Gawain Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Arthurian Literature

Words: 5193 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27209723

Pearl Poet's Sir Gawain

The Arthurian Legends are one of the most mysterious of Middle English literature. For many years historians have tried to match King Arthur to one of the Early Kings of Britain, however, all attempts have met without success. It is now generally accepted that King Arthur and the other Knights of the Round table represent a composite of the behaviors and attitudes of people of that time period. The same can be said of the character of Sir Gawain in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." As social attitudes changed, so do the ideal characteristics that exemplify virtue and purity. The character Sir Gawain appears in many versions of the Arthurian Legends. The characteristics and attitudes of Sir Gawain seem to shoe a shift over time. The most widely accepted version of the character of Sir Gawain is the version that is attributed to the poet…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abrams, M.H. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. New York W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1993.

Andrew, Malcolm, and Ronald Waldron, eds. The Poems of the Pearl Manuscript. 2d ed.

London: Arnold, 1982; Gordon, E.V., ed. Pearl. Oxford: Clarendon, 1953.

Bishop, Ian. Pearl in Its Setting- A Critical Study of the Structure and Meaning of the Middle English Poem. Oxford: Blackwell, 1968
View Full Essay

Courtly Love

Words: 2729 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46249152

Chivalry in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Although Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is considered to be a romantic poem because of its nature and the era in which it was written, it does not represent romance in the traditional sense of courtly love during the medieval times. It is worth mentioning that Sir Gawain and the Green Knight does not substantially represent any of the conventions listed in "The Art of Courtly Love" by Capallanus, but instead focuses on the chivalrous nature of an honorable knight who struggles when his chivalry comes into conflict with his basic need for self-preservation.

This paper will examine Gawain's character, which is clearly very noble, and how this conflict between morality and mortality becomes almost a mockery by the poet by the end of the poem. Through satire, the poet is able to show the reader how even the noblest and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abrahms, M.H. ed. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. New York: Norton and Company. 1986.
View Full Essay

Green Knight vs The Mario

Words: 1712 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73176498

Mario, however, is not so lucky. He finds Bowser, and is forced to do battle with the giant beast until Bowser inadvertently casts himself into the fiery abyss of his own creation. Bowser's downfall is rather ironic: what ultimately ruins his grand designs of Mushroom domination is the structure of the castle that he built himself.

Despite the dissimilarities concerning the identities of their enemies, both Mario and Sir Gawain are victorious because they live up to their reputations as good and honorable heroes. Sir Gawain travels back to Camelot where he is praised by his King and the other Knights of the Round Table. Mario receives an identical homecoming -- he is praised as the conquering hero of the Mushroom realm. Stories, feasts, and games follow in both lands. Eventually in the Mushroom realm, even Bowser is allowed into the noble games and he races alongside Mario is his…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Hero in Literature and the Hunt Symbolism

Words: 2642 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53484876

unter and the unted:

Courtly Love and the Many Faces of the ero

Literature abounds in depictions of the hero.

Solomon, Esther, Gawain, and countless others call to mind tales of strength, valor, and passion. Whether a text's purpose is religious, instructional, or purely a matter of entertainment, a single character stands out. Emotion is often overpowering, as too, are the choices between what is right and what is wrong. Morality plays an equally important role in each of these "superhuman" stories. Frequently, the path of virtue is crossed by the highways of desire. A hero may take the high road, or he may take the low road, but which choice is correct depends upon the specific circumstances of the narrative, and upon the central figure's point-of-view. A bewildering array of problems, impossible tasks, and larger-than-life villains can turn closely-held beliefs inside out, and cause a hero to commit acts…… [Read More]

Heide Estes, "Bertilak Reads Brut: History and the Complications of Sexuality in Sir Gawain and the Green

Knight," Essays in Medieval Studies, 17, 72, Allen J. Frantzen, Ed. Illinois Medieval Association, 2000.

Guinevere Shaw, "Interpretations of Honor in the Medieval Period," URL: http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/Hall/1170/medhero.html.
View Full Essay

Old and Middle English

Words: 2234 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79408193

Knighthood and Chivalry: Heroism, Love, and Honor in "Canterbury Tales" by Geoffrey Chaucer and "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"

Fourteenth century literature was characteristically based on medieval period, wherein the dominance of Christianity is evident in estern society during that time. Influenced by the image of a knight, who serves as a warrior and man of noble birth, literary works during this period centered on the virtues taught to be important by the Church: love, honor, and chivalry. These are the characteristics that every heroic knight should have: respect for other people and the self, respect for love, and protecting those people who are unable to protect themselves from harm.

These are the traits that readers see in the images of the 'knights' depicted in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" and "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." Belonging to the 14th century estern literary period, these works have illustrated how…… [Read More]

Works Cited

E-text of "The Knight's Tale." Available at http://www.literatureclassics.com/etexts/98/89/.

E-text of "The Tale of Sir Thopas." Available at http://www.literatureclassics.com/etexts/98/96/.
View Full Essay

British Lit Legends Tales About

Words: 2346 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55725005

"

In total contrast with these heroes lies the modern hero or better said the modern man defined by his struggle for power. The idea of an individual selling his or her soul to the devil for knowledge is an old motif in Christian folklore, one that is centered upon in Cristopher Marlowe's "Doctor Faustus."

Doctor Faustus, a well-respected German scholar unsatisfied with the traditional forms of knowledge decides he wants to learn to practice magic. He begins his career as a magician summoning Mephastophilis, a devil while Valdes and Cornelius instruct him in the black arts. Despite the devil's warnings about hell Faustus tells the devil to return to his master Lucifer with an offer of Faustus's soul in exchange for twenty-five years of service from Mephistopheles. As the twenty-five years have passed, Faustus begins to dread his impending death and on the final night he is overcome by…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. The Norton Anthology of English, Norton Topics Outline. 2003-2006. W.W. Norton and Company. On the Internet at http://www.wwnorton.com/nael/middleages/topic_4/welcome.htm.Last retrieved on November 24, 2006

2. The Sixteenth century topics: The Magician, the Heretic and the Playwright: Overview. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 2003-2006. W.W. Norton and Company. On the Internet at http://www.wwnortoncom/nto/16century/topic_1/welcome.htm

3. Jokinen, Aniina. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Luminarium: Anthology of English Literature. November 2006. On the Internet at  http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/gawainintro/htm.Last  retrieved on November 24, 2006

4. Sera, Joseph. A character analysis of Sir Gawain. Pace University Student Projects on Gawain. November 2006. On the Internet at http://csis.pace.edu/grendel/projs2d/ana/page.htm.Last retrieved on November 24, 2006
View Full Essay

Knighthood Medieval Knighthood or Chivalry

Words: 1536 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84623652

By the late thirteenth century he had his own seal. The various officials concerned with the holy infirmary, the infirmary for sick brothers and almsgiving were under his authority. From 1340, the hospitaller was a brother from the tongue of France."(Nicholson, 77) Thus, the knights were mainly warriors who nevertheless had numerous other attributions, such as being actively engaged in charity actions and other social services. Percival's quest for the Holy Grail exemplifies the sublime missions assigned to the most virtuous of knights.

Thus, knighthood can be identified as an important cell in the Middle Ages, with a complex ideology of its own but also with a determinate role in society.

orks Cited

Harper-Bill, Christopher ed. And Ruth Harvey ed. Medieval Knighthood IV: Papers from the Fifth Strawberry Hill Conference 1990. oodbridge: Boydell, 1992

Kaeuper, Richard . Chivalry and Violence in Medieval Europe. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Nicholson,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harper-Bill, Christopher ed. And Ruth Harvey ed. Medieval Knighthood IV: Papers from the Fifth Strawberry Hill Conference 1990. Woodbridge: Boydell, 1992

Kaeuper, Richard W. Chivalry and Violence in Medieval Europe. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Nicholson, Helen. The Knights Hospitaller. Woodbridge: Boydell, 2001.

Prestage, Edgar. Chivalry: A Series of Studies to Illustrate Its Historical Significance and Civilizing Influence. London: Kegan Paul, 1968
View Full Essay

Christian Themes in Everyman Beowulf

Words: 929 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62954345

Beowulf experiences tough circumstances and because he does the right things, he emerges a hero and can live knowing he did the best he could. Here, responsibility leads to good works and, subsequently, a good life.

In "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," we see Christian values displayed when Gawain accepts his responsibility in much the same way that Grendel does. hen examining the story of Sir Gawain, we cannot overlook the importance of chivalry, which is strongly associated with Christian ideals. Gawain maintain the knight's high ideals even when he under pressure. hen Gawain is traveling to the Green Chapel, he speaks with God, working out his own fear and uneasiness. The result of this conversation is a renewed sense of honor and a urgency to continue. Another example of how the poet intended Gawain to carry these ideals with him is in the pentangle, in which he describes…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beowulf." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol I.M.H. Abrams, ed. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986. pp. 31-78.

Everyman." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol I.M.H. Abrams, ed. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986. pp. 347-67.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986. pp. 233-87.
View Full Essay

Gender Women Occupy Conflicted and Ambiguous Roles

Words: 1687 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55478888

Gender

Women occupy conflicted and ambiguous roles in Middle English and enaissance English literature. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and Shakespeare's Twelfth Night all show how male authors in particular grappled with the role of women in an increasingly patriarchal society. Women feature prominently in each of these stories, even if their status and perceived morality is questionable. Each of these stories features women who have a fair degree of power, albeit expressed within the confines of a patriarchal social and political construct. What's more, the women in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Canterbury Tales, and Twelfth Night create their own power; power is not "given" to them by self-serving benevolent men. In fact, women like Morgan Le Fay, Lady Bertilak, the Wife of Bath, and Viola all wield power effectively. Women and men occupy separate and distinct spheres, and each wields a different type…… [Read More]

References

Arkin, L. (1995). The role of women in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Retrieved online: http://msuweb.montclair.edu/~furrg/arkin.html

Chaucer, G. (1475). The Canterbury Tales. Retrieved online:  http://www.canterburytales.org/ 

Shakespeare, W. (1601). Twelfth Night. Retrieved online:  http://shakespeare.mit.edu/twelfth_night/full.html 

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Retrieved online:  http://www.yorku.ca/inpar/sggk_neilson.pdf
View Full Essay

Chaucer and Pearl Poet

Words: 2192 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34242530

Pearl-Poet

Indeed, few figures are more dominant in any era of literature in any language or cultural tradition, than both Chaucer and the Pearl-Poet are in the way that they tower over the rest of Middle English literature in terms of having crated the most imposing, lasting, and resounding works of literature associated with that time period and that stage of the development of the English language. Indeed, both Chaucer's and the Pearl-Poet's works are indubitably some of the most important and lasting of any works in English literature and without their contributions to the early development of literary style in English, it is difficult to imagine the stage having been properly set for any of the later greats of Modern English, from Shakespeare on down to Joyce. Indeed, for the very fact that their works was so unbelievably influential in even setting the tone for the sort of literature…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chaucer. Canterbury Tales. Retrieved Decmeber 5, 2003, at  http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/ 

OMACL/Troilus/.

The Pearl." Retrieved December 5, 2003, at http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/cgibin/browse- mixed?id=AnoPear&tag=public&images=images/mideng&data=/lv1/Archive/mideng-parsed.
View Full Essay

Courtly Love

Words: 2762 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32641731

Courtly love is, in general form, a structured form of male / female interaction which was infused with a poetic, heroic, romantic idealism about the virtue of both the man and the woman. The core idea of Courtly Love, as defined by Capellanus, is that the woman (or Lady) should be worshipped, ardently pursued, and intensely desired. She is to receive this attention and devotion not because of an intrinsic beauty and nobility (read: only the members of the upper class were capable of Courtly love), but because she capable of endowing the male with virtue and honor because of and through her acceptance and faith in him. The Lady, then, is to judge her suitor upon the basis of his character, his noble deeds of gentleness and courtesy, his degree of chivalry, not his incidental qualities. In this dynamic, the Lady is obligated through her social responsibility, to accept…… [Read More]

Bennetts, Melissa. "Knightly Prowess and Courtly Love Revealed." Christian Science Monitor. 25 Apr, 1996. v88. i105. pB1 (1).

Capellanus, Andreas. The Art of Courtly Love. John Jay Parry, Translator. New York: Ungar, 1959.

Koenigsberg, Richard A. "Culture and Unconscious Fantasy: Observations on Courtly Love." The Psychoanalytic Review. Spring, 1967. v54. n1. p36(14).
View Full Essay

Courtly Love

Words: 2256 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62670320

Courtly Love -- the French Ethos Embodied in the Romantic Lancelot, and the English Ethos Embodied in the Dutiful Gawain

In many ways, the courtly love narratives of medieval chivalric romance were equally as formulaic as Hollywood romances today. The typical Hollywood romance is boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl, while the typical courtly love scenario might be defined along the lines of knight pines for (married) lady, married lady pines for knight, knight does great deeds in the name of the unattainable lady, and both come to tragic ends. The French chivalric romance adopted many of the characters and conventions of the English tales of Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table, such as the thwarted love for the greatest and most loyal knight Lancelot for Arthur's queen Guinevere. But when the French chivalric genre, as exemplified Chretien de Troyes' Lancelot, "Knight of the Cart"…… [Read More]

Works Cited

De Troyes, Chretien. "The Knight of the Cart." Online Medieval and Classical library Electronic edition was edited, proofed, and prepared by Douglas B. Killings, 1996.  http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/ OMACL/Lancelot / [30 Apr 2005]

Malory, Sir Thomas. Le Morte D'Arthur: Sir Thomas Malory's Book of King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table, Volumes 1 and 2. Bartleby.com, 2001.

http://www.bartleby.com/35/2 [30 Apr 2005]
View Full Essay

Courtly Love Is Expressed in Sir Gadwain

Words: 856 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65261371

Courtly Love" is expressed in ir Gadwain and the Green Knight

How social and cultural events influenced the development of the selected theme "Courtly Love"

What makes the selected work uniquely English

The term 'courtly' love only evolved far later. Here, in ir Gawain and the Green Knight,, t he poet refers to it as 'courtesy'. It is still uncertain whether courtly love was a social construction or a literary notion that existed in many medieval romances (http://www.cliffsnotes.com/study_guide/literature/sir-gawain-and-the-green-knight/about.html). Either way, it was pervasive. The most influential and earliest book on courtly love was that written by Andreas Capellanus in the 1170s where he provides rules of love that are illustrated by a story of a knight on the way to the court of King Arthur. The knight was a man devoted to pleasing the lady. The fact that the lady was married was no impediment to the knight. He was…… [Read More]

Sources

Armitage, Simon (2007). Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: A New Verse Translation. New York: Norton. Cooke, Jessica (1998). "The Lady's 'Blushing' Ring in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." The Review of English Studies 49 (193) [HIDDEN]

Dinshaw, Carolyn. "A Kiss Is Just a Kiss: Heterosexuality and Its Consolations in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." Diacritics. Vol. 24 No. 2/3 (Summer 1994) pp. 204 -- 226
View Full Essay

Perceval the Arthurian Legends May

Words: 1628 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10472853

This includes the need to maintain chastity, a test Perceval passes when he "has a close call with sexual temptation: slipping into bed with a demon in alluringly feminine form, he is only saved when his glance falls on the red cross inscribed on his sword pommel. The 'lady' and her silk tent disappear in a flash and a puff of smoke, leaving the tell-tale sulphurous stench of hell. A distraught Perceval stabs himself through the left thigh in penance" (Kaeuper 258). Such ability to resist is the mark of a knight, though many of the stories also suggest that the knight often fails this test at some point and then has to do penance to make up for his failure.

hether the Grail derives from Christian ideas first or from Celtic images and stories, over time the idea of the Grail did become more associated with Christian symbols so…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kaeuper, Richard W. Chivalry and Violence in Medieval Europe. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Loomis, Roger Sheman. The Development of Arthurian Romance. London: Hutchinson University Library, 1963.
View Full Essay

Le Morte D'arthur the Legend

Words: 3262 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77893118

No other hero is so frequently mentioned. He is the only person so important that triads are enlarged into tetrads to fit him in. (Ashe 45)

The account that did the most to establish Arthur as a prominent historical figure was the History of the Kings of Britain written in 1135 by Geoffrey of Monmouth, a elsh monk, and the book provides a history of the earliest kings of Britain, some 99 in all, including King Coel, known to us today from the nursery rhyme as Old King Cole. About one-fifth of the book is devoted to Arthur, and Geoffrey provides the first organized version of the story. Many of the elements that would be part of the later tradition were missing, however. Arthur's court is not at Camelot but at a place called Caerlon-on-Usk, or City of Legions. Geoffrey contributed at least three new elements to the existing histories…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ashe, Geoffrey. "The Arthurian Fact." The Quest for Arthur's Britain, Geoffrey Ashe (ed.). Chicago: Academy Chicago Publishers, 1987.

Beowulf. Library of the Future CD-Rom, 4th Edition. Irvine: World Library, 1996.

Capellanus, Andreas, the Art of Courtly Love. New York: Columbia University Press, 1990.

Chaucer, Geoffrey. The Canterbury Tales. New York: Holt, 1963.
View Full Essay

Arthurian Legend and Myth --

Words: 763 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12850778

She receives the wounded king after the last battle and offers to cure him if he remains long enough." (Rise, 2001) Because Christianity had such a difficult time "assimilating a benevolent enchantress," into Camelot's structure of tales, particularly a female outside of male religious spheres of power, Morgana "becomes more and more sinister," in later tales, and also more human in her jealousies and passionate wrangling in Camelot. (Rise, 2001)

In Malory's "Morte d'Arthur" for example, Morgana gives Excalibur to her lover Accolon so he can use it against Arthur. In the anonymous but still clearly Christian poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" Morgana is presented as the instigator of the Green Knight's visit to Arthur's court, partly motivated by her desire to frighten the Queen. (Camelot Project, 2004) "Part of Christianity's failure to understand the character of Morgan was their misapplied versions of morality. They imposed a Judeo-Christian…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Mythical Realm. "Morgan le Fay." 2004. http://www.mythicalrealm.com/legends/morgan_le_fay.html[22 Mar 2004]

Morgan le Fay," Camelot Project at the University of Rochester. 2004. http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/morgmenu.htm[22 Mar 2004]

Took, Thalia. "Morgana." 2004. http://www.thaliatook.com/morgana.html[22 Mar 2004]

Rise, Brian Edward. "Morgan le Fay.' Folklore Encyclopedia.
View Full Essay

Odyssey and Arthurian Legend the

Words: 1059 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5273159

The supernatural element is also often present in the Arthurian legends, such as the appearance of the Green Knight in Sir Gawain, and it is an important part of the mystical experiences described in the legends. In a sense, the knights, just like the epic heroes, are confronted with the supernatural so as to prove their worthiness, but the difference is that the knights, such as Lancelot, Percival or King Arthur himself engage in a mystical experience rather than in a mere confrontation with their own destiny, as Ulysses does. The romance is thus more concerned with the inner qualities of the knights. Courtly love also plays a very important part in the romances, as the knights are usually devoted to God, to their king or liege and to a beautiful and virtuous lady.

The Odyssey and the Arthurian Legend

There are many similarities, as well as significant differences between…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Malory Comparison Thomas Malory's L'morte

Words: 460 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40371306

The question of how the knights may prove themselves as Christian men of might and lordly loyalty yet negotiate courtly love ethics is important to Malory, rather than the Camelot kingdom's ethics and laws as in Tennyson.

Also, the French tales adapted by Malory for his story were more fascinated and focused upon the character of the French Lancelot and Lancelot's relationship with Queen Guinevere. These were seen as embodying Christian courtly love ideals as well as being adulterous. The noble French Lancelot sacrifices all for the queen -- his sworn loyalty to his lord and king, his reputation, and even his faith in the divine in Malory. This is seen as somewhat sublime albeit foolhardy by the author Malory. But this act provokes mostly outrage and nationalist pride in Tennyson instead. Tennyson crafts poems that give greater significance to the coming of Arthur at the earlier parts of the…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

The Tattoo Experience Regrets and Memories

Words: 786 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18743258

Janes used humor to describe her "failed" tattoo as a Rorschach inkblot. This was a light-hearted, comedic way of showing how what she wanted (something delicate but strong -- like an iron-wrought fence) could turn out so wrong. Dolgoff's humor is more situational -- popping Vicodin to get through a tattooing. The humor works for both pieces, because it lightens the mood: Janes refers to herself as a "badass" in a playful but serious way and Dolgoff shows a softer, more sensitive side to getting a tattoo.

I don't think they would need to be forgiven anymore. Today, so many people have tattoos that it just seems like something that is accepted. Especially as the younger generation grows up, the tattoo taboo will recede into the past like an ancient memory. It is almost like a rite of passage today -- or an expression of creative genius, as Dolgoff notes.…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Villains in Beowulf and the Song of

Words: 646 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90024926

villains in Beowulf and the Song of Roland, I believe those in the last-mentioned work are more justified in their actions than those in Beowulf. This at least is true from the perspective of the 20th century religious paradigm. In the modern world, it is vitally important to display a tolerant attitude towards all pardigms of religion and other directions of philosophy. In Beowulf there is a direct rivalry between the villagers and the monster, Grendel. There is little doubt that Grendel is a monster and a bully, without any right to reprieve or defense. His mother is the only one prepared to defend him, and she does so to her own demise. Of course this could be understood from the perspective of the family paradigm. Nonetheless, Grendel was never justified in his slaughter of the celebrating party. His villainy is apparently inherent, and he simply enjoys terrorising people without…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Warrior Hero A Stranger in a Strange

Words: 2455 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70639141

arrior Hero: A Stranger in a Strange Land

The figure of the hero is set apart from the common herd of ordinary men by virtue of his special qualities and abilities; in some works, this separateness is literal - he is in a strange land apart from his own kin. To see how this alienation enhances the tale of the hero's conflict, The Odyssey, Beowulf and The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice will be considered.

Odysseus, Beowulf and Othello are all warrior heroes. Odysseus, in The Odyssey, has been instrumental in the victory at Troy, and now fights to return to Ithaca and bring his men safely home; more struggles await him there. Beowulf, a great fighter who has proven his mettle in many conflicts, hears about the depredations of Grendel on Heorot Hall and journeys there to rescue Hrothgar's people. His role in the conflicts against the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, Michael, trans. Beowulf, Penguin Classics. New York: Viking Penguin, 1973.

Cook, Albert, trans. Homer: The Odyssey. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1967.

Shakespeare, William. The Tragedy of Othello, The Moor of Venice, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. London: Abbey Library.
View Full Essay

Elizabethan Love Poetry Is Laden

Words: 939 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23235078

He "almost" despises himself but still seems not to think that his actions were absolutely wrong. Furthermore, the narrator of the Shakespeare Sonnet finds solace and comfort in thinking of his lover. By thinking of the one he loves, a human being, the narrator feels absolved of any wrongdoing. The narrator of the Shakespeare Sonnet is more concerned with the consequences of his actions, such as being an outcast, than with whether the action was right or wrong. For Herbert, morality is quite the opposite. Herbert suggests that the human condition is itself a state of sin.

Therefore, a central difference between secular and religious morality as expressed in Elizabethan poetry is between absolute and situational ethics. For Herbert, morality is based on a set of absolute values that God and only God can create. God is the "Just Judge" and God's judgments transcend any human laws (l 12). Moreover,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Herbert, Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke. "Psalm 51." Retrieved July 15, 2009 from  http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/psalm51.htm 

Shakespeare, William. "Sonnet 29." Retrieved July 15, 2009 from  http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sonnets/29.html
View Full Essay

Pilgrims Progress

Words: 2220 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44308154

STYLE OF RITING AND TEACHING METHODS IN PILGRIM'S PROGRESS

Teaching and preaching have always been considered cornerstones of Christian beliefs. For devout Christians, teaching others about various things of value is what their entire religion is based upon as Gospel of Matthew mentions that Jesus is believed to have instructed his disciples to "Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the orld" (Matthew 28: 19-20). Teaching has thus been considered an important part of religious beliefs and it is one responsibility that Christians must shoulder. For this prominent Christian figures with authority over the subject have also upheld the responsibility of teaching. Saint Augustine for example maintained that it was…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Augustine. On Christian Doctrine. Trans D.W. Robertson, Jr. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1958.

Batson, E. Beatrice. John Bunyan: Allegory and Imagination. London: Croom Helm, 1984.

Bunyan, John. Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners. 1666. Ed. Roger Sharrock. Oxford: Clarendon, 1962.

Bunyan, John. The Pilgrim's Progress. 1678. Ed N.H. Keeble. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1984.