First World War Essays (Examples)

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WWI Analysis Examining the Significance and Impact of WWI on U S History

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69598273

World War Analysis

WWI analysis examining the significance and impact of WWI on U.S. history

In the early 20th Century, a general fear existed that a huge war would break out due to the circumstances existing at that time and therefore every small incident was considered deadly. However the triggering factor was the assassination of Austrian Archduke Ferdinand in June 1914 resulting in World War I (WWI) or the Great War. WWI took place from 1914 to 1918 and major countries took part in it; war resulting in drastic consequences such as collapse of economies and death of millions of people. The two main groups fighting against each other were Triple Alliance and Triple Entente (also known as the Western Powers). The U.S. did not participate in the war in the beginning and tried its best to remain neutral. However, it was forced to join the Triple Entente when German…… [Read More]

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WWI the Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

Words: 1553 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55010445

WWI

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife represented a culmination of several concurrent forces, all of which led to the outbreak of World War. The concurrent forces that led to World War One can be loosely grouped under the following categories: nationalism, imperialism, and militarism. Within each of these categories are ample sub-categories that can testify to the extent of forces that shaped the pre-war conditions throughout not just Europe but the entire world. World War One was a total war for many reasons: it involved serious civilian casualties on a horrific scale for all parties. The Great War also brought to light the impact of globalization on the global economy and political enterprise. Nationalism, imperialism, and militarism all played a part in shaping participation in World War One; the effects of which continue to reverberate.

As Marshall (2001) points out, "Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy were all…… [Read More]

References

Allan, T. (2003). The Causes of World War I. Chicago: Reed Elsevier.

Bosco, P., & Bosco, A. (2003). World War I. Infobase.

Heyman, N.M. (1997). World War I. Greenwood.

Marshall, S.L.A. (2001). World War I. New York: First Mariner.
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World War I Like All

Words: 1716 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82623559

National debt and veterans benefits for example drove a permanent increase in taxes, although these were not as high as during the war. The country's international economic position was also permanently affected. Its pre-war status as a debtor country was permanently changed to a net creditor, in the order of $6.4billion. Also, the power as financial world leader shifted from London and the Bank of England to New York, with an enhancement of the Federal Reserve's role (World War I History). In general, it appears as if the war effort had a favorable impact on the U.. economy. The devastating human and resource losses were offset by favorable economic factors. In this way, World War I changed the economic position of the United tates both permanently and favorably.

ources

Duffy, Michael. "The Causes of World War I." FirstWorldWar.com feature articles. March 27, 2004. http://www.firstworldwar.com/origins/causes.htm

U.. Declaration of War with Germany,…… [Read More]

Sources

Duffy, Michael. "The Causes of World War I." FirstWorldWar.com feature articles. March 27, 2004.    http://www.firstworldwar.com/origins/causes.htm   

U.S. Declaration of War with Germany, 2 April 1917" FirstWolrdWar.com primary documents. April 14, 2002. URL:    http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/usneutrality.htm   

Feldmeth, Greg D. "U.S. Involvement in World War I." U.S. History Resources. March 31, 1998. URL: http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Bunker/3017/

Rockoff, Hugh. "U.S. Economy in World War I." EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. September 30, 2005. URL:
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World War I Known at

Words: 3255 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87605902



Conscription

From the beginning of the war, there had been some variation in the Canadian attitude toward the conflict. Canada never questioned the legitimacy of the war and did not question the need for Canadian participation. There were differences of opinion, though, concerning how extensive the Canadian contribution should be. These variations affected the response to calls for enlistment and divided the country as the towns were more willing than the countryside, the prairies more willing than the Atlantic seaboard, and "it was observed that the proportion of enlistments achieved by any social group appeared to vary almost inversely to the length of its connection with Canada. On the one hand, the ritish-born -- the new arrivals with a large proportion of unattached males of military age -- gave the highest percentage of their numbers to the armed services, and, on the other hand, the French Canadians unquestionably gave the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ameringer, Charles D. Political Parties of the Americas, 1980s to 1990s: Canada, Latin America, and the West Indie.

Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1992.

Bothwell, Robert. History of Canada since 1867. Washington, D.C.: Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, 1996.

Boudreau, Joseph a. "Canada and the First World War: Essays in Honour of Robert "Canada and Worlod War I," the History of Canada (2007),   http://www.linksnorth.com/canada-history/canadaandworldwar1.html  .
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WWI and WWII Sonar in Naval Warfare

Words: 4448 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19694347

Sonar esearch and Naval Warfare: 1914-1954

During both World War I and World War II, there were a number of informational tactics used by the Navy in order to gain ground on enemy troops. One of those was sonar research, because it provided them with knowledge they would not have otherwise had (Hackmann, 1984). Sonar is not perfect, but a great deal of work has gone into it since its creation, and that has helped it to become a more valuable tool for Naval operations. Sonar is used for navigation, but also for communication and the detection of objects, primarily underwater (Urick, 1983). There are two types of sonar: passive and active. In active sonar, pings are sent out to search for other objects (Hackmann, 1984). Passive sonar does not send out a signal, but only listens for the pings and signals of others (Hackmann, 1984). Both have their place,…… [Read More]

References

Abbatiello, J. (2005). Anti-submarine warfare in World War I: British Naval aviation and the defeat of the U-boats. NY: Routledge.

Adamthwaite, A.P. (1992). The making of the Second World War. New York: Routledge.

Barber, J., & Harrison, M. (2006). Patriotic war, 1941 -- 1945. In Ronald Grigor Suny, ed. The Cambridge History of Russia, Volume III: The Twentieth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hackmann, W. (1984). Seek & Strike: Sonar, anti-submarine warfare and the Royal Navy 1914-54. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office.
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WWI & WW2 Comparing and

Words: 1852 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68215387

The U.S. emerged as a leading superpower and the sole nuclear power in the world, determined to play a leading role in international politics. The post-Second World War era saw the start of a prolonged Cold War in which the U.S. competed for political domination around the world with Soviet Communism until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. The Second World War also helped the country to overcome the economic depression of the 1930s as its wartime industrial production stimulated its economy.

eferences

Arima, Y. (2003). "The Way to Pearl Harbor: U.S. Vs. Japan." ICE Case Studies:

Number 118, December, 2003. etrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.american.edu/TED/ice/japan-oil.htm

Dwyer, J.J. (2004). "The United States and World War I." Lew ockwell.com. etrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig3/dwyer3.html

Keylor, William . (2007). "World War I." Encyclopedia Encarta Online. On May 26, 2007 at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761569981/World_War_I.html

Steiner, Z. (2001). 2 the…… [Read More]

References

Arima, Y. (2003). "The Way to Pearl Harbor: U.S. Vs. Japan." ICE Case Studies:

Number 118, December, 2003. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.american.edu/TED/ice/japan-oil.htm

Dwyer, J.J. (2004). "The United States and World War I." Lew Rockwell.com. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig3/dwyer3.html

Keylor, William R. (2007). "World War I." Encyclopedia Encarta Online. On May 26, 2007 at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761569981/World_War_I.html
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World War I And Its Effect on

Words: 989 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51192383

World War I and its Effect on the Middle East

The Europeans who had already colonized much of the area with post-World War I now spread further into the Middle East claiming further portions such as Arabia, Iraq, yria, Libya, and Palestine. The Constantinople Agreement followed by many more including the ykes Picot agreement over and again implemented covert agreements regarding lands that would go to each of the Allies. After the war, France received Lebanon and yria (

) even though yria herself preferred an American mandate (2), and Britain received land that included Palestine, Israel, Transjordan, and Iraq (3). The indigenous people themselves were never consulted regarding whom they wished to control them, and colonization, consequently, prompted Arabic nationalism.

Nationalism was, furthermore, created by the fact that the peace settlements imposed by the Allies after World War I broke up nation states and created others, confusing many who,…… [Read More]

Sources

Bloomberg.com. "U.S., U.K. Waged War on Iraq Because of Oil, Blair Adviser Says" Bloomberg.com, May 1, 2003

CBS.com. "Poll: Talk First, Fight Later." CBS.com, Jan. 24, 2003. Retrieved 1/17/2011.

DeNovo, J. American Interests and Policies in the Middle East (University of Minnesota Press, 1963)

Gelvin, J. History of the Modern Middle East (Oxford University Press, 2005)
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WWI WWII or Nazi

Words: 928 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75308216

Nazi Germany

Nazi Propaganda and the Spread of Fascism

orld ar II was precipitated by the rise of fascism throughout Europe. As the mores of socialism began to take root in many parts of the continent, fascism emerged as a powerful counterpoint. For nations like Italy, Spain and Germany, the consequences of a sustained and devastating recession would be a coalescing of support behind strong, self-proclaimed and authoritarian leaders. Certainly, most notorious among them would be Adolph Hitler, whose Nazi party would first occupy Austria and Germany before ultimately pursuing a more global agenda. However, for our discussion, the primary interest is the degree of success that the Nazi party had in ultimately penetrating Germany with its values, ideals and policies. As the discussion here will show, propaganda would play a central role in the ability of the Nazi party to garner support and generate the impassioned loyalty of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

German Propaganda Archive. (2013). Es Lebe Deutschland. Bytwerk.com.

History Learning Site (HLS). (2012). Propaganda in Nazi Germany. Historylearningsite.co.uk.

Welch, D. (2011). Nazi Propaganda. BBC History.
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WWI When World War I

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12021802

..the spirit of ruthless brutality will enter itn every fiber of our national life" (Johnson 643).

Staying out, states Tindall & Shi 948), was "more easily said than done, not least for Wilson himself. Americans might want to stay out of the war, but most of them cared which side won. Ironically, because there were so many first- or second-generation immigrants from Germany and Ireland, the leaning was toward the Central Powers. However, "old-line Americans" mostly of ritish descent were sympathetic to the Allies.

Yet actions were to occur that made the final decision. In 1915, the Germans sank the ritish Cunard liner Lusitania with 128 Americans on board. The Americans were outraged and sent letters to no avail. Then U-boats sank a number of American ships and finally, the press published a secret telegram from the German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmerman to the Mexican government proposing a German-Mexican offensive…… [Read More]

Books Cited

Johnson, Paul. History of the American People. New York: Harper Collins, 1997.

Tindall, George Brown and Shi, David. America. A Narrative History. New York:

Norton, 1984.

Zinn, Hoard. People's History of the United States. New York: Harper Collins, 1999.
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World War I And Related

Words: 624 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62380097

All European nations suffered devastating postwar economic consequences, which further increased the reluctance to use military force to subdue Hitler. The United States enjoyed a postwar boom, given that none of the battles had been waged upon its own territories. But the Republican-dominated Senate refused to allow the U.S. To become a member of the League of Nations, and the absence of strong American leadership made the League ineffective as a peacekeeping force. Germany was also stripped of all of its colonies: the fact that many new nations were created in the redrawing of the map of Europe meant that many of the recently evolved national identities and infrastructures of new countries were quite fragile.

Although they were 'older' nations, Germany and Russia were particularly politically unstable, as a result of the conditions spawned by orld ar I. Despite its early exit from the ar, Russia's economy was undergoing an…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"German Revolution." Spartacus Schoolnet. April 14, 2010.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/GERrevolution.htm

"Wars and Battles, World War I." U.S. History. April 14, 2010.

 http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1334.html
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World War I On Politics

Words: 958 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22933742



With a profound sense of the solemn and even tragical character of the step I am taking and of the grave responsibilities which it involves, but in unhesitating obedience to what I deem my constitutional duty, I advise that the Congress declare the recent course of the Imperial German Government to be in fact nothing less than war against the Government and people of the United States....America is privileged to spend her blood and her might for the principles that gave her birth and happiness and the peace which she has treasured. God helping her, she can do no other." (Woodrow Wilson's war message)

United States' entry bolstered the Allied forces and gave them extraordinary power over the German Imperial army. With America's entry into the war, things suddenly changed as we were was no longer spectators. The response from the public was however not overwhelming since it had been…… [Read More]

References

President Woodrow Wilson's War message" accessed online 14th April 2005:

http://bss.sfsu.edu/tygiel/Hist427/texts/wilswarmessage.html

John Bach McMaster. The United States in the World War: D. Appleton & Company. New York. 1918
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World War I And II

Words: 457 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66832139

David Fromkin's "A Peace to End All Peace." From the beginning, the review provides intriguing information, including the fact that the title relates to the ideal of "a war to end all wars." The ironic nature of this phrase has been the subject of discussion and occasional mirth for all the years after the war. I was delighted to find out the name of the originator of the term, British commander Archibald Wavell, since this is not something I knew before.

The review provides several pieces of interesting information, including the fact that the British, and particularly Kitchener, were largely ignorant about the social and cultural nature of the Middle East, making the British policy for this region largely ineffective at best and explosive at worst. Another piece of interesting information is the mistaken belief that a conspiracy was underway to undermine the position of the British in the Middle…… [Read More]

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World War One Leadership Military Political

Words: 717 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85056402

leadership is crucial to successful political military campaigns. Close scrutiny of the military and political leaders of the First World War demonstrate how political leaders use methods like propaganda and ideology to forge their victories in the psyches of the people, helping military leaders achieve their goals by engendering trust, courage, and conviction in spite of tremendous hardships and even death. Similarly, the victories of military leaders become critical for effective political campaigns. Military leadership requires a different set of tools and tactics than political leadership but both are crucial for desirable outcomes.

One of the most successful political leaders during World War One ended up being Vladimir Lenin, who spearheaded the Bolshevik evolution and ensured the enduring success of Soviet policies. Lenin's leadership skills far exceeded those of Czar Nicholas II, who failed to inspire the people of ussia in the way Lenin had, thus leading to the demise…… [Read More]

References

Lenin, Vladimir. Appeal for Revolt Issued by Lenin, 19 October 1917. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/lenin_19oct1917.htm

Lenin, Vladimir. Lenin's Proclamation of 7 November 1917. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/lenin_25oct1917.htm

Sir Douglas Haig's 2nd Despatch (Somme), 23 December 1916. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/haigsommedespatch.htm

Sir Douglas Haig's Final Despatch, 21 March 1919. Retrieved online: http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/haiglastdespatch.htm
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World War I Had Devastating

Words: 1737 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35830852

The soldier is simply unable to live with this corruption. Instead, the narrator continues as his voice by proxy, indicting the society that caused the war and created the atrocity the killed the solder. Likewise, Graves is forever changed by his experience, losing the respect he used to hold for the values and norms of the society that caused the war and failed to understand the effect of the war upon all that was beautiful and young.

In concussion, assoon's and Graves's work compare well as commentaries and criticisms upon what both authors appear to regard as the atrocity of war. assoon's very brief work has its impact in this very brevity, while Graves's detail and individual focus achieves the same effect. Both protagonists are severely traumatized by their experiences. In both works, this trauma does not remain unaddressed. Both authors provide their central characters with a mouthpiece to denote…… [Read More]

Sources

Buzzle.com. Siegfried Sassoon -- War Poet. 2010. Retrieved from  http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/7-27-2006-103706.asp 

Graves, Robert. Good-bye to All That. Providence: Berghan Books, 1995.

Sassoon, Friedrich. Suicide in the Trenches. Retrieved from http://community.livejournal.com/afoxhuntingman/3587.html
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Nationalism Before World War I

Words: 1489 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85302243

World War I

Causes and Consequences of World War I

World War 1

(Causes, America's Contribution to the War, ole of President Woodrow Wilson, Treaty of Versailles Failure)

The First World War (1914-1918) or the Great War was fought between the Allies and the Central Powers. The Allies included 27 countries of which ussia, the United States of America, France, Japan and Britain are the most prominent. The Central Powers consisted of Turkey, Germany, Bulgaria and Austria-Hungary as the chief combatants. It is the greatest and most atrocious war brawled till date.

Causes

There were a number of causes that initiated the brutality of World War I Major causes include imperialism, nationalism, materialism and alliance systems. However, the immediate cause of the beginning of the War was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the oyal Prince of Hungary and Bohemia. As he was killed by a Serbian nationalist in June…… [Read More]

References

America in the Great War. (2000). Retrieved from  http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/snpwwi1.htm 

Wilson, Woodrow. (2009). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Retrieved April 15, 2011, from http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117053275

World war one - causes. (2011, 01, 02). Retrieved from  http://www.historyonthenet.com/WW1/causes.htm 

World War I. (2009). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Retrieved April 15, 2011, from http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117053630
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American and German Perspective in WWI

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73554165

World War I

The First World War began in the summer of 1914 with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. The conflict lasted through late 1918, concluding with the treaty of Versailles. The war to end all wars, as it was commonly known, was dominated by trench warfare. Due to numerous advances in defense technology and a lack of tactical advances, both the Allied Nations and the Central Powers, were stymied by a lack of military advances. Early victories in France, by the German army, and in Serbia by the Austrian/Hungarian forces proved to be less than decisive, due to miscommunication between the two Central powers.

Not only was this the First war between so many great world powers, additionally this was the first war to be affected by, and ultimately fought, not only on the battle field but also in the press rooms. Due to expansion in…… [Read More]

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What Led to World War 1 And How Did it End for Different Nations

Words: 1449 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2248747

WW1

USSIA

In 1917 ussia suffered two revolutions, which resulted in a drastic change of leadership. Tsarist ussia became Lenin's Soviet ussia and the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was signed shortly thereafter in March 1918 with Germany. The treaty gave Germany much: over a million square millions and 60 million people -- a third of ussia's population -- were annexed. ussia lost railroads, factories, the majority of its coal and iron -- but Germany was in no position to immediately profit from the treaty. The Western Front was calling. ussia gained some peace from the treaty, and could now focus on its internal problems resulting from the recent overthrow and the war effort. Leading up to the treaty, Imperial ussia had suffered devastating casualties and food shortages. The Bolsheviks called for an end to the war on the Eastern Front, and Germany supported this call, allowing Lenin himself to return to…… [Read More]

Reference List

Grebler, L. (1940). The Cost of the World War to Germany and Austria-Hungary. Yale Keynes, J.M. (1920). The Economic Consequences of the Peace. NY: Harcourt Brace.

Stone, O., Kuznick, P. (2012). The Untold History of the United States. NY: Gallery

Books.
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Zionist Influence in World War I

Words: 1903 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77380740

WWI: The Forces of Nationalism, Imperialism and Militarism

The forces of nationalism, imperialism and militarism irrevocably led to World War I in several ways. Germany had become an industrialized nation, vying for economic power and rivaling the power of Britain (Gilbert, 1994). Germany had also defeated France in the prior century in the Franco-Prussian War and taken the territories of Alsace and Lorraine. France wanted them back (Bradberry, 2012). ussia also had a grievance with Germany: it wanted the Bosporous Straights that were "controlled by Germany through her alliance with the Ottoman Empire" (Bradberry, 2012, p. 42). The only way for each of these countries to get what they wanted from Germany was to go to war: their alliance gave them the opportunity to attack Germany on all fronts, and Germany's support for the Austria-Hungary attack on Serbia (in retaliation for the Serbian assassination of Archduke Ferdinand) gave the Triple…… [Read More]

References

Balfour Declaration. (1917). Knesset. Retrieved from https://www.knesset.gov.il/lexicon/eng/BalfourDeclaration_eng.htm

Bradberry, B. (2012). The Myth of German Villainy. IN: Authorhouse.

Gilbert, M. (1994). The First World War. NY: Henry Holt and Company.

Lloyd-George, D. (1939). Memoirs of the Peace Conference. CT: Yale University
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Effect of WWI on Literature

Words: 1616 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8625859

WWI and Literature

World War I was certainly one of the most productive periods in literature with millions of poets and authors emerging on the scene and each one contributing tremendously to the growth and progress of literature. It is quite strange that while WWI was a deeply disturbing and a largely horrifying experience for most countries, it inspired writers and poets around the globe and this resulted in significant growth of world literature.

In England alone, more than 2000 poets emerged during this period as Harvey (1993) elaborates: "From the very first week, the 1914-18 war inspired enormous quantities of poetry and fiction. The claim that three million war poems were written in Germany in the first six months of hostilities is difficult to substantiate, but Catherine W. eilly has counted 2,225 English poets of the First World War, of whom 1,808 were civilians. For example, William Watson (then…… [Read More]

References

A.D. Harvey, First World War literature. Magazine Title: History Today. Volume: 43. Publication Date: November 1993.

Fussell, Paul. The Great War and Modern Memory. New York: Oxford UP, 1975.

Hemingway, Ernest. Complete Poems. Lincoln: U. Of Nebraska, 1983.

Granville Hicks, The Great Tradition: An Interpretation of American Literature since the Civil War. Publisher: Biblo and Tannen. Place of Publication: New York. Publication Year: 1967.
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Impact of WWI

Words: 975 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39166867

World War I

The Causes and How America Joined the War

The events that led to the causes of the first world war had its roots in the Balkans in late July 1914 and there are causes including political, territorial, and economic conflicts among the great European powers in the four decades leading up to the war. Militarism, a complex web of alliances, imperialism and nationalism were some of the other causes that led up to the First World War.

The root for the Second World War lay in the peace accords and the punishments that were meted out to the Germans after the First World War and the sense of humiliation and economic debacle following the end of the First World War.

The animosity between the Americans and the Germans started with the sinking of the Lusitania as she made her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York in…… [Read More]

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Reconstructing the Occurrence of the WW1 and the Great Depression

Words: 1506 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61541414

World War I and the Great Depression

World War I

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand on 28 June 1914 sparked the occurrence of the First World War. A Serbian nationalist called Gavrilo Princip murdered him as the heir apparent to the throne of Austria. However, other underlying factors that contributed to the rivalry between the Great Powers include the system of alliances, nationalism, domestic political factors, militarism, the Eastern question (The Balkans), and the crises before 1914. The main powers of Europe before 1914 were: (i) the Triple Alliance of Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy (1882) and (ii) the Triple Entente of Britain, ussia and France (1907). In nature, the alliances were defensive, and this implied that major political disputes inevitably would lead to large and not small conflicts. Nationalism looked at eager people across the world who wanted to let the rest of the world know how strong and…… [Read More]

References

Giangreco, D. M. & Griffin, R. E. (1988). Airbridge to Berlin -- The Berlin Crisis of 1948, Its Origins and Aftermath. Background on Conflict with USSR.

Hiebert, Ray, and Roselyn Hiebert. (1970). The Stock Market Crash, 1929. New York, NY: Franklin Watts.

McElvaine, R. S. (1993). The Great Depression: America, 1929-1941. New York, NY: Times Books.

Parrish, M. E. (1992). Anxious Decades: America in Prosperity and Depression, 1920-1941. New York, NY: W.W. Norton.
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Pre and Post Reactions to World War I

Words: 648 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58538457

orld ar I: "The Great ar"

The historical record shows that orld ar I, the "ar to End All ars," did not end war, but rather set the stage for an even greater global conflagration a generation later. This paper reviews the relevant literature to assess the relative importance of diplomacy, imperialism, and nationalism in causing the Great ar (1914-1918), as well as to identify the major players leading Europe to war. An analysis of why this "unwanted war" was greeted with such joy is followed by an assessment of whether this enthusiastic reaction to the outbreak of war was the consequence of domestic tension or simple patriotism and whether the victors' positions after the war reflect their wartime experiences. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings concerning the Great ar are presented in the conclusion.

Relative Importance of Diplomacy, Imperialism and Nationalism in Causing the Great ar…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Olmsted, Kathryn S. Real Enemies: Conspiracy Theories and American Democracy, World War I to 9/11. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Print.

"The Great War." (2015). The History Channel. Web.

"WWI Casualties and Death Tables." (2015). PBS. Web.
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Analyzing World War I Dada

Words: 1543 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65341779

World War I: Dada

The literary and artistic movement known as Dada originated in the Swiss city of Zurich, at the time of the First World War, as a response to the War as well as the nationalism considered by many to have sparked the war. Inspired by Futurism, Cubism, Expressionism, Constructivism, and other innovative movements, Dadaism's output ranged from poetry, collage, and painting, to performance arts and sculptures (Jones, 2002; Hulsenbeck, 1988). The movement's aesthetic, characterized by contempt for nationalistic and materialistic attitudes, strongly influenced artists in major cities across the globe, such as Berlin, Paris, Cologne, Hanover, and New York, and all ended up creating their own separate groups. Surrealism led to Dadaism's degeneration.

Beginnings

Sickened by the nationalism that triggered WWI, Dadaists were constantly against the idea of authoritarianism, and all kinds of guiding ideologies or group leadership. Their main concern was revolting against the apparent middleclass…… [Read More]

References

Buskirk, M., & Nixon, M. (1996). The Duchamp Effect. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Elder, B. (2013). Dada, Surrealism, and the Cinematic Effect. Waterloo, Ontario, Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Hulsenbeck, R. (1988). "En avant Dada: A history of Dadaism." In R. Motherwell (Ed.), The Dada painters and poets (pp. 23-48). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Original work published 1920)

Jones, A. (2002). Equivocal Masculinity: New York Dada in the context of World War I. Art History, 25(2), 162.
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Causes and Effects of World War I

Words: 1489 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10394223

1st orld ar (I) was a global scale military conflict, which erupted in 1914. Virtually, the whole of Europe was involved as well as countries and kingdoms from other regions of the globe (Strachan 9). It should however be noted that the countries that engaged in this war entered the said war at different times and joined different alliances. Essentially, the war was between two alliances - the Central Powers and the Allies. In addition to these two sides, there was a neutral group of nations that remained neutral to the war. However, some of the said groups later on started taking sides. The Allies according to Kelly consisted of Great Britain, Belgium, Ireland, Serbia, Montenegro, Russia, as well as France and they were later joined by some neutral nations including Romania, Greece, Italy, and Portugal. On the other hand, the Central Powers alliance included the Ottoman Empire and Bulgaria…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Collins, F. Ross. World War One. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, 2008. Print.

Howard, Michael. The First World War. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2003. Print.

Kelly, Martin. Top 5 Causes of World War 1. 5 January, 2013. Web. 27 Sept. 2013.

*****. Consequences of World War I.17 march, 2005.Web. 27 Sept. 2013.
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Great War World War One Ultimately Killed

Words: 981 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5878712

Great ar

orld ar One ultimately killed 35 million people -- this alone might have merited its being called "The Great ar," although to a large degree it was the astonishing way in which the deaths happened. On the first day of the Battle of the Somme alone, Britain suffered almost sixty thousand casualties. The ten-month stalemate of the Battle of Verdun resulted in seven hundred thousand (700,000) dead, with no discernible tactical advance made by either side (Tuchman 174). The immediate causes of orld ar One were complicated but fairly straightforward. Many of the long-standing political institutions of Europe were badly outmoded, in particular two of the oldest: the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the Ottoman Empire. Each of these institutions were the inheritors of previous large-scale imperial institutions (the Holy Roman Empire and the Byzantine Empire accordingly) which dated back nearly a thousand years -- and each was failing badly.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Karp, Walter. The Politics of War: The Story of Two Wars Which Altered Forever the Political Life of the American Republic. New York: Franklin Square Press, 2010. Print.

Tuchman, Barbara. The Guns of August. New York: Ballantine, 1962. Print.
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U S Involvement in World War I &

Words: 994 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91788876

U.S. Involvement in orld ar I & II:

There are several historical details of America's involvement in the First and Second world wars and the critical role that this country played in the two wars. Studies on these historical events have mainly focused on examining the involvement of the United States in the wars, the results of the engagement, and its impact on the country's position nationally and globally. America's involvement in the two wars had a crucial impact on the development of the nation to its current state both from the home front and internationally.

America's Involvement in orld ar I:

America's entrance and involvement in the First orld ar occurred on 6th April 1917, breaking the nation's long isolation tradition. The nation had embraced a policy of isolation and neutrality when war was declared in Europe in 1914. This policy seemed to be the most appropriate approach since…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

"45. America in the First World War." U.S. History: Pre-Columbian to the New Millennium. U.S. History - Independence Hall Association in Philadelphia. Web. 21 May 2012. .

"World War II Guide: Bibliographical Essay." Digital History. The University of Houston. Web. 21 May 2012. .
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Rosa Luxemburg's View of World War I

Words: 917 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39558264

osa Luxemburg's view of World War I, as demonstrated in her political tract "The Workers and the War," was relatively simple. She vehemently protested against the war on political grounds, arguing that it actually represented a dissolution of the socialist principles which had largely animated Europe and large portions of Germany at the time. This fact is readily underscored by the notion that the author was imprisoned for the majority of World War I due to her protesting this war as violating many of the crucial tenets of socialism. The author's primary thesis is that large international conflicts such as World War I were fundamentally contrary to the ideologies of socialism, which strove to unite and empower the working class. Luxemburg widely believed that World War I and the very conception of nationalism itself merely led to the disempowerment of socialists, and regulated the working class to its substandard living…… [Read More]

References

Luxemburg, R. (1916). "The war and the workers." www.h-net.org. Retrieved from http://www.h-net.org/Y?\?X[???^ ??Z\?\??ZX? ?^ ?[
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Imperialism and War WWI

Words: 1667 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40738769

First World War was the first-ever war that had brought great destruction and required greater involvement of many countries, most especially the European nations. Evidence of the impending world war started during the early 19th century, wherein colonization and strengthening of military power is the most prevalent activity of all European nations at that time. The World War I was said to have many causes, although the most important and more popular cause discussed by historians today is that the First World War started because of the rising imperialism among competing European nations. The war had two competing groups, the Triple Alliance and the Triple Entente. The Triple Alliance was composed of Germany, Austria- Hungary, and Italy, while the Triple Entente was made up of Great ritain, France, and Russia. These groups were not originally formed as a triad; rather, each nation became affiliated with each other before and during…… [Read More]

Bibliography

The Causes of the First World War." 05 April 2002. Student-Run Computing Facility Homepage. 9 July 2002 http://srcf.ucam.org/~mrs35/hist/html-nodes/subject-notes/firstww.html.

Coffman, Edward. "World War I." The World Book Encyclopedia Vol. 21. USA: World Book Inc. 1991.

Europe in 1914." 1 January 2002. Spartacus Educational. 9 July 2002 http://spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/TGfww.htm.

The First World War." 11 March 2001. Schools History.
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Causes of World War One

Words: 1893 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56235563

Wilson was one of the massive supporters of this League of Nations as he felt it would help in being responsible in preventing subsequent wars. One major aspect of the treaty of Paris in 1919 was that it contained the Treaty of Versailles, one which has a major goal of disciplining Germany and forcing a sense of punishment and finality of Germany. For instance, Germany lost many colonies and investments in lieu of this treaty and their ability to forge a military was crippled and limited to a fraction of its original size; the German air force was also similarly crippled. Germany was also further bankrupt in the reparations that it was ordered to pay -- the equivalent of $132 billion gold marks. These intense punishments were a major aspect of the treaty and were something that did cause a deadlock at certain points in the negotiating process (MacMillan, 195).…… [Read More]

References

Afflerbach, H. (2007). An Improbable War?: The Outbreak of World War I and European Political. New York: Berghahn Books.

Louis, W. (2006). Ends of British Imperialism. New York: I.B.Tauris.

MacMillan, M. (2007). Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World. New York: Random House Publishers.

MacMillan, M. (2009). The War that Ended Peace. New York: Random House Publishers.
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Impact of World War 1 And the Great Depression

Words: 438 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2471492

orld ar I upon the Great Depression on the federal role of American government

After the advent of the Great Depression and the presidency of Franklin Roosevelt, America shifted in its national emphasis from being an economically decentralized nation, with a capitalistic and 'hands off' attitude to the development of industry, to a more truly modern nation that took an active role in the lives and well being of its citizens. The American federal government also began to seek to exercise its moral influence upon the rest of the world. However, this shift from American isolationism towards those in need within America, as well as the needs of individuals abroad, did not come with some national soul-searching. The historian illiam E. Leuchtenburg writes in his text The Perils of Prosperity: 1914-32 that the economic advancement of the post orld ar I era, and America's less economically damaging late involvement in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gould, Lewis. America in the Progressive Era. New York Longman, 2000.

Leuchtenburg, William E. The Perils of Prosperity, 1914-32. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958.
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Ideological Relationship Between WWI and WWII

Words: 1385 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18232482

ideological relationship between WWI and WWII. The writer explores the ideological relationship between the two wars and then moves into the arena of contrasting the differences between several war germane terms. The comparison includes Fascism and Nazism. There were three sources used to complete this paper.

Should the U.S. launch an attack on Iraq? Nations of the world have been lining up on both sides of this question for the last few weeks. The world is used to divisions when it comes to military action. World War One and World War Two both provided training grounds for the world nations drawing lines in the sand and choosing sides. The World Wars were ideologically related in several ways with the most important ideal being personal freedom.

Each of the world wars stood for freedom. The freedom to choose one's lifestyle and the freedom to choose one's government style and participants were…… [Read More]

References

Axel, Alan. The Complete Idiot's Guide to World War II. Alpha Books (October 23, 1998)

Calvocoressi, Peter. The Penguin History of the Second World War

Penguin USA (Paper);; (February 27, 2001)

Morrow, John. The Great War in the Air: Military Aviation from 1909 to 1921 Smithsonian Institution Press;; (May 1993)
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Foreign WWI Propaganda From Dutch Neutral Perspective

Words: 746 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74625101

perceptions of World War One propaganda from the Dutch, neutral perspective. The reception of this foreign propaganda can be measured in a number of different ways: via the culling of contemporary newspapers with editorials reacting to the propaganda, and with counter-propaganda materials such as pamphlets. Special attention will be given to pamphlets, posters, and other propaganda describing the 1914 invasion of Belgium by Germany, known colloquially as the ape of Belgium.

Historical context will comprise the background section of the research report. It is necessary to highlight the specific issues that the propaganda material were designed to address in the public consciousness. The propaganda material will be analyzed in terms of its symbolism and composition, and there will be some mention also of the prevailing artistic sensibilities that influenced the artwork -- which cannot be taken out of its historical context. For example, many of the sketches used for the…… [Read More]

References

Abbenhuis, Maartje. The Art of Staying Neutral. University of Chicago Press.

Army Heritage Center Foundation. "Soldier Stories: Remember Belgium." Retrieved online: http://armyheritage.org/education-and-programs/educational-resources/soldier-stories/42-information/education-a-programs/170-remember-belgium

Duffy, Michael. "Battles: The Destruction of Louvain, 1914." First World War. Retrieved online:  http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/louvain.htm 

Jacobi, Ava Caroline. "Into the Abyss: The Legacy of the 'Rape of Belgium' Propaganda." Retrieved online:  https://repository.library.georgetown.edu/bitstream/handle/10822/555503/JacobiAvaThesis.pdf?sequence=2
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Treatment of Blacks During Combat in WWII vs In WWI

Words: 684 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31688934

There was an increase in the human right agencies that fought for the protection of their rights. Multiple efforts such as recognition of their contribution and minimal exposures to traumatic experiences were adopted to ensure their protection (Parker 113).

Gaines (58) recognized that significant variability is traceable in the roles of the human rights bodies in the orld ar I and II. The First orld ar was characterized by minimal activity of the black press. The orld ar II witnessed a significant change, as there was a transformation in the representation of the Africans taking part in the orld ar For example, the Second orld ar saw an increase in the black press that offered a forum for the expression of contemporary issues affecting Africans in the ar. orld ar II also witnessed the transformation of civil right efforts with more focus on opposing discrimination of Africans on issues related…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gaines, K. "The Civil Rights Movement in World Perspective." OAH Magazine of History 21.1 (2007): 57-64

Parker, Christopher S. "When Politics Becomes Protest: Black Veterans And Political Activism In The Postwar South." The Journal of Politics 71.01 (2009): 113
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Effect of WWI on Jews and Germans

Words: 3140 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25856239

Germans and Jews After I

Germans and Jews After orld ar I

In orld ar I, more than 12,000 Jews lost their lives fighting for Germany (Flannery, 43). They were a large part of the culture there, and had intermingled as much as they were able to. However, despite the way they were involved in so much of what was taking place in the country, they were also never really accepted. After I, Germany's official position on Jews changed. Much of that took place because the German leaders did not want to take any blame for the problems that had caused them to lose out in the war. Because they wanted to make sure the people saw them in a good light, and they did not want to admit past mistakes, they looked for scapegoats. One of the main groups for that scapegoating was the Jewish people. Even though many…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anti-Semitism in History: World War 1. United States Holocaust Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 2014. Print. http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007166

While Anti-Semitism is nothing new in society, this article spells out clearly what was taking place in Germany after WWI and how that shaped the beliefs of the Germany people when it came to their feelings about Jews in their country.

Elon, Amos. The Pity of It All: A History of Jews in Germany, 1743 -- 1933. New York, 2002. Print.

The Jewish people in Germany never really had much of a chance to be a part of the country, at least not on a proper level. They were marginalized from the very beginning, and that only got worse after WWI, finally culminating in the atrocities of WWII.
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Causes of World War I

Words: 2738 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46041458

WWI was also the first time that toxins such as mustard gas were used and this created panic and death in many different countries, significantly raising the death toll from the war and also making it more difficult for the country to stay organized and on-track when it came to supporting the troops that were fighting (Marston, 1981).

Italy was another of the allies that joined up to retaliate against Germany. If it were not for the issue with the alkans, it is likely that WWI would have never taken place, but other countries objected so strongly to the way that Germany handled the problem that they felt they must become involved. When Italy had finally been pushed far enough, it "decided to retaliate" and officially joined the war (Marston, 1981).

For Italy, going into the war meant protecting itself and its allies. It had generally enjoyed a good relationship…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Americanization (1925). Dept. Veterans of Foreign Wars of U.S., America: Great crises in our history told by its makers.

Barnes, Harry Elmer. (1970). The genesis of the world war: an introduction to the problem of war guilt. Howard Fertig, Inc.

Marston, F.S. (1981). The peace conference of 1919: organization and procedure Greenwood Press, 1981.

Rothberg, Gunter E., Moltke, Schlieffen (1986). The Doctrine of Strategic Envelopment. In Makers of modern strategy from Machiavelli to the nuclear age. Peter Paret ed.
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Balkan War Led to WWI

Words: 808 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44364193

Balkan ar that led to orld ar I

There were several factors of the Balkan Crisis of 1914 that led to orld ar I. Generally, the European Crisis of 1914 is blamed on the "Great Power statesmen for their shortsightedness, incompetence, or failure to act in a timely or effective way to keep the peace" (Sowards 2001). However, it is important to consider the players involved in the conflict between the two states in the original Sarajevo crisis, Austria-Hungary and Serbia. Early in the crisis, when the Austrian, Hungarians, and Serbs made important decisions, "they consistently avoided compromise and risked war" (Sowards 2001). Two months passed between the murder of Franz Ferdinand and the "coming of the general war...plenty of time for calculation, caution and decision" (Sowards 2001). However, there were several successive events that took place during those two months.

On June 28, 1914, Gavrilo Princip, a nineteen-year-old student…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Duffy, Michael. "How It Began: The Causes of World War One." First World War.Com.

April 2002. http://athene.mit.csu.edu.au/~mrahma06/how%20it%20began.htm.(accessed 01-21-2003).

Sowards, Steven W. "Twenty-Five Lectures on Modern Balkan History." March 2, 2001. http://www.lib.msu.edu/sowards/balkan/lect15.htm.(accessed 01-21-2003).

Who started World War I?" February 6, 2002. http://history.acusd.edu/gen/classes/diplo177/warstart.html.(accessed 01-21-2003).
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What Led to the US Entry to World War 1

Words: 1876 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10732355

United States entry into world war.

Taking nations from more than half the globe as partakers and victims, the first war broke out, 1914-1918, and that is known as World War 1 or the First World War. Until the World War II broke out, it was widely known as the war which had broken out which had the capacity to put an end to all wars, and commonly it was known as The Great War. In fact multiple factors produced the First World War. An International anarchy was seen all over Europe. On the eve of the World War I there were 25 sovereign states in Europe, each desiring to act on its own individual conscience. None of them was ready to submit to the interference or will of the other, as each of them held its pride high, thinking if they accepted the advice of any other state, their…… [Read More]

References

Bass, Herbert J., "America's Entry Into World War I." Chicago; Holt, Rinehart And Winston, 1964, p.14-17

Andrea, Alfred J., and Overfield, James H., "The Human Record." Boston; Houghton Mifflin Company, 1994, p.63-66

Pope, Stephen, and Wheal, Elizabeth-Anne, "The Dictionary of The First World War" New York; St. Marten's Press, 1995, p.24-27

Venzon, Anne Cipriano, "The United States in the First World War" New York; Garland Publishing, Inc., 1995, p.56-59
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Protestant Ref Imperialism and WWI

Words: 1290 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34222582

92). Pope Innocent X lamented the procedure, of course -- for it served to subvert the truths which the oman Church strove to propagate.

Thus, the modern world was built not upon the majesty of kings and religion, but upon treaties and revolutionary ideals. The philosophical fruit of Protestantism would spring up in the age of omantic/Enlightenment doctrine, which would produce the American and French evolutions. "Liberty, equality, fraternity" would be the modern world's ethos -- in theory. However, capitalist ethics would undermine the romantic ideology. Imperialism -- for gold, God, and glory at the end of the medieval world -- would be based, in the modern world, upon sheer greed (as a principle). America defined this principle well with the notion of "manifest destiny," which by the end of the 19th century was expanded beyond the American frontier to encompass the whole globe.

The new Imperialism of America (and…… [Read More]

Reference List

Elliot, J.H. (2009). Spain, Europe and the Wider World: 1500-1800. Yale Universtiy

Press.

Haaren, J. (1904). Famous Men of the Middle Ages. New York, NY: American Book

Company.
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Post World War I Era

Words: 2253 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55780798

Post orld ar I era: Freud and Ortega y Gasset

The outbreak of orld ar I was a traumatic and disillusioning event for many people in Europe, perhaps most of all for those who had committed themselves to a notion of progress and advancement in human affairs. The sheer scale of the destruction and death unleashed by the war, which "exceeded that of all other wars known to history," at the end of a century which had been largely seen as one of peace, progress and prosperity, was a profound shock - one from which, it could be argued, the nations of Europe never entirely recovered.

hen the Austrian psycho-analyst Sigmund Freud sat down to write an article on the war in early 1915, it was this sense of disillusionment, of a loss of faith in progress, that was uppermost in his mind. The resulting essay, "Thoughts for the Times…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Freud, Sigmund, "Thoughts for the Times on War and Death" (1915), in Collected Papers: Volume IV (London: Hogarth Press, 1924).

Gilbert, Martin, First World War (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1994).

Ortega y Gasset, Jose, The Revolt of the Masses (English translation, New York: Norton, 1932; 2nd edn., 1957).

Pick, Daniel, War Machine: the Rationalization of Slaughter in the Modern Age (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1993).
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Flanders Fields A World War I Poem

Words: 529 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93784275

Flanders Fields: A World War I Poem Written by John McRae

The poem "In Flanders Fields" was written by John McRae, Canadian soldier, surgeon, and last, but not least, a poet, during World War I. McRae's poem gives a voice to those who died fighting in the war. Flanders Fields is reported to have been "the generic name of the World War I battlefields under the medieval County of Flanders." Golden Map, nd, p.1) In Flanders Fields was penned by McRae during the War Poetry Movement, a time during World War I when many poets penned poetry relating the battlefield tragedies. The primary themes in McRae's poems were death, revenge, and honor. Righter, 2008, p.1) The most famous of all his poems is "In Flanders Field" in which the idea of a tragic theme of war is related. Righter, 2008, paraphrased) A great deal of symbolism is used by McRae…… [Read More]

(4) Righter, K. (2008) The Poppies Blow "In Flanders Fields" Critical Analysis. 14 Nov 2008. Retrieved from: shspoetrya.wikispaces.com/.../In+Flanders+Fields+Critical+Ess

This study conducts a critical analysis of McRae's poem "In Flanders Fields."

(5) Patterson, R. Fermor, D. And Hall, C. (1994) John Mcrae: The Poetry and Tragedy of Flanders Fields. CMAJ 1994 Nov. 1; 151(9): 1307-1310. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1337332/?page=1
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What Caused World War 1

Words: 1373 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30090281

nations all over Europe made mutual defense treaties, which would pull them into war. These agreements implied that in case one nation was invaded, associated nations had to protect them. The following alliances existed prior to World War 1 (Kelly):

Japan and Britain

ussia and Serbia

France and ussia

Germany and Austria-Hungary

Britain and France and Belgium

The Triple Alliance was created in 1882 by Germany, Italy and Austria-Hungary. These three nations agreed to support one another in case of an attack from either ussia or France. France, in particular, felt intimidated by this alliance. The main aim of the alliance was to support collaboration against Germany's thought threat. After three years, ussia that was scared of the growth of the German Army, united with France and Britain, to create the Triple Entente (Triple Entente). Contrary to the Triple Alliance, the terms of the Entente did not need each nation…… [Read More]

References

"Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated - Jun 28, 1914 - HISTORY.com." History Canada -- Videos, TV Schedule & Watch Full Episodes Online. Web. 14 Oct 2015. .

"First World War.com - Feature Articles - The Planning of the War." First World War.com - A Multimedia History of World War One. Web. 9 Oct 2015.
Kelly, Martin. "Top 5 Causes of World War 1." Learn American History on About.com. Web. 9 Oct 2015. .

"Triple Entente." Spartacus Educational. Web. 14 Oct 2015. .
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Similarities Between World War I And Modern Warfare

Words: 1178 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52835861

World War I is fundamentally similar to warfare as it is practiced today.

This paper reviews the relevant literature to provide evidence in support of the argument that World War I is fundamentally similar to warfare as it is practiced today.

Major and Supporting Points of Evidence

There were numerous innovations in military ordnance and munitions that took place during and following the U.S. Civil War, but the purpose of the warfare practiced on the field of battle in World War I was fundamentally similar to the purpose of warfare as it is practiced today for a number of reasons, including the following:

The fundamental purpose and nature of warfare today is identical to the purpose and nature of the warfare prosecuted in World War I;

Notwithstanding some differences in the composition of the belligerents and military tactics, wars are still fought and won by "boots on the ground"; and,…… [Read More]

References

Black's Law Dictionary (1990). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co.

Clausewitz, Carl von. (1976). On War, ed. And trans. Michael Howard and Peter Paret.

Princeton, N.J.: Princeton Univ. Press.

Hooker, R.D. Jr. (2005, Summer). "Beyond Vom Kriege: The Character and Conduct of Modern
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Pre World War One German Nationalism

Words: 1878 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74479719

Nationalism was a global trend by the time the Great War broke out. Each nation state developed its own national identity via the use of myths, symbols, and ideology that ranged from ethnic solidarity to political values. Nationalism in Germany became especially potent after the Franco-Prussian War, during which Bismarck wielded his political and military prowess in formidable ways. Crucial to winning the war campaign was a sense of national pride and identity, which Otto von Bismarck promoted through an idealized unity between disparate religious and cultural groups within the various German-speaking states. In addition to promoting a sense of regional identity, Bismarck also championed the vision of an epic, legendary, heroic German state grounded in a sense of power and prestige. Also characteristic to German nationalism was a sense of pride in the act of struggle itself, another point that Bismarck promoted through his speeches. German nationalism had been…… [Read More]

References

Bismarck, Otto von. The Imperial Proclamation, January 18, 1871

Otto von Bismarck: Letter to Minister von Manteuffel, 1856

Otto von Bismark: Nationalist Speech. April 1, 1895. Retrieved online: https://kquazza.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/blood-and-iron-nationalist-speech.pdf

Johann Gustav Droysen: Speech to the Frankfurt Assembly, 1848
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Lost Battalion WWI by Thomas

Words: 1375 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87060571

The heavy losses being experienced by the troops of the Lost Battalion were further exacerbated by misdirected friendly artillery fire that killed or wounded hundreds of the bewildered U.S. forces that was only stopped by hittlesey's use of a carrier pigeon to call off the barrage (Coffman viii). It was during this low phase of the battle that the battalion earned its now-famous but misplaced moniker: "hile the five-day siege was in progress, war correspondents picked up on the story of what was then miscalled the 'Lost Battalion.' Everyone knew where they were. The issue was whether or not the division could fight its way to them" (Coffman vi). The day-by-day first-hand descriptions of the battlefield and how the men of the Lost Battalion reacted to the deteriorating conditions were among the most vivid accounts in this regard, with American resolve and fortitude being eroded by hunger, desperation and aggravated…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Johnson, Thomas M., Fletcher Pratt and Edward M. Coffman. The Lost Battalion. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2000.
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Tanks of World War I

Words: 1401 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2729328

The latter was skeptical, referring to the device as "a pretty mechanical toy" (Harris 31) but everybody else was favorably impressed and the ar Office continued enthusiastically to support tank development. "Mother" became the basis for the Mark I tank, the first mass-produced tracked armored fighting vehicle in history. The Mark I, powered by two diesel engines, was built in two versions, "male" which mounted four machine guns and two 6-pounder naval guns in protruding barbettes, and "female" which carried machine guns only. The male version was intended as an assault weapon; the female tanks were designed to protect their male counterparts and each other by using machine guns to mow down attacking infantry who might otherwise swamp and overcome the tanks (Harris 31-2). This huge, heavy, lozenge-shaped monster became the pattern for the classic First orld ar tank, through to the Mark VIII of 1918.

The tanks were ready…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bourne, J.M. Britain and the Great War 1914-1918. London: Edward Arnold, 1989.

Duffy, Michael. "Weapons of War - Tanks." First World War.com: A Multimedia History of World War One. 2002. 20 Nov. 2004.  http://www.firstworldwar.com/weaponry/tanks.htm .

Harris, J.P. Men, Ideas and Tanks. British Military Thought and Armoured Forces, 1903-1939. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1995.

Reid, Brian Holden. "The Tank: Visions of Future War." History Today Dec. 1987: 36-41.
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Trench Warfare of WW1

Words: 2181 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52152309

Trench Warfare in World War I (WWI)

Trench warfare was used in World War I and they were forced to live in muddy, isolated conditions for months exposed to horrific elements, and inviting diseases like gangrene. During World War I many things changed, as lives were destroyed, dreams shattered, and many soldiers died or suffering immeasurable psychological and physical conditions.

WWI was the first time in history that war involved the use of new technology such as airplanes, tanks and submarines. However, for many WWI soldiers, trench warfare presents the most lasting image of World War I. Trench warfare caused many horrific deaths. In addition, many soldiers who participated in trench warfare had serious psychological and health problems by the time they returned home.

About Trench Warfare

Trench warfare is a type of warfare in which opponents of war "attack, counterattack, and defend from relatively permanent systems of trenches dug…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baggett, Blaine. (November, 1996). The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century Humanities, PBS.

Beyond Books. (2002). In the Trenches New Forum Publishers, Inc. Retrieved from the Internet at http://www.beyondbooks.com/bbx/login/bb/eur12login.asp?asplreq=http://www.beyondbooks.com/eur12/6c.asp.

Ellis, John. (1989). Eye Deep in Hell: Trench Warfare in World War I. John Hopkins University Press.

Hansen, Ole. (2001). The War in the Trenches. Raintree Publishing Co.
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Literary Resopnse to World War One

Words: 714 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74317857

Social Activism and Literature

Two of the major themes in 20th century American literature are war and social protest. The United States has been engaged in a steady series of wars since the beginning of the 20th century. With the carnage of the First World War, the horrors of the Second, the futility of Vietnam, many writers and artists contributed to the literature of protest with respect to war, and America's involvement in it.

Amy Lowell's September, 1918 is a good example of how writers reacted to the First World War. Its presentation of a wistful era where there is no war, juxtaposed against the current "broken world," illustrates the yearning that many had for a world without war. The First World War had essentially eliminated any romance that there was of war in society, and its brutality would spark this sort of response across the world. For the first…… [Read More]

References

Parini, J. & Cutter, M. (2009). Themes in Contemporary American Literature. Cengage.
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WWII Battle of Monte Cassino History Has

Words: 2237 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64322020

WWII: Battle of Monte Cassino

History has been known to repeat itself. Today in Iraq for example, United States and Allied troops are torn when drawing up plans to win the war in the holy land. The problems stem from their not being able to directly attack certain Muslim holy locations or shrines even though Iraqi insurgents are constantly utilizing these positions as sanctuaries and initiation points for waging battles against the allied forces or the new Iraqi government. During World War II, the Axis powers with Adolf Hitler and the Nazi army also attempted to use similar tactics to fend off attacks by Allied forces.

This report discusses the Battle of Monte Cassino and the pros and cons of the Allied Forces' actions during World War II. A historic shrine was completely destroyed by the events of the Allied forces during the Battle of Monte Cassino in the Italian…… [Read More]

References

Colvin, David, & Hodges, Richard (1994). Tempting providence: the bombing of Monte Cassino. History Today, Vol. 44.

Eagle19. (n.d.). The Battles for Monte Cassino and the Defense of the Gustav Line. Retrieved October 15, 2004, at http://www.eagle19.freeserve.co.uk/cassino.htm

Griess, Thomas E. (2002). The Second World War Europe and the Mediterranean. The West Point Military History Series.

Hapgood, David, & Richardson, David (1984). Monte Cassino: The Story of the Most Controversial Battle of World War II. Add City: Add Publisher.
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WWII Without a Doubt the Expansionist Policies

Words: 399 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96793550

WWII

Without a doubt, the expansionist policies of Germany, Italy and Japan and a direct attack by Japan on Pearl Harbor necessitated the need for America to enter World War II. However, the real question is not whether America should have entered World War II, but could it have prevented it from happening. As the world's new super power following World War I, America should have done more to restore stability to Western Europe, particularly Germany, a country saddled with huge reparation payments. And, the United States could have taken a more active role in the League of Nations to discourage aggression. Instead, America enjoyed the spoils of World War I and became isolationist in response to the Great Depression. Economic and political instability caused by World War I led the rise of fascism. The Nazi goals of reversing the Versailles Treaty and the establishment of a German Empire by…… [Read More]

Bibliography

'World War II." Wikipedia. Available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II#Home_front (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II.," Available: http://web.uccs.edu/history/student%20presentations/heidi/world_war_two.htm (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II." Wikipedia. Available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II#Home_front (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II.," Available: http://web.uccs.edu/history/student%20presentations/heidi/world_war_two.htm (Accessed 3 May 2005).
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World War II in Europe

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By attacking from the North, Hitler effectively bypassed France's only real defense against invasion. Within two weeks, Paris was under Nazi control, and still seething from the harsh terms of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I, Hitler demanded that the surrender terms be signed in the very same spot as the armistice that ended that war, and in the very same railroad car, which he had brought out from its museum display for that purpose3. Belgium had surrendered to Germany without firing a shot, effectively dooming France to Nazi occupation, and nearly sealing the fate of more than a quarter million British troops sent to support Britain's ally, France. Only a last-

3. Hayes & Faissler p.444 minute scramble saved the British from capture, at the port city of Dunkirk, where the British used thousands of ships, boats, and dinghies to rescue them all and ferry…… [Read More]

References

Commager, H.S., Miller, D.L. The Story of World War II: Revised, Expanded & Updated from the Original Text by Henry Steele Commager (2002)

Hayes, C., Faissler, M. Modern Times: The French Revolution to the Present (1966)

Kowalick, T.M. The Western Tradition Transcripts (1989)

Lukacs, J. The Last European War (1976)
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World War II Happen The

Words: 1724 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15911546

" Military History. [online]

available: http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/wwiieurcauses.htm.

Shevin-Coetzee, M. & Coetzee, F. (2010). The World in Flames: A World War II Sourcebook.

Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Snell, J.L. (1962). The Outbreak of the Second World War: Design or Blunder? Boston D.C.

Heath.

Carr, F.M. (2005, January 1). "World War I to World War IV: A Democratic-Economic Perspective." Journal of Economics and Economic Education esearch, 6(1), p. 117.

Carr, p. 117.

Shevin-Coetzee, M. & Coetzee, F. (2010). The World in Flames: A World War II Sourcebook. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hickman, K. (2012). "World War II Europe: The oad to War." Military History. [online] available: http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/wwiieurcauses.htm.

Hickman, p. 1.

Corum, J.S. (2004, Summer). "The Luftwaffe and Its Allied Air Forces in World War II: Parallel War and the Failure of Strategic and Economic Cooperation." Air Power History, 51(2), p. 4.

Corum, p. 4.

Corum, p. 5.

Bassett, .L. (2009, Fall). "Sacred Causes:…… [Read More]

References

Bassett, R.L. (2009, Fall). "Sacred Causes: The Clash of Religion and Politics, from the Great

War to the War on Terror." Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 28(3), 281-289.

Carr, F.M. (2005, January 1). "World War I to World War IV: A Democratic-Economic

Perspective." Journal of Economics and Economic Education Research, 6(1), 117-121.
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World War II and the

Words: 1799 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91851453

Today, the Americans fight different insurgent factions, who have limited weaponry, no air force, and no real large scale fighting tactics. Instead, they create havoc with roadside bombs and suicide bombers. Vietnam was fought on the scale of a world war, while Iraq is being fought on a much smaller scale. In addition, there was a draft in place during Vietnam, and no draft in place today, so our forces are stretched much thinner in Iraq and at home.

In contrast, many experts believe there are similarities between the two wars, but there are far more differences that keep the two wars very far apart in perspective. For example, there is no real Communist influence in Iraq; rather the country suffers from domestic unrest and insurgency, rather than large-scale intervention from other countries (except perhaps Iran). Thus, Americans are not fighting a "cold" war but rather a war supposedly based…… [Read More]

References

Kagan, Frederick W. "Iraq Is Not Vietnam." Policy Review (2005): 3+.

Letters from Iwo Jima. Dir. Clint Eastwood. Perf. Ken Watanabe, Kazunari Ninomiya, Tsuyoshi Ihara, and Ryo Kase. Warner Brothers, 2006.

Lopez, George a. "A Quagmire? Vietnam, Iraq & Other Analogies." Commonweal 16 Jan. 2004: 11+.

May, Elaine Tyler. Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era. Revised ed. New York: Basic Books, 1999.
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World War II Broke Out Russia Was

Words: 2569 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38358365

orld ar II broke out, Russia was not prepared, nor did she manage to be the military threat she could have been, because the nation was weakened by lack of industrialization, the defeat by Japan in 1905, and a lack of support by the people for involvement in this new war. hat seems clear is that Russia was not prepared when the war began and had to work to muster its army, provide war materials, and protect its own territory against the German advance. The fact that Germany was indeed stopped cold in Russia shows how well the Russians did their job, but the issue is why they did not do what they could before the war started given that the whole world could see war coming long before it reached Russia. More recently, though, the question of unpreparedness has been given a new look, and a new theory of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

McTaggart, Pat. "Winter Tempest in Stalingrad." World War II 12(4)(November 1997), 30-36.

Raack, R.C. "Stalin's Role in the Coming of World War II: Opening the Closet Door on a Key Chapter of Recent History." World Affairs 158(4)(1996), 198-211.

Taylor, a.J.P. The Origins of the Second World War. New York: Athenaeum, 1985.

Tucker, Robert C. Stalin in Power. New York: W.W. Norton, 1990.
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World War II WWII Transformed the United

Words: 1343 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22535567

World War II (WWII) Transformed the United States Domestically

World War II was a global military conflict that, in terms of lives lost and material destruction, was the most tragic war in human history. It started in 1939 as a European conflict between Germany and an Anglo-French coalition but eventually grew to include most of the nations of the world. It ended in 1945, leaving a new world that was dominated by the United States and the U.S.S.R.

When the United States became involved with World War II, there were immediate and long-term changes in virtually every aspect of American life. Millions of men and women joined the military and saw areas of the world they would likely never have seen on their own. The labor demands of war industries caused millions more Americans to relocate, mainly to the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts, where most defense plants were located.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Encarta. World War. Encyclopedia Article. Retrieved from the Internet at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761563737/World_War_II.html.

Sage, Henry. (March 23, 2004). The Postwar United States. The Library of Congress. Retrieved from the Internet at http://www.nv.cc.va.us/home/nvsageh/Hist122/topics/PostWorldWarIIDom.htm.

Stravelli, Gloria. (March, 2004). In unexpected ways WWII changed women's lives: Role in war effort helped shift societal perceptions and expectations. New Jersey: The Hub.

The New Georgia Encyclopedia. (2004). Civil Rights Movement. Retrieved from the Internet at http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/ArticlePrintable.jsp?id=h-2716.
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World War II Drew to a Close

Words: 2281 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3306350

World War II drew to a close, and the planet was forced to recalibrate in unprecedented proportions, the United States began its long emergence as the most expansive super-power that had yet been known. Its influence that would compete virulently with the post-war Soviet influence for half a century, has since disseminated into every facet of the geopolitical theatre. As such, American support can operate as the determining factor in the success of a national agenda. Likewise, American dissent can be the stifling roadblock that sets nations adrift in failure and, consequently, resentment. So it's important to acknowledge that a nation's complaint of American neglect is more than just the bitter rhetoric of the disenfranchised. The emphasis placed on American approval and volition is fairly justified when one considers the weight and implication of the U.S. stance on any given topic. And it's certainly fair to say that American intervention…… [Read More]

5. Maisel, David, The Founding Myths of Israel: Nationalism, Socialism, and the Making of the Jewish State, Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1998.

6. Rabinovich, Itamar, Waging Peace, New York, NY, Farrer, Straus and Giroux, 1999.

7. Smith, Charles D., Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict, New York, NY, St. Martin's Press, 2001
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Changes in WWII

Words: 1752 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67033905

WW2 Momentum Shift 1942-1944

WWII

One of the events that rocked the world and consequently shaped the world was the WWII that commenced effectively in 1939 and ended in 1945. It is however worth noting that some of the conflicts that eventually ended up in the culmination of the WWII started much earlier. The WWII parse involved majority of the nations, including the powerful nations at that time taking sides and aligning themselves and their military and diplomatic allegiance to either the Allies or the Axis, each side forming their combined forces. The commanding forces in the Allies were France, Great Britain, Soviet Union, United States and to some little extent China (odye-Smith J., 2014). One the other side of the divide the Axis were Italy, Germany and Japan. This war was largely seen as a continuation of the WWI bearing the 20 years of unresolved disputes that emanated from…… [Read More]

References

Rodye-Smith J., (2014). World War II. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/648813/World-War-II

Rogole J.A., (2002). The Strategic Bombing Campaign against Germany during World War II. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from http://www.google.co.ke/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=10&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CGoQFjAJ&url=http%3A%2F%2Fetd.lsu.edu%2Fdocs%2Favailable%2Fetd-0413102-132317%2Funrestricted%2FRigole_thesis.pdf&ei=rnTVU7T2HOHj4QTl6YCwCA&usg=AFQjCNGr0G5t3esuMHkyG6efcmsHwe2lVg&sig2=f4uVuDX2XSnYn89JcB0wYA&bvm=bv.71778758,d.bGE

Yale Law School, (2008). The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Chapter 7 - The Attacks. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from  http://avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/mp07.asp
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History World War II

Words: 1685 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34052508

World War II, which took place from 1939-1945, was waged by the Allied Nations as a struggle for freedom against the evil and totalitarian regimes that existed in Germany, Italy and Japan.

Leaders of the War

There were several leaders that made decisions that contributed to the start and end of WWII. Adolf Hitler, who became the leader of Germany during the Great Depression, is blamed for WWII. He raised German spirits by telling them of a better future and a better Germany. ut in reality, he gave them a war. Hitler planned to expand Germany by taking Austria, Poland, and many other countries. He believed that German people were superior to the rest of the world and wanted everyone to prove this. (Keegan)

efore Hitler, the spirit and nationalism of the German people was very low, but he was able to get the German people to take pride in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Keegan, John. The Second World War. Penguin Books, 1989.

Allen, Thomas. World War II: The Encyclopedia of the War Years, 1941-1945. Random House, Inc., 1996.

A.J.P. Taylor, The Origins of the Second World War. Atheneum, 1983.

John Keegan. The Face of Battle. Penguin Books, 1987.
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Innovations in the WWII

Words: 1735 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79414055

WWII

If there is a period that will always be remembered in the history of the 20th century, it is the Second World War. Although it was blamed for deaths of hundreds of thousands, it is also a period that stimulated technological advancement and prepared the world for the social changes that ensued after the war. Some of the most notable social changes include the termination of European colonial rule in some countries. It is also the period that marked heightened civil rights movements in the U.S.A. and the emergence of women's movements. The programs that set the pace of the exploration of outer space also started in this period. The warring groups involved a split on the axis of Nazi Germany, imperial Japan, Fascist Italy and some relatively smaller allies versus the allied group that involved ritain along with the commonwealth nations, the Soviet Union, and USA[footnoteRef:1]. The allies…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Diffen - Compare Anything. Diffen. Discern. Decide. World War I vs. World War II - Difference and Comparison -- Diffen. Accessed January 28, 2016, from http://www.diffen.com/difference/World_War_I_vs_World_War_II

"The European Theater in WWII: The Eastern Front, Western Front & Fight for North Africa." Study.com. Accessed January 28, 2016. http://study.com/academy/lesson/the-european-theater-in-world-war-ii-the-eastern-front-western-front-and-fight-for-north-africa.html.

"The European Theater." World War 2 History Info. Accessed January 28, 2016. http://www.worldwar2history.info/Europe/.

"World War II." History Net. Accessed January 28, 2016. http://www.historynet.com/world-war-ii.
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WWII the United States Entered

Words: 1011 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71170487

Gradually, though, the war effort eroded the practical and theoretical underpinnings of racism in the United States. The war stimulated the domestic economy, particularly in the industrial and manufacturing sectors. Jobs were opening up rapidly, and because so many white men were fighting the war, many black men were available to work. "For black workers orld ar II opened up opportunities that had never before existed," (O'Neil 1). The same was true for women, as the war left gaping holes in the labor market that needed to be filled in untraditional ways. At the same time as the war exposed American prejudice, "orld ar II gave many minority Americans -- and women of all races -- an economic and psychological boost." (Harris 1). The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was founded, and overall, the war "jump-started the civil rights movement" in the United States (Harris 1; "Identify the impact of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harris, Michael. "How WWII Affected America's Minorities." Los Angeles Times. 13 June, 2000. Retrieved online:  http://articles.latimes.com/2000/jun/13/news/cl-40272 

"Identify the impact of World War II on minority groups in America." (U.S. History)." Retrieved online: http://share.ehs.uen.org/node/6217

O'Neil, William L. "Minorities and Women During World War II." Retrieved online: http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/WWII_Women/RA/NCraig/Minorities.html

Takaki, Ronald. Double Victory. New York: Time Warner/Little Brown.
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WWII to the 60s the

Words: 1427 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99114644

Wilson, a student of public administration, favored more governmental regulation and action during a time when large monopolies still existed. He saw the role of public administration as "government in action; it is the executive, the operative, the most visible side of government, and is of course as old as government itself" (Wilson 235). The pendelum swung, though, and the government was blamed for many of the ills that caused the Great Depression. Franklin oosevelt, despite being called draconian, knew that he had to launch programs that would have a quick effect upon the struggling economy; resulting the New Deal -- a complex, interlocking set of programs designed to produce jobs, economic recovery, and fiscal reform of banking and Wall Street -- exactly what was needed, it seems to turn the Titanic in a new direction (Badger). Then, of course, came the war, which stimulated the economy like nothing else,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Badger, A. FDR - The First Hundred Days. New York: Macmillan, 2009.

Cooper, P. Public Law and Public Administration. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1988.

Fesler, J. "Public Administration and the Social Sciences: 1946-1969." Mosher, F. American Public Administration: Past, Present, Future. Washington, DC & Birmingham, AL: The University of Alabama Press, 1975. 97-142.

Halberstam, D. The Fifties. New York: Ballantine, 1994.
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World War Turning Point Europe Significant Change

Words: 2238 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90985032

World War Turning Point Europe, Significant Change Occurred Emergence Legitimate evolutionary egimes

Self-Determination in Cuba

There are few who would dispute the fact that following the conclusion of World War II and prior to its revolution (which began in 1953 and concluded on January 1 of 1959) Cuba was a prosperous region of the world that was certainly worth fighting for. The country's leader prior to the ascendancy of Fidel Castro, Fulgencio Batista, had cleverly manipulated the assistance of a number of external forces, primarily that of the United States, to assist the country in achieving a degree of economic gain and modernity the likes of which were comparable to, if not surpassing, those of other parts of the world.

Its economic prowess may be demonstrated from the following quotation. "Cuba in 1958, prior to the government of the Communist Fidel Castro, paid its employees an average of $3.00 per…… [Read More]

References

Epperson, R.A. (1985). The Unseen Hand. Arizona: Publius.

Guevara, C. (2005). Cuba: Historical Exception or Vanguard in the Colonial Struggle? Retrieved from http://www.marxists.org/archive/guevara/1961/04/09.htm

Kapur, T., Smith, A. (2002). "Housing Policy In Castro's Cuba." Retrieved from http://www.jchs.harvard.edu/education/oustanding_student_papers/kapur_smith_cuba_02.pdf

Jones, L. (1966). Home. New York: William Morrow and Co.
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World War II Book Review

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It is key to understanding the author's view of love and even her own status as a woman and as a thinker. Of course, the book can simply be read as a love story of infidelity and sexual liberty gone wrong in the face of an ever-changing political society in a state of national and European chaos. But the Mandarins de Beauvoir referred to were also the elite, the intellectual elites of Chinese society who held themselves above from the common peasants.

Thus, by calling her fellow Left Bank intellectuals 'Mandarins' De Beauvoir symbolically calls upon her fellow intellectuals to become part and parcel of the political fray, rather than wasting their energies with entangling personal alliances that can be just as dissipating as the betrayals of Vichy and the subsequent alliances that sapped the French nation of its own vital energies. She calls upon the intellectual Mandarins of French…… [Read More]

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Air Warfare in World War

Words: 1934 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7895958

The First World War was neither won nor lost by the air warfare. What this war did for military aircraft design and development was to open up new possibilities of warfare.

It was the promise rather than the actuality of air power which most struck contemporaries. The war had not been decided in the air. Nevertheless, the race for supremacy had produced astonishing developments in a short space of time. The general purpose plane had given way to a sophisticated set of types -- the French Nieuport and Spad, the ritish Camel and the German Fokker, to name but a few fighters. It was grandiose to speak of aircraft factories in 1914, but not by the end of the war. Speed, range, and rate of climb increased, giving advantages first to one side and then the other. (Robbins 101)

The Second World War was to see further and more extensive…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Belloc, Hilaire. The Elements of the Great War. New York: Hearst's International Library Co., 1916.

Bombing During World War. February 20, 2005. I http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Air_Power/WWI_Bombing/AP3.htm

Buchan, John. A History of the Great War. Vol. 2. Boston, MA: Houghton and Mifflin Company, 1922.

Buchan, John. A History of the Great War. Boston, MA: Houghton and Mifflin Company, 1922.
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Cause Lead World War In Spite of

Words: 652 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30743133

Cause lead world war.

In spite of the fact that it happened almost a century ago, the First orld ar continues to intrigue people as a consequence of the forces involved in it, as a result of the catastrophic number of casualties, and generally because it demonstrates the fact that people are (or at least, they were) unhesitant about committing great crimes in order to impose their absurd thinking on others. It is difficult to determine whether the motives behind the war can be considered reasonable, especially given the fact that Europe had been in a state of turmoil years before the Austro-Hungarian heir, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, was assassinated.

One cannot simply consider causes when dealing with the reasons for which the First orld ar commenced. The conflict's causes alone are impossible to understand when given the numbers associated with it. "Some 61 million troops of 16 nations…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Bloch, Camille, The Causes of the World War An Historical Summary, trans. Jane Soames (London: George Allen & Unwin, 1935)

Higham, Robin and Showalter, Dennis E. eds., Researching World War I: A Handbook (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2003)

"World War I," The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.
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Origins of World War 2

Words: 876 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51495395

Second orld ar and how the Allied Powers were able to defeat the Axis Powers, ending Nazism, the Holocaust, and Japan's stranglehold on the Pacific. However, fewer people are truly knowledgeable about the beginning of the war. For the United States, orld ar II officially began on December 7th, 1941 with the bombing of Pearl Harbor. For the rest of the world, the war began much earlier and had already produced massive damage of property and people. The series of events that would lead to a world at war began in the early 1930s with the invasion of Manchuria by Japan and the seizing of power in the nation of Germany by Third Reich leader Adolf Hitler.

After the First orld ar, Germany was suffering from a massive depression. Losing the war left the people destitute; many were jobless and many were homeless. hen things are their bleakest, it can…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Paxton, Robert O. Europe in the Twentieth Century. 5th. Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt College,

2012. Print.
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American Involvement in World War

Words: 427 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30275285

The U.S. retaliated by freezing Japanese assets and imposed a complete embargo on oil exports to Japan and delivered the 'Hull Note' -- an ultimatum demanding a complete withdrawal from China. Japan considered the act unacceptable and opted for all-out war by attacking Pearl Harbor. (Ibid.)

Major Issues of the War:

Fight against Fascism: Fascism gained strength after the WWI. Totalitarian regimes in Germany, Italy, and Japan looked to dominate their neighbors and threatened military occupation. The democratic countries and the Soviet Union fought to stop them.

esources: The struggle to capture natural resources such as oil, considered necessary for development in an industrial age, was another major issue of the War. Hitler looked to capture the resource rich areas to the east as well as to create Lebensraum ("living space") for the expanding German population. A resource-poor Japan led by militarists had also adopted a policy of expansionism in…… [Read More]

References

Arima, Y. (2003). "The Way to Pearl Harbor: U.S. v Japan." ICE Case Studies.

December, 2003. Retrieved on November 18, 2006 at http://www.american.edu/TED/ice/japan-oil.htm
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Soviet WWII Soviet Policy Leading

Words: 2876 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40659937



The explanation that the Non-Aggression Pact was an agreement in which Hitler ultimately exploited Stalin may not necessarily be accurate. There is even the supposition that Stalin was deeply hurt on a personal level by Hitler's betrayal. But in reality, the Pact was sufficient to prevent the Soviet Union and Germany from coming into conflict until almost a full two years later. These were two years during which Hitler needed to focus his efforts on facing the British and French while strengthening Germany's key alliances with Japan and Italy.

Likewise, the Soviets benefited in the intervening time both by reaching gradual armistice with the Japanese and by enjoying the full extent of the Pact's guarantees to unchecked Soviet reclamation of the Baltic States, and its share of Poland. Though "Nazi Germany occupied the remainder of Poland when it invaded the Soviet Union in June 1941," the Soviet foothold in Poland…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Halsall, P. trans. (1997). Modern History Sourcebook: The Molotov-Ribbentrop

Pact, 1939. Modern History Sourcebook. Online at http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1939pact.html>

Holocaust Memorial Museum. (2005). Invasion of Poland, Fall 1939. Holocaust Encyclopedia. Online at http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?ModuleId=10005070>

Roberts, G. (2001). From Non-Aggression Treaty to War: Documenting Nazi Soviet Relations, 1939-41 Geoffrey Roberts Explains the Fateful Sequence of Events from the Nazi-Soviet Pact to Hitler's Invasion of the U.S.S.R. History
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Gulf War I Was Gulf

Words: 435 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90005896

This was a very dangerous development since the Saudi kingdom, which contained another 20% of the world's oil reserves, was militarily weak and liable to be easily over-run by the battle-hardened Iraqis. Saddam's control of such a vast proportion of a resource on which the world's economy depended was simply unacceptable for the rest of the world ("The Gulf ar").

As a result, the UN Security Council passed a series of resolutions, giving a deadline to Iraq for withdrawing its forces from Kuwait and authorizing military action by the coalition force, if it failed. In a foolish act of defiance, Saddam chose to ignore the ultimatum, and suffered a crushing defeat in the war with the coalition forces that followed. It was one of the few justifiable wars in recent history because failure to confront Saddam militarily at the time would have emboldened him into further aggression against his neighbors.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Rayment, W.J. "The Gulf War." in-depth Info. 1999-2007. March 15, 2007.  http://www.indepthinfo.com/iraq/ 

Iraq accused Kuwait of drilling for oil diagonally across its borders; was irked at Kuwait's refusal for foregoing loans made to his country during the Iran-Iraq war, and claimed that Kuwait was historically part of Iraq anyway

Saddam was also suspected of possessing biological weapons and on the brink of developing nuclear weapons