Family Dynamics Essays (Examples)

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Family Dysfunction Economic Distress and

Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24044401

It shows the selfishness of Dewey Dell, who is only concerned about her pregnancy and gives other family members little thought. It shows the long-suffering, to the point of self-immolation, of Cash. It shows the rivalry of Darl and Jewel, both vying for their dead mother's affection. And it shows the innocent simplicity, bordering on mental instability, of the young Vardaman. Each of these family members was affected in different ways by this destructive family dynamic.

Anse, in one of the most telling passages in the book regarding his relationship to the family, goes down the list of family members and whines about how each has cost him money in some way, further complaining that he has to work, when he does so, even though he doesn't have any teeth (35-37). Wadlington argues that because the story is set in the south and Anse is the "master" of the house,…… [Read More]

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Family Relation Dynamics

Words: 1578 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15410632

Family elations esearch

The Sociology of Families and Households is a film that will be examined in this paper. The film is full of controversial topics as well as complex socioeconomic issues that will be discussed in detail. A textbook, Public and Private Families, written by Andrew Cherlina share a lot of concepts of the film will be brought in to the discussion as well.

The various relationships that exist between Marxist theory, sociological perspectives, structural functionalism, as well as the family and early feminist theory are examined throughout the program. It examines the rapid decline in marriage over the last few decades as well as the great increase in couples choosing cohabitation. Divorce is increasing and the fertility rate is on the decline in the U.K. All of these factors have combined to affect the traditional family in Britain and has created new challenges for them in how everyday…… [Read More]

References

The Sociology of Families and Households. (n.d.). Retrieved April 12, 2015, from http://www.educationaltrainingvideos.com/The-Sociology-of-Families-and-Households.html

Cherlin, A. (2013). Public and Private Families: An Introduction (7th ed.). McGraw-Hill Higher Education.

Sociology of the Family. (2013). Retrieved April 11, 2015, from http://www.academicroom.com/topics/sociology-family

Parker, S. (2013, October 25). Why family issues are economic issues. Retrieved April 12, 2015, from http://www.wnd.com/2013/10/why-family-issues-are-economic-issues/
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Family Case Study Presenting Problem

Words: 4052 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32471628

Expressive functioning is related to communication such as emotional, verbal, and nonverbal communication, problem solving and roles within the family. Beliefs within the family are also a part of expressive functioning.

For the purpose of the Calgary Family Assessment Model, a family is defined as who they say they are. It is very important that the clinician performing the assessment not assign their own beliefs upon what he or she believes a family is, and take into account what the patient feels about family as to the patient is may mean not only the people who actually live within the household but can also address past, present and future emotional attachments.

Calgary Family Intervention Model:

The immediate family is composed of Mr. Herbert Schelley (the patient), Mrs. Annette Schelley (his wife), and their son Thomas Schelley. The extended family consists of the Schelley's two married daughters, their husbands and their…… [Read More]

Reference:

Brownwald H. ed. (2003) Harrison's Textbook of Internal Medicine, 15th edition,

McGraw-Hill, New York

Clement S. (2004) Guidelines for glycemic control. Clin Cornerstone. 6(2):31-9

Echeverry D.M., Dike M.R., Washington C., Davidson M.B.. (1995). The impact of using a low-literacy patient education tool on process measures of diabetes care in a minority population J. Natl Med Assoc. (11):1074-81
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Family Care Plan Nursing Family

Words: 782 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39760808



Family Interventions

-Mother can attend cancer support groups and receive advice and education through other channels regarding proper methods of providing care and improving quality of life for her husband

-Son can explore employment options as well as discuss various needs and responsibilities with his parents in order to determine his most effective utilization within the changed family dynamic

-Father can provide the levels of self-care that come easily, but should educate himself regarding his condition and ease care by allowing others to help when necessary

Nursing Interventions

-Provide educational materials/answer questions for both mother and father

-Assist son with psychological transition of increased responsibility/familial dependence

-Instruction of proper care techniques for mother and father regarding father's condition

Evaluation

Levels of comfort and competence in new family roles should be easily assessed in regular visits through brief questioning. Monitoring father's health through standard vital sign and other appropriate tests will…… [Read More]

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Family-Centered Program Theories and Concepts

Words: 2475 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87788339



As with any other behaviors they are taught in school, pro-social behaviors must be reinforced at home (U.S. Department, 2011). Practicing with the child can go a long way toward developing an understanding of acceptable behavior. Many parents leave this up to the school, but children generally want to emulate what they see at home. As they move into pre-school and learn new ways to interact with people, those ways should be encouraged at home. This will help the family dynamics, and will also help the pre-school teachers who are looking for ways to ensure that order is kept in their classrooms.

When parents talk to their children about what they have learned that day, and when they correct their children when they make a social faux pas, they are helping their children learn valuable lessons that those children will use all throughout their school years and into adulthood (U.S.…… [Read More]

References

Buysee, V., & Wesley, P.W. (2005). Consultation in early childhood settings. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., Inc.

Levin, H. M & Schwartz, H.L. (2007). Educational vouchers for universal pre-schools. Economics of Education Review, 26, 3-16.

Levin, H.M., & Schwartz, H.L. (2007, March). What is the cost of a preschool program? National Center for the study of Privatization in Education. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the AEFA Annual Conference, Baltimore, Maryland.

McCollum, J.A., & Yates, T., (1994). Dyad as focus, triad as means: A family-centered approach to supporting parent-child interactions. Infants and Young Children, 6, 54-66.
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Family Institutions That Oversee the Bearing and Raising of Children

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13750686

Diverse and Changing Face of the Family Structure

The state of marriage has statistically changed in recent years, transforming the familiar structure of the nuclear family into an institution of non-traditional deviations. As with any issue, deviations from the norm pose objections and controversy. In the case of the family, philosophical, theological, and social debates revolve around the question of what constitutes the family structure ideal for raising children. The trend in single parenting, a decline in marriage rates, and the introduction of the homosexual family has led to the conservative opinion calling for a return to traditional family values and ethics to counter the demoralization of America. Sociologists, however, observe that family diversity is healthy and should be supported by society. Thus the depiction of the ideal family framework becomes a struggle between social opinions and political agendas. Society is changing, and the family compositions are reflective of those…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Harms, William. (1999, Nov. 24). "Marriage wanes as American families enter new century,

University of Chicago research shows." The University of Chicago News Office.

Herbst, Matthew T. (2003, July). "Do Family Values Lead to Family Violence?: A Consideration

of the Idea of Family." Quodlibet: Online Journal of Christian Theology and Philosophy. 5:2-3. Retrieved February 17, 2004. http://www.quodlibet.net/herbst-family.shtml
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Family Life With a Focus

Words: 2052 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77728106

Today, however, that is not the case and Native American children are encouraged to become bilingual at young ages.

Children are currently encouraged to speak English however because of the many different language within the Native American race (NATIVE AMEICAN ELDELY (http://cas.umkc.edu/casww/natamers.htm).

Native Americans are a very heterogeneous group, made up of approximately 530 different tribes. Of these, 280 reside on reservations, which accounts for approximately 50% of Native Americans in the United States (Wise & Miller, 1983). eservation tribes differ between themselves, in customs, language, and family structure. In addition, Native Americans, in general, differ greatly in their degree of acculturation (NATIVE AMEICAN ELDELY (http://cas.umkc.edu/casww/natamers.htm)."

The Native American population currently promotes the early introduction of children to both English and their tribal language.

CONCLUSION

The Native American population has steadily held onto its traditions and cultures through two centuries of opposition. The children of Native Americans are raised in…… [Read More]

References

Native Americans (Accessed 7-27-06)

http://www.native-languages.org/kidfaq.htm#3

NATIVE AMERICAN ELDERLY (Accessed 7-27-06)

 http://cas.umkc.edu/casww/natamers.htm
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Family Systems and Marriage Psychology

Words: 1742 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19445983

Psychology of Marriage and Family Systems

Vignette One

Considering the reading assignments in both texts, what do you see going on with Pete and his family?

Family dynamics is affecting Pete and his family. The point of focus is the pattern of dynamics apparent in Tim's family, including the impact that the youngsters behavior has on the family members. The following points affect family dynamics:

Intra-parental relationship number of youngsters in the family persona of each of the family member an absence of a parent the assortment of individuals who are living under the same roof level and type of influence from extended family or others a chronically sick individual within the family a veritable assortment of societal and emotional trauma faced in the past by elders, such as an divorce, affair, unemployment, death, homelessness familial attachments, or lack thereof (i.e. insecure, secure)

inherited features of family members through generations…… [Read More]

References

Adkins, K.S. (2010). A Contextual Family Therapy Theory Explanation for Intimate Partner Violence (Doctoral dissertation, The Ohio State University).

Australian Counseling Association (n.d). Code Of Ethics and Practice.

Boszormenyi-Nagy, I., & Krasner, B. (1986). Between give and take: A clinical guide to contextual therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel.

Bubenzer D. L & West J.D. (1993) Counseling Couples Volume 8 of Therapy in Practice. SAGE.
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Family Business Starting and Running

Words: 2181 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19315698

1). Crane (2007) further asserts her perspective that the lack of success has a lot to do with a lack of formalized structure and the tendency to hire within the family even when those hires are not a good fit. Crane (2007) echoes much of what the others have said about success in family businesses requiring consistent, honest communication, transparency, and outside advice.

Evaluation

Karolyi Gymnastics Camp

In 1981, Bela Karolyi and his wife, Martha, founded a camp within the Sam Houston National Forest (in Texas) (Karolyi, 2010). It contains a 35,000 square foot gymnasium complex, a huge lake for boating, an exotic animal petting zoo, horse stables and space for horseback riding, trails for nature walks, and an Olympic size swimming pool (Karolyi). It is on these grounds that Bela and Martha host gymnasts from all levels, over 7 years of age, from all over the world (Karolyi). It…… [Read More]

References

Aronoff, C.E., McClure, S.L., & Ward, J.L. Family Business Succession: The Final Test of Greatness. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Chakrabarty, S. 2009. The influence of national culture and institutional voids on family ownership of large firms: A country level empirical study. Journal of International Management, 15(1). Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

Crane, M. 2007. The Perils of Running a Family Business. Forbes.com. Retrieved from http://finance.yahoo.com/career-work/article/102660/The-Perils-of-Running-a-Family-Business.

Fishman, A.E. 2009. 9 Elements of Family Business Success. USA: McGraw-Hill.
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Family and Systemic Therapies Shift From First-Order to Second Order

Words: 2684 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81794575

Shift From First-order to Second-Order Cybernetics in the Family and Systemic Therapies

The strategic family therapy model came up in the 1950s and was inspired by two primary works: the works of Milton Erickson who came up with revolutionary paradoxical interventions which took advantage of people's resistance to change to help alter psychiatric symptoms first; and the works of Gregory Bateson and the Palo Alto Group that made use of cybernetics in communication patterns of the family. The style of a therapist changes as he or she gets better as a person and as they develop professionally, and also as per what is in fashion at the time. An older person has the chance to look at what happened in their past and see what worked and what failed. This gives them a better perspective of what works and what might not work for a given situation. The path is…… [Read More]

References

Asen, E. (2004). Outcome research in family therapy. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, vol. 8, pp. 230-238

Asen, K.E., Berkowitz, R., Cooklin, A., et al. (1991). Family therapy outcome research: a trial for families, therapists and researchers. Family Process, 30, 3-20.

Baron, P. (2007). Ecosystemic psychology; first and second order cybernetics.

Baucom, D., Shoham, V., Mueser, K., et al. (1998). Empirically supported couple and family interventions for marital distress and adult mental health problems. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66, 53-88.
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Analyzing Family Relation and Substance Use Disorders

Words: 1518 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52086634

Family elation and Substance Use Disorders

Families have multiple reasons to exist. The key reason, however, is nurturing, and fulfilling the present as well as long-term wants and needs of all members. A secondary motive is contributing, as a participant and consumer, to the wider society (Peter 2015). This paper will explore important familial roles, cultural differences in family systems, and how family members can facilitate treatment of a teenage member diagnosed with substance/drug use disorder. Family interventions such as Functional Family Therapy, Brief Strategic Family Therapy, In Family Behavior Therapy, Multi-systemic Therapy and Multidimensional Family Therapy will also be discussed.

In What Way Is The Family A System Of oles?

Families have multiple reasons to exist. The key reason, however, is nurturing, and fulfilling the present as well as long-term wants and needs of all members. A secondary motive is contributing, as a participant and consumer, to the wider…… [Read More]

Reference

Marcia .C. (2011). Culture and Family Dynamics. Retrieved March 30, 2016, from http://www.dimensionsofculture.com/2010/11/culture-and-family-dynamics/

National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2014, January). Family-Based Approaches. Retrieved March 30, 2016, from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-adolescent-substance-use-disorder-treatment-research-based-guide/evidence-based-approaches-to-treating-adolescent-substance-use-disorders/family-based-approaches

Novella .R. (2014, January). Family-Based Approaches. Retrieved March 30, 2016, from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-adolescent-substance-use-disorder-treatment-research-based-guide/evidence-based-approaches-to-treating-adolescent-substance-use-disorders/family-based-approaches

Peter K. (2015, March). Use Family System Concepts to Improve Your Members' Harmony. Retrieved March 30, 2016, from http://sfhelp.org/fam/system.htm
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Family Systems Therapy Strengths and

Words: 899 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27485534

Bowen therapists would respond that all members of the family unit share the same emotional 'skin' in a unique fashion. ithin today's cultural context, because the nuclear family is given such importance, it often must be subject to particular examination. But "each concept in Bowen theory applies to nonfamily groups, such as work and social organizations. The concept of societal emotional process describes how the emotional system governs behavior on a societal level, promoting both progressive and regressive periods in a society" (Societal emotional process, 2009, the Bowen Center). Bowen theory ultimately does take a macro view, and sees the family system as interlocked in a series of family systems that make up a society.

Thus family systems therapy does allow for an analysis of an extended family, when these relationships are sufficiently impactful upon the individuals. The therapy analyzes multigenerational influences upon the family's collective psyche. It examines how…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bowen theory. (2009). The Bowen Center. Retrieved August 24, 2009 at http://www.thebowencenter.org/pages/theory.html

Differentiation of the self. (2009). The Bowen Center. Retrieved August 24, 2009 at http://www.thebowencenter.org/pages/conceptds.html

Nuclear family emotional system. (2009). The Bowen Center. Retrieved August 24, 2009 at http://www.thebowencenter.org/pages/conceptnf.html

Societal emotional process. (2009). The Bowen Center. Retrieved August 24, 2009 at http://www.thebowencenter.org/pages/conceptsep.html
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Family and Education in Frankenstein

Words: 2250 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42657604

People generally focus on appearance when coming across a particular individual. This is perfectly exemplified by the meeting between the old member of the De Lacey family and the monster. The man initially welcomes the creature, as he is no longer able to see and is unacquainted with the monster's facial features and body.

Victor Frankenstein can be considered to contrast the monster through his behavior, his background, and because of the goals that he has. The scientist virtually had everything that the monster longed for, considering his family, his reputation, and the fact that he was generally seen as one of society's leading members. Instead of valuing what he had, however, Frankenstein gave it all away in favor of gaining reputation, as this was apparently the thing that he appreciated the most in life. hile most readers are likely to blame Frankenstein for most unfortunate events in the book,…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Bloom Bissonete, Melissa, "Teaching the Monster: Frankenstein and Critical Thinking"

Chao, Shun-Liang. "Education as a Pharmakon in Marry Shelley's Frankenstein," the Explicator, Vol. 68, No. 4, 223-226, 2010.

Lunsford, Lars, "The Devaluing of Life in Shelley's Frankenstein," the Explicator, Vol. 68, No. 3, 174-176, 2010

Schmid, Thomas H. "Addiction and Isolation in Frankenstein"
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Family How the Family Really

Words: 581 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34910049

Women had joined the workforce long before the 1950s, with dual incomes being as necessary for many families during the Depression and even through the 1940s as they are today (Coontz 2000). In fact, the emphasis that was brought to the cohesion and in many ways the isolation of the nuclear family during the first half of the twentieth century was detrimental to many aspects of the family, including its economic viability, according to Stephanie Coontz's The Way We Never Were (2000). This historian also argues that personal satisfaction and happiness suffered when they became wholly attached to the success of the family rather than being derived form individual pursuits, as was the case earlier in the nineteenth century and before (Coontz 2000). The period since the 1950s has been one of increasing individualism and self-definition outside the context of the family, which has again made familial roles both more…… [Read More]

References

Coontz, S. (2000). The way we never were. New York: Basic.

Skolnick, A. & Skolnick, J. (2004). Family in transition. New York: Allyn & Bacon.
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Family Group Conference in New

Words: 4176 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76066618

Many nations do not use restorative justice as a policy, but eventually bright, progressive leaders worldwide will hopefully learn the value of restorative justice, and implement it at some level.

Youth Justice Process in New Zealand. (2005). Family Group Conference. Retrieved 29 June 2008, at http://www.justice.govtnz/youth/fgc.html.

This government-produced review of the ideologies and practical implementation of the Family Group Conference was a valuable and basic article in terms of the understanding the process and how it works well in most cases.

The Family Group Conference in New Zealand

The Family Group Conference (FGC) was established in New Zealand in 1989, with the purpose in mind of more skillfully and more fairly dealing with problems and issues of boys and girls (under the age of 14) and young people (14-16) who get in trouble with law enforcement. According to information provided by the Youth Justice Process (www.justice.govt.nz),the FGC has modernized and…… [Read More]

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Family on Family An Interview With Uncle

Words: 587 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23465464

Family on Family: An Interview With Uncle Simon

The idea of the family as a social subsystem is a very useful one in the academic world and in sociological and therapeutic practice, but it is not necessarily one that individual laypeople ascribe to when they think about their own family (Lesser & Pope, 2007). Though certain aspects of most people's conceptions of the family unit can be seen to mirror larger social structures in some ways, most people's views are much more individual and personalized (Carter & McGoldrick, 1998). The following interview, conducted with the interviewees uncle, demonstrates the personalized yet somewhat standardized view of family that can and does ultimately emerge when people think about their family.

The interviewee, Simon, had not previously though very much about the definition of "family" or how this definition was and is influenced by other social trends, though upon reflection he acknowledged that…… [Read More]

References

Carter, B. & McGoldrick, M. (1998). The Expanded Family Life Cycle. New York: Lavoisier.

Lesser, J. & Pope, D. (2007). Human Behavior and the Social Environment. New York: Pearson.

Walsh, F. (2011). Normal Family Processes. New York: Guilford.
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Family Homelessness in Mass or in America

Words: 867 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71621802

Family homelessness has emerged as a serious global problem and over the last twenty-five years the make-up of the homeless population has changed significantly in the United States (Swick Pp). The majority of the homeless were men in the early 1980's, however, today, families make up thirty percent of the homeless population, and some scholars suggest that families may constitute up to forty to fifty percent of the homeless (Swick Pp).

The United States federal government defines homeless individuals as those lacking a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, or those who have a primary nighttime residence that is:

*a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations

(including welfare hotels, congregate shelters, and transitional housing for the mentally ill);

*an institution that provides a temporary residence for individuals intended to be institutionalized; or *a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Swick, Kevin J. "The dynamics of families who are homeless: implications for early childhood educators." Childhood Education. 3/22/2004; Pp.

This article focuses on articulating the various dynamics of families who are homeless and what strategies can be employed to effectively support homeless families with young children.

Washington, Thomas Alex. "The homeless need more than just a pillow, they need a pillar: an evaluation of a transitional housing program."

Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services. 3/1/2002; Pp.
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Families in a Global Context

Words: 2653 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18759597



At the same time, the Japanese parent will likely encourage the child's freedom, especially in the early stages of life, while the American parent will tend to correct from early stages of development any misbehavior or errors. With the relationship mother-child, the Japanese mother will tend to emphasize less the development of the communication side for the child and will prefer a more symbiotic relationship (Ibid. page 71).

4. A family can best be defined through some of the main characteristics it has. However, one should also known that there are some general characteristics that everyone accepts as to what a family is and several others that are only accepted by groups of individuals as to what the family is. As such, both aspects need to be taken into consideration and discussed.

First of all, the family is judged to be the fundamental unity cell of society. From this perspective,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Roopnarine, Jaipaul. Gielen, Uwe. 2005. Families in Global Perspective. Pearson.

2. Ehrenreich, Barbara, Hochschild, Arlie Russell. 2002. Global Woman. Henry Holt and Company
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Family and Community Support and

Words: 2900 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45705115

...in the end 'the addict has to want to change' and if the addict does not want to change it does not matter what program..." that the addict is in. (National Institute of Justice, 2005) the National Institute of Justice reports that a woman "often retains legal custody of a child while in prison, and once out, may not have the child immediately returned to her by the family member caring for the child." (2005)

Sarah Samson reports in the work entitled: "Groundbreaking Study Identifies Crucial Factors for Successful Community Reintegration of Ex-Prisoners in altimore" published in 2004, that Programs that help prisoners stay connected with their families, get drug treatment, and work while in prison can increase the chances that they will successfully reintegrate back into society, according to a new study released today by the nonpartisan Urban Institute. The study breaks new ground by recording prisoners' perspectives on…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baltimore Prisoners' Experiences Returning Home," by Christy Visher, Vera Kachnowski, Nancy La Vigne, and Jeremy Travis, has been made possible by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, OSI-Baltimore, the Abell Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Maryland Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention, and the John D. And Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Community Supervision and Reentry (2008) Urban Institute Prison Reentry Portfolio. Online available at http://www.urban.org/projects/reentry-portfolio/community-supervision.cfm

Pelissier, Bernadette (2004) Gender Differences in Substance Use Treatment Entry and Retention Among Prisoner with Substance Use Histories. Research and Practice. American Journal of Public Health August 2004. Vol. 94 No. 8. Online available at http://www.ajph.org/cgi/reprint/94/8/1418.pdf

Powell, M. Anne; and Nolan, Clare (2003) California State Prisoners with Children:
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Family Owned Businesses

Words: 829 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76860558

Family

Moshavi D. & Koch M.J., (n.d). he Adoption of Family-Friendly Practices in Family Owned Firms.

he article is centered on the family business and how the conflicts that emanate from the family business affects the non-family employees and what repercussions it has on the business as well. It highlights the work and family systems interaction and how that interaction can be managed. his is an empirical investigation into how the family business owners manage the work and family conflicts that face the non-family employees. he article first highlights some pertinent theories that help explain the influence of family on business like the resource-dependency theory and institutional theory in order to help the reader understand the entire concept. he researcher used the survey method to collect his data and 680 human resource manager filled in questionnaires that were used. he dependent variable is sighted as work-family responsiveness and the independent…… [Read More]

The writer here takes a closer look at the family business and specifically the communication trends that are experienced within such businesses. It also looks at how the communication helps to boost innovativeness in family business. The paper seeks to examine the effects of communication on innovation within the family business and how much innovation there is within the family business setting. The researcher here also looks at the variations in innovation among the family businesses and the reasons behind these disparities. The researcher highlights the various factors that are likely to affect the innovation within the family business setting and how these have over years changed. The data that was used was widely sourced from case studies of various family owned business in contrast to the business not owned by families. There was a general conclusion that non-family owned businesses seemed to show higher levels of innovation and better structured communication systems.

Memili E., Zellweger T. & Fang H.C., (2013). The Determinants of Family Owner-Managers' Affective Organizational Commitment. Interdisciplinary Journal of Applied Family Studies.

The author here highlights the need for the commitment of the owner-managers within the family owned businesses. The levels of commitment as managers are seen to be affected by the levels of harmony that is within the business management position. The conceptual framework of this article looks highlights some major factors that are likely to determine the commitment of any individual family member in managing the family business. These are relationship conflict, work-family conflict, affective organizational commitment which are all seen to have an impact in the ownership attachment.
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Family Systems Theory Applied to Stepparents

Words: 1933 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89284100

Family Interactions

The Harrison family in the 1998 film "Stepmom" consists of the father (Luke Harrison, played by Ed Harris), the ex-wife and mother (Jackie Harrison, played by Susan Sarandon), the daughter (Anna Harrison, played by Jena Malone), the son (Ben Harrison, played by Liam Aiken), and the soon-to-be stepmom (Isabel Kelly, played by Julia oberts). The children's natural mother and ex-wife becomes of aware that she has cancer, a number of therapies are tried, but finally everyone must face the fact that disease will end her life before long.

The parents of Anna and Ben have divorced, and their father's girlfriend, Isabel -- a single, successful professional photographer -- is living with them. Isabel's efforts to provide good mothering to the children is met at every turn by their resistance -- understandably, the children want their parents back together. Ganong, et al. (2011) identified six patterns of step-relationship development,…… [Read More]

References

1492 Pictures (Producer), & Chris Columbus (Director). (1998). Stepmom [Motion picture]. United States: TriStar Pictures and Columbia Pictures.

Cox, M.J. & Paley, B. (1997). Families as systems. Annual Review of Psychology, 48, 243-267.

Deater-Deckard, K., Dunn, J. & Lussier, G. (2002). Sibling relationships and social-emotional adjustment in different family contexts. Social Development, 11(4).

Ganong, L.H., Coleman, M., & Jamison, T. (2011, April). Patterns of stepchild-stepparent relationship development. Journal of Marriage and Family, 73, 396-413. doi: 10.111/j.1741-3737.2010.00814.x.
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Family Systems Theory A Case Study

Words: 2897 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90599096

Family Systems Theory: Vignette II

Discussion of what's going on in this family

Claudia and Margaret had suffered violence at a young age and therefore, are prone to commit acts of aggression, with the chances of developing more symptomatology like anxiety, aggression, depression and low levels of self-esteem, as compared to those who led a violence-free childhood. Being victims of, and exposed to, family violence during childhood years can make Claudia and Margaret victims or offenders. Margaret was a victim of violence when she was young and resorted to aggression as the means to resolving conflicts in her relationships; her personality structure incorporates shame, anger and guilt. Claudia, also being victimized in childhood, cannot regulate her emotions, particularly anger, and exhibits more tolerance to adult intimate abuse. As they were both victimized or exposed to abuse, they not only display aggressive behaviors, but also possess ineffective ways of coping and…… [Read More]

References

Substance abuse and dependence within the gay/lesbian community. (2008). Retrieved April 8, 2015, from http://www.hebpsy.net/articles.asp?id=1804

Beatty, D.M. (2013).Effects of Exposure to Abuse and Violence in Childhood on Adult Attachment and Domestic Violence in Women's Same-Sex Relationships (Doctoral dissertation, Seton Hall University).

Kolko, D.J., Simonich, H., & Loiterstein, A. (2014). Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: An Overview and a Case Example. In Evidence-Based Approaches for the Treatment of Maltreated Children (pp. 187-212).Springer Netherlands.

Trepper, T.S., McCollum, E.E., De Jong, P., Korman, H., Gingerich, W., & Franklin, C. (2008). Solution focused therapy treatment manual for working with individuals research committee of the solution focused brief therapy association. Retrieved July, 23, 2008.
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Generations of Family TV Shows Many Believe

Words: 2268 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8144614

Generations of Family TV Shows

Many believe that scripted television shows provide a window into the culture, by portraying cultural norms and standards. Therefore, family television shows should highlight aspects of family life in American culture during the time period in which the shows were produced, not necessarily the time period portrayed in the show. This investigation will involve a single television episode from two family-focused television series that stopped airing new shows at least 20 years ago, and a single episode from two family-focused television series that are currently airing on modern television. The two older television shows chosen for this paper are Little House on the Prairie and Bewitched. The two currently-running television shows are Good Luck Charlie and Two and a Half Men.

Little House on the Prairie

Little House on the Prairie was a television series that aired in the mid-1970s through early 1980s. It was…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Big, Flappy Bastards." Two and a Half Men. Twohalfmenonline.com. 29 Sep. 2003. Web.

11 Dec. 2012.

"Charlie is 2!" Good Luck Charlie. YouTube. 10 Feb. 2011. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.

"Nobody's Perfect." Bewitched. YouTube. 15 Sep. 1966. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
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Marriage & Family Marriage and

Words: 1797 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85947328

In J. Smith (Ed.), Understanding families into the new millennium: A decade in review (p. 357-381). Minneapolis, MN: National Council on Family Relations.

Ferree, M. (1984). The view from below: Women's employment and gender equality in working-class families. In .. Hess, & M.. Sussman (Eds), Women and the family: Two decades of change (p. 57-75). New York: Haworth Press.

Fung, J. (2010). Factors associated with parent-child (dis)agreement on child behavior and parenting problems in Chinese immigrant families. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 3993), 314-327.

Hewlett, S., & West, C. (1998). The war against parents: What we can do for America's beleaguered moms and dads. New York: Houghton Mifflin.

Hwang, K., Chang, S., Chen, S., Chen, C., & Yang, K. (2001). Chinese relationism and depression. Unpublished manuscript.

Lai, E., & Fang, S. (2001). Sex role attitude and housework participation among men and women in Taiwan. Paper presented at the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beutell, N. & Wittig-Berman, U. (2008). Work-family conflict and work-family synergy for generation X baby boomers, and matures: Generational differences, predictors, and satisfaction outcomes. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 23(5), 507-523.

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). Contexts of child rearing: Problems and prospects. American Psychologist, 34(10), 844-850.

Carlson, J. (2009). Family therapy techniques: integrating and tailoring treatment. Florence, KY: Brunner-Routledge.

Chen, F. & Li, T. (2007). Marital enqing: an examination of its relationship to spousal
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Divorce in Minority Families Divorce

Words: 2846 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95317753

(Coleman et al., 2006) there are more significant differences between race and ethnic groups in beliefs about intergenerational assistance than are expected by chance the differences are not large. As expected, White European-Americans perceive that less help should be given to older adults than is true of African-Americans and Asian-Americans. Unexpectedly, European-Americans and Latinos rarely differ in their beliefs about intergenerational assistance. When differences exist among the three minority groups, it is typically because African-Americans and Asian-Americans perceive that more help should be given to older family members than Latinos. The family plays a unique role in forming and sustaining intimate relationships; however, there have been notable changes in the family in the past 50 years. As marriages are being delayed, birth rates are decreasing, and maternal employment, divorce, cohabitation, and births to single mothers are increasing, the course of intimate relationships is becoming more diverse and less stable and…… [Read More]

References

Bean, R.A., Crane, D.R., & Lewis, T.L. (2002). Basic research and implications for practice in family science: A content analysis and status report for U.S. ethnic groups. Family Relations, 51, 15-21.

Bramlett, M.D., & Mosher, W.D. (2001). First marriage dissolution, divorce, and remarriage: United Stales (Advanced Data from Vital and Health Statistics No. 323). Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.

Chadiha, L.A., Veroff, J., & Leber, D. (1998). Newlywed's narrative themes: Meaning in the first year of marriage for African-American and White couples. Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 29, 115-130.

Coleman, M., Ganong, L.H., & Rothrauff, T.C. (2006, December). Racial and Ethnic Similarities and Differences in Beliefs about Intergenerational Assistance to Older Adults After Divorce and Remarriage. Family Relations, 55(5), pp. 576-587.
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Multiple Therapeutic Models of a Family the

Words: 1306 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92071633

Multiple Therapeutic Models of a Family

The main components of structural therapy

Structural therapy is a family treatment model founded on the frameworks of systems theory. The distinctive component of this model is the emphasis it has placed on structural adjustments as the primary objective of the therapy session. This emphasis is prominent over details of adjustments in individual behaviors. This model is distinctive because the therapist is the most active agent and receives much attention in the course of family restructuring (Lock & Strong, 2012).

The main purpose of structural family therapy is prevention of sequences from repetition by coveting the hierarchical structures of families. This encompasses shifts in power distribution among family members by adjusting interaction styles. Nevertheless, structural family therapy operates by making alterations on the dysfunctional family structure through encouragement and promotion of growth among family members with the primary intention of re-building the family (Petridis,…… [Read More]

References

Goldenberg, H., & Goldenberg, I. (2008). Family therapy: An overview. Australia: Thompson Brooks/Cole.

Lock, A., & Strong, T. (2012). Discursive perspectives in therapeutic practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Peterson, G.W., Steinmetz, S.K., & Sussman, M.B. (2009). Handbook of marriage and the family. New York: Plenum Press.

Petridis, N., Pichorides, S.K., & Varopoulos, N. (2010). Harmonic analysis, Iraklion 1978: Proceedings of a conference held at the University of Crete. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.
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Psycho-Social Dynamics of Alcoholic Addiction Family

Words: 1931 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86530127

Psyco-Social Dynamics of Alcoholic Addiction Family

Alcoholism is a disease.

It affects the entire family and creates an environment of dysfunction and disorganization.

ithin the family, the social and psychological ramifications of alcoholism affect the alcoholic, his or her spouse, and the children.

Children Supporting Paragraph

Children must cope with the effects of an alcoholic on the family (disorganization).

There are five roles which serve as coping mechanisms.

The mascot, placater, acting out child, lost child, responsible child.

Child Roles Supporting Paragraph

Roles either make things better or worse.

The responsible child excels

The mascot and placater child intermediate.

The former does so from foolery, the second from caring.

The lost child disassociates.

The acting out child gets in trouble.

Spouse Supporting Paragraph

A. Spouses are more of a determinant of an alcoholic's behavior than children.

B. Spouses have three perspectives on actions of the alcoholic.

1. They like alcoholism…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Devine, Cindy and Valerie Braithwaite. "The Survival Roles of Children and Alcoholics: Their Measurement and Validity." Addiction 88.1: 69-78. 1993. Print.

Glover, Geraldine. "The Hero Child in the Alcoholic Home: Recommendations for Counselors." School Counselor 41: 185-191. 1994. Print.

Janzen, Curtis. "Family Treatment for Alcoholism: A Review." Social Work 23.2: 135-144. 1978. Print.

Johnson, Patrick. "Dimensions of Functioning in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Families." Journal of Mental Counseling 23 (2001): 127-136
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Deployment on Military Families Cause Deployment Effect

Words: 1366 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51479252

Deployment on Military Families

Cause (Deployment) Effect (Stress on Families / Children)

The stress on military families when the father or mother is deployed -- whether the deployment is to a war zone or to another place -- can be very intense and psychologically stressful. There is a great deal of literature on what military families experience before, during, and after deployment, and this paper provides several peer-reviewed articles that discuss and assess the situations that military families must deal with during deployment. Thesis: families left at home when a military parent is deployed face social and psychological issues that do not necessarily end when that parent returns from deployment; however, there are strategies to reduce the stress once the parent returns home from the deployment.

The Literature -- Psychological Adjustment for Children

The psychological adjustments that children must make -- especially children with "…preexisting psychological conditions" such as depression…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hinojosa, Ramon, Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna, and Hognas, Robin S. "Problems with Veteran-

Family Communication During Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom

Military Deployment." Military Medicine, 177.2 (2012): 191-197.

Lincoln, Alan, Swift, Erika, and Shorteno-Fraser, Mia. "Psychological Adjustment and Treatment of Children and Families With Parents Deployed in Military Combat." Journal
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The Fall of the American Family

Words: 1738 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65865996

Relationship Trends
Abstract
This paper looks at relationship trends in the U.S. from a sociological perspective, using feminist political stance as a way to explain the transformation from traditional family norms of the early 20th century to the mixture of families today. Today, single parenting is the new norm as half of all marriages end in divorce. More and more people are going unwed and not having children as well. The population is aging and there are effects to all these factors that are discussed as well. The pros and cons of these trends are examined and described.
Introduction
The traditional family of one hundred years ago used to be the sociological norm; today, however, the new norm is that there is no norm. Half of all marriages end in divorce, and as the Pew Research Center (2015) shows, not only are family sizes shrinking (with parents having fewer children…… [Read More]

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High Risk Family Type Healthy People 2010

Words: 2055 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52269419

High isk Family Type: Healthy People 2010

Homelessness: Health isks and Prevention

For the purpose of national census statistics and for clarification of this discussion, a homeless person is defined as one living on the street, in deserted apartment buildings or one who spends nights at a homeless shelter. Due to the difficulty of counting the homeless, statistics in recent years have been variable. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, there were 643,067 sheltered and unsheltered homeless persons nationwide as of January 2008. (Preston, 2008). Another approximation stems from a study conducted by the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, which estimates that 3.5 million people, 1.35 million of them children, are likely to experience homelessness in a given year. (2007). These numbers are likely underrepresentative because they rely heavily on data from homeless shelters, which do not account for people living in deserted apartments…… [Read More]

References

Healthy People 2010. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.healthypeople.gov.

Hibbs, J.R., Benner, L., Klugman, L., Spencer, R., Macchia, I., Mellinger, A. (1994). Mortality in a cohort of homeless adults in Philadelphia. New England Journal of Medicine, 331, 304, 309.

Lawrence, R.S., Gootman, J.A., Sim, L.J., editors. (2009). Adolescent health services: Missing opportunities. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. Committee on Adolescent Health Care Services and Models of Care for Treatment, Prevention, and Healthy Development. Washington: National Academies Press, 2009. Retrieved from: http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?recordid=12063&page=1.

Morrison, D.S. (2009). Homelessness as an independent risk factor for mortality: results from a retrospective cohort study. International Journal of Epidemiology, 38, 877-883.
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Noel Coward's Dysfunctional Family in

Words: 1278 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44009397

He is perfectly well aware that he possesses 'star quality', which is the lodestar of his life. In his case, it might be defined as the ability to project, without effort, the outline of a unique personality, which had never existed before him in print or paint." (Eller, p. 1)

So to an extent, the various characterizations used to present the Bliss family may in some manner echo the various personas between which Coward could move so easily. In the Bliss children especially, we can speculate that Coward is of a mixed sentiment regarding his entrance into high society in spite of his low society birth. A spot of dialogue between Simon and Sorel underscores this sentiment. Here, Sorel asserts, "I sometimes wish we were more normal and bouncing Simon." hen Simon presses her on this proclamation, she tells, "I should like to be a fresh, open-air girl with a…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Coward, N. (1954). Hay Fever: A Play in Three Acts. Samuel French, Inc.

Eller, M. (2010). Hay Fever by Noel Coward. Central Washington University.

Kellaway, K. (2012). Hay Fever -- Review. The Guardian.

Kenrick, J. (2000). Noel Coward: Biographical Sketch. Musicals 101.com.
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Omid's Story the Power of Family Centered Care

Words: 2756 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61192459

Omid's Story

Being ill is never a simple thing. Besides the physical tolls a medical condition can take on a person's body, there are also many mental and psychological costs that affect a sick person. Nor do these physical and mental effects only harm the person with the medical condition. Research shows that family members and close friends of ill people will also be seriously affected by the condition. Illness is a physical, mental, sociological, and financial drain and, in some family units, an illness can destroy the fabric of the family itself. A person who is involved in the medical profession must have a clear understanding not only of medicine and what they need to do to cure or treat an illness; they must also be aware of the psychological issues that a patient deals with, along with the pressures which are placed upon members of their family. Nurses…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bruce, B. et al. (2002). A multisite study of health professional's perceptions and practices of family centered care. The Journal of Family Nursing. (8:4). 408-29.

Harrison, T. (2010). Family centered pediatric nursing care: state of the science. Journal of Pediatric Nursing. (25:5). 335-43.

Raoufian, D. (2003). The power of family-centered care. The Journal of Family Nursing. (9:3).

227-31.
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The Changing Meaning of the Family

Words: 759 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60853954

sociological perspectives (e.g., social functionalism, social conflict, and symbolic interaction) be used to conceptually understand the family?

What fundamental changes to the family have been made over the last 40 years?

What is the "family"? Use the 3 sociological perspectives to explain.

Social functionalism views institutions like the family as necessary to preserve society. This perspective views the integrative components that make up society as greater than the sum of their individual parts and holds the family to be one of the fundamental building blocks that provide stability and coherence to people's lives. Preserving the family as a social institution is thus vital to reduce crime and to improve society as a whole. "Through kinship networks, people cooperate so that they can acquire the basic necessities of life, including food and shelter. Kinship systems can also serve as a means by which property is transferred, goods are produced and distributed,…… [Read More]

Reference

Kendall, D. (2015). Sociology in our times. (10th ed). Cengage.
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Obesity Ma Adolecents Family Centered

Words: 2798 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89381977

" (2008, p. 146) Flegal, Ogden & Carroll stress the need to educate lowering the fat content of the diet through nursing intervention and practice. (2004, p. S147) These nursing interventions can like this work stress the implementation of a program that exposes adolescents to healthier alternatives and builds the efficacy for obtaining them through successfully seeking family behavior changes and building awareness about healthier options and food costing that make such options obtainable.

What interventions have been successful and what interventions have NOT been successful?

It is clear that general nutrition education, in the schools or in the community has not been an effective intervention tool for children in general, especially given what some would consider the deplorable condition of the public school nutrition programs in most states. It is also clear that family focused interventions are rare, but where they have been tried they have proven most successful…… [Read More]

References

Heiss, G.L. (2008) Chapter 18: Health Promotion and Risk Reduction in the Community. In Maurer, F.A. & Smith C.M. eds. (2008) Community/Public Health Nursing Practice: Health for Families and Populations Philadelphia, PA. Saunders.

Flegal, K.M. Ogden, C.L. & Carroll, M.D. (July 2004) Prevalence and Trends in Overweight in Mexican-American Adults and Children. Nutrition Reviews 62 (7) S144-S148.

Fortmeier-Saucier, L. Savrin, C. Heinzer, M. & Hudak, C. (Third-Quarter 2008) BMI and Lipid Levels in Mexican-American Children Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes World Views on Evidenced-Based Nursing. 142-147.

Kumanyika, S. & Grier. S. (2006) "Targeting Interventions for Ethnic Minority and Low-Income Populations." The Future of Children 16 (1) 187.
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Impact of Post Deployment on Family Life

Words: 3156 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35927024

Post Deployment on Family Life

It is stated in a Defense Watch document entitled "Post-Deployment Stressful for Many Veterans" that deployments are not only stressful for members of the armed forces but as well deployments are "also very stressful on the families who've had to create a daily routine without their deployed soldier." (Defense Watch, 2010) The spouse of the individual deployed naturally must take on many more responsibilities in the home including those related to "…finances, household repairs, disciplining of children, and other day-to-day activities." The result is that many spouses are overwhelmed by responsibility and this produces a great deal of "anxiety, stress, and occasionally, substance abuse." (Defense Watch, 2010) In contrast, the impact is quite the opposite with the spouse left behind thriving on the extra responsibility and at the time the deployed spouse returns home, the spouse who was left with all the responsibilities at home…… [Read More]

References

Post-Deployment Stressful for Many Veterans (2006) Defense Watch. Military.com Soldiers for the Truth (SFTT) 20 Feb. Retrieved from:  http://ptsdcombat.blogspot.com/2006/02/defensewatch-post-deployment-stressful.html 

Karney, Benjamin, et al. (2008) Invisible Wounds: RAND Health Working Paper. Center for Military Health Policy Research. Retrieved from: http://www.litagion.org/pubs/working_papers/2008/RAND_WR546.sum.pdf

Network of Care for Service Members, Veterans & Their Families (2010) Retrieved from:http://montgomery.md.networkofcare.org/veterans/library/detail.cfm?id=2113&cat=443

Finley, E., Pugh, M.J.; and Jeffreys, M. (2010) Talking, Love, Time: Two Case Studies of Positive Post-Deployment Coping in Military Families. Family Life Journal. 20 Jan 2010. Retrieved from:  http://www.journaloffamilylife.org/militaryfamilies
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How Huntington's Disease Affects Families

Words: 3858 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83682537

Huntington's disease affects families

What is Huntington's disease, and how does it affect the patient and his family? How does one deal with the patient? Is there any cure for the disease, and what is it? When was the disease discovered? Who discovered it, and how was it discovered? What way is support offered from external sources for the disease, and how can one avail of the support? What, exactly is Huntington's disease? It is a genetic disease that affects the central nervous system, in individuals who are thirty years and above, though it does occur sometimes in people younger than this. When the disease occurs, it occurs as an inherited autosomal dominant condition, and it affects all or most of the family members within the same family. The onset of symptoms and of the rate of the progression of the disease may differ between the different family members, and…… [Read More]

References

A Brief History of Huntington's disease. 8 July, 2004. Retrieved From

http://www.stanford.edu/group/hopes/basics/timeline/r2.html Accessed on 22 March, 2005

Abuse of the patient. Retrieved From

  http://www.kumc.edu/hospital/huntingtons/ abuse.html  Accessed on 22 March, 2005
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Case Study of Family With Family Management

Words: 695 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91494019

Family Management Styles Framework (FMSF) was originally developed to help families caring for a child with a chronic illness or chronic condition (Knafl, et al., 2016). However, the Family Management Styles Framework can be extended to address family functioning in other situations. Applied to my own family, the FMSF offers insight into how we might handle an unforeseen situation in which a family member were to be unexpectedly diagnosed with a chronic condition. In fact, the FMSF can offer a family like ours, which typically does not suffer from crises, a means by which to prevent and plan for unforeseen circumstances. Therefore, the FMSF can help families build resiliency.

We are a close-knit and happy family consisting of me, my husband, his parents, and our two children aged 6 and 8 years old. The Family Management Styles Framework can help my husband and me, and also my in-laws, in developing…… [Read More]

References

Knafl, K., et al. (2013). Patterns of family management of childhood chronic conditions and their relationship to child and family functioning. Journal of Pediatric Nursing 28(6): 523-535.

Knafl, K., et al. (2016). Family management measure. UNC School of Nursing. Retrieved online: http://nursing.unc.edu/research/office-of-research-support-consultation/resources/family-management-measure-famm/
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Examination of Addiction in Families

Words: 1822 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58408084

Substance use and mental health problems often go hand-in-hand. People who feel depressed or anxious may depend on marijuana, alcohol, or other substances to feel at better or at ease. Although not everyone who experience mental health problems abuse substances, it is more common than imagined with people abusing prescription medication as well from Adderall to Vicodin (Montvilo, 2013). Although my immediate family has not experienced substance abuse problems, some within my family have gone through depression and anxiety issues. Other more distant relatives have experienced problems with marijuana and prescription medication. While their reasons differ, it amazing how family dynamics play a role in the creation of substance abuse and mental health problems.

B.)

The first person to look at is my father. He experienced a bout of depression when he had to deal with a potential loss of work a few years ago. He is the main provider…… [Read More]

References

Montvilo, R. (2013). Addictions & substance abuse. Ipswich, Mass.: Salem Press.
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Applied Structural Family Therapy

Words: 1287 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31198792

Psychology -- Counseling -- Structural Family Therapy Model

"Juno" is a refreshingly nonjudgmental look at teenage pregnancy and a family's ultimately positive, supportive response. Addressing the situation from a systematic therapeutic perspective, the counselor can accept Juno, her family and the adoptive family as they are and help them reach their agreed upon goals. The movie's portrayal of a teenager's situation that is normally deemed problematic in a positive human light makes the happy outcome of this film readily achievable and believable.

Juno

"Juno" (Reitman, 2007) is a film about teenage pregnancy, an aspect of life that frequently positively and negatively confronts modern American families. hen 16-year-old Juno irresponsibly becomes unexpectedly pregnant by her teenaged best friend, Bleek, she decides against abortion and chooses to give the baby to an as-yet-unknown infertile couple. hen she tells her father and stepmother, they are initially rattled but quickly become supportive because after…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chenail, R. J. (2009). Learning marriage and family therapy in the time of competencies. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 28(1), 72-87.

Gehart, D. R. (2014). Mastering competencies in family therapy, 2nd edition. Balmont, CA: Brooks-Cole Cengage Learning 978-1-285-07542-6.

Gerhart, D. (2011). The core competencies and MFT education: Practical aspects of transitioning to a learning-centered, outcome-based pedagogy. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 37(3), 344-54.

Reitman, J. (Director). (2007). Juno [Motion Picture].
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Children in Dysfunctional Families the

Words: 1730 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67754779

We are essentially powerless to prevent all dysfunctions - but, the mental health and social support structures within communities have the responsibility to do as much as they possibly can to promote healthy family life for all. This support often involves early identification of dysfunctional families, counseling, disruption of negative patterns. The schools, churches, hospitals and any other institution both public and private have a responsibility to reach out and try to help those who are suffering - and often that suffering must be alleviated at the source, the dysfunctional family.

ibliography

Abell, Troy D., et al. "The Effects of Family Functioning on Infant irthweight." Journal of Family Pratice 32.1 (1991): 37(8).

Hamamci, Zeynep. "Dysfunctional relationship beliefs in parent-late adolescent relationship and conflict resolution behaviors." College Student Journal 41.1 (2007): 122(16).

Hillis, Susan D., et al. "Adverse Childhood Experiences and Sexual Risk ehaviors in Women: A Retrospective Study." Family Planning…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abell, Troy D., et al. "The Effects of Family Functioning on Infant Birthweight." Journal of Family Pratice 32.1 (1991): 37(8).

Hamamci, Zeynep. "Dysfunctional relationship beliefs in parent-late adolescent relationship and conflict resolution behaviors." College Student Journal 41.1 (2007): 122(16).

Hillis, Susan D., et al. "Adverse Childhood Experiences and Sexual Risk Behaviors in Women: A Retrospective Study." Family Planning Perspectivesq 33.5 (2001): 206(5).

Martin, Don and Maggie Martin. "Understanding Dysfunctional and Functional Family Behaviors for the at-Risk Adolescent." Adolescence 35.140 (2000): 785(4).
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Role of Family Nurse Practitioner

Words: 1278 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55068438

Advance Practice egistered Nurse (APN) role of Family Nurse Practitioner

The US is witnessing a growing demand for the services of primary care providers, owing to an increase in the nation's elderly population. With Obamacare's enactment in the year 2010, the above trend is predicted to persist in the course of the next many years. FNPs or Family Nurse Practitioners can help mitigate the forecasted dearth of primary care providers. Available literature on the subjects indicates that FNPs might be capable of delivering a subsection of services categorized under primary care better than, or at least, just as proficiently as, doctors. Increased NP employment can improve healthcare access, especially in generally underserved localities and communities. For furthering this, APN stakeholder bodies and state nursing boards have endeavored to revolutionize and standardize FNP practice (National Governors Association, 2012).

APN represents a broad term utilized for defining nursing practice which exhibits competencies…… [Read More]

References

Sangster-Gormley, E., Martin-Misener, R., & Burge, F. (2013). A case study of nurse practitioner role implementation in primary care: what happens when new roles are introduced? BMC nursing, 12(1), 1.

National Governors Association. (2012). The role of nurse practitioners in meeting increasing demand for primary care. Washington: National Governors Association.

Wessel, L. A. (2012). Nurse practitioners in community health settings today. Journal of health care for the poor and underserved, 16(1), 1-6.

Britt, D. (2012). Family nurse practitioner's role in primary care. Retrieved February 3, 2017, from  http://source.southuniversity.edu/family-nurse-practitioners-role-in-primary-care-110820.aspx
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Use of Strategic Family Therapy

Words: 2356 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77118289

Dana is a young and beautiful woman with family members that seem to constantly put her down whenever they get together. They appear to be self-centered and attention seeking. The mother has set expectations she places on her family and seems angry whenever they do not meet those expectations. For example, the mother suggested Dana get breast enlargement surgery to appease her boyfriend Matt. Her sister, Joanie also commented on Dana's appearance, making sure to let Dana know she appeared overweight or had a large rear end. These comments can and do affect people's self-esteem especially when the source of such comments are from people that person loves or is supposed to trust.

Dana takes everything and says nothing, agreeing with the remarks and feeling like she truly is overweight even if objectively people see her as very attractive. She also cannot say how she feels even around her boyfriend.…… [Read More]

References

Arendt, K., Thastum, M., & Hougaard, E. (2015). Homework Adherence and Cognitive Behaviour Treatment Outcome for Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders. Behavioural And Cognitive Psychotherapy, 44(02), 225-235. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1352465815000429

Gingerich, W. & Peterson, L. (2013). Effectiveness of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Controlled Outcome Studies. Research On Social Work Practice, 23(3), 266. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049731512470859

Hayes, S., Levin, M., Plumb-Vilardaga, J., Villatte, J., & Pistorello, J. (2013). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Contextual Behavioral Science: Examining the Progress of a Distinctive Model of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy. Behavior Therapy, 44(2), 180-198. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2009.08.002

Hofmann, S., Asnaani, A., Vonk, I., Sawyer, A., & Fang, A. (2012). The Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Review of Meta-analyses. Cognitive Therapy And Research, 36(5), 427-440. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10608-012-9476-1
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Family Traditional Definition Limits Families to a

Words: 755 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74764947

Family

Traditional definition

Limits families to a heterosexual union with children

Does not account for other family types

Does not accept gay unions

Is highly positivist in data analysis and collection

The traditional family defintion focuses on the family with a heterosexual orientation. This defintion is functional in orientation and highly conservation in terms of its approaches to family. Consequently, other forms of family are not recognized or accepted as legitimate forms of family. This posture means that these families are not families. Single parents, extended families, and other non-traditional models are not entertained. Additionally, this approach is highly positivist in orientation and depends heavily on the creation of categories of families and the use of statistical data. The analysis attempts to understand trends based on the mean and departures from that mean. This is a major limitation since the nuanced nature of family requires that different types of data…… [Read More]

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Family Systems and Marriage Psychology

Words: 3816 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87974286

Psychology of Marriage and Family Systems

The literal meaning of the word "psychopathology" is a mind disorder or disease. Psychological diagnosticians, while assuming that the illness is located inside a person, always use the medical model in treating or studying patients with 'mental illnesses'. In comparison with the approach they take, I present two converging and related psychopathology perspectives. The two perspectives give an analysis based on context from the family's viewpoint. The first approach, the "family systems" approach, is a conception that came up in the 1950s as a substitute to the traditional focus of psychopathology on individuals (Goldenberg & Goldenberg, 1996).

The second approach, "family risk factors" has been in existence in psychopathology but not in the foreground. It tries to identify a couple family aspects of the functioning of the family that are significant in the treatment as well as etiology of patients that have tested positive…… [Read More]

References

Ackerman, N.W. (1958). The psychodynamics of family life. New York, NY: Basic Books.

Ackerman, N.W. (1962), Family Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: The Implications of Difference. Family Process, 1: 30-43.

Ackerman, N.W. (1962). Family Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: The implications of difference. Family Process, 1(1): 30-43.

Ackerman, N.W. (1966). Treating the troubled family. New York, NY: Basic Books.
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Family in the UK the Traditional Definition

Words: 1808 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78097776

family in the UK

The traditional definition of family has always been unanimous among the various disciplines in life. Though the different disciplines may use different wording to derive the meaning of the concept of family, the underlying core similarities coalesced them all into similarity in definition and spirit. It basically boils down to a social unit that lives together, primarily a married heterosexual pair or couple and their children more often living together (Family Plus, 2009).

According to the anthropologists, the family was distinct from the household with the word family often used to refer to a group of individuals who have a common genetic connection. This genetic connection was manifest in the bearing and nurturing of children, ad the unit referred to as family had the right to property which was basically land at the moment.

It is evident with passing time and changing society that the definition…… [Read More]

Reference

An Encyclopedia of gay, lesbian, bisexuals, transgender and queer culture, 2004. Family.

Retrieved March 6, 2011 from http://www.glbtq.com/social-sciences/family.html

Factoidz, 2008. Divorce Rate in the UK. Retrieved March 7, 2011 from divorce-rate-in-the-uk/" http://factoidz.com/the-divorce-rate-in-the-uk/

Family Plus, 2009. What is a Family. Retrieved March 7, 2011 from http://familyplus.bgca.org/YourFamily/EffectiveParenting/WhatisaFamily/Pages/default.aspx
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Dynamics the Company General Dynamics

Words: 3865 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77456136



General Dynamics employed WBS to connect their Integrated Product Teams, known as Design Build Teams -- DBTs having the established design goals. Hence every DBT possess a particular design goal allocated by management. The WBS is planned to wholly describe everything inside the program. A WBS defines the product(s) to be developed or produced and connects the constituents of work to be attained mutually and to the final product. Hence the role of WBS is important in planning and assigning management and technical duties; and evaluating and controlling the progress made and also the position of the engineering endeavors, resource allocations, cost estimates, expenses, and cost & technical performance. (Clark; Littrell, 2002)

Giving a logical framework for mentioning the technical purposes of the program, the WBS initially defines the program on the basis of the hierarchically associated, product-oriented factors and the work processes needed for their accomplishment. Every constituent for…… [Read More]

References

At a Glance: Key Offerings" Retrieved at  http://www.gd-ais.com/ . Accessed 25 September, 2005

Author Unknown. (22-28, April 2000) "Doing well by doing good: Is Business ethics an oxymoron? The Economist.

Author Unknown. (17 June, 2004) "General Dynamics Selects Siebel Systems to Support

Command-and-Command Systems for the Department of Defense" Business Wire. pp: 8-11
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Family Law

Words: 942 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94835660

Child Support

The complex dynamics of any individual family creates certain problems for legislative processes and all-encompassing rules. The relative factors that determine any single individual's family status is often outside of that individual's control and presents multiple avenues of responsibility, and at the same time creating multiple avenues of means of success. Unfortunately, marriage in today's society is consistently threatened by the complex and varying forces that influence relationships. In some instances where marriages produce children, outside powers step in to ensure that equal protection is guaranteed for all involved in this problem. The purpose of this essay is to examine certain situations where child support obligations are in question. I'll examine the biological, legal and socioeconomic relationships that help contribute to determining what fairness is in terms of child support payments.

According to the U.S. Census ureau, "in the spring of 2000, an estimated 13.5 million parents had…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Case, A. et al. (2003). " Explaining trends in child support: economic, demographic, and policy effects." Demography, Vol 40, 1 Feb 2003: 171-189. Retrieved from http://www.princeton.edu/~accase/downloads/Explaining_Trends_in_Child_Support_Eco nomic_Demographic_and_Policy_Effects.pdf

Meyer, D. et al. ( 2005). " Multiple-partner fertility: incidence and implications for child support policy." The Social Service Review, Dec 2005, 79, 4. Retrieved from http://www.lafollette.wisc.edu/Courses/PA882/Meyer.Cancian.Cook.05.pdf

US Census Bureau (1999). "Custodial mothers and fathers and their child support." Current Population Reports issued Oct 2002. Retrieved at http://ncfm.org/libraryfiles/Children/child%20support/censuschildsup.pdf
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Dynamics of Domestic Violence and the Resulting Effects on Children

Words: 3275 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35285789

Domestic violence is an ongoing experience of physical, psychological, and even sexual abuse in the home that is often a method used by one adult to establish control and power over another person (Flitcraft et al., 1992). Exposure by children to marital aggression is now a recognized public health concern. The investigation of the effects of the exposure to this type of aggression on the functioning of a child is a significant societal concern. Marital conflict is generally defined as any difference of opinion between martial or domestic partners whether it is minor or major. Marital conflict can assume many different forms including displays of both negative and positive emotions and/or constructive and destructive tactics. Marital aggression is characterized by physical and/or psychological abuse and would fall at the negative extreme on a continuum of marital conflict (Cummings, 1998). Marital psychological/verbal aggression refers to things such as threats, insults, and…… [Read More]

References

Babcock, J.C., Green, C.E. & Robie, C. (2004). Does batterers' treatment work? A meta-

analytic review of domestic violence treatment. Clinical Psychology Review 23(8), 1023-1053.

Carlson, B.E. (1984). Children's observations of interparental violence. In A.R. Roberts (ed.),

Battered women and their families (pp. 147 -- 167). New York: Springer.
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Family Nurse Practitioners in Pediatrics With Patients Who Are Terminally Ill

Words: 2783 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37110296

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner in the Care of Terminally Ill Children

Pediatric nurse practitioners provide a valuable contribution to the care of chronically and terminally ill children. This position is essentially a subtype of advanced practice nurse, whose function is to provide the best possible patient care for ill children. This position functions within a pediatric hospital setting, in which the goal is to provide cost-effective patient care that meets and exceeds the needs of patients and their families. Although the pediatric nurse practitioner may work with children that present with acute or chronic illnesses, there is a critical need for nursing practitioners that are motivated to work with terminally ill children. Terminally ill children and their families present unique needs and situations that require knowledge, expertise, and intervention skills beyond what conventional nurses can offer. This population requires specialized care that can be fulfilled by a trained pediatric nurse practitioner.…… [Read More]

References

Knight, J. (1990). The Betty Neuman Systems Model applied to practice: A client with multiple sclerosis. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 15, 447-55.

McAtee, P. & Silver, H. (1974). Nurse practitioners for children: Past and future. Pediatrics, 54(5), 578-82.

De Moutigny, F. (1995). Family nursing interventions during hospitalization. Canadian Nurse, 91(10), 38-42.

Teicher, S., Crawford, K., Williams, B., Nelson, B., Andrews, C. (2001). Emerging role of the pediatric nurse practitioner in acute care. Pediatric Nursing, 27(4), 387-91.
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Brice Family Systems Napier and Whitaker Exemplify

Words: 844 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33281320

Brice Family

SYSTEMS

Napier and Whitaker exemplify systems therapy with their presentation of the Brice family case. It is necessary to identify the origins of the systems approach in order to fully appreciate its value in the context of family therapy. It approaches the family unit as a system and therefore borrows heavily from systems theory. Systems theory is a general theory applies across many disciplines and looks at systems that have the ability to self-regulate. The theory applies to biological systems, climate, environment, and the family unit.

Systems approach recognizes the interdependencies that exist in the family as a system. The family unit consists of individuals related to one another forming a complex web that should act in congruence. Therefore, although a part of a system is essential, it is the relationship of the part to the whole that is paramount. The family as a system is dynamic since…… [Read More]

References

Napier, A.Y., & Whitaker, C. (1978). The family crucible: The intense experience of therapy. New York: HarperCollins.
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Sociology Families Are the Basic

Words: 1264 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4425014

People read the world differently and that explains why they respond to the world differently. For instance my mother is very tidy and neat whereas my father is the exact opposite. When my family is looked at from the social interaction perspective then it can be clearly concluded that symbolic interaction definitely can explain the divorce (Farley, 2012).

The conflict theory looks at how people within a family struggle for power; how they disagree and how they compete for resources. Wealth and prestige form the basis for most of the competitions. When my family is looked at from the conflict theory it can be said that our family underwent conflicts and disharmony. This was due to the fact that there are different dynamics and roles played by my family members. First traditionally the father are seen as the head of the family and it should come naturally. However this was…… [Read More]

References

Farley, a. (2012).What is the Symbolic Interaction Perspective in Divorce? Retrieved December 10, 2012 from  http://www.ehow.com/info_10017957_symbolic-interaction-perspective-divorce.html 

Ray, L. (2010).Conflict theory and the family. Retrieved December 10, 2012 from  http://www.livestrong.com/article/345499-conflict-theory-the-family/ 

Naveed, K. (2009).Family in Sociological Perspective. Retrieved December 10, 2012 from  http://www.slideshare.net/naveedtaji/family-in-sociology-perspective
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Marriage & Family Myths Critique

Words: 1169 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95778733

According to the authors, this dynamic that many contemporary views consider to be a universal fact of life actually evolved only after the social changes introduced by the Industrial evolution. In fact, any so-called "modern" shift to a more egalitarian sharing of family responsibilities represents more of a return to the more natural state of families than any "radical" or "new" approach.

Branden (1999) agrees, again tying in excessive adherence to typical male and female roles as a potential source of unnecessary strain, especially where marital partners may be better suited to a different arrangement or sharing of responsibilities. Likewise, oberts (2007) also acknowledges the damage caused to marriage by dissatisfaction, especially among wives, as to the roles prescribed to them by society.

Myth # 4 - the Unstable African-American Family:

In their criticism of the notion that the African-American community reflects a lower level of marital and family stability…… [Read More]

References

Branden, N. (1999) the Psychology of Romantic Love. New York: Bantam.

Roberts, S. (2007) the Shelf Life of Bliss. The New York Times, July 1, 2007.

Schwartz, M.A., Scott, B.M. (2000) "Debunking Myths about Marriage and Families" in Marriages and Families: Diversity and Change.
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Generational Differences in Family Formation

Words: 1821 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74532443

I, meanwhile, helped with the family business, but I had a "normal" adolescence, and enjoyed it as what normal teenage boys are expected to when they are 17 years old. At 20 years old, my grandfather is already a family man raising a family of his own, my father has just started forming a family of his own as well, while I am in college, pursuing higher studies and experiencing an entirely new world as an immigrant in the U.S. Ten years after, my grandfather at 30 years of age worked harder than ever to grow the restaurant business in the city; my father during this age is transitioning from a businessman to a professional employed by a multinational company; I envision myself as a successful manager in a multinational company and has a small, Internet-based business on the side, which will help me financially enrich myself and not be…… [Read More]

References

Chan, H. And R. Lee. (1995). "Hong Kong families: at the crossroads of modernism and traditionalism." Journal of Comparative Family Studies, Vol. XXVI, No. 1.

Engel, J. (1984). "Marriage in the People's Republic of China: Analysis of a New Law." Journal of Marriage and the Family, Vol. 46, No. 4.

Lin, C. And W. Liu. (1999). "Intergenerational relationships among Chinese immigrant families in Taiwan." In Family Ethnicity: Strength in Diversity. H. McAdoo (Ed.). CA: Sage Publications.
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Sociology of Families Making Families

Words: 3136 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89493662

They are therefore not determined or restricted by factors such as norms, morals or external principles. A concise definition of this view is as follows:

Constructivism views all of our knowledge as "constructed," because it does not reflect any external "transcendent" realities; it is contingent on convention, human perception, and social experience. It is believed by constructivists that representations of physical and biological reality, including race, sexuality, and gender are socially constructed

Constructivist epistemology)

Another theoretical and philosophical stance that is pertinent to the understanding of the status of the family in modern society is the post-structural or deconstructive view. This is allied to a certain extent with the constructivist viewpoint, which sees society as a social construction and denies the reality of transcendent factors. This view therefore sees the family as a structure which is not fixed or static but is relative in terms of the norms and values…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, G.L. (Ed.).1997, the Family in Global Transition. St. Paul, MN: Professors World Peace Academy.

Baker, M. 2003, 'Reinventing the Family: In Search of New Lifestyles', Journal of Sociology, Vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 178+.

Constructivist epistemology. [Online] Available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_constructivism

Coulter, G. 2001, 'Cohabitation: An Alternative Form of Family Living', Canadian Journal of Sociology, Vol.26, no. 2. p. 245.
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Globalization in Terms of Family Studies and Psychology

Words: 2697 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70782175

Globalization in Terms of Family Studies and Psychology

Globalization: The ealities of Families

Globalization can be defined as the unfolding resolution of the contradiction between ever expanding capital and its national political and social formations. While the expansion of capital once represented that associated with national capital and later that associated with corporations expanding from the national to the transnational, it has now come to represent that which occurs without the assistance of or located in nations. These changes have been brought about by globalization which has led to the shift of the main location of capital accumulation from the national to the supranational or global level. With the emergence of globalization, economics has gained a more important place in the matters of humans than politics and public policy has become superseded by corporate demands. These matters as well as those that suggest that the best interests of the private…… [Read More]

References

Carrington, V. (2001). Globalization, family and nation state: reframing family in new times. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 22 (2), 185-200.

Cheung, F. & Tsui, M. (2002)A wake-up call to the social work profession. Families in Society, 83 (2), 124-125.

International Labour Organization (2002). ILO tackles social consequences of globalization. Press Release, ILO News, (27 February 2002). Geneva, Switzerland.

Hetata, S. (1998). Dollarization, fragmentation, and God. In S. Fish, & F. Jameson, (eds). The cultures of globalization. NC: Duke University Press, pp. 273-290.
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Lilo and Stich Family

Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14630207

Extended Family in Finding Nemo and Lilo & Stitch

In the American society, the concept of the family can be interpreted in various ways, due to the flexibility in which the term is used by Americans. More often, family does not only mean the nuclear family composed of the father, mother, and child/children, but it also includes relatives and friends who are close to the individual. Indeed, through the years, society has evolved to make its family institution bigger, more flexible, and wider, yet deeper, in scope.

The concept of the "family" is an important theme discussed in the animated films, Finding Nemo by Pixar and Lilo & Stitch by Walt Disney. These films centered its theme on how a family is constructed and what are the dynamics (or relationships) that develop from within upon its creation. This paper discusses and analyzes how these two films depict the concept of…… [Read More]

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Pa Chin Family Book Critique

Words: 1619 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17294904

But Pa Chin never takes only one side, and his portrayals are always slightly ambiguous. While Chueh-hui is admirable at times, however, there are also disturbing signs of Maoist censorship in his action. When his grandfather gives him a book he disagrees with called on Filial Piety and the Shunning of Lewdness, he destroys it, censoring it as his own magazine is censored, confident that destroying a book is good, because it will prevent other minds from being corrupted by its ideals. his suggests that he wishes to be in control of the ideas of others.

o give added political resonance to Family, Chin sets the book during the May 4th movement of 1919. his nationalist movement was a reaction to the Chinese government of the time and to Confucian hierarchies of authority in general. he new flame of populism is embodied into the younger generation, across China and also…… [Read More]

The three brothers symbolize different ways of coping with Chinese tradition. The eldest tries to bow to Confucian morality, and loses his individual soul in the process. The middle brother seeks a personalized, romantic Western-style method of escape. The youngest takes refuge in politics, and rejects all tradition, even refusing to ride in a sedan-chair as a protest to the status of his family, which he sees as stolen. Instead of merely talking about change, he lives change, and this seems to be the course of action favored by the author. But Pa Chin never takes only one side, and his portrayals are always slightly ambiguous. While Chueh-hui is admirable at times, however, there are also disturbing signs of Maoist censorship in his action. When his grandfather gives him a book he disagrees with called on Filial Piety and the Shunning of Lewdness, he destroys it, censoring it as his own magazine is censored, confident that destroying a book is good, because it will prevent other minds from being corrupted by its ideals. This suggests that he wishes to be in control of the ideas of others.

To give added political resonance to Family, Chin sets the book during the May 4th movement of 1919. This nationalist movement was a reaction to the Chinese government of the time and to Confucian hierarchies of authority in general. The new flame of populism is embodied into the younger generation, across China and also within the Kao family. But as the book is written from a distance from this era of history, Chin is not intent upon offering a literal depiction of the May 4th Movement, rather it adds atmosphere to the book and underlines the need to rebel against tradition in a coherent and meaningful way.

Rebellion is necessary, otherwise one falls into the trap of the first brother. But rebellion cannot be purely personal, along the lines of the second brother, otherwise things will never change. And even the political solution of the third brother, while it is validated more by the narrative than the neo-Confucian or quasi-Western paths of the first and second brother, is lacking in humanity. Chin advocates a balance, a balance that is often difficult to find in any society, but particularly in China -- whether the prerevolutionary traditional China infused with the memory of Confucius or the China Chin himself lived in, the China of Mao.