Healing Hospital Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Hospital Readmissions in Any Profession Today Quality

Words: 2147 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85028575

Hospital eadmissions

In any profession today, quality control means the prevention of problems that were the aim of the business to solve in the first places. ecurrence of these problems means that the business has not been functioning optimally and a new strategy or focus is required. In the health care setting, such a challenges is presented by hospital readmissions. When a person is discharged from hospital after receiving treatment for a certain condition, this means that the aim to persuade the patient with a remedy for the condition was reached. eadmission for the condition at some future date means that the remedy was not sufficient and a different strategy needs to be followed. There are several focus points when considering the readmission of patients to hospital and how this can be prevented. Upon final analysis, it is indeed possible to prevent this and the health care professional has an…… [Read More]

References

Daly, B.J., Douglas, S.L., Kelley, C.G., O'Toole, E., and Montenegro, H. (2005). Trail of a Disease Management Program to Reduce Hospital Readmissions of the Chronically Critically Ill. CHEST, Vol 128, No. 2. Retrieved from: http://journal.publications.chestnet.org/article.aspx?articleid=1083596&issueno=2

Fiegl, C. (2012, Aug 27). 2,200 hospitals face Medicare pay penalty for readmissions. Retrieved from: http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2012/08/27/gvsb0827.htm

Gleckman, H. (2012, Sep. 12). How Nursing Homes Can Cut Hospital Readmissions. Forbes. Retrieved from: http://www.forbes.com/sites/howardgleckman/2012/09/12/how-nursing-homes-can-cut-hospital-readmissions/

Gonseth, J., Catillon-Guallar, P., Banegas, J.R., Rodriguez-Artalejo, F. (2004, Aug.). The effectiveness of disease management programmes in reducing hospital re-admission in older patients with heart failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published reports. The European Society of Cardiology. Retrieved from: http://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/content/25/18/1570.full.pdf
View Full Essay

Spirituality and the Healing Environment in Hospitals

Words: 1149 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67963991

Healing Hospital and the Importance of Spirituality

Chapman (2003) defines a Healing Hospital as being about "loving service to others" (p.4). This paper examines the concept of the Healing Hospital and the role that spiritually plays in that model.

Numerous theorists have argued that advances in technology, pressure on budgets, and drives for efficiency over the last few decades have shifted the focus of attention from general care giving to technological and pharmacological interventions, with the need to extend life and fix broken parts (Puchalski, 2001; Treloar, 2000). However, there has also been increased realisation, back by significant research, that better outcomes are achieved when the patient is treated in a holistic manner (Baboni, Puchalski, & Peteet, 2014; Puchalski & Mcskimming, 2006).

The Healing Hospital is based on the premise of treating the whole person, rather than just the illness (Chapman, 2003). This includes all physical needs, as well as…… [Read More]

References

Baboni, M. J., Puchalski, C. M., & Peteet, J. R. (2014). The Relationship between Medicine, Spirituality and Religion: Three Models for Integration. Journal of Religion and Health, 53(5), 1586 -- 1598. Retrieved from  https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Balboni/publication/263055322_The_Relationship_between_Medicine_Spirituality_and_Religion_Three_Models_for_Integration/links/57039a6408aeade57a259720.pdf 

Chapman, E. (2003). Radical Loving Care: Building the Healing Hospital in America. Nashville, TN: Baptist Healing Hospital Trust.

Diaz-Gilbert, M. (2014). Spirituality, Suffering, Meaning, Resiliency, and Healing: Research Findings and a Patient's Story of Overcoming a Medical Challenge. International Journal for Human Caring, 18(4), 45 -- 51.

Johnson, B. H., Abraham, M. R., & Parrish, R. N. (2004). Designing the neonatal intensive care unit for optimal family involvement. Clinics in Perinatology, 31(2), 353 -- 382.
View Full Essay

Creating a Healing Environment

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12606994

Healing Hospital

Consider how the paradigm of a healing hospital might influence your philosophy of caregiving.

Describe the components of a healing hospital and their relationship to spirituality.

What are the challenges of creating a healing environment in light of the barriers and complexities of the hospital environment?

Include biblical aspects that support the concept of a healing hospital.

According to Eberst (2008), one of the primary components of a healing environment is the environment in which the patient receives care; she states "We have learned that proving a loving and compassionate environment that is aesthetically pleasing promotes healing" (Eberst, 2008). It is not only the aesthetics that are important, rather the environment must be looked at from the patient's perspective to see what types of things may prevent a patient the rest and relaxation that they need during a recovery phase. For example, one of the best examples of…… [Read More]

References

Dunn, L. (2010). Creating Healing Environments: A Challenge for Nursing. Online Journal of Rural Nursing and Health Care, 3-4.

Eberst, L. (2008). Arizona Medical Center Shows How to Be a "Healing Hospital." Health Progress, 77-80.
View Full Essay

Healing With Statistics There Are Numerous Ways

Words: 795 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13252148

Healing with Statistics

There are numerous ways in which statistics are used in a standard healthcare organization. Statistical measurements and analyses are used to track patient costs and hospital/healthcare organization expenses, to determine appropriate medication levels, to assign work staff and maintain proper human resource levels, and for a wide variety of other applications and areas of concern. In many ways, the quality and the cost-effectiveness of care provided by a typical healthcare organization is directly related to the quality of the statistical data the organization collects and assesses. Without such statistical analysis and manipulation, direct healthcare providers as well as administrators within the healthcare organizations would be left with little more than anecdotal evidence and subjective perceptions and judgments when it came to making decisions for patient health and/or organizational fitness, thus the importance of statistics in such organizations is difficult to overstate.

The most basic level of analysis…… [Read More]

References

Hill, J. (2012). introduction to descriptive statistics. Accessed 19 February 2012. http://mste.illinois.edu/hill/dstat/dstat.html

Lund. (2010). Descriptive and inferential statistics. Accessed 19 February 2012. http://statistics.laerd.com/statistical-guides/descriptive-inferential-statistics.php

Trochim, W. (2006). Levels of measurement. Accessed 19 February 2012.  http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/measlevl.php
View Full Essay

Hospital Community Group With High Incidence of

Words: 3039 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66050551

hospital community group with high incidence of diabetes and low literacy presents to the teaching efforts of a hospital nurse.

Description of the selected adult learner, learning topic and related hospital circumstances

I am a registered clinical nurse in St. Vincent's hospital. We are a medium-sized hospital located in a highly diverse part of the town. We have a sizeable domestic and Spanish inpatient population with diabetes, including people with long-standing diabetes related complications and co-morbidities requiring inpatient expertise. Today, that population seems to be increasing. Almost 80% of all our adult patients lack literacy referring to the ability to read and write as well as knowledge about the topic of diabetes literacy. It is not only the printed word that challenges these patients with inadequate literacy; writing, speaking, listening numeracy, and conceptual knowledge is often impaired as well. About 2/3 of these illiterate patients are Latinos and the majority…… [Read More]

References

Davis, E. (2000). A quality improvement project in diabetes patient education during hospitalization. 1-6. Diabetes Spectrum Volume 13 Number 4, 2000,-Page 234.

Accessed 3 October 2011.

journal.diabetes.org/diabetesspectrum/00v13n4/page228.aspCached - Similar

You +1'd this publicly. Undo Heisler, M. & Bouknight, R.R. & Hayward, R.A. & Smith, D.M. & Kerr, E.R. (2002). The relative importance of physician communication, participatory decision making and patient understanding in diabetes self-management. 242-252.
View Full Essay

Healing Wounds Case Study

Words: 6082 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87019295

MS Case Study Nurse Practice

When patients enter hospitals it is oftentimes they become more ill and sicker due to inappropriate care and professional ignorance. This is due mainly to the amount of hubris involved within the medical profession and a tendency to ignore empirical evidence as practiced to success. This approach underlines the most important aspects of healing and the medical profession itself.

The argument for continued improvement in the treatment of patients is best exemplified in the case of MS. His ill health has led to more problems and the approach by the nurse practitioner and her staff is critical to the ultimate survival of this young child who innocently trusted the advice of both his parents or caretakers that the medical staff would be able to treat him with the care and respect that every patient deserves when being encountered during a medical treatment or hospital stay.…… [Read More]

References

Arnold, M., & Barbul, A. (2006). Nutrition and wound healing. Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 117(7S), 42S-58S.

Bennett, G., Dealey, C., & Posnett, J. (2004). The cost of pressure ulcers in the UK. Age and ageing, 33(3), 230-235.

Campbell, N.C., Murray, E., Darbyshire, J., Emery, J., Farmer, A., Griffiths, F., ... & Kinmonth, A.L. (2007). Designing and evaluating complex interventions to improve health care. BMJ: British Medical Journal, 334(7591), 455.

Corbett, L.Q. (2012). Wound care nursing: professional issues and opportunities. Advances in Wound Care, 1(5), 189-193.
View Full Essay

Hospital Overhaul

Words: 2193 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51263825

communication and best practices or standards are very simple yet when not addressed may cause complex problems that require serious modification. Quality improvement within certain aspects of the medical professional landscape may be extremely beneficial to the solving of these problems.

This Quality Improvement Plan is based upon the problems experienced at Samaritan Hospital, located in Watertown, NY. This environment has been targeted because a lack of effective patient transfer from one department to another. The documentation process has been identified as problematic and in order to adjust to this problem a quality improvement effort is applied to this situation.

This plan describes in detail the many facets of this process into a real world situation. The goals and objectives of this plan are to significantly increase patient quality through better communication at the transfer patient level within this hospital. This plan details how the gathering of information and data…… [Read More]

References

Burns, N., & Grove, S.K. (2011). Understanding nursing research (5th ed). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders

Eichner, J.S., & Das, M. (2010). Challenges and barriers to clinical decision support (CDS)

design and implementation experienced in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality CDS demonstrations. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Finkelstein, R. (2010, April 10). Get Everything In Your Day Done Efficiently with POSEC Time Management . Retrieved from Go Articles: http://goarticles.com/article/Get-Everything-In-Your-Day-Done-Efficiently-with-POSEC-Time-Management/1531249/
View Full Essay

Hospital Work on Most Frequent Complaint Noise

Words: 608 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36791665

Noise eduction

Medical care institutions have come up with various strategies to reduce noise generated within their facilities. However, this has remained quiet a challenge. The situation has never been rosier even in the private rooms within such facilities. Matters have worsened bearing in mind that hospitals have become increasingly open with more liberal visiting hours and policies that permit cell phones and other devices (Cmiel, Karr, Gasser, Oliphant & Neveau, 2004). The war is not yet lost because some medical facilities have come up with ways of reducing noise like reducing the frequency and intensity of medical alarms, dimming lights in the evening, and replacing nurses' pagers and walkie-talkies with mobile headsets. Walkie-talkies and pagers make all manner of noises during a typical night in a hospital bed. Patients are also being provided with Quiet Kits (Landro, 2013). The use of information technology is really taking the war against…… [Read More]

References List

Cmiel, C.A., Karr, D.M., Gasser, D.M., Oliphant, L.M., Neveau, A.J. (2004). Noise Control: A

Nursing Team's Approach to Sleep Promotion. American Journal of Nursing, 104(2), 40

48.

Landro, L. (2013). Hospitals Work on the Most Frequent Complaint: Noise. Retrieved August
View Full Essay

Evolution of Hospitals From 18th Century to Present Era

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3516974

History Of Hospitals

The combined arts and sciences responsible for how society cares for its sick and ill has transformed much throughout recorded history. The greatest and most dramatic changes occurred alongside other historic eras that complimented the changes seen in medicine and health care. The purpose of this essay is to examine the metamorphosis of hospitals from the 18th century until today. In this examination I will focus on the extent of these changes being forced by the ideas of professionalism, medical therapy or technology and the overall character of the changes and how they related to greater historic transformations.

Modern medicine was ushered in with modern times, and revolutionary society changes complemented those which occurred within medicine and health management. The 18th century in historic Europe was ripe with ideas of liberty and freedom, contrasting the previous century's of closed and restricted ideas. The Power Point Slide Presentation…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brunton, D (2004). "The Emergence of a Modern Profession?" In Medicine Transformed. Health, Disease and Society in Europe 1800-1930 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2004), pp. 119-150.

Marland, H. (2004).The Changing Role of the Hospital, 1800-1900, in Medicine Transformed. Health, Disease and Society in Europe 1800-1930 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2004), pp. 31-60.

"Modern Medicine." Power Point Presentation.

" The New Hospital." Power Point Presentation.
View Full Essay

Nurse-Manager for a Hospital Floor and Focuses

Words: 2455 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46695608

nurse-manager for a hospital floor and focuses on a proposed change to that floor: the addition of a certified wound care nurse. It begins by describing the benefits of a specialized wound care nurse, the existing conditions on the hospital floor, and how each of the stakeholders would be impacted by such a change. It utilizes Lippitt's phases of change theory to describe how those changes would be implemented on the floor, outlining each of the phases in implementing such a change.

Wound care nurses play a special role in the hospital environment, and hospitals without those specialized nurses may not be able to offer the level of care as hospitals that have these specialized professionals. "Wound care nurses, sometimes referred to as wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) nurses, specialize in wound management, the monitoring and treatment of wounds due to injury, disease or medical treatments. Their work promotes the…… [Read More]

References

Kritsonis, A. (2004-2005). Comparison of change theories. International Journal of Scholarly

Academic Intellectual Diversity, 8(1), 1-7.

McIsaac, C. (2007). Outcome measurement and EB wound care practice in home care:

Translating evidence into action: Evidence-based practice, education, and knowledge transfer. Retrieved January 16, 2012 from Medscape website: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/569492_2
View Full Essay

Importance of Spirituality and Caregiving

Words: 889 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87055293

Healing Hospital: The Importance of Spirituality and Caregiving in Healthcare

THE HEALING HOSPITAL

Describe the components of a healing hospital and their relationship to spirituality

Many healing experts believe that the foundation of a healing hospital is basically love and not about the vain reason of money that appears to be the force behind modern western hospitals and even clinics. To make a bigger point, even corporations that are nonprofit need some kind of financial in order flow to maintain the basics such as supplies and phones that are around. On the other hand, the concept of a focus for profit conflicts with healing and wellness. The idea of wellness and love as the support of the said hospital fluctuates in that the patient turn out to be the emphasis for healing instead of the substance for some kind of a money flow. Spirituality appears to be major characteristic of…… [Read More]

References

Akchurin, W.K. (2015, June 27). The Ethics of Gender Selection. Retrieved from http://www.ethicpublishing.com/ethical/3CH2.pdf

Becker, F.B. (2012). Ambulatory Facility Design and Patients' Perceptions of Healthcare Quality. Healthcare Environments Research & Design Journal, 1(4), 35-54.

Douglas, C.H. (2011). "Patient-friendly Hospital Environments: Exploring the Patient's Perspective. Health Expectations, 23-45.
View Full Essay

Quality of Life Among Tawau Hospital Sufering

Words: 8383 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85112392

Quality of Life Among Tawau Hospital Sufering From

Knee Osteoarthritis With Physiotherapy

Qualitative study of How Quality of Life of Tawau Hospital Staff

Suffering from Knee Osteoarthritis have been improved at Physiotherapy Unit.

To investigate how the Quality of Life among Tawau Hospital staff suffering from Osteoarthritis (knees) have been improved using Physiotherapy intervention.

The study employs qualitative techniques to collect data. The sample population is selected from people and Tawau Hospital staff visiting the physiotherapy unit. Approximately 100 sample valid questionnaires are collected and the data collected are used for the research findings. The study evaluates the extent the physiotherapy intervention has been able to improve the quality of life of participants. The physiotherapy intervention include physical exercise, and massage. The study measures the outcome of physiotherapy intervention using VAS (visual analogue scale). The reduction of pain has been used to measure the improvement of quality of life index…… [Read More]

References

Aoki, Y. Sugiura, S. Nakagawa, K et al. (2012).Evaluation of Nonspecific Low Back Pain Using a New Detailed Visual Analogue Scale for Patients in Motion, Standing, and Sitting: Characterizing Nonspecific Low Back Pain in Elderly Patients. Pain Research and Treatment.

Baba, D. Indah, D.D.D. Rasdan, I.A. (2010). Work Posture and Back Pain Evaluation in a Malaysian Food Manufacturing Company. American Journal of Applied Sciences 7 (4):, 473-479.

Breedveld, F.C. (2004). Osteoarthritis -- the Impact of a Serious Disease. Rheumatology. 43(Suppl. 1):i4 -- i8

Brigham and Women's Hospital (2009). Standard of Care: _Osteoarthritis of the Knee. Department of Rehabilitation Services.UK.
View Full Essay

Parkland Hospital A Dallas Icon the History

Words: 3857 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25491878

Parkland Hospital: A Dallas Icon

The history of the City of Dallas would hardly be complete without consideration of Parkland Hospital and its contributions to the Dallas community. Parkland Hospital began in the Civil ar Reconstruction era and has always maintained operations that were state of the art for the time. Parkland hospital has always aligned itself research and the academic community and it is for this reason that Parkland has always offered the latest in techniques and technology. Parkland Hospital has a long tradition of caring for the poor and those who cannot otherwise care for themselves. The following research will highlight the major accomplishments of the hospital from its primitive beginnings to its present position as a leader in patient care and technology Seven years after the end of the Civil ar; Dallas became a thriving city. In 1885 the Dallas Morning News began publication, at that time…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abraham, Laurie. Dramatic Differences: Dallas Public Hospital: A Lesson for County? Chicago

Reporter. May 5, 1990. http://www.chicagoreporter.com/1990/05-90/0590%20Dramatic%20Differences.htm Accessed February, 2003.

Conger, Darrell. Southwestern Department of Opthamology History. Department of Opthamology. March 20, 2001. http://www.swmed.edu/ophth/history.htm. Accessed February, 2003.

Dallas Nephrology Associates. History of DNA. Online. http://www.dneph.com/about/history.html Accessed February 2003.
View Full Essay

Cultural care of an Aboriginal patient in an Australian hospital

Words: 1901 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53146497

Australia, indigenous people recognize themselves as belonging to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander or by descent, and also identified as the same by the society. A resistance has been observed in them to access hospitals for healthcare. Therefore, healthcare professionals need to plan, implement and maintain appropriate policies for their treatment. Also, cross-cultural awareness training should be given to paediatric hospital staff. (Munns & Shields, 2013, p. 22)

How would you support ianna and her family in this situation?

The poor health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is well documented, and has been the subject of official policy and program attention for many years. The mainstream health system has responded to increased funding and clear portfolio responsibility, with increasing attention to the burden of illness that Aboriginal people experience and the need for effective health care (Dwyer et al., 2014). I would thus make arrangement for proper…… [Read More]

References

Ansuya. (2012). Transcultural Nursing: Cultural Competence in Nurses. International Journal of Nursing Education, Volume 4(1), pp. 5-7.

Durey, A, Wynaden, D, Thompson, SC, Davidson, PM, Bessarab, D & Katzenellenbogen, JM. (2012). Owning Solutions: A Collaborative Model to Improve Quality in Hospital Care for Aboriginal Australians. Nursing Inquiry, Volume 19(2), pp. 144-152.

Dwyer, J, Willis, E & Kelly, J. (2014). Hospitals Caring for Rural Aboriginal Patients: Holding Response and Denial. Australian Health Review, Volume 38(5), pp. 546-551.

Kelly, J & Willis, E. (2014). Travelling to the City for Hospital Care: Access Factors in Country Aboriginal Patient Journeys. Australian Journal of Rural Health, Volume 22(3), pp. 109-113.
View Full Essay

Appreciating Diversity in a Hospital Setting

Words: 1295 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62709592

Cultural Diversity

Healthcare providers deal with people and family during stressful and difficult situations. Professionals delivering palliative care must understand how culture and religious background affect this interaction. The provision of a favorable healing environment is possible via the understanding of culture and religion.

How cultural diversity affects the quality of services and health outcomes

egardless of the similarities, fundamental variations among people arise from nationality, culture, ethnicity, as well as from personal experience and family background. These variations affect the health behaviors and beliefs of both providers and patients have of each other. The provision of high-quality palliative care that is accessible, effective, affordable and requires medical care practitioners to exhibit an in-depth understanding of the socio-cultural backgrounds of a patient, their families, and the environments in which they live. Culturally competent palliative care facilitates clinical experiences with more favorable outcomes, support the possibility for an extremely rewarding patient…… [Read More]

References

Andrews, M.M., & Boyle, J.S. (2008). Transcultural concepts in nursing care. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Coward, H.G., & Ratanakul, P. (2009). A cross-cultural dialogue on health care ethics. Waterloo, Ont: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Daniels, R. (2014). Nursing fundamentals: Caring & clinical decision-making. Australia: Delmar Learning.

Srivastava, R. (2007). The healthcare professional's guide to clinical cultural competence. Toronto: Mosby Elsevier.
View Full Essay

Pour Faith Community Hospital Has

Words: 2033 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 192043

This section lists my express recommendations and my reasons for presenting them.

First, Faith Community Hospital should cut its fixed costs by 10% by next year, at which point we will reassess our financial situation. The main way to cut costs at Faith Community Hospital will be through working more closely with our partners. Not only will working with our partners in the community improve our reputation and public relations, our teamwork will allow us to share equipment costs and services. Several organizations in the community share "the same vision and values" in offering optimal patient care. Therefore, we can trust our partners to assume their responsibilities, whether they include testing or care services. Specialists such as a hospice, burn center, addiction and recovery center, and midwifery services can all cooperate with Faith Community Hospital to prove a true "continuum of services." In fact, we might find that increasing our…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Hospitalization of Older People Hospitals

Words: 835 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38946284

.. we have goggles that mimic sight deficits. We use ear plugs, and ways to mimic the tactile changes elderly patients go through. We'll immobilize people, to show what it would be like if they had a stroke, and then ask them to do tasks. It makes them more sensitive to seniors' needs."

In Great ritain, nursing care follows a holistic approach to guiding the aging patient through the hospital stay and into 'step down', cottage hospitals, and community recovery centers. Through an empathetic and geriatric skill set, the geriatric nurse can thereby decrease her ultimate workload while maintaining a higher quality of life for the hospitalized patient.

Summary

Aging is no respecter of persons, countries, or races.

We all age. As a graying generation of millions of 'baby boomers' approach the golden years, medical care must shift much of its focus to the particular needs of this group.

Unlike…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"1999-2008, a 10-year Action Plan for Services for Older Persons," (1998), Eastern Health Board.

Bernard, M. & Phillips, J. (2000), "The Challenge of Ageing in Tomorrow's Britain," Ageing and Society, vol. 20, pp.33-54.

Dickinson E. (1996). "Long-term care of older people," BMJ, vol 312, no. 7035, pp.862-863.

"Fact Files - Ageing in Ireland, National Council on Ageing and Older People," (1997).
View Full Essay

Boston Children's Hospital Ranked 1 Facility for

Words: 311 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2283519

Boston Children's Hospital

anked #1 Facility for Children (U.S. News and World eport)

Why? Community Focus

Values: Excellence, Leadership, Sensitivity, Community

Challenge 1: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Challenge 2: Demand for more beds, more staff

Core Challenge: Meeting increased patient needs in restrictive financial climate

Challenges

Why is Boston Children's Hospital ranked #1?

What can Boston Children's Hospital do to continue its reputation for quality of care?

What are the most serious challenges facing Boston Children's Hospital at this time?

What are the best solutions to these challenges?

Discussion outline/Question set

Examine carefully the provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Examine carefully State and Federal law and policy

Interviews with patients, staff at Boston Children's Hospital

Tips for esolving the Case

ole of strategic partnerships, alliances with education and community organizations

"Children are not small adults" (Sandi Fenwick, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Therapeutic Touch Healing Comforting Hands

Words: 2455 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89316083

Physically, massage or TT eases muscle tension and improves circulation. In turn, it improves digestion and breathing, enhances mental clarity, and encourages better sleep. TT is particularly useful to terminally ill patients in reducing or mitigating pain to the extent of making prescription painkillers unnecessary. Emotionally, TT or massage is a gentle and compassionate experience for the dying. It reduces the sense of isolation by providing him or her with physical connectedness. It can also re-establish dwindling or lost self-esteem and self-acceptance on account of disease. As a result, it contributes to increased quality of life and a much-needed release of emotions. Medicare as yet does not cover massage therapy for hospice settings but an increasing number of group have been lobbying for its inclusion.

Useful Alternatives to Pain and Discomfort Management

These alternatives have shown to be effective in easing spiritual, emotional and psychological pain that contribute to the…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Aghabati, N et al. (2010). The effect of therapeutic touch on pain and fatigue of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Evidence-based Complementary Alternative

Medicine: PubMed. Retrieved on June 16, 2011 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2887328

Catlin, A. (2009). Hospice massage: easing the pain of a life-limiting illness (Part 1).

vol 9 # 3, Massage Today: MPA Media Publications. Retrieved on June 19, 2011
View Full Essay

Traditional Methods of Healing

Words: 2078 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17732385

Nursing Process to Deliver

Application of the Nursing Process to Deliver Culturally Competent Care: Malay culture

Each society has devised its own methodology of dealing with diseases. As per the old Manuscript MSS1292 KitabTib (Book of Healing) (a 19th century Malay manuscript), people of Malay have successful and strong healing practices which work wonderfully well in case of integrative and complementary medicines (Baharuddin & Sidik, 2010). An analytical approach is required to study the contents of the Malay manuscript for understanding it deeply. As per the research, there are three kinds of methods in case of healing diseases (Baharuddin & Sidik, 2010). These are as follows:

Natural resources

Wafak (written symbols)

Quranic verses for healing purposes and offering respect to prophet (P.B.U.H)

It is quite evident that these traditional practices were ecological and holistic in origin, which is stressed upon even today (Baharuddin & Sidik, 2010).

Background

The roots of…… [Read More]

References

Baharuddin, A., & Sidik, R. (2010). The Case of Malay Manuscript of the 19th Century. Traditional Healing In Malay Culture:, 1-7.

Farooqui, M. (2013).The Current Situation and Future Direction of Traditional and Complementary Medicine (T&CM) in Malaysian Health Care System. Alternative and Integrative Medicine, 1(1), 1.

Ghani, R., & Hamid, M. (2011).Traditional and Complementary Medicine Programme in Malaysia. Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 1-6.

Jamal, A. (2006). An overview of scientific and technological progress. Malay Traditional Medicine, 37-46.
View Full Essay

Jesus' Healing of the Leper

Words: 1576 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23625451

The comparison between HIV and leprosy is a proper framework for this examination. Today, HIV is still a stigmatized disease in many communities, but the predominate view is that its sufferers should not be outcasts of society, though the once were. Foundations have arisen to find a cure, and charities often donate to those with HIV in many countries, so that sufferers can obtain their medication. Today, HIV and AIDS, as well as other diseases like cancer, are prime issues in politics, as leaders try to fund scientific efforts to cure them. In Jesus' time, however, lepers, or those with contagious diseases, were seen as outcasts by society. They, too, were political issues, but the issue was how to contain the sufferers, not how to help them. Thus, with this contemporary view of Jesus' political time in light of contemporary politics, one can see how Jesus could quite easily have…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Preventing Unnecessary Hospital Readmissions

Words: 5603 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61470120

causes for Medicare and Medicaid patients to be readmitted to hospitals within thirty days of a prior discharge. This is a fairly pervasive and major problem and it is one that demands solutions. As part of this capstone, there will be a number of facets and tools used. There will be a problem description that identifies what the problem is and why it is important. There will be a solution description that broadly asserts what is needed to address and resolve the problem identified. There will be an implementation plan that will lay out how the program will be rolled out to the locations and the people that work therein. There will also be an evaluation plan that will be used to monitor and assess performance so that any deficiencies can be spotted and addressed before they become full-on conflagrations that can sap the performance and outcomes of the project.…… [Read More]

References

Challen, L., Kelso, C., & Gandi, B. (2014, May). Association between prescription drug benefit and hospital readmission rates. Hospital Pharmacy, 49, 449-454. http://dx.doi.org/http://dx.doi.org.library.gcu.edu:2048/10.1310/hpj4905-449

Cisneros, F. F. (2015). Transformational Tool Kit for Front Line Nurses, an Issue of Nursing Clinics of North America. London: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Communication and dissemination strategies to facilitate the use of health and health care evidence. (2013). Retrieved from http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/index.cfm/search-for-guides-reviews-and-reports/?productid=1208&pageaction=displayproduct#toc

Costantino, M. E., Frey, B., Hall, B., & Painter, P. (2013, November 5). The influence of a postdischarge ntervention on reducinghospital readmissions in a Medicare population. Population Health Management, 16(5), 310-316. http://dx.doi.org/http://dx.doi.org.library.gcu.edu:2048/10.1089/pop.2012.0084
View Full Essay

Sufficient Evidence for Its Hypothesis or Claim

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33265740

sufficient evidence for its hypothesis or claim?

The paper is clear int hat it provides us with Introduction, body, and conclusion. The theme is simple too: health care providers (the paper tells us) need to respect, acknowledge, and understand the challenges that the 3 religions -- Judaism, Islam, and Shintoism -- can provide to th health care system. The health system needs to know how to satisfy adherents of these religions in order to optimize their medical care.

The paper then goes through a brief description of each religion (in Judaism's case, of Orthodox Jews) particularly as touches on their medical care and cursorily describes how medical practitioners can meet these needs. There are many more points that can be mentioned, particularly in the case of Orthodox Judaism where the profession may be riddled with many more challenges, such as kosher (and food regulation exist with Islam too). In the…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Training Nurses About the Most Effective Practices

Words: 1564 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76393239

Hospital Evaluation Project

The world of healthcare is continually evolving. For professionals, this means that they must possess certain skill sets. In the case of graduate nurses, these issues are becoming more pronounced with the increasing demand which is placed on them. Training programs are effective in helping organizations to become responsive to the different challenges they are facing. To improve the effectiveness of them requires assessing specific psychomotor skills. This will be accomplished by developing an evaluation plan, identifying test objectives, defining parameters of the evaluation, the psychomotor skills they must possess, the steps, assigned weighting, grading rubric, passing scores and grading parameters. Together, these elements will highlight the best avenues for training graduate nurses about the challenges they are facing and the skills they must utilize. (Kovner, 2011)

Psychomotor skills are focusing on the way the mind interprets information and how the individual reacts. At the heart of…… [Read More]

References

Harrington, C. (2008). Health Care Policy. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Kovner, A. (2011). Jonas and Kovner's Healthcare Delivery in the United States. New York, NY: Springer.

Masters, K. (2013). Role Development in Professional Nursing. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Noe, R. (2013). Employee Training and Development. New York, NY: McGraw Hill
View Full Essay

Thermo Therapy

Words: 3365 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52189201

Thermo Therapy

Application of healing thermal agents to certain body areas that feel wounded or dysfunction is heat treatment. The main use of a heat treatment is to help alleviate pain, support muscle repose, increase function of the tissue cells, improve blood flow, and remove poison from cells and to increase the extensibility of soft tissues. Superficial and deep are the two types of heat treatment. Superficial heat treatments apply heat to the exterior part of the body. Heat aimed at certain inner tissues through ultrasound or by electric current is deep heat treatment. Heat treatments are favorable before exercise, giving a limbering up result to the soft tissues involved. Heat treatment using conduction as a form of heat transfer in hot pacts is very common. Damp heat packs are easily available in most hospitals, physical treatment centers and sports teaching rooms.

For tissue heating many thermal agents are on…… [Read More]

References

Bigos S, Bowyer O, Braen G. et al. Acute lower back problems in adults. Clinical Practice Guideline, Quick Reference Guide Number 14. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, AHCPR Pub. No. 95-0643. December 1994.p.3-6

Biundo JJ Jr., Torres-Ramos FM: Rehabilitation and biomechanics. Curr Opin Rheumatol 1991 April; 3(2): 291-99

Fedorczyk J: The role of physical agents in modulating pain. Journal of Hand Therapy 1997 Apr-June; 10(2): 110-21

Grana WA: Physical agents in musculoskeletal problems: heat and cold therapy modalities. Instructional Course Lecture 1993; 42: 439-42.
View Full Essay

Interventional Pain Clinic Ipc as Part of

Words: 534 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70556553

Interventional Pain Clinic (IPC) as part of PeaceHealth Southwest Washington Hospital, located in Vancouver, Washington. This descriptive essay will be used to assist in developing focus on future projects with this class. This essay will give a background and history of this institution before investigating some of the specific purposes of the pain clinic. This community need will be explained and how this need does or does not specifically address the population this facility is attempting to serve.

PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center has deep roots within this pacific northwest community. The original building was established in 1858 and the hospital was called St. Joseph Hospital. This hospital was originally founded by Mother Joseph Pariseasu and it is the oldest hospital in this part of the country. The other side of this merger began with Clark General Hospital which opened in 1929 to honor and serve military veterans and later changed…… [Read More]

References

PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center Homepage. Visited 5 July 2013. Retrieved from http://www.swmedicalcenter.org/default.cfm
View Full Essay

United States Has the Most

Words: 6833 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34903730

al., 2010).

Nursing and the E

The Emergency oom is often one of the most visible parts of healthcare for political debate. It is also one of the most difficult environments for a modern nurse. It is interesting that one of the founders of modern nursing had emergency experience prior to developing her overall theories. Nightingale also looked at negatives and positives that are the conditions, which could help make people recover and reach their actual potential, as also noted by Maslow hierarchy of needs. She did not look or speak directly of the disease per se, but rather, looked at air, clean water, environment, and sanitation. She published her book in1860 with the title a "Notes on Nursing: What it Is and What it Is Not," connecting human beings and quality of human life, and comparing the stagnant sewage she saw in Scutari, as well as in London. She…… [Read More]

References

Americans at Risk. (March 2009). Families USA. Retrieved from:

http://www.familiesusa.org/assets/pdfs/americans-at-risk.pdf

Patient Perceptions in the Emergency Department: Physicians, Physician Assistants,

Nurse Practitioners. (30 August 2010). Retrieved from: http://idiopathicmedicine.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/patient-perceptions-in-the-emergency-department-physicians-physician-assistants-nurse-practitioners/
View Full Essay

Routine Shaving of the Surgical Site Select

Words: 2524 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31433982

Routine Shaving of the Surgical Site

Select a preoperative procedure (e.g., routine shaving of the surgical site) that you would commonly find on a surgical floor.

Describe the process or procedure you have chosen and why you think it needs change.

The process which I have chosen for surgical floor is routine shaving of the surgical site and I think it needs change because patients going through surgery are required to remove hair from the site of the cut. This is considered to reduce the chance of the surgical site becoming infected (National Collaborating Centre for omen's and Children's Health, 2008). Shaving, clipping the hair and using a cream which dissolves the hair are some of the different methods available to remove hair. And these are important because clinically, care plans offer a way to plan and communicate appropriate patient care.

A2. Based on your initial investigation of the situation,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Collins, A.S. (n.d.). Preventing Health Care - Associated Infections. Retrieved October 30, 2012, from National Center for Biotechnology:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2683/ 

Graham, I.D., RN, J.L., Harrison, M.B., Straus, S.E., Tetroe, J., RN, W.C., et al. (2006). Lost in knowledge translation: Time for a map? Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 13-24.

Green, L.A., & Seifert, C.M. (2005). Translation of Reserch into Practice: Why we can't "Just Do It." PubMed, 541-545.

National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health. (2008, October). Surgical Site Infection: Prevention and Treatment of Surgical Site Infection. Retrieved October 29, 2012, from Nice.org.uk: http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/pdf/CG74FullGuideline.pdf
View Full Essay

Future of Healthcare as it Relates to the Geriatric Population

Words: 3240 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11316341

Future of Healthcare as it Relates to the Geriatric Population

Description and Problem Statement

The geriatric population in the United States is growing and compared to the population of health care providers the geriatric population growth is advancing much more rapidly. This presents a problem in making provision of health care to the future geriatric population. While there is a growth in the demand for geriatric health care services, there is not a matching growth in the population of health care providers and in fact, a shortage presently exists.

The population of geriatric patients is experiencing rapid growth while the population of health care providers specifically trained in geriatric medicine is seriously lagging behind. In fact, of the approximately 650,000 medical doctors who are practicing, only a small percentage receives the training and education required to provide geriatric care. Exacerbating the problem is the fact that only three medical schools…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bagel, LM (2011) Designs to Support Aging Acute Care Patients. Elder Care. Health Facilities Management. Retrieved from: http://www.hfmmagazine.com/hfmmagazine/jsp/articledisplay.jsp?dcrpath=HFMMAGAZINE/Article/data/04APR2012/0412HFM_FEA_interiors&domain=HFMMAGAZINE

Gottlieb, S. (2013) Medicare Has Stopped Paying Bills For Medical Diagnostic Tests. Patients Will Feel The Effects. Forbes 27 Mar 2013. Retrieved from: http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottgottlieb/2013/03/27/medicare-has-stopped-paying-bills-for-medical-diagnostic-tests-patients-will-feel-the-effects/2/

Graverholt, B., et al. (2011) Acute hospital admissions among nursing home residents: a population-based observational study. BMC Health Services Research 2011. Retrieved from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6963/11/126

Healthcare in America: Trends in Utilization (2004) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from:  http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/misc/healthcare.pdf
View Full Essay

Letter Against Unionization Dear Mr Hines Thank

Words: 1880 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42334858

Letter Against Unionization

Dear Mr. Hines

Thank you for our recent discussion regarding the American Professionals Union's attempt to organize our nursing staff. The nurses have made their many grievances known and I have listened intently to their rationale about unionizing. With the widespread shortage of nurses, many hospitals have given way to unionization. This is not a new trend. It is a popular way for nurses to resolve challenges and negotiate salaries. The American Nurses Association first endorsed collective bargaining in the later 19040s and at the time, viewed it as the road to improving both wages and working conditions (Carrell & Heavrin, 2007). Today, nurses' attention has shifted from wages, benefits, and work conditions, to also include patient issues. ecent strikes in California, Minnesota and Pennsylvania have focused on nurse to patient ratios in particular, after extensive research revealed a direct correlation between minimum nurse to patient ratios…… [Read More]

References

Carrell, M.R., & Heavrin, C. (2007). Labor relations and collective bargaining: Cases, practice, and law (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Harrison, M. (2012). Nurses Need the Right to Strike to Protect Patients. Nursing Standard, 26(34), 33.

Gillen, S. (2012). Under deconstruction -- employers chip away at Agenda for Change. Nursing Standard, 26(34), 12-13.

Sherwood, C. (2012) Untruths. Retrieved June 7, 2012 from http://www.stopunions.com.
View Full Essay

Geriatric Nursing

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1748724

Search the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Guideline Clearinghouse website at http://www.guideline.gov / for a quality guideline that pertains to the area of nursing in which you are interested. Describe the guideline and how the information could be used in a process improvement project. Reference the website.

Quality Guideline: Pressure ulcer prevention. In: Evidence-based geriatric nursing protocols for best practice at http://www.guideline.gov/content.aspx?id=43935.

With the elderly segment of the merican population growing more rapidly than any other, there are going to be a number of age-related infirmities that will require informed healthcare services in the future. This quality guideline sets forth best evidence-based practices for the prevention and care of pressure ulcers and skin tears for the clinical specialties of nursing, family practice and geriatrics with intended users including advanced practice nurses and nurses. The stated guideline objectives are to provide a standard of practice protocol for: (a)…… [Read More]

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2014). CUSP Toolkit. Retrieved May 11, 2014 from http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/education/curriculum-tools/cusptoolkit/index.html

Safety in the workplace is everyone's responsibility and preventing the spread of increasingly resistant infectious agents represents a timely and valuable enterprise. One straightforward method that has been used to good effect to help coordinate the actions of all healthcare practitioners is the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) toolkit. This training program for healthcare providers is intended to promote teamwork and improve communication levels in ways that reduce the risk of infection and improve the safety of healthcare delivery systems.

One practice area that the CUSP toolkit can be used to plan a process improvement project in my workplace is through a reduction in patient falls. Currently, patients are allowed to fall up to three times before a fall flag was placed on their bed alerting healthcare providers of the patient's potential fall risk and placing a notice on the electronic and hard-copy medical records to this effect. In some cases, patients have been severely injured (in fact, one patient even died after his surgical wound became infected when it was contaminated by the contents of his colostomy bag that ruptured when he fell on it) before an medical record and fall flag alerts were posted. The current system requires improvement in order to reduce the prevalence of falls in this tertiary healthcare facility. Implementing the principles of the CUSP toolkit would provide a consistent approach to risk management for patients that are at risk of falling during the in-patient stay, including identifying better ways to conduct assessments and the number of falls that should be allowed before an alert is posted.
View Full Essay

Aromatherapy in Addiction Treatment for

Words: 5849 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23652968

S ome aromas even affect us physiologically" (p. 38). esearchers exploring human olfaction have determined that:

faint trace of lemon significantly increases people's perception of their own health.

Lavender incense contributes to a pleasant mood -- but it lowers volunteers' mathematical abilities.

A whiff of lavender and eucalyptus increases people's respiratory rate and alertness.

The scent of phenethyl alcohol (a constituent of rose oil) reduces blood pressure.

These findings have contributed to the explosive growth in the aromatherapy industry; according to Furlow (1996), "Aromatherapists point to scientific findings that smell can dramatically affect our moods as evidence that therapy with aromatic oils can help buyers manage their emotional lives" (p. 38). According to Ornstein and Sobel, one recent experiment to determine the effect, if any, of fragrances on mind/body involved subjects being wired to physiological monitoring equipment, and then being interrogated with stress-provoking questions, such as "What kind of person…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.J., Manheimer, E. & Stein, M.D. (2003). Use and Assessment of Complementary and Alternative Therapies by Intravenous Drug Users. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 29(2), 401.

Aromatherapy Therapy Chart of Essential Oils by Therapeutic Effect. (2004). MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart. Available:  http://www.moondragon.org/aromatherapy/aromatherapychart.html .

Ba, T.R.D.N. (Ed). (2003). An Introduction to Complementary Medicine. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Battista, J.R., Chinen, A.B. & Scotton, B.W. (1996). Textbook of transpersonal psychiatry and psychology.
View Full Essay

Music and Therapeutic Influence on

Words: 2089 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66616166

As per Dr. Sacks, Alzheimer patients take advantage from listening to the familiar music. The music entails them memory stimulus, restoring the accessibility to personal history. It is said to have motivated the powers of speech and the thought process. However, his entire emotional as well as intellectual configuration, his life history, his identity, is greatly influenced by the music. The study of psycho-neuroimmunology narrates the influence of neuropeptides on human emotions. The beta-endorphins appear to be released and the body is permitted to perform its own healing work on physiological level, while the person is in a relaxed condition. The music therapy attempts to bring such state which is revealed to be 'audio analgesisa'. (Music Heals: Music for Healing and Transition)

5. What facilities practice this form of therapy and where and is it becoming more and more popular?

The Kaiser-Permanente Medical Center in Los Angeles was regarded to…… [Read More]

References

Alzheimer's and Other Dementias: Understanding the Differences. Retrieved at http://www.helpguide.org/elder/alzheimers_dementias_types.htm. Accessed 6 June, 2006

Forgeron, Nicole. The Impact of Music Therapy on Alzheimer's Disease Patients. March, 1999. Retrieved at http://faculty.uccb.ns.ca/gcarre/courses/health/music.htm. Accessed 6 June, 2006

Gerosa, Cristina. M; Bonanomi, Claudio. Observation of the Alzheimer Patient and Music

Therapy. Retrieved from www.musictherapyworld.de/modules/mmmagazine/issues/20020801160643/20020801170306/Bonamifinal.htm. Accessed 6 June, 2006
View Full Essay

Allopathic Medicine Outweigh the Risks

Words: 4631 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37148611

" Prescription drugs invade the markets today only to mask the symptoms of disease instead of preventing disease from happening. In this back-end approach to fighting disease instead of preventing it from occurring in the first place, pharmaceutical companies have profited at the expense of society." (Karel M.)

There is therefore also the feelings and the growing suspicion that prescription drugs are controlled by large pharmaceutical corporations and these influence practitioners and the health care industry. Modern medical practitioners are also "... subject to persuasion from drug manufacturers and rely on them for their information, despite their obvious bias to use their drugs." (Karel M.) This is an area that has been severely critiqued in allotropic health care; namely the fact that modern medicine is dominated by large drug companies which to a large extent are more concerned with their profit margins than with the quality and the ultimate effectives…… [Read More]

References

Bawaskar H.S. Non- allopathic doctors form the backbone of rural health.

Retrieved March 8, 2007, at http://www.issuesinmedicalethics.org/044ed112.html

Death by Modern Medicine. Retrieved March 8, 2007, at http://www.ashtreepublishing.com/bookshop/carolyn-dean.php

Definition of Allopathic. Retrieved March 6, 2007, at http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=33612 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5010938986
View Full Essay

Cultural Awareness Americans Have Traditionally Celebrated the

Words: 2642 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94745781

Cultural Awareness

Americans have traditionally celebrated the diversity of cultures that comprises the United States. Despite some reservations, much of the country still believes that the amalgamation of different ethnicities contributes to the richness of American culture.

The merging of cultures in the United States has also given rise to conflicts and collisions, as established concepts are confronted and challenged. New belief systems, often developed over centuries, have already redefined prevailing estern cultural concepts.

This paper examines how prevailing estern cultural concepts regarding the soul and spirituality, gender and healing have been challenged and redefined by a growing awareness of cultural alternatives. Some of these concepts, such as gender, were redefined largely within an American context. Many, such as healing and spirituality, have been influenced by Eastern and African cultures and religions.

The first part of the paper looks at the various cultural meanings of healing, as practiced by the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fadiman, Anne. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1997.

Feminist Research Center. "Empowering Women in Sports." Empowering Women in Sports. March 1995. Feminist Majority Foundation. 17 April 2003 http://www.feminist.org/research/sports6.html.

Grenz, Stanley. A Primer on Postmodernism. Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1996.

Some, Malidoma Patrice. The Healing Wisdom of Africa: Finding Life Purpose through Nature, Ritual and Community. New York: Putnam, 1998.
View Full Essay

Mozart Effect the Work of

Words: 2911 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90273124

Mozart especially did the trick. Einstein loved Mozart's highly organized, intensely patterned sonatas. He felt, as many before him, that music and the reasoning intellect were linked. Music and his scientific work...were 'born of the same source.'" (Dowd, 2008) a report conducted by the German Ministry of Education in 2007 while failing to uphold music having a long-term influence on intelligence did state findings of a "link between musical training and IQ development." (Dowd, 2008) Dowd additionally reports that "...brain mapping has revealed that professional musicians have more grey matter in their right auditory cortex than non-musicians, as if practicing an instrument flexed a muscle in the brain." (2008) Dowd states: "It seems increasingly likely that the long-term practice of playing music, rather than merely listening, can have the kind of impact suggested by the Mozart Effect. Einstein, after all, organized his mind by playing the violin, not listening to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bangeter, Adrian and Health, Chip (2005) the Mozart Effect: Tracking the Evolution of a Scientific Legend. Group de Psychologie Appliquee, Universite de Neuchatel, Switzerland.

Braun, Melanie (2005) Exploring the Efficacy of Vowel Intonations. The Rose+Croix Journal 2005. Vol. 2. Online available at http://www.rosecroixjournal.com/issues/2005/articles/vol2_11_21_braun.pdf

Donald Hatch Andrews, the Symphony of Life (Unity Books, 1966), pp. 55, 58.

Dowd, Will (2008) the Myth of the Mozart Effect.- the Skeptic Magazine. 1 Jan 2008. Online Highbeam Research at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1419874671.html
View Full Essay

Problems and Solutions to Increase Greening of the Health Care System

Words: 1230 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31807014

Greening of the Health Care System

The objective of this work in writing is to examine problems and solutions to increase greening of the health care system. Towards this end, this work examines and reports literature in this area of study.

It is reported that Pittsburg, PA was, in the 1940s a place coping with extreme pollution and was known as 'the Smoky City'. However in the 1940s leaders in the city met with architect Frank Lloyd Wright inquiring as to what might be done to improve the city. The leaders chose to change the environment "and stimulate new ways of thinking." (oard on Population Health, 2007, p.45) The businesses in Pittsburg were required to change from coal to gas and other fuels that were smokeless for heating and that begin "a significant green renaissance for Pittsburg and created was "a livable, diverse economic region, with one of the most…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Green Healthcare Institutions: Health, Environment, and Economics, Workshop Summary (2007)

Board on Population Health (BPH)

VA Sierra Nevada is Greening Our Healthcare System (nd) Retrieved from:  http://www.reno.va.gov/docs/GREENING_OUR_HEALTH_CARE_SYSTEM.pdf 

A Practical Approach to 'Green' for Health Care Providers (2009) Deloitte. Retrieved from: http://www.deloitte.com/assets/Dcom-UnitedStates/Local%20Assets/Documents/us_lshc_PracticalApproachtoGreeningforProviders_082609.pdf
View Full Essay

Healthcare Finance

Words: 1420 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69888307

Healthcare Finance

Government rules:

In United States the Congress had passed the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 or MMA and with this imposed a stoppage for 18 months on the starting of new physician owned specialty hospitals. At the same time, they also wanted to know the position regarding certain matters of physician owned heart, orthopedic and surgical specialty hospitals through MedPAC. The team visited sites, made legal analysis and met the share owners in these hospitals and finally presented a report to the Congress. It had also gone through the cost reports received from Medicare and inpatient claims of 2002, which was the most recent at that time. This will naturally form the basis of such hospitals being permitted or not. (Physician-owned specialty hospitals)

Findings of MedPAC:

The findings of this committee showed that:-

Physician owned hospitals generally treated patients who had less severe problems…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Healing Ministry of the Madras Diocesan Medical Board" Retrieved from http://www.csimadrasdiocese.org/hospital.htm Accessed 21 August, 2005

Kamath, Gauri. "Doctors in arms" Retrieved from http://www.businessworldindia.com/Nov1003/indepth01.asp

Accessed 21 August, 2005

"Parkwest Medical Center" (October 25, 2004) Retrieved from http://www.covenanthealth.com/coldfusionapplication/covhlthwhatsnew/Detail.cfm?Post_ID=12027 Accessed 21 August, 2005
View Full Essay

Restaurant and Hospitality Concept and

Words: 949 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63501127

The entire Blue Hill menu demonstrates the chef's commitment to emphasizing the connection between the farmer and the customer at the table. It provides a range of flavors and always features pristine, farm-fresh produce and artisan ingredients that remain consistent between Blue Hill in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns.

WD50 helped introduce American palates to molecular gastronomy. It is a restaurant designed to stimulate the interests of people who think food can be fun. In my opinion, WD50's Michelin deserves a much higher rating for its food score because every new little dish is both a taste sensation and source of laughter and fun. It is definitely not recommended for strict traditionalists because every dish is presented to challenge your expectations, such as where a dish looks one way to the eyes but stimulates your taste buds much differently. Chef Wylie Dufrense is an FCI graduate,…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Heal Sometimes

Words: 1002 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97829499

Heal Sometimes: My Nursing Ethic

The job of a nurse is to help their patients (Board of Registered Nurses 2013). This is more than just helping to heal their physical or mental illnesses or injuries. It is also about being compassionate and understanding, to make the patient feel safe and to try to help them deal with the anxiety and fear of being in a hospital setting. As a nurse, I believe in doing everything that is possible to help my patients while maintaining ethical standards as well. In the chapter entitled "To Heal Sometimes, to Comfort Always," the author explains that there is far more to nursing than simply evaluating illness or injury and helping to provide treatment for the condition. Above all else, a nurse should be the person who treats the mental state of the patient and tries to make them feel better about being in a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Nurses Association (2014). American Nurses Association Inc.: Silver Springs, MD. Retrieved from  http://www.nursingworld.org/nursingstandards 

Board of Registered Nursing (2013). Department of Consumer Affairs. State of California.

Retrieved from http://www.rn.ca.gov/about_us/whatisbrn.shtml

Kass, L.R. (n.d.). The Hippocratic oath.
View Full Essay

Religion and Science & Religion

Words: 1911 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36140675

There are exceptions, where legal ramifications are employed and individuals are held to account for their inaction. For most people, including myself the idea that faith is the only solution to medical concerns, and especially emergent ones is unfathomable. Medical care is congruent with faith, as even for the most ardent believer in God if God had not meant for children to be cured of preventable a treatable disease he would not have developed treatments to do so. For the broader population this is a reasonable tenet and most people report taking themselves and their children to a doctor or hospital when they feel it is necessary. It is also clear that modern people are even more involved in their own wellness and may even be able to treat some injuries and illnesses at home, without medical intervention. Furthermore most know when they need to seek care for themselves and…… [Read More]

References

Barnes L.L. & Sered, S.S. (2005). Religion and Healing in America. New York: Oxford University Press

Hamer, D. (2004).The God Gene: How Faith is Hardwired Into our Genes.

Koenig, H.G. (2005). Medicine, Religion, and Health: Where Science and Spirituality Meet. West Conshohocken, PA: Templeton Foundation Press.

Nord, W.A. (1999). Science, Religion and Education. Phi Delta Kappan, 81(1), 28.
View Full Essay

Skilled Helping Interview Clarifying the

Words: 1821 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89277365

Linguistic analyses of conversational patterns indicate that most pauses can be predicted by linguistic structures, such as clause or sentence breaks" (Levitt, 334) by eliminating some of the non-verbal factors that may tend to undermine these silences, I would find that the interviewee was far more comfortable with the nature of the interview and its opportunity for a free and informal discussion relating to treatment experience, personal history and current disposition.

3. Conclusion

The helping model, according the research which was conducted in preparation for and in light of Mr. Smith's situation, would be further illuminated by the interview. Here, firsthand interaction illustrated that individuals who have undergone such institutional experiences are sometimes eager to share details and feelings directly related thereto. The way that Mr. Smith opted to open up would be especially revealing in verifying the value of allowing one's self to fully accept and understanding the nature…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Levitt, H.M. (2002). The Unsaid in the Psychotherapy Narrative: Voicing the Unvoiced. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 15(4): 333-350.

Myers, S. (2003). Relational healing: To be understood and to understand. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 43(1): 86-104.

Myers, S. (2000). Empathetic listening: Reports on the experience of being heard. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 40(2): 148-173.

Rogers, C.R. (1995). What understanding and acceptance mean to me. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 35(4): 7-22.
View Full Essay

Translating Evidence Into Practice Data

Words: 616 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27653771

Accessed 08 Feb, 2012 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0U/is_12_27/ai_n17165803/pg_4/?tag=content;col1

Part 2

Quality improvement research enables hospitals and doctors a means of maximize their services and ensuring that the patients receive the utmost care. A difficult area for doctors to find a solution was the area of compliance. Many patients fail to accept a physician's advice and their illness continues resulting in repeat hospitalizations and further injury to the patient.

In a study conducted in 1976, concerned physicians wanted to find a means of getting patients to better cooperate with their recommended treatment options. Prior to the study, less than half of the hospital's patients followed their doctor's advice and took their medication as prescribed. The one group that was most notorious for this was high blood pressure patients. So, this was the group that the study targeted and tried to improve the outcome of.

uring the study, doctors were trained on a new…… [Read More]

During the study, doctors were trained on a new communication technique known as patient centered communication. This technique required the doctors to fully listen to the patient's description of symptoms, probe deeper with followup questions, educate the patient on their condition and explain the purpose of the recommended treatment in improving the condition. Half of the patients were treated using this technique while the other half were treated using the standard technique. The result was that the technique doubled the amount of patients who took their medication.

This study followed a Stetler model where the problem of non-compliance was identified and reasons for the problem theorized. A solution was then constructed and attempted alongside a control group and the results were tracked. In this case, the intervention proved successful and the results revealed the improved success rate.

Inui TS, Yourtee EL, Williamson JW (1976). Improved outcomes in hypertension after physician tutorials. A controlled trial. Ann Intern Med. 84(6), 646 -- 651.
View Full Essay

Friends of the Fci 2010

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34741367

The garden was located at the back of the unit, and instead of watching television or aimlessly wandering the halls, I witnessed the residents spend hours tilling the soil, planting seeds, tending the young shoots, harvesting the fruits of their labor, and finally cooking and serving their creations. What can be more inspiring than knowing you can feed yourself and your friends? The change in their appearance was remarkable. Gardening and cooking was not just a hobby, it was a metaphor for their ability to regenerate themselves in mind and body.

My dream is to own my own restaurant, a place where all of the food on the menu is grown and raised on-premises. I would also like to employ members of the community along with professional hospitality staff to serve in the restaurant and tend the garden. My hero is Dan Barber, a man who has successfully united his…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Ambulatory Care Unit Designing Your Own Healthcare

Words: 3449 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74042928

Ambulatory Care Unit

Designing your own healthcare unit

Designing a health care unit

The health care system in the world continues to grow amid the several challenges it faces from the developments in the related sectors. The world health organization puts strict restrictions on the quality of services that hospitals and all other care units should abide. It is in this resolution that the sector is changing tremendously from the federal centered and directed care units to privatization sector. Consequently, it increases the need for introduction of quality care units in hospitals to ensure that patients and all other needy people receive the deserved attention. The emergency care system is one sector that needs critical improvement and increment of services to cater for the rising incidences of emergencies. Thus, an ambulatory care unit best fits for introduction into the current hospital to ensure quality attendance to patients.

The mission statement…… [Read More]

References

Wolper, L.F. (2011). Health care administration: Managing organized delivery systems. Sudbury, Mass: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Fisher, A., & OCR (Organisation). (2005). Health & social care. Oxford: Heinemann

Niemcryk, S.J., Joshua-Gotlib, S., & Levine, D.S. (2005). Outpatient experience of patients with GERD in the United States: Analysis of the 1998-2001 national ambulatory medical care survey. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 50(10), 1904-8. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10620-005-2959-0

Mangione-Smith, R., DeCristofaro, A.H., Setodji, C.M., Keesey, J., Klein, D.J., Adams, J.L., . . . McGlynn, E.A. (2007). The quality of ambulatory care delivered to children in the United States. The New England Journal of Medicine, 357(15), 1515-23. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMsa064637
View Full Essay

Nursing Annotated Bibliography Nursing Annotated Bibliography Annotated

Words: 1256 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27408840

ursing Annotated Bibliography

ursing

Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography

This article categorizes diabetes as an epidemic that can responds well with the adjunctive treatment of HBOT. The authors use two clinical case studies in their literature review of how oxygen plays a part in the healing of lower extremity diabetic ulcers. They argue for the necessity of further study and research into HBOT because of its efficacy and the potential to drastically lower medical costs for diabetic patients, whose numbers continue to increase steadily. There is a very clear focus on the costs of diabetic treatments on a global scale in relation to the number of diabetic patients worldwide, as part of the authors' strategy to advocate the widespread use of HBOT. Charts and color photographs contextualized the text and make the research more concrete in the mind of the reader, especially the photographs of diabetic amputees who have not had…… [Read More]

Neal, M.S. (2001). Benefits of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for diabetic foot lesions. Journal of Wound Care, 10(1), 507 -- 509.

This article provides a quantitative explanation for the presence of lower extremity ulcers and wounds in diabetic patients. The article additional explains how HBOT elevate the presence of circulating stem cells in diabetic patients. Their research aims to prove how HBOT stimulates the vasculogenic stem cell mobilization in the bone marrow of diabetics, which then are used to heal skin wounds. The authors explain their experience with these types of patients and HBOT treatments because at the hospital where they all work, HBOT is standard operating procedure for the qualifying patients in they study. This is another example of a highly statistical article with the presence of charts and graphs, even digital images of blood samples from the participants both in color and in black and white. Images have the potential to bring the reader closer to the content of the text. Their research shows that HBOT increases important agents in diabetics' bone marrow that lead to increased circulation and healing properties.

Thom, MD, PhD, S.R., Milovanova, MD, PhD, T.N., Yang, MD, M., Bhopale, PhD, V.M., Sorokina, E.M., Uzun, MD, G., Malay, D.S., Troiano, M.A., Hardy, MD, K.R., Lambert, MD, D.S., Logue, MD, C.J., & Margolis, MD, PhD, D.J. (2011). Vasculonic stem cell mobilization and wound recruitment in diabetic patients: Increased cell number and intracellular regulatory protein content associated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Wound Rep Reg, 19(2011), 149 -- 161.
View Full Essay

LR Explor The Nurse Leader Role

Words: 8934 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96826619

(Feldman & Geenbeg, 2005, p. 67) Staffing coodinatos, often nuse leades must seek to give pioity to educational needs as a eason fo adjusting and/o making schedules fo staff, including offeing incentives to staff not cuently seeking educational goals fo assisting in this pioity egadless of the implementation of a tuition eimbusement pogam. (Feldman & Geenbeg, 2005, p. 233)

Nuse Leades as Academic Theoists

The fact that many nuse leades seve as the fundamental souces fo new and emeging nusing paadigms and theoies cannot be ignoed in this eview. The theoies associated with nusing ae as divese as nuses themselves and seve seveal puposes. With egad to nuse ecuitment and the ole that nusing theoy and paadigm plays in it, nuse leades seve to espouse theoy though mentoship and taining that helps individuals see thei futue intinsic ole in nusing. To explain this ole a bief discussion of nusing theoy…… [Read More]

references and Affirmative Action in Making Admissions Decisions at a Predominantly White University. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 31(4), 269.

Burgener, S.C., & Moore S.J. (May-June, 2002) The role of advanced practice nurses in community settings. Nursing Economics 20 (3) 102-108.

Cimini, M.H., & Muhl, C.J. (1995). Twin Cities Nurses Reach Accord. Monthly Labor Review, 118(8), 74.

Cleary, B. & Rice, R. (Eds.). (2005). Nursing Workforce Development: Strategic State Initiatives. New York: Springer.

Daly, J., Speedy, S., Jackson, D., Lambert., V.A., & Lambert, C.E. (Eds.). (2005). Professional Nursing: Concepts, Issues, and Challenges. New York: Springer.
View Full Essay

Communication Diversity This Is the

Words: 1935 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83120658



17. Johann calls you and says that Billy smells and he needs a shower. If you don't move Billy to another ward, Johann will sign himself out. Explain in details what you would do to resolve this cross cultural situation.

I would tell Johann that we are doing all we can to ensure Billy's hygiene and that if his body odor continued to bother Johann that we can move him to another room or ward in the hospital.

18. There seems to be a language and cultural barrier that's blocking effective communication occurring between these two gentlemen. Considering they are both your clients, what strategies would you put in place to improve this situation?

The best way to remedy the situation would be to introduce the two patients to each other. A handshake, some eye contact, and small personal interactions can go a long way toward eliminating prejudices and stereotypes…… [Read More]

References

Australian Indigenous HealthInfo.net (2008). Retrieved Feb 29, 2008 at  http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/ 

Department of Education and Training (2005). "Racism No Way." Retrieved Feb 29, 2008 at http://www.racismnoway.com.au/library/cultural/

Indigenous Peoples of Australia: Health." Retrieved Feb 29, 2008 at http://www.ldb.org/oz_h.htm
View Full Essay

Role of Religion in Health Care

Words: 2205 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31892040

PTSD & SPIITUALITY

PTSD/Spirituality

Health care and spirituality have long been linked and involved with each other. This involvement and linkage goes far beyond the stereotypical "faith healers" that have become the butt of many jokes. Indeed, faith is used by many to get through struggles and challenges of many kinds. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is no different in this regard. While medication and therapy are the more commonly cited ways to address and treat PTSD, faith-based options are also quite common. These spiritual methods are easy to apply in the patient care sphere given that many hospitals are religiously based and/or are willing to tailor a patient's emotional and mental care based on their specific faith. While there can be some pushback when religious and spiritual values are suggested as part of a care program, the use of these values can absolutely be beneficial to a person's mental well-being…… [Read More]

References

Bormann, J., Liu, L., Thorp, S., & Lang, A. (2012). Spiritual Wellbeing Mediates PTSD

Change in Veterans with Military-Related PTSD. International Journal Of

Behavioral Medicine, 19(4), 496-502. doi:10.1007/s12529-011-9186-1

Currier, J.M., Drescher, K.D., & Harris, J. (2014). Spiritual functioning among veterans seeking residential treatment for PTSD: A matched control group study. Spirituality In Clinical Practice, 1(1), 3-15. doi:10.1037/scp
View Full Essay

ACA Assisted Suicide

Words: 1518 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34616216

Laws and Health Care

The health care industry has undergone massive overhaul in recent times and the impact of the laws and regulations that accompany this change have deep and resounding effects on the way professionals approach their industry. The purpose of this essay is to explain the role of governmental regulatory agencies and their effect on the health care industry.

This essay will first provide two examples of laws and regulations that have empirically demonstrated a noticeable and impactful transformation of the system. The next section of this essay is how these laws have personally affected me and my environment in Samaritan Hospital and how these regulations both serve and detract from our overall objectives of patient quality and healing those who seek our help.

Example 1: Affordable Care Act

Laws and regulations are present at many different levels within the health care industry. Private practices surely have their…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, A. (2014). The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on the Health Care Workforce. The Heritage Foundation, 18 Mar 2014. Retrieved from http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2014/03/the-impact-of-the-affordable-care-act-on-the-health-care-workforce

Emanuel, E.J., Daniels, E.R., Fairclough, D.L., & Clarridge, B.R. (1996). Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: attitudes and experiences of oncology patients, oncologists, and the public. The Lancet, 347(9018), 1805-1810.

McClanahan, C. (2012). Cliffs Notes Version of the ACA. Forbes, 9 July 2012. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/carolynmcclanahan/2012/07/09/cliffs-notes-version-of-the-affordable-care-act/

Pereira, J. (2012). Legalizing euthanasia or assisted suicide: the illusion of safeguards and control. Current Oncology, Apr 2011, 18 (2). Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3070710/
View Full Essay

Emily-Rose Had Just Turned 36 and Was

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 640390

mily-Rose had just turned 36 and was in her first semester at university when her world began to crumble. This could not have come at a worse time as she has always looked forward to doing a Health Studies degree. Her friends and family were alarmed at the sudden moodiness, insomnia, fatigue, headaches, confusion, joint and muscle pain, nausea & #8230;and above all, the enduring feeling of tiredness she complained of.

mily-Rose has suddenly changed from a happy woman to someone who battled daily episodes of what she calls extreme tiredness and anxiety. In the first three weeks of starting university, her husband Harry and sons, Brian and Bob have put this down to overwork at university and firmly told her to "slacken up a bit." Although she tried a new relaxation regime suggested by her friend Anita, she still complained of daily episodes of overwhelming tiredness and general malaise.…… [Read More]

Even in the west we have a relatively new field, psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) that suggests a connection between mind and body. In 1964, psychiatrist George Solomon noticed that patients with rheumatoid arthritis got worse with depression. His reasoning was that the mind has an impact on inflammation and on the general immune system.

Another physician, Herbert Benson, later showed how medication could affect blood pressure and he coined the term "relaxation response." Mind -- body connection was becoming increasingly popular and reached further publicity when Robert Ader in 1975 showed the impact that the mind (and cognitions as well as mental state) had on the immune system.

Today, the mind has achieved a larger place in Western medical practice, although conventional medicine still battles with its principals and, in many places, denies its exclusive veracity. There are some areas that are still in doubt
View Full Essay

Diabetes and Indigenous Australians

Words: 2524 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25859858

Indigenous Australians and Diabetes

In Adelaide the first case of diabetes in Indigenous people was noted in 1923. The records clearly show that Indigenous people didn't diagnose diabetes at the time as they were fit, lean and in good shape. Apart from that, they didn't have any metabolic ailment at the time. Till the 1960's, the estimates of diabetes in Indigenous people weren't taken and no investigation done until then. Then a connection was found between indigenous population and westernized living in the population as type-2 diabetes was slowly starting to materialize. Since then, type 2 diabetes has been deemed as the most worrying health problems in Australia as the probability of it being in the population is four times (Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet, 2007a).

Diabetes and the afflicted person

Diabetes can affect a person in many ways as shown below:

Family

Work

Daily life

Emotionally

Monetarily

Physically (Shaw, 2012)

Physical…… [Read More]

References

Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2006) The health and welfare of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 2006. Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (2007a) Review of diabetes among Indigenous peoples. Retrieved June 7, 2014 from   http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/ chronic-conditions/diabetes/reviews/our-review 

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (2007b) Background information on Diabetes. Retrieved June 7, 2014 from