the other ethical concerns like: what is best for society and being fair to other people (regarding who the patient's decisions are affecting).

Who should have decision making power in our society on issues of genetic / medical testing?

Regarding the "Dwarfism…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Biesecker, Barbara. "Future Directions in Genetic Counseling: Practical and Ethical Considerations." Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8.2 (1998). 145-160. Web.

Flackelman, Kathy. "Beyond the genome: the ethics of DNA testing." Science News. 5 Nov. 1994: 66-70. Print.

Flackelman, Kathy. "DNA dilemmas: readers and 'experts' weigh in on biomedical ethics." Science News. 5 Nov. 1994: 64-66. Print.
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Ethical Issue at Work

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11786699

Ethical Argument: Smoking in the Workplace

In 1994, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) defined second- hand tobacco smoke as a potential workplace hazard, estimating that as many as 14,000 workers die each year from the effects of exposure to passive tobacco smoke. The National Cancer

Institute endorsed much higher estimates, according to which as many as 65,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and lung cancer caused by inhaling secondhand smoke (Washington Post, 2004). Since then, many states have instituted legislation prohibiting smoking in the workplace and the FAA has imposed an outright smoking ban on commercial aircraft, which many smokers view as an infringement of their rights.

Argument:

While anti-smoking legislation certainly does affect the rights of smokers, it is justified on the basis of comparing the relative imposition on smokers to the rights of non-smokers to a healthy work environment. Certainly, smokers have the same…… [Read More]

References

Washington Post; "Who's Protecting Workers' Health." August 27, 2004; p. A20. (Washingtonpostonline.com) Accessed August 27, 2004, at  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A37210-2004Aug26.html
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Ethical Analysis of Satyam Scandal

Words: 1584 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28450390



Best Ethical Approaches and Alternatives

Frankly, the Satyam case is not one that requires splitting the proverbial hairs sometimes associated with more complex ethical analyses. Virtually every known ethical system other than egoism would condemn aju's conduct (osenstand, 2008; Shaw & Barry, 2007). Unfortunately, the magnitude of the harm caused and the vast numbers of individuals detrimentally affected by aju's subterfuge absolutely defies any conceivable ethical solution that relies on restitution or compensation to the victims.

In the Satyam case, aju would not benefit from any of the ethical systems considered. Act utilitarian ethical analysis would condemn aju's actions simply by virtue of their consequences on the countless victims of his conduct. ights-based ethical analysis would reach the same conclusion regardless of whether the system relies on objective or conventional ethical rules. Justice-based ethics would condemn aju's conduct because it violated both objective ethical principles and the formal rules governing…… [Read More]

References

Halbert, T., and Ingulli, E. (2007). Law & Ethics in the Business Environment.

Cincinnati, OH: West.

Rosenstand, N. (2008). The Moral of the Story: An Introduction to Ethics. New York:

McGraw-Hill.
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Ethical Theory and Moral Practice

Words: 4260 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80307899

Ethical Theory & Moral Practice

Debates about theory and practice are ancient. Each generation considers the dynamics that surround issues about the interdependency of theory and praxis to be uniquely challenging. Complexity is a variable closely linked with knowledge. As science has added layer upon layer of knowledge, decision-making dilemmas have been confounded by new and staggering concomitant factors. In concert, theoretical frameworks for social science disciplines have been adapted to accept newly identified moral imperatives and ethical considerations.

This paper offers a discussion about the nexus of epistemology, ethics / morality, and praxis. An examination of the historical development of the paradigm and the assumptions of post-positivism is presented as an introductory foundation for the discussion. Next, is a discussion about ethical theory, followed by an exploration of the increasing division between philosophical frameworks and evolving modern science. Particular note is made of the theory-practice gap in healthcare, which…… [Read More]

References

Beauchamp, T.L. (2007). Does Ethical Theory Have a Future in Bioethics? The Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics. 32(2): 209-217.

"Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: How do they relate?" (2008). Conference 2008. Retrieved online: http://www.bezinningscentrum.nl/links / special_links5/special_links5_conference.shtml

Fieser, J. (2009). Ethics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved online:  http://www.iep.utm.edu/ethics/#H3 

Gastmans, C. (1998). Nursing Considered as Moral Practice: A Philosophical-Ethical Interpretation of Nursing. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8(1): 43-69.
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Ethical Position on Euthanasia Suicide

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44540955

That is a perfectly valid reason not to engage in the practice, at least in the case of any person who makes that decision because of his or her religious beliefs and values. However, the very same concept of religious freedom means that no person should ever have his or her rights defined against his or her will by the religious beliefs and values of other people. In this country, the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution expressly prohibits the state from imposing religion on any individual; yet that is exactly the situation to the extent that legislators ever oppose euthanasia on "religious" grounds. Incidentally, the exact same principle applies to abortion to the degree that the issue involves religious beliefs about when human life "begins."

Conclusion

Supporting the right of the individual to choose euthanasia does not mean that there should be no safeguards to protect mentally unstable patients…… [Read More]

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Ethical Issues in Law Enforcement

Words: 2631 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29653362

J. Simpson or John Gotti. In both cases, the defendants are entitled to the presumption of innocence only in court; but there is no such "presumption" in the intellectual "court" of one's mind.

A lawyer with integrity would refuse to represent any defendant he believed was probably guilty of horrendous crimes and simply let that defendant be represented by a court-appointed attorney who is obligated by law to represent any defendant who cannot afford a private attorney. If all criminal defense lawyers had high personal ethical standards, the Simpsons and Gottis of the world would find it impossible to retain any defense counsel other than those obligated by law to take their cases.

4. Define and briefly explain ethical dilemma. Of the four categories of dilemmas: discretion, duty, honesty and loyalty, which one applies best to the following situations? Explain your rationale. Also, explain how an officer might analyze the…… [Read More]

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Ethical System and Its Justification in the

Words: 1208 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21829878

Ethical System and Its Justification

In the definition of an ethical system, there are both the ethical theories and ethical principles. These provide the viewpoints upon which an ethical analysis is conducted Schwartz, 2003.

They provide guidance as to what path to take to arrive at the final decision James, 2000.

To me, good is defined as that action which is ethical in nature and which complies with the standards of the society at large.

There are several actions that I consider to be good. One example is helping another student revise for an exam. Secondly, there is the action of helping an elderly woman cross the street. There is also the act of encouraging and motivating people in their daily lives. Another action that I consider to be good is that of letting certain persons such as the elderly or a pregnant woman cut the line where you are…… [Read More]

References

James, H.S., Jr. (2000). Reinforcing Ethical Decision Making through Organizational Structure. Journal of Business Ethics, 28(1), 43-58.

Morris, M.H., Schindehutte, M., Walton, J., & Allen, J. (2002). The Ethical Context of Entrepreneurship: Proposing and Testing a Developmental Framework. Journal of Business Ethics, 40(4), 331-361.

Schwartz, M.S. (2003). The "Ethics" of Ethical Investing. Journal of Business Ethics, 43(3), 195-213.

Thong, J.Y.L., & Yap, C.-S. (1998). Testing an Ethical Decision-Making Theory: The Case of Softlifting. Journal of Management Information Systems, 15(1), 213-237.
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Ethical Issues Surrounding the Adoption of Electronic

Words: 1295 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55644945

Ethical Issues Surrounding the Adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR) by Health Care Organizations and Meaningful Use

The objective of this work in writing is to examine why health care organizations are hesitant to adopt electronic health records (HER) in light of the potential of HER to improve quality, increase access, and reduce costs. This issue will be examined from a legal, financial, and ethical standpoint and in relation to 'meaningful use'.

The use of information technology in the health care field shows a great deal of potential toward improving quality, efficiency, and safety in medical care. (DeRoches, Campbell, and Rao, 2008, paraphrased; Frisse & Holmes, 2007, paraphrased; and Walker, et al., 2005, paraphrased) The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 is reflective of the unprecedented interest of the Federal government in the area of bringing about increases in the use of IT in health care for system…… [Read More]

Bibliography

A New Hospital EMR Adoption assessment Tool (2012) HIMSS Analytics. Retrieved from: http://www.himss.org/content/files/EMR053007.pdf

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Available athttp://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=111_cong_bills&docid=f:h1enr.pdf. Accessed 5 August2010.

Daniel, J. And Goldstein, MM (2010) Consumer Consent Options for Electronic Health Information Exchange: Policy Considerations and analysis. 23 Mar 2010.

DesRoches CM, Campbell EG, Rao SR, et al. Electronic health records in ambulatory care -- a national survey of physicians. N Engl J. Med 2008; 359:50 -- 60.
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Ethical and Moral Behavior and

Words: 4020 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49084010

The published codes of ethics for different professions try to make it clear that "professional" in that occupation will not misuse that power, and especially that the use will not be made for personal gain. Of course, in totality, the codes of ethics should provide guidance about the values to be upheld in the profession, specific ethical principles and specific standards. (Professional code of Ethics)

Since there is a wide variation in codes for different professions, it is required that codes from some professions be looked at to decide the ethical standards of a profession. However, studying ethical codes does not mean that the individual will be following the codes and behaving in an ethical manner. This is mentioned clearly in the code for National Association of Social Work as "a code of ethics cannot resolve all ethical issues or disputes or capture the richness and complexity involved in striving…… [Read More]

References

An Overview of Morality and ethical systems" Retrieved at http://faculty.ncwc.edu/toconnor/415/415lect01.htm. Accessed on 30 July, 2005

Dean, John. W. (26 March, 2004) "A Closer Look at the Case from Which Justice Scalia Has

Refused To Rescue Himself." Retrieved at  http://writ.news.findlaw.com/dean/20040326.html . Accessed on 30 July, 2005

Etzioni, Amitai. (4 August, 2004) "When It Comes to Ethics, B-Schools Get an F" Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&contentId=A38323-2002Aug2&notFound=true. Accessed on 30 July, 2005
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Ethical Codes or Programs 1

Words: 2508 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33282034



Another main factor that has also been mentioned above is the factor of Personal Development that is held highly important at Saint Leo University. The administration and education board at the university feels that it is essential for every educational institution to have the kind of educational setup that will promote the progress of every individual's mental, physical and spiritual being in an appropriate and composed way (ALA/ACL, 2008).

esponsible Stewardship is another important factor in the educational setup of the university as the administration feels that an individual's capability and service spectrum can not be fully utilized without his or her ability to truly use the resources available to him or her. The administration feels that they, as an institution, can use all the resources available to them and their students towards not only developing their university but also their community as well as the neighboring communities (ALA/ACL, 2008).…… [Read More]

References

ALA/ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. 2008. Accessed at http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/informationliteracycompetency.htm

Andberg, M., M. Caught in the Middle: Ethical/Legal Mandates and Test Security. Symposium: Recent Developments in Psychological Testing - Update for Assessment Professionals. American Psychological Association Convention; Honolulu, Hawaii. Marcia Andberg Associates LLC, 2004.

American Psychological Association (APA). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. American Psychological Association, Inc. December 2002; 57, 12

Dr. Kirk, a.F. The State of Saint Leo University. President of Saint Leo University Community Day. 2006. Accessed from https://www.saintleo.edu/resources/docs/intranet/commday_aug2006_kirkspch.pdf
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Ethical Case Study What Ethical

Words: 319 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72433463

Only parents with nothing to hide would allow their children to participate, while children with violent family histories might be withdrawn from the study, or pressured by their parents to lie.

Additionally, students might not want their records accessed, if there was potentially damaging evidence in their records, out of embarrassment or fear. Thus, to ensure that the study was valid, and to obtain a more representative cross-section of individuals, Ludwig violated basic ethical research principles of parental consent for participation for minors and did not obtain standard confidentiality waivers.

Describe your reactions to the way this study was done.

Regardless of Ludwig's rationale, no individual's personal rights can be sacrificed to the personal needs and desires of the researcher, however much Ludwig and those like him might cloak their unethical behavior in the language of 'science.'… [Read More]

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Ethical Dilemmas in Police Work

Words: 741 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16031888

Policing Dilemmas

Ethical Dilemmas in Police ork

For ethical training to be effective in a police profession then there must be continuous education and practice. Officers work in a rapidly evolving field that is in a dynamic environment and therefore will most likely encounter new challenges frequently. These challenges can be further complicated by the fact that officers must often make quick decisions in situations in which their physical safety is on the line. ithout proper training there is an increased likelihood that an officer will chose their own self-interest or preservation without regard for the ethical dilemmas that are present in their choices. This analysis will provide some ethical dilemmas that officers might encounter. Such dilemmas can also be used for learning or training purposes so that officers can practice beforehand some of the situations they may face on the job so that they are better prepared.

Ethical Dilemmas…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gilmartin, K. And J. Harris. "Law Enforcement Ethics." 2006. E-S Press. Online. 2 April 2013.

Lieberman, B. "Ethical Issues in the Use of Confidential Informants for Narcotic Operations." 2007. The Police Chief. Online. 2 April 2013.

Pollock, J. Ethical Dilemmas and Decisions in Criminal Justice. Cengage Learning, 2012. Print.
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Ethical Dilemma in Monique's Case

Words: 947 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60207956

achel Faybyshev

Professional Issues and Ethics in Counseling

Dr. Aaron Lieberman

Ethical Issues

Ethics and law are two concepts that are intertwined in the field of mental health though they have their own differences. According to Corey, Corey, Corey & Callahan (2014), law is a term that refers to the basic standards that will be tolerated by the society and imposed by government while ethics refers to the ideal standards that are established and imposed by professional associations. Medical professionals are faced with the need to be aware of any unethical behavior and practice since they can generate legal repercussions and affect licensure. This is an extremely important consideration for medical professionals, especially mental health practitioners who deal with situations that are likely to generate legal and ethical issues. An example of such as situation is Monique's situation, which has multiple relevant ethical and legal issues that need to be…… [Read More]

References

Corey, G., Corey, S. C, Corey, C., and Callahan, P. (2014). Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions (9th ed.). Stamford, CT.: Brooks/Cole.

Counseling Connection. (2013, March). Ethical Issues in Counseling. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://www.counsellingconnection.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Legal-and-Ethical-Issues-11.pdf
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Ethical Treatment of Human Subjects History

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72685387

ethical concerns when it comes to conducting human research. This paper presents those concerns and reviews the regulatory protocols that the United States employs in order to meet high ethical and legal standards.

How research involving human subjects works in the U.S.

In the Journal of Clinical Pathology author M.B. Kapp explains that the issue of ethics vis-a-vis human subjects in research isn't just a concern of clinicians and scientists; rather, these issues also have importance to lawyers, philosophers, and policy makers. And there definite legal provisions that are applied regarding "…participant safety, informed consent, and confidentiality" (Kapp, 2006). Of great interest when it comes to pathologists is how human tissue specimens are handled -- whether the tissues are to be used in the present or at some point in the future.

Kapp references what the writer calls "the most salient ethical values" that come into play when research involving…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davidson, S. (2001). Protecting Research Participants -- A Time for Change. Ethical and Policy Issues in Research Involving Human Participants. National Bioethics Advisory

Commission. Retrieved March 7, 2015, from https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu.

Department of Health and Human Services. (1979). The Belmont Report. Retrieved March 8, 2015, from http://www.hhs.gov.

Kapp, M.B. (2006). Ethical and legal issues in research involving human subjects: do you want a piece of me? Journal of Clinical Pathology, 59(4), 335-339.
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Ethical or Social Justice

Words: 3148 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8427475

Aboriginal people are the Indians who live in Canada. Over the years, they have been characterized by poor living conditions, low social status, poverty, discrimination, and social injustices. Government organizations should be on the front ensuring proper treatment and social justice for the Aboriginal people. ed Cross is an example of non-profit organization, which seeks to improve the status of the Aboriginal people, regardless of their social status and with equal treatment to all, as discussed in the paper.

Non-profit organization aims at providing services to the public, while profit organizations aim at profit maximization. Public interest comes first, for the non-profit organization, rather than their interests. The ed Cross is recognized as the non-profit organization, and it is chartered by the U.S. congress. It provides services worldwide, and the general population during times of disaster and the workforce is predominantly volunteers.

ed Cross society

Nonprofit organizations have to be…… [Read More]

References

Journal of Education Controversy:. (1997). The Give Away Spirit.

Australia, N.L. (1992). Australian Public Affairs Information Service. Australia: National Library of Australia.

Ciconte, B.J. (2011). Fundraising Basics: A Complete Guide. Atlanta: Jonnes and Bartlett Learning.

Crooks, C.T. (2007). Engaging and Empowering Aboriginal Youth. Chicago: Trafford Publishing.
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Ethical Decision

Words: 931 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76990847

Ethical Decision

Nursing professionals have to make routine decisions bearing ethical principles and regulations in mind. Proper decision-making necessitates a grasp of the interface between nursing, laws, and ethics (Furlong, 2007, p. 29). But nursing professionals across the world face increasing difficulty when attempting to work with integrity amid the complicated ethical decisions and pressure they encounter. "Notes on Nursing" by Florence Nightingale describes the ethical obligations of communication, confidentiality, and the importance of fulfilling patient requirements (Ulrich et al., 2010)

Ethical / Moral Issue

Karen, a nurse practitioner (NP) fresh out of college, working in a little town, is visited by a first-time expectant mother (previous menstrual period -- 5 weeks ago), Susan uttley, aged 29 years. Karen wishes to begin prenatal care for the patient, who, although married, visits alone and claims she hasn't informed her husband of her condition, as he wished to postpone starting a family,…… [Read More]

References

Corbin, J. R. (2007). Confidentiality & the Duty to Warn: Ethical and Legal Implications for the Therapeutic Relationship. The New Social Worker, 14(4). Retrieved 5 September 2016 from  http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/ethics-articles/Confidentiality_%26_the_Duty_to_Warn%3A_Ethical_and_Legal_Implications_for_the_Therapeutic_Relationship/ 

Furlong, E. (2007). Right or Wrong: Legal and Ethical Issues and Decision-Making. Jones and Bartlett Publishers. Retrieved 5 September 2016 from  http://www.jblearning.com/samples/0763744352/44352_ch03_pass1.pdf 

Kaplan, C. (2016). Ethical Dilemmas. Advance Healthcare Network for NPs & PAs. Retrieved 5 September 2016 from http://nurse-practitioners-and-physician-assistants.advanceweb.com/article/ethical-dilemmas-2.aspx

Ulrich, C. M., Taylor, C., Soeken, K., O'Donnell, P., Farrar, A., Danis, M. & Grady, C. (2010). Everyday Ethics: Ethical Issues and Stress in Nursing practice. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(11), doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05425.x. Retrieved 5 September 2016 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3865804/
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Ethical Issues in Research

Words: 1046 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13492185

Anna's rationale for not obtaining informed consent?

Not informing research subjects regarding one's purpose is unethical. In order to see just how unethical her decision is, Anna must understand ethical concerns linked to studies that utilize human participants. The basic principles of justice, independence, and goodness form the basis of the aforementioned ethical concerns and warrant attention (UNC Charlotte| esearch& Economic Development Centre, n.d).). Ethics guidelines and codes explain the idea of informed consent with regard to studies on human participants. This process aims at presenting adequate facts to participants to ensure they are able to decide, after acquiring an adequate grasp of the situation, whether to participate in any research venture or not, and whether to continue participating or not. It is imperative to seek informed consent for every kind of research on humans, including therapeutic, diagnostic, social, behavioral and interventional researches, as well as for studies performed locally…… [Read More]

References

Argosy University (2014).Institutional Review Board Handbook. Retrieved 7 April 7, 2017 from https://ucmrp.edmc.edu/idc/groups/webcontent/@edmc_aug/documents/webcontent/edmc-03428020.pdf

Office for the Protection of Research Subjects (OPRS)| University of Southern California (n.d) Informed Consent in Human Subjects Research. Retrieved 7 April 7, 2017 from http://oprs.usc.edu/files/2013/04/Informed-Consent-Booklet-4.4.13.pdf

Office of Research Integrity| The University of Tennessee Chattanooga (n.d) Informed CnosentConsent Requirements. Retrieved 7 April 7, 2017 from  https://www.utc.edu/research-integrity/institutional-review-board/informedconsent/ 

UNC Charlotte| Research & Economic Development Centre (n.d). Informed Consent. Retrieved 7 April 7, 2017 from http://research.uncc.edu/departments/office-research-compliance-orc/human-subjects/informed-consent
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ethical violation law enforcement

Words: 718 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13763888

Police Use 'Fake News' in Sting Aimed at California Gang," ABC news reporter Melley (2016) describes a recent and unusual tactic used by Santa Monica Police Chief alph Martin. The story details how Police Chief Martin issued a press release that was picked up by the Santa Monica Sun. The press release said that two gang members had been arrested. It later turned out the press release was false, issued by the Police Chief in order to entrap other members of the gang. Investigators later deemed the fake press release legal, even if it does raise serious ethical issues about the behavior of the Chief of Police. "There was nothing illegal about what police did, but it could raise questions about the department's future credibility," said one journalism professor interviewed for the story (Melley, 2016). Harming the credibility of the police could in itself be considered a significant ethical violation…… [Read More]

References

Grant, J.K. (2002). Ethics and law enforcement. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 71(2): 11-14.

Melley, B. (2016). Police Use 'Fake News' in Sting Aimed at California Gang." ABC News. 3 Dec, 2016. Retrieved online: http://abcnews.go.com/U.S./wireStory/police-fake-news-sting-aimed-california-gang-43949543

United States Department of Justice (2016). Ethics and integrity. Retrieved online:  https://cops.usdoj.gov/Default.asp?Item=2469
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Ethical Perspectives Alahmad Friedman vs Drucker Murphy

Words: 2579 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38408652

CSR

Contrasting Different Vantage Points Regarding the Role of CSR and Business Ethics

Introduction to Corporate Social Responsibility

Review of the Variety of Ethical Systems

Contemporary Vantage Points

Corporate social responsibilities as well as business ethics have served as hotly contested issues over the last few decades. There has yet to be a consensus reached, to say the least, as to what there composition should look like or even if they are necessary academic pursuits at all. Research was conducted in regards to the various categories of ethical systems in existence and concluded that each system has merit under various sets of circumstances. Furthermore, contemporary individuals who have acted to influence business culture were identified, compared, and contrasted. It was found that there arguments were reasonable based on their assumptions however these assumptions are inherently flawed. The article concludes, that given the growing body of evidence that suggests that life-sustaining…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alahmad, A. (2010). To Be Ethical Or Not To Be: An International Code of Ethics For Leadership. Journal of Diversity Management, 31-35.

Cavanagh, G., Moberg, D., & Velasquez, M. (1981). The Ethics of Organizational Politics. The Academy of Management Review, 363.

Drucker, P. (1981). What is Business Ethics? The Public Interest, 18-36.

Friedman, M. (1970, September 13). The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits. The New York Times Magazine.
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Ethical Foundation for Spiritual Transformation

Words: 3261 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94780664

Spiritual Transformation

The topic of spiritual transformation will be grounded upon the ethics presented within the Holy Bible and the teachings of the Apostle Paul. There must be a solid foundation to build ethical principles on for a true transformation to occur. When the training up is unrecognized, the transformation process will ultimately fail in its attempt. With this in mind, there will be a question to be answered in delivery of the thesis and its corresponding evidence of argument. The question will be "What is the foundational source to ground spiritual formation on?" The ethical ground of the Pauline ethics will consist of such things as moral instructions, passion, love, community formation, and virtues. The ultimate goal of Christian ethics is the fulfillment of being Christ-like. The character of Jesus Christ is the greatest goal to strive for. The thesis statement is "A Christians ethical foundation must be centered…… [Read More]

References

Giannet, S.M. (2002). The Radical Ethics of Jesus. The American Journal of Biblical Theology. Retrieved from  http://www.biblicaltheology.com/Research/GiannetS02.html 

Hartog, P. (2011). The Integrative Role of the Spirit in the Ethics of Galatians. Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal, 16, 19-39.

Harrison, N.V. (1996). The Holy Spirit and Ethics: A Response to Philip S. Keane. CTSA Proceedings, 51, 114-119.

Pettegrew, L. (2000). Theological Basis of Ethics. The Master's Seminary Journal, 11(2), 139-153.
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ethical and legal dilemmas in counseling

Words: 2404 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

Abstract
Counseling is a highly sensitive profession that depends on maintaining boundaries and solidifying trust. The establishment of clear ethical codes helps counselors to understand their roles and responsibilities to clients and to their colleagues. Laws at the state and federal level may provide additional protection to both clients and counselors and determine penalties for ethical violations. However, counselors inevitably encounter ethical dilemmas. Ethical dilemmas can arise when there is a conflict between two or more moral standards, or between the law and an ethical standard. Likewise, a counselor’s personal moral code could sometimes conflict with the law or the ethical code guiding their professional practice. This paper outlines some of the most common ethical and legal dilemmas counselors are likely to face, and how counselors can rightfully and safely resolve those conflicts. 
Introduction
The counseling profession is governed by a set of ethical standards similar to those used in…… [Read More]

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Ethical Behavior

Words: 1201 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21588468

Ethics and Nursing

One of the complexities of 21st century medicine is the evolution of nursing care theories in combination with a changing need and expectation of the stakeholder population. Nurses must be advocates and communicators, but must balance these along with an overall philosophy of ethics while still remaining mindful of budgets and the need for the medical institution to be profitable. It seems as if these issues comprise a three-part template for nursing: respect for patient value & individuality, education of patients, and cognition and respect for the realities of contemporary medicine. When there are issues surrounding unethical behavior, the standard view is that the issue is one of ignorance (unaware of the issue or policy), failure (sloppy medical work), or intent (purposeful negativity). Instead, Christopher Meyers (2004) believes that it is more the culture of the institution that frames ethical behavior than it is anything more purposeful.…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Gaudine, A., et.al. (2011). Ethical Conflicts With Hospitals: The Perspective of Nurses

And Physicians. Nursing Ethics. 18 (6): 756-66.

Meyers, C. (2004). Institutional Culture and Individual Behavior: Creating an Ethical

Environment. Science and Engineering Ethics, 10 (1): 269-76.
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Ethical Issues in Healthcare Prayer and Religion

Words: 1079 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53667214

eligion and health have long been linked, and continue to be so in most cultures around the world. In fact, both mental and physical health problems were once believed to have supernatural or spiritual origins, a belief which persists until this day in spite of empirical evidence showcasing the biological and chemical causes of illnesses (Koenig, 2000). egardless of whether or not religion is a worthwhile social institution, religion, spirituality, and practices like prayer remain central to the lives of most people. eligion can be inextricably linked with personal and cultural identity, and can greatly inform both medical decisions and health practices including lifestyle choices. There is also a notable link between religiosity and a number of health outcomes including morbidity and mortality rates, proven in empirical studies. The literature tends to support a strong connection between prayer and stress relief in particular, as prayer and religion are widely believed…… [Read More]

References

Bearon, L.B. & Koenig, H.G. (1990). Religious cognitions and use of prayer in health and illness. The Gerontologist 30(2): 249-253.

Davis, L.I. & Owens, C. (2013). The impact of religion on health practices. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Retrieved online: http://www.aacp.org/governance/SIGS/hdcc/Documents/Webinar%20Materials/Impact%20of%20Religion%20Webinar.pdf

Koenig, H.G. (2000). Religion and medicine I. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine 30(4): 385-398.

Koenig, H., King, D. & Carson, V.B. (2012). Handbook of Religion and Health. Oxford University Press.
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Ethical and Fair Decisions

Words: 725 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63077173

Business Ethics

The Case of Tobacco Industry

Business ethics can be defined as the art, system, method and the discipline that is applied to along with ethical principles to solve complex business issues and dilemmas. It defines the actions that are taken that tries to reach a balance between the organization achieving its business and economic obligations and social obligations (Ferrell & Ferrell, 2009). For this paper, we consider the case of the tobacco industry and the role of ethics in the industry. The important ethical issues that should be followed while conducting business as a customer are primarily being truthful to the customer.

The first ethical issue that is expected from a tobacco company as the customer is in the realm of product safety and honesty towards the consumers. As a member of the society, a customer would also like to see that the tobacco industry fulfills its responsibility…… [Read More]

References

Ferrell, O. & Ferrell, L. (2009). Ethical business. New York: DK Pub.

Gavai, A. (2010). Business ethics. Mumbai [India]: Himalaya Pub. House.

McCambridge, J. (2016). Ethical issues raised by tobacco industry-linked research in the era of e-cigarettes. Addiction, 111(8), 1334-1335. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.13308

Palazzo, G. & Richter, U. (2005). CSR Business as Usual? The Case of the Tobacco Industry. J Bus Ethics, 61(4), 387-401. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10551-005-7444-3
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Ethical Dimensions of the Innovator Role

Words: 717 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52938797

Ethics is a term that is commonly used to refer to appropriate rules of conduct or moral guidelines that govern people’s behaviors and actions. Additionally, ethics is a terms that refers to standards or norms for differentiating between right and wrong (Center for Innovation in Research and Teaching, n.d.). As a result, ethics has become an important component in research because researchers have a moral responsibility to safeguard their research participants when conducting a study. Experiment ethics has become a common feature in modern research practices because of the role and significance of the moral responsibility that researchers have as they conduct their study.
One of the most famous and compelling psychological researches that highlight experiment ethics is The Stanford Prison Experiment, which provided a simple narrative regarding human nature (Resnick, 2018). According to McLeod (2017), this research was conducted to examine how willing and ready people would adapt to…… [Read More]

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Ethical Considerations for a Nurse Educator

Words: 1360 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24877925

Nurse Educator: What I Have Learned

My interaction with a nurse educator has been positive because the educator provided a good learning environment by essentially banning negativity from the classroom and promoting an atmosphere of positivity. This inclined me to want to excel and to do my best in the class, and it also diminished any fears of failure I might have had because I knew that the teacher would not harp on failures but would always be encouraging. Thus, the teacher removed the pressure from the classroom and made the experience very enjoyable. I wanted to do well in the class just to show my gratitude for the positivity that the teacher brought.

The educator was also always attentive to questions and needs of the students, going above and beyond the average teacher: this educator always asked how we were, if we were getting everything we needed, if we…… [Read More]

References

Conger, Jay A. (1989). Leadership: The art of empowering others. Academy of Management Executive, 3 (1) 17- 25.

Knight, J. (2011). What good coaches do. Educational Leadership, 69(2): 18-22.

Philipsen, N. C., Soeken, D. (2011). Preparing to blow the whistle: A survival guide for nurses. The Journal for Nurse Practicioners, 7(9): 740-746.
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Nursing Ethical Issues

Words: 1040 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39401317

Ethical Analysis #2

Nursing Issue/Dilemma

Nurses face dilemmas of an ethical nature on a regular basis. This effectively means that from time to time, nurses are called upon make ethical decisions -- decisions that could have a huge impact on the well-being of patients. One of the current ethical issues being faced by nurses is whether or not to lie to patients. ecently, it was revealed that psychiatrists and nurses caring for dementia patients were actively practicing what Williams (2013) refers to as "therapeutic lying" in an attempt to keep the said patients happy. As a matter of fact 98% of nurses, as William further points out, admitted to lying to dementia patients. The question that ought to be answered in this case is; should nurses withhold some potentially upsetting information about diseases that happen to be life-threatening?

B. Ethical Principles and Theories at Issue

The ethical principles at work…… [Read More]

References

American Medical Association -- ANA (2014). Short Definitions of Ethical Principles and Theories: Familiar Words, What do they Mean?  http://www.nursingworld.org/mainmenucategories/ethicsstandards/resources/ethics-definitions.pdf 

Corner, J. & Bailey, C.D. (eds.) (2009). Cancer Nursing: Care in Context (2nd Ed.). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.

Williams, A. (2013). Dementia sufferers told white lies to keep them happy: Nurses and psychiatrists admit 'therapeutic lying' to confused patients. Retrieved from  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2410811/Dementia-sufferers-told-white-lies-happy-Nurses-psychiatrists-admit-therapeutic-lying-confused-patients.html
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Decision Making by a Healthcare Leader in Case of an Ethical Dilemma

Words: 709 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3855789

Ethical Analysis

Memo on a Ethical Analysis

____, Student

____ (due date)

e:

Decision making by a Healthcare Leader in case of an Ethical Dilemma

in an interview of my health care administrator of the long care health facility where I work, I asked, "How do you make a wise decision in a situation relating to an ethical dilemma?"

esponse:

Description of the Answer

It seemed like my question took the administrator by surprise perhaps he did not expect such a question when I requested for an interview. However, he looked composed and amused by my question. Confidently and leaning a little bit forward and supporting his hands on his desk, he responded. He first pointed out the numerous occasions when ethical dilemmas were evident in his health care administration career at the health facility. He said that he learnt over time through many experiences and a little consultation and…… [Read More]

References

Forester-Miller, H., & Davis, T. (1996). A Practitioner's Guide to Ethical Decision Making. American Counseling Association, 1-5.

Pope, K.S., & Vasquez, M.J. (2010). Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
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Resolving Clinical Ethical Dilemma

Words: 1424 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88202580

Ethical Dilemma- A Framework

Ethical Dilemma

Taking into account ethical concerns is one of the key components in providing healthcare in the therapeutic nurse-patient relationship (osenbaum, 1982). Nurses face ethical uncertainty, distress and conflict in their day-to-day work. When more than one ethical value applies to a particular case, and all of them recommend following a different course of action, then an ethical dilemma exists in such a case a nurse would be not be sure of which value takes precedence (College of Nurses of Ontario, 2009). This specific case involves a 6-year-old who is by law a minor and thus a physician must obtain informed consent from their legal guardian. However, the child's primary guardian is his non-biological mother who is citing her religious reason to refuse medical treatment, while the biological father who resides in another state wants the kid to be treated, a situation that leaves the…… [Read More]

References

American Counseling Association (2005). Code of Ethics. Alexandria, VA: Author. College of Nurses of Ontario (2009). PRACTICE Standard: ethics. Retrieved 16 September 2015 from https://www.cno.org/Global/docs/prac/41034_Ethics.pdf

Forester-Miller H. & Davis T. (1996). A Practitioner's Guide to Ethical Decision Making. Retrieved 16 September 2015 from http://www.alabamacounseling.org/pdf/acaguide.pdf

Forester-Miller, H. & Rubenstein, R.L. (1992). Group Counseling: Ethics and Professional Issues. In D. Capuzzi & D. R. Gross (Eds.) Introduction to Group Counseling (307-323). Denver, CO: Love Publishing Co.

Haas, L.J. & Malouf, J.L. (1989). Keeping up the good work: A practitioner's guide to mental health ethics. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Exchange, Inc.
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Analyzing Ethical Issues in Healthcare

Words: 899 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17607319

Ethical Issues in Healthcare

Euthanasia

Euthanasia is also termed as 'mercy killing', involves concluding the existence of a terminally ill patient on deathbed due to a life-threatening illness. In essence, another individual decides to conclude the existence of the patient by multiple methods, such as using a lethal dosage of injection. The patients can choose euthanasia (voluntary), reject using euthanasia (involuntary), or could be unable to response, depending on their neural function. It is undertaken without the consent of the patient (non-voluntary). As euthanasia dictates authority over the life of an individual, it also allots this authority to an individual to act as an agent of death (American Nurses Association, 2013).

Euthanasia is a word taken from the Greek language, two words mainly, 'eu' and 'thanatos' which means 'good death'. As opposed to being condemned to an excruciating death, euthanasia provides a better opportunity to relieve a person of his…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association. (2013). Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide, and Aid in Dying. ANA Center for Ethics and Human Rights.

Bartels, L., & Otlowski, M. (2010). A right to die? Euthanasia and the law in Australia. J Law Med, 532-55.

Ebrahimi, N. (2012). The ethics of euthanasia. Australian Medical Student Journal.

(1969, December 31). Ethical Dilemma Faced by Professional Nurses on Abortion Issue.
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Ethical Practice Involves Working Positively Diversity Difference

Words: 2498 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31023695

Ethical Practice Involves Working Positively Diversity Difference

Counseling is a profession that involves associations based on principles and values ethically. Patients are able to benefit by understanding themselves better and through creating relationships with others. Through counseling, the clients are able to make positive alteration in life and enhance their living standards. Communities, organizations, couples and families are different groups of individuals are main sources of relationships (BACP Ethical Framework, 2013, p.4). Frameworks of ethical practice direct the attention of counseling practitioners to engage in ethical responsibilities. This stud describes the purpose of each principle following the development of good counseling practice. Practitioners make reasonable decisions grounded on these principles without making any contradictions. Nevertheless, research indicates that professionals have met barriers hindering them to integrate all the principles in some cases. In such situations, they are forced to select between required principles. A course of action or a decision…… [Read More]

References

BACP Ethical Framework. (2013). The Ethical Framework for Good Practice in Counselling. Pp 1-10. Accessed April 7, 2013 from www.bacp.co.uk/admin/structure/files/pdf/9479_ethical%20framework%20jan2013.pdf

Clarkson, P. (2009). The Therapeutic Relationship. New York NY: Wiley

Handout 1. MkSame-Sex Relationships, an Historical Overview. A review by Robin Heme

Handout 2. What are the potential abuses of these kinds of power in the relationship between counsellor and client? Janet Dowding 02.2010 saved as power
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Ethical Issue on Abortion

Words: 3142 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89322346

Ethical Issues Surrounding Abortion

Notwithstanding the laws being passed in various states against a woman's right to chose to terminate her pregnancy, the position of this paper is that Roe v. ade is the law of the land and a woman has the ethical and moral right to decide to have an abortion. There are many positions for and against Roe v. ade, and there are many ethical issues that may be (and in many cases are) embraced on both sides of the issue. But the law of the land vis-a-vis a woman's right to the privacy -- regarding her own values -- when it comes to terminating a pregnancy has been determined by the High Court. As a nurse committed to fairness and ethics in healthcare issues, while I respect the rights of others to practice their own values in opposition to Roe v. ade, I am in support…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abort73. (2010). U.S. Abortion Statistics. Retrieved April 16, 2012, from  http://www.abort73.com .

Glionna, John M. (2012). Arizona passes law restricting abortion. Los Angeles Times.

Retrieved April 16, 2012, from http://www.southbendtribune.com.

Jones, K., and Chaloner, C. (2007). Ethics of abortion: the arguments for and against. Nursing Standard, 21(37), 45-48.
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Ethical Decision 'Not to Resuscitate' Is Indeed

Words: 2702 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37490633

Ethical Decision

'Not to Resuscitate' is indeed a difficult decision that has to be made by the patient, when he or she is in good health, or the guardians of the patient. However, according to the law and ethical code of conduct, the medical practitioner, or whoever is in charge of the health care of a patient in a hospital setting, should always inform the patient about the whole procedure (L., 2008). There are certain indications when resuscitation needs to be performed on the patients, meanwhile there are also some contradictions where it should not be performed on the patient. Nonetheless, the final decision lies with the patient or with family. The indications of this decision include a case in which resuscitation would be of any help to save the life of the patient. For example, if the patient is dying and who has been given all sorts of treatment…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Miller, Franklin and Wertheimer, Alan (2009). "The Ethics of Consent: Theory and Practice." Oxford Scholarship Online, Print.

Nandimath, Omaprakash V. (2009). Consent and medical treatment: The legal paradigm in India. Indian J. Urol. 25(3): 343-347.

O' Neill, O (2003).Some limits of informed consent. J Med Ethics.

Salins, Naveen S.; Pai, Sachin G.; Vidyasagar, MS; Sobhana, Manikkath (2010).Ethics and Medico Legal Aspects of "Not for Resuscitation." Indian J. Palliat Care.
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Ethical Perspectives Summarize Briefly the Organization's Background

Words: 1181 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46607580

Ethical Perspectives

Summarize briefly the organization's background / history.

The World Health Organization (WHO) was established in 1948. This was in response to the need for an entity which could address issues impacting various countries and their overall quality of health. They began cataloguing and analyzing how communicable diseases can be prevented over the long-term through effective coordination. Since this time, they have achieved a number of milestones through this approach to include: working to develop a vaccine for polio, helping to conduct the first heart transplant, focusing on effective vaccinations (in order to prevent the spread of communicable diseases), providing essential drugs to over 156 countries, the eradication of small pox and working to coordinate with various stakeholders around the globe. ("An Introduction to the World Health Organization," 2007)

Its primary mission is continuing to evolve with a focus on a number of objectives. The most notable include:

Providing…… [Read More]

References

An Introduction to the World Health Organization. (2007). WHO. Retrieved from:  http://www.who.int/about/brochure_en.pdf 

Health Ethics. (2011). WHO. Retrieved from:  http://www.who.int/ethics/publications/ETX_Newsletter_May2011.pdf 

How Culture Influences Health Beliefs. (2012). Euro Med Info. Retrieved from:  http://www.euromedinfo.eu/how-culture-influences-health-beliefs.html/
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Ethical Branding Case of Divine

Words: 3560 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34797428

The business is also becoming one of the leading companies and a well-known case study of the fair trade principles within the market. The business is also creating a noble image within the target market through its efforts of creating awareness for paying the fair price to its coca producers. The image created by the business is significantly affecting its brand image as an ethical brand. The research of Britain (2007) is also evident of the findings presented above.

USA consumer attitudes:

According to Ma (2007) the consumers in United States are also familiar with the fair trade attitudes and principles. The young consumers are highly likely to purchase products that are manufactured by the businesses incorporating fair trade principles. The consumers of young age group prefer to value the contributions of manufacturers towards fair trade principles (Gropel, 2012). The graduates and educated high income group is also tilted towards…… [Read More]

References:

Britain, G 2007, Fair trade and development: seventh report of session 2006-07, Vol. 2: Oral and written evidence (Vol. 356), Stationery Office, United Kingdom.

Clarke, N, Barnett, C, Cloke, P & Malpass, a 2007, the political rationalities of fair-trade consumption in the United Kingdom, Politics & Society, Vol. 35, No. 4, pp. 583-607.

De Pelsmacker, P, Driesen, L & Rayp, G 2005, Do Consumers Care about Ethics? Willingness to Pay for Fair-Trade Coffe, Journal of consumer affairs, vol. 39, No. 2, pp. 363-385.

DeCarlo, J 2011, Fair trade and how it works, the Rosen Publishing Group.
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Ethical Problem's Relevant Values Stakeholders Decision Making

Words: 3888 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4540143

Ethical Problem(s)

elevant Values

Stakeholders

Decision Making

Utilitarianism

Problems with Utilitarianism

Deontology

awlsian Ethics

oss's Ethical Theory

Natural Law Theory

Ethical Analysis

Scenario

A Pennsylvania hospital is faced with a non-U.S. born 5-year-old daughter of undocumented immigrants who has a life-threatening need for a 2 million dollar transplant. Using critical analysis and your ethics knowledge render and defend a decision about whether to provide the transplant.

Ethical problem(s)

One of the ethical problems present is the fact that the 5-year-old was born in undocumented immigrants parents. She also was a non-United States citizen. Another problem is the child has a life threatening disease that requires a transplant for a substantiate amount of money that is two million dollar to be spending on a non-U.S. citizen. The case that is being presented brings into focus a number of the most currently vital questions that occur in the gap of medicine and…… [Read More]

References

Dwyer, J. (2004, February). Illegal immigrants, health care, and social responsibility. The Hastings Center Report, 34(1), 34-41. Retrieved from http://benedictine.learntoday.info/AngelUploads/Content/MPH-603-D3A3/_assoc/site/MM/WK5_Dwyer_Article.pdf

Kershaw, S. (2007). U.S. rule limits emergency care for immigrants. Retrieved from http://benedictine.learntoday.info/AngelUploads/Content/MPH-603-D3A3/_assoc/site/MM/WK5_NYTimes%20_%20No_Healthcare_for_Illegals.doc

Maximiano, J.M.B. (2003). Corporate social responsibility: Basic principles and best practices: Historico-philosophical issues in international business. Manila: DLSU University Press.
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Ethical Argument

Words: 3188 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36427916

Ethical Argument

Proclaimed by scientists, the thriving cloning of an adult sheep and the prospect to clone a human being is one of the most striking and latest instances of a scientific innovation turning out to be a major argumentative issue. A variety of critics, physicians and legal specialists, scientists and theologians, talk-radio hosts, as well as editorial column writers, for the period of the preceding few months, have been effectively reacting to the news, a number of them bringing up fears and apprehensions on the ethical and moral side of the subject, of the viewpoint of cloning a human being.

The National ioethics Advisory Commission (NAC), at the appeal of the President, held inquiries, as well as organized a report on the ethical, religious, as well as lawful subjects contiguous to human cloning. The Commission suggested a suspension on attempts to clone human beings, at the same time as…… [Read More]

Bibliography

National Bioethics Advisory Commission. Cloning Human Beings. Report and Recommendations. June 9, 2001.

James Q. Wilson. The Paradox of Cloning. Weekly Standard. May 26, 2001.

Jean Bethke Elshtain. Ewegenics. New Republic. March 31, 2001.

R.C. Lewontin. The Confusion over Cloning. New York Review of Books. October 23, 2001.
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Ethical Responsibilities of the Nurse Educator Role

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24916372

Ethical Scenarios in Nursing Education

The scenario chosen for this analysis is one in which a colleague failed to conduct a class as was planned allowing students to leave early and not following instructions for the class. The problem that resulted is that only two groups presented in person and the other two groups posted their presentations on the Web. This content is scheduled on the next exam and no time is left for the student presentations.

This problem is one that should be handled in a manner that retains due respect for the colleague who instructed the class during the absence of the individual who was the instructor for this class. One of the principles in the statement of ethics for nursing education states as follows:

"As colleagues, professors have obligations that derive from common membership in the community of scholars. Professors do not discriminate against or harass colleagues.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Statement on Professional Ethics (2012) American Association of University Professors. Retrieved from: http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/pubsres/policydocs/contents/statementonprofessionalethics.htm
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Ethical Theories Describe in Detail Teleological Deontological

Words: 1637 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93678187

Ethical Theories

Describe in detail

Teleological, deontological, and virtue ethics: A comparison

Teleological ethics are also called consequence-based ethics. Teleological ethical systems emphasize the results of ethical decisions, versus the moral principles behind such decisions. Utilitarianism is an excellent example of teleological ethics. The stress in utilitarianism is doing the greatest good for the greatest number of people, versus setting a precedent for all ethical actions. "It denies that moral rightness depends directly on anything other than consequences, such as whether the agent promised in the past to do the act now" (Armstrong 2011). What is good for the greatest number of people one day may not be the case several years from now, or even to morrow.

For example, no one would state that as an abstract moral principle, having to fire competent employees is a 'good thing.' However, bosses are often forced to do so, because of the…… [Read More]

References

Alexander, Larry & Michael Moore. (2007). Deontological ethics. The Stanford Encyclopedia

of Philosophy. Retrieved:  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ethics-deontological/ 

Armstrong, Walter. (2011). Consequentialism. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Retrieved:  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/consequentialism/