Hannah Arendt Essays (Examples)

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The economy of the totalitarian state must be effectively directed with only so much control that the system can be directed effectively; it must obtain growth and combat economic problems to the best of its ability so as to ensure political, social and economic stability.

Conversely, Arendt argues that "the totalitarian dictator regards the natural and industrial riches of each country & #8230; as a source of loot and a means of preparing the next step of aggressive expansion."

Arendt thus labels the totalitarian economy as a war economy, but it is not necessary for a totalitarian leader to adopt such an economy as such economies finance expansionistic foreign policies and totalitarianism does not have to have an international focus; rather it must have a national focus. Arendt is too specific on this point and is once again directly attacking Hitler rather than discussing the realities of totalitarianism. Totalitarianism does not require….

In this respect, he fervently opposed all tendencies towards technocratic governance, which he identified both in the Communist bloc in Eastern Europe, and in the rapidly expanding welfare state of the ederal Republic under Adenauer. Technocracy, he asserted, is the objective form of the instrumental tendencies in human reason, and if it is not counterbalanced by the integrally human resources of cultural or rational communication it is likely to result in oppressive government. In this respect, he moved close to quite standard variants on political liberalism, and he endorsed limited government, relative cultural and economic freedom, and protection for society from unaccountable political direction. ourth, he also argued that a human polity requires a constitutional apparatus, enshrining basic rights, imposing moral-legal order on the operations of the state, and restricting the prerogative powers of the political apparatus. Like Kant, therefore, he advocated the institution of an international federation of….

Thus, power in the public realm is, by definition, a manifestation of the people, and it is the people who have the power to change the government's rule if they so desire.
Although Arendt's definition of the relationship between violence and power offers an explanation into how the cruelest of dictators can remain in power, her book, the Human Condition, Arendt also makes a case for the importance of speech in securing that public power that will allow rule in the public realm. To make this argument, Arendt begins by summarizing Aristotle, who stated that just two facets were "necessary and present in human communities" -- speech and action. Arendt suggests that from these necessary facets arose the "realm of human affairs" (25). Furthermore, Arendt describes the importance of speech in the early Greek democracy, in which words were considered a precursor to and more important than thought (25). In….

First, the mass public is greatly influenced by a monopolistic media while the importance of separate discussion circles is diminished proportionately with the increase of media. Second, the process of forming opinion is hold and spread from a center, making media markets "huge and centralized" (idem). Third, opinion is determined by unnatural causes due to manipulation of the public who is passively receiving information and not invited to discussion. Fourth, that only in the case of authoritarian forms of government, decision making is enforced by the power of fear and violence. (idem) Mills briefly describes a survey destined to gather data from people in the American Midwest, in a small city in Illinois. The questions of the survey, conducted twice at an interval of two months, shed some light into the way people change their mind. Mass media is responsible for a big part of people's opinions, but "person-to-person….

Part 1: Analytical SummaryIn \\\"The Origins of Totalitarianism,\\\" Hannah Arendt examines the rise of totalitarianism in the 20th century and the various factors that contributed to its emergence. In Chapters 10 and 11, Arendt discusses the concept of a \\\"classless society\\\" and the role of the \\\"totalitarian movement\\\" in the rise of totalitarianism.In Chapter 10, \\\"A Classless Society,\\\" Arendt argues that the emergence of a classless society was a crucial factor in the rise of totalitarianism. She notes that traditional social hierarchies and class structures were disrupted by the forces of industrialization, urbanization, and modernization, leading to the erosion of traditional values and the emergence of new forms of social and political organization. Arendt contends that in a classless society, individuals are more likely to feel disconnected from their social and political communities, leading to a sense of alienation and powerlessness. This sense of alienation can make individuals vulnerable to….

Likewise, the heroes are those who took actions to prevent the amassing of victims. Clearly, the individual Nazis do not fit into this category. (Arendt, 2006: p. 74).
Thus, Arendt leaves the question as to whether the individual Nazis were bystanders or murderers. To be a bystander, Arendt argues that the Nazi soldiers would have to be completely free of any act that perpetuated the actions. However, because the Nazis made numerous choices, from joining the party, from giving up their individuality and morals, and for following the theory of the final solution, it would seem that one would conclude that they are not innocent bystanders, as would be community members who did nothing in the face of their neighbors being taken away to their deaths. (Arendt, 2006: p. 57).

ased on this thinking, one would think that Arendt would conclude that all Nazis were guilty of crimes against humanity due….

Vogt, Ellison and Arendt
The idea of a utopian society, a perfect Eden, has been a recurring theme in human literature, philosophy, religion, and commentary almost from the beginning of civilization. This recurrent theme is no accident: most cultures have, as a basis for their creation mythos, a utopian view of either the pre-human world or the post-human world. Sociological, this is a functionalist approach that serves to "validate, support, and imprint the norms of a give, specific moral order" and to authorize its moral code "as a construct beyond criticism and human emendation" (Campbell and Fairchild 221).

In opposition, a dystopia, becomes part of the anti-heroic paradigm in that all the benefits of an overall utopian society are almost backwards. hat was good, now seems evil, what was light, dark. Political philosopher Hannah Arendt, in Ideology and Terror: A New Form of Government, sees one of the maxims of the 20th….

Language
Power and Language

The concept of power has been examined closely by many philosophers throughout human history. These philosophers have different ideas of what power is, but they all, in some way, believe that the concept of language is central to power. In On Violence, Hannah Arendt quotes several such definitions. She says that power may be "making others act as I choose," "to command and be obeyed," or "the instinct of domination" (36-7). All of these definitions have some basis in the reality of the concept, but the two philosophers who will be the focus of this essay, Arendt and Nietzsche, disagree with this basic premise and attempt to quantify power in different terms. They also make the case of the centrality of language to power. In other words, that there is a language to power, and the creation of power, that needs to be understood before the concept itself….

Lovely Hannah
PAGES 2 WORDS 616

Language, Liteay and Cultual Studies
The piece of witing eviewed in this document is the initial paagaph in Hannah Aendt's essay entitled "Lying in Politics: Reflections on the Pentagon Papes." This paagaph is typically tenchant, as vitually all of Aendt's wok is. Howeve, one can undestand the incisiveness of this paagaph by evaluating its stuctues and the liteay conventions the autho employs thoughout it. Doing so eveals that this paagaph pimaily functions as an intoductoy paagaph to an essay about the commonality of lying in politics.

The basic stuctue of this paagaph is fom boad to naow. Fo the most pat, the final sentence of the paagaph functions as the thesis of the entie document: essentially that the Pentagon Papes -- which was a govenment odeed manuscipt about the eality of the Vietnam Wa and the delibeate deceptions that wee used on the public to manipulate its conception of this matial….

Arendt\\\'s Understanding of Education in Dark Times: An Exploration of her Perception on Black AmericansAbstractThis paper examines Hannah Arendt\\\'s conception of education during periods of societal crisis, with a particular focus on her simplistic perspective of the experience of Black Americans during the Little ock Crisis. It is in her article on that crisis that her sense of education in dark time appears to expose some of the limitations of her viewpoint. This paper analyzes Arendts view on that crisis and what her overall idea of education in dark times means as well as how it can be deepened. In doing so, this paper juxtaposes her thoughts on the role of education during \\\"dark times\\\" with the Black American experience, through the eyes of people like alph Ellison. Arendt\\\'s philosophy on totalitarianism, the human condition, and crisis in education provides a foundation for the analysis, but so too does the….

Human Condition
hat Caught My Attention

Hannah Arendt is a German philosopher who has refused to call herself a philosopher, but her work has been praised as being influential and brilliant (though controversial) in its originality and in its bold departure from what other philosophers have written about the human condition. hat I found most compelling, and even appalling, is the way in which Arendt differentiates between "labor" and "work"; those are words that are most often used interchangeably but for Arendt, they are worlds apart in their true meaning.

ork vs. Labor -- a rather radical position by Arendt

In The Human Condition Arendt describes work and labor as two vitally different things. The laborer of today is similar to the slaves of ancient Greece, she explains. In fact those individuals whose whole lives totally revolve around labor (perhaps an example would be the farm laborers who toil in fields all day)….

Politics During Holocaust
PAGES 6 WORDS 1868

Holocaust Politics
Totalitarianism's Controversial Notions

The human social animal's capacity for collective tyranny and violence in Hannah Arendt's seminal work

Since the publication of her 1951 work on The Origins of Totalitarianism, Hannah Arendt has received much criticism as a philosopher and an historian for her theory of the human, historical development of notions of society or what Arendt terms 'the social.' From the social organizations of the salon, which were loose and diffuse, and based on ideological alliances, human beings evolved in their organization, she suggests, to alliances upon material interests in the forms of classes. But the nationalist and imperialist movements of the 19th century perverted these previous mental and material social alliances in history, to create the manifestation of 'the masses' that enabled totalitarianism to take hold in Germany, Russia, and other areas of the world.

Critical to Arendt's conception of totalitarianism is her notion of the political phenomenon as a….

Role of Memory in Shaping Morality
Oscar Wilde once wrote that, "The man with a clear conscience probably has a poor memory." The role of memory and remembering in shaping moral decisions is a concept that is central to sections of Hannah Arendt's Responsibility and Judgment and Friedrich Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals as both texts wrestle with how one knows that an action is morally wrong. It is a question that goes back to the earliest days of philosophical inquiry under Socrates: Does the understanding of morality come inherently from something within man or is it merely inculcated by society and thereby remembered. Drawing from her own experiences as a German Jewish refugee and after World War II as a reported at the Nuremberg Trials, Arendt argues that morality must exist beyond the scale of the individual as there is too much variability within humanity's perspective on moral….


Of the six conflicts (within the fifty mentioned) that resulted in 200,000 or more deaths, three were between Muslims and non-Muslims, two were between Muslim cultures, and just one involved non-Muslims on both sides. The author references a New York Times investigative piece in which fifty-nine ethnic conflicts were reported in forty-eight locations in 1993. In "half these places Muslims were clashing with other Muslims or with non-Muslims"; in thirty-nine of the conflicts groups from different civilizations were engaged, and two-thirds of those were between "Muslims and others" (Huntington, 257).

Keeping in mind this book was published in 1996 -- and updated data employing Huntington's Muslim-violence theme is not immediately available -- it is worthy of note that of the twenty-nine wars (that involved 1,000 or more deaths in a year's time) in 1992, twelve were intercivilizational, and of those dozen, nine were between Muslims and non-Muslims (257). Huntington raised a….

Strauss and Nature
Strauss is contending that the "self-evident" natural rights of man are no more apparent because of a creeping relativism in thought and an increasing dependence on legalism. Thus, "the legislators and the courts" decide what is "right" and what is not. In a sense, the lament of Strauss for the loss of common sense, especially regarding what is naturally good and lawful is appreciable. It is just. On the other hand, it could be argued that the "natural right" that Jefferson believed in was not as "self-evident" as imagined but rather more imaginary than "self-evident." Strauss asserts that this line of argumentation is the result of the subjectivist attitude and perspective of modern philosophy. hile subjectivism is a deadly form of philosophy and kills all sense of truth, as Plato shows in Euthyphro, it is the natural consequence of what Strauss identifies in his last sentence of this….

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8 Pages
Essay

Government

Hannah Arendt Jews and Politics

Words: 3522
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Essay

The economy of the totalitarian state must be effectively directed with only so much control that the system can be directed effectively; it must obtain growth and combat economic…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

Government

Hannah Arendt and Karl Jaspers

Words: 2765
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

In this respect, he fervently opposed all tendencies towards technocratic governance, which he identified both in the Communist bloc in Eastern Europe, and in the rapidly expanding welfare…

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2 Pages
Essay

Government

Hannah Arendt on Violence Speech

Words: 651
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Thus, power in the public realm is, by definition, a manifestation of the people, and it is the people who have the power to change the government's rule…

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2 Pages
Essay

Government

Hannah Arendt Presents the Converging

Words: 594
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

First, the mass public is greatly influenced by a monopolistic media while the importance of separate discussion circles is diminished proportionately with the increase of media. Second, the…

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3 Pages
Essay

History

Arendt on the Rise of the Reich

Words: 949
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Part 1: Analytical SummaryIn \\\"The Origins of Totalitarianism,\\\" Hannah Arendt examines the rise of totalitarianism in the 20th century and the various factors that contributed to its emergence. In…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Drama - World

Eichman and the Holocaust Hannah

Words: 766
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Likewise, the heroes are those who took actions to prevent the amassing of victims. Clearly, the individual Nazis do not fit into this category. (Arendt, 2006: p. 74). Thus,…

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2 Pages
Essay

Government

Vogt Ellison and Arendt the Idea of

Words: 680
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Vogt, Ellison and Arendt The idea of a utopian society, a perfect Eden, has been a recurring theme in human literature, philosophy, religion, and commentary almost from the beginning of…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Black Studies - Philosophy

Power and Language Arendt and Nietzsche

Words: 917
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Language Power and Language The concept of power has been examined closely by many philosophers throughout human history. These philosophers have different ideas of what power is, but they all, in…

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2 Pages
Essay

Black Studies - Philosophy

Lovely Hannah

Words: 616
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Language, Liteay and Cultual Studies The piece of witing eviewed in this document is the initial paagaph in Hannah Aendt's essay entitled "Lying in Politics: Reflections on the Pentagon…

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11 Pages
Research Paper

Race / Racism

Intersectionality of Race and Education in America

Words: 3357
Length: 11 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Arendt\\\'s Understanding of Education in Dark Times: An Exploration of her Perception on Black AmericansAbstractThis paper examines Hannah Arendt\\\'s conception of education during periods of societal crisis, with a…

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2 Pages
Book Review

Biology

Why Is Work Different From Labor

Words: 728
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Book Review

Human Condition hat Caught My Attention Hannah Arendt is a German philosopher who has refused to call herself a philosopher, but her work has been praised as being influential and…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

Government

Politics During Holocaust

Words: 1868
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Holocaust Politics Totalitarianism's Controversial Notions The human social animal's capacity for collective tyranny and violence in Hannah Arendt's seminal work Since the publication of her 1951 work on The Origins of Totalitarianism,…

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2 Pages
Thesis

Business - Ethics

Role of Memory in Shaping Morality Oscar

Words: 627
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Thesis

Role of Memory in Shaping Morality Oscar Wilde once wrote that, "The man with a clear conscience probably has a poor memory." The role of memory and remembering in…

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10 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

Strategic Security in the Middle

Words: 3247
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Of the six conflicts (within the fifty mentioned) that resulted in 200,000 or more deaths, three were between Muslims and non-Muslims, two were between Muslim cultures, and just one…

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10 Pages
Term Paper

Black Studies - Philosophy

Natural Right and History Leo Strauss

Words: 3274
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Strauss and Nature Strauss is contending that the "self-evident" natural rights of man are no more apparent because of a creeping relativism in thought and an increasing dependence on legalism.…

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