Human Geography Essays (Examples)

667+ documents containing “human geography”.


Sort By:

Reset Filters

According to the Oregon Environmental Council the estimated cost per year of environmentally attributed cancer is around $131 million for both adults and children. Much about cremation is unknown but it is believed that the process of cremation emits several harmful chemicals into the air including benzene, mercury (from mercury fillings) and persistent organic pollutants. Modern crematoriums, like any burning industry are regulated by laws and standards that require the removal of certain smells and ash waste from the smoke that is emitted but like any other industry enforcement is spotty if present and standards are not checked after initial certification unless there are overt violations and complains. Self report is the manner in which crematoriums are permitted initially and on an ongoing basis every five years. "Crematoriums are regulated through the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). They must adhere to emission regulations as well as obtain an operating….


The only two exceptions on the map were Peru and Turkey. These countries only produced a single garment each. Peru perhaps could be viewed as an extension of the Latin American cluster save for its position on the other side of the equator. Turkey is a true outlier, with no other representation either from Europe or from the Middle East, despite centuries of advanced clothing production in both areas.

There are two main factors that influence these patterns. The first is the availability of cheap labor. Garment production is a labor intensive process, such that labor is the major cost driver of clothing. This has in turn convinced companies to offshore their production. The clusters tend to be in areas where wages are low -- Central America, China, India, and Southeast Asia. Canada is an anomaly here, as the only other First World economies noted were the United States and Hong….

There is evidence that Newark is poised to begin attracting the urban professional demographic, in part because of its low rents, proximity to New York and its tax incentives. If this occurs, with the extant immigrant demographics, Newark will have pieces in place to experience full-fledged renewal not unlike what has transpired in those leading cities.
Costs

That said, there are costs associated with such renewal. In the 1960s, Newark experienced race riots as the result of urban renewal efforts. A demographic shift and the creation of knowledge industries can precipitate similar conflict today, given that the city still has an African-American majority and much of this majority remains in poverty. The lack of economic mobility among this community is not explicitly addressed in Newark's urban renewal plans. Ramos-Zaya (2009) argues in a study of Hispanic youth in Newark that neoliberal renewal policies result in shifting sense of identity among such….

In many situations, and the one described in "Coup de Torchon" is an eloquent example, native societies do not exist.
If we have a look at the solitary native society, as described in Daniel Mengara's book "Mema," and then turn to the situation described in "Coup de Torchon," we have a relevant experience of what it means to place together two entirely different social structures. This is perhaps one of the most relevant conclusions of this analysis in terms of human geography and human geography factors.

The impact between colonial culture and native culture was so dramatic in so many cases because (1) the native cultural structure was typically isolated, with almost no contact with the exterior and (2) because the differences between the two cultural and social structures were impossible to smoothen out: there was simply a significant temporal difference, with native cultures still baring many traditions belonging to pre-colonial….

These firms are scattered around the region geographically, but they are all interconnected.
The interconnectedness of firms in this industry can be seen through the ways in which they interact and support one another. In the export markets, the trade industry supports the resource extraction industries that are the backbone of the regional economy. Goods coming into port are cleared through customs by brokers, and shipped to the rest of Canada and to the U.S. via trucks and trains. For any given set of goods passing through the port, multiple companies are involved in the shipping or in the processing of the paperwork relating to the shipments. The government also becomes involved on several fronts, from trade promotion to customs to the management of the main ports (border, airport and sea port), creating more jobs. The economy becomes self-sustaining because trade brings people from around the world together. In this….


New Orleans is not alone in exposure to dangerous hurricanes and associated flooding. The worst hurricane in terms of loss of life was that in Galveston, Texas in 1905, which killed over 6,000 people. Galveston at the time was the second-largest city in Texas; subsequent population movements emptied the city in favor of Houston, which was inland, and therefore much less susceptible to flooding. Houston's town planners pushed for and built the Houston Ship Channel, which, like New Orleans, created a major harbor for ocean-going freight.

Hurricane Katrina hit Mississippi, Alabama and central Florida at the same time that it hit New Orleans. While each of the oceanfront states faced significant damage, none encountered the same loss of life as was experienced in New Orleans. Since there were no levees to breach in those areas, part of the reason for the difference lies in those states' lower exposure to long-term flooding.….

Human Geography in Action (textbook)
Should so-called 'less developed' countries pursue policies of 'development?' If yes, how can this be done without leading to the myriad problems our class examination of the concept has pointed out? If no, how can they then best address the legitimate desires of their people for increasing their material security and well-being (with things like access to clean water, adequate food, lower infant/maternal mortality, etc.)?

From the macro perspective of the globe, the world cannot afford more 'development' in terms of commodity-focused capitalism. As chronicled in The Story of Stuff, the planet simply cannot support any more cultures that are obsessed with disposable items and accumulating more goods. However, capitalism has also provided a great deal of material comfort to a large percentage of the population. Despite the systemic inequalities manifest in America, even the poor of America are better off than the poor of Jamaica (as….

However, the rapid pace of urbanization in Asian, African and Latin American countries has served to stimulate "several studies of water problems in megacities, secondary cities, peri-urban areas, and squatter settlements." (Muir, 2007)
That the management of water is emphasized on the state level in the United States is stated to come as little surprise in a country characterized by a federal system of government. This is because "Constitutional authority for water law and policy rests principally at the state level of government." (Muir, 2007) Muir notes that there has been a neglect of 'interstate water relations due to an emphasis on "interstate river basins and regulated rivers. River basin surveys were one of the earliest forms of water resource geography, dating back to the work of Phillipe auache in eighteen-century France, developing slowly in the nineteenth century with surveys of the upper Mississippi River by Claude Nicollet and Western….

Rhetoric of Nationalism
It has been remarked that a person's cultural background is influential in the way that they look at and interpret the world around them. The word 'nationalism' brings to mind the hordes that attended rallies in support of Adolph Hitler as he made his rise to power, fame and infamy. The nationalist group defines its focus in terms of geographical identity which may, or may not, include elements of religion, ethnicity or race. Rhetoric is a form of communication whose purpose is to persuade the audience to the presenter's point-of-view by utilizing an appeal to authority, imagery and tone appropriate to the state of excitement surrounding the event o condition.

Cultural attributes may serve as an identifying marker for nationalist groups and, or, religious fundamentalists. The Islamic revivalism is an example of the religious community and ethnic stratification has come together for the purpose of asserting political power.….

Loans needed to buy the equipment and seeds create indebtedness to Western banks. Western professionals are needed to intervene and to manage. The productivity of monocrops (e.g., rice or maize) undermines other native crops. Routledge writes, "The project destabilized traditional farming methods, which further rationalized the use of new technologies from the West, and the displacement of traditional foodstuffs by the HYVs" (316). The whole agro-food system has damaged the soil fertility and made dependent the poorer nations, who are compelled to use the seeds of the manufacturers and their means of industrial growth (fertilizer, experts, credit, etc.). People are viewed as irrational and a hindrance to progress. State control over natural and financial resources consolidates the power of the national ruling party who serves the interests of transnational corporations. Routledge writes, "In the process, traditional subsistence economies and their associated cultures are being destroyed; people face displacement from….

It is not startling that some remarkable variation exists between the great apes as well as humans with regard to mental capabilities. Humans possess a lot higher intricate types of verbal communications compared to any other primates. Humans are the sole animal to make and apply symbols as a way to communicate with each other. Humans also have diverse as well as complex forms of social organizations compared to that of the other nonhuman primates. The most unique characteristic of humans lies in human mental capability to build novel ideas as well as intricate technologies. This has been considered to be important in the fight for endurance. (O'Neil 2007)
Further, the relatively negligible structural variations among humans and apes are generally an outcome of regular bipedalism observed in human beings. Quite a number of alterations in human bodies were linked to the growth of this type of locomotion. As opposed….

A number of companies put into practice an ethnocentric direction in which the management is focused on the home market. Ideas that begin from the headquarters are thought to be better than to those that come from the foreign subordinate. Top organization in the foreign business is usually managers that come from the head office. Some of the businesses take a polycentric approach, in which each market is thought to be exclusive. Supervision in home companies is typically taken on by local people. The third approach is geocentric, which is rather like the ethnocentric approach as it shifts the authority back to the head office for employing managers. These supervisors are hired from dissimilar areas around the world. Essentially the geocentric approach looks for the most part appropriate employees from a collection of gifted people and they are employed on their value and not because of where they came….

Second, the assumption of a phased roll-out in each of the global geographies of Cincom makes the most sense, concentrating on localization of languages and variation in key human resources processes by region prior to the formal introduction of the system. This is critical, in our experience, to ensure there is a higher probability of adoption of the system. Third, the assumption that the system will be integrated with payroll and accounting systems has been made in this initial business case. From our previous conversations it is clear you would like to manage human resources to a tighter budget given these difficult economic times, and the system we've chosen is flexible enough to allow for costing and integration. Fourth, the assumption that the outsourcing businesses of Cincom, now in its formative stages, will grow. Our criteria in the evaluation of the recommended system take the potential growth of this….

Social Geography
Socially Constructed Geography

As a society, humans by nature relate to the world and define norms by identifying with the environment around them. In America for example, the foundation for the society was built on idealisms that suggested that the first entrants into this society were pioneers, overcoming a vast wilderness and pristine landscape in order to build the foundation upon which modern society now reigns supreme. People by nature identify with social constructed realities that bring them together in a communal and socially responsible manner. In order to help civilians learn about society and social norms, it is often necessary to deconstruct and reconstruct the geographic landscape of a land to build a culture from a blank template.

Human beings have socially constructed the view that the landscape of this nation prior to discovery was naked, raw, virgin; basically one might conclude that it was a pristine wilderness based on….

World Regional Geography
PAGES 7 WORDS 2680

Regional Geography
hy could Africa be considered on of the richest continents on Earth? Discuss some of sub-Saharan Africa's Assets. Then address why, despite these facts, the majority of African states remain poor. Be sure to include several factors relation to this region's unique physical geography, complex human geography, history.

The spectrum of environments which exist in Africa spans entire moisture and temperature gradients, from perhaps the most arid to among the well-watered places on earth, from the coolness of the Cape to the furnace that is the Sahara. This environmental diversity is mirrored in the proliferation of its fauna and flora, for Africa has seemingly every conceivable combination of climatological, geological, and pedological factors; the plant and animal communities have evolved over time to reflect this heterogeneity. Moreover, it is an ancient continent that has provided a cradle for a wide range of taxonomic groups, from among the very first….

How Prioritizing Sustainability Enhances Project Resilience through Absorptive and Adaptive Capacities
Prioritizing sustainability in project management fosters a robust and adaptable foundation for projects, significantly enhancing their resilience in the face of a rapidly changing world. By adopting a sustainability mindset, projects can cultivate two crucial capacities: absorptive capacity and adaptive capacity, which enable them to respond effectively to evolving circumstances and mitigate potential risks.
Absorptive Capacity
Absorptive capacity refers to a project's ability to acquire and assimilate new knowledge and capabilities external to the project environment. Projects that prioritize sustainability inherently possess a heightened absorptive capacity due to their focus on continuous....

image
5 Pages
Research Paper

Transportation - Environmental Issues

Human Geography Urban or Local

Words: 1680
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Research Paper

According to the Oregon Environmental Council the estimated cost per year of environmentally attributed cancer is around $131 million for both adults and children. Much about cremation is…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
5 Pages
Research Paper

Business - Miscellaneous

Human Geography in Our Grandparents'

Words: 1393
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Research Paper

The only two exceptions on the map were Peru and Turkey. These countries only produced a single garment each. Peru perhaps could be viewed as an extension of the…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
7 Pages
Research Paper

Urban Studies

Human Geography by 1970 Newark

Words: 2148
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Research Paper

There is evidence that Newark is poised to begin attracting the urban professional demographic, in part because of its low rents, proximity to New York and its tax…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
6 Pages
Term Paper

Sociology

Human Geography We May Consider

Words: 1641
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

In many situations, and the one described in "Coup de Torchon" is an eloquent example, native societies do not exist. If we have a look at the solitary native…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
5 Pages
Research Paper

Economics

Human Geography Vancouver British Columbia

Words: 1394
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Research Paper

These firms are scattered around the region geographically, but they are all interconnected. The interconnectedness of firms in this industry can be seen through the ways in which they…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
3 Pages
Term Paper

Weather

Human Geography - Aftermath of

Words: 838
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

New Orleans is not alone in exposure to dangerous hurricanes and associated flooding. The worst hurricane in terms of loss of life was that in Galveston, Texas in 1905,…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
2 Pages
Essay

Agriculture

Human Geography in Action Textbook

Words: 605
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Human Geography in Action (textbook) Should so-called 'less developed' countries pursue policies of 'development?' If yes, how can this be done without leading to the myriad problems our class examination…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
9 Pages
Essay

Geography

Water to Human Geography Human

Words: 2379
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Essay

However, the rapid pace of urbanization in Asian, African and Latin American countries has served to stimulate "several studies of water problems in megacities, secondary cities, peri-urban areas,…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
6 Pages
Term Paper

Terrorism

Human Geography Nationalism

Words: 1926
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Rhetoric of Nationalism It has been remarked that a person's cultural background is influential in the way that they look at and interpret the world around them. The word…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
9 Pages
Term Paper

Agriculture

Geographies of Global Change 1

Words: 2794
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Loans needed to buy the equipment and seeds create indebtedness to Western banks. Western professionals are needed to intervene and to manage. The productivity of monocrops (e.g., rice…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
7 Pages
Term Paper

Disease

Humans as a Diverse Species

Words: 3179
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Term Paper

It is not startling that some remarkable variation exists between the great apes as well as humans with regard to mental capabilities. Humans possess a lot higher intricate…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
3 Pages
Case Study

Business

Human Resources Development in the

Words: 997
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Case Study

A number of companies put into practice an ethnocentric direction in which the management is focused on the home market. Ideas that begin from the headquarters are thought…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
3 Pages
Thesis

Business - Management

Human Resources Information Systems --

Words: 891
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Thesis

Second, the assumption of a phased roll-out in each of the global geographies of Cincom makes the most sense, concentrating on localization of languages and variation in key…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
7 Pages
Term Paper

Geography

Socially Constructed Geography

Words: 1925
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Social Geography Socially Constructed Geography As a society, humans by nature relate to the world and define norms by identifying with the environment around them. In America for example, the foundation…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
7 Pages
Term Paper

Literature - Latin-American

World Regional Geography

Words: 2680
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Regional Geography hy could Africa be considered on of the richest continents on Earth? Discuss some of sub-Saharan Africa's Assets. Then address why, despite these facts, the majority of…

Read Full Paper  ❯