Human Geography Essays (Examples)

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Geographies of Global Change 1

Words: 2794 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35757888

Loans needed to buy the equipment and seeds create indebtedness to Western banks. Western professionals are needed to intervene and to manage. The productivity of monocrops (e.g., rice or maize) undermines other native crops. Routledge writes, "The project destabilized traditional farming methods, which further rationalized the use of new technologies from the West, and the displacement of traditional foodstuffs by the HYVs" (316). The whole agro-food system has damaged the soil fertility and made dependent the poorer nations, who are compelled to use the seeds of the manufacturers and their means of industrial growth (fertilizer, experts, credit, etc.). People are viewed as irrational and a hindrance to progress. State control over natural and financial resources consolidates the power of the national ruling party who serves the interests of transnational corporations. Routledge writes, "In the process, traditional subsistence economies and their associated cultures are being destroyed; people face displacement from their…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Johnson, R.J., Peter J. Taylor, and Michael J. Watts, eds. Geographies of Global Change: Remapping the World at the End of the Twentieth Century. 2nd edition. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 2002; reprint, 2007.
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Humans as a Diverse Species

Words: 3179 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99987217

It is not startling that some remarkable variation exists between the great apes as well as humans with regard to mental capabilities. Humans possess a lot higher intricate types of verbal communications compared to any other primates. Humans are the sole animal to make and apply symbols as a way to communicate with each other. Humans also have diverse as well as complex forms of social organizations compared to that of the other nonhuman primates. The most unique characteristic of humans lies in human mental capability to build novel ideas as well as intricate technologies. This has been considered to be important in the fight for endurance. (O'Neil 2007)

Further, the relatively negligible structural variations among humans and apes are generally an outcome of regular bipedalism observed in human beings. Quite a number of alterations in human bodies were linked to the growth of this type of locomotion. As opposed…… [Read More]

References

Berg, Kate; Bonham, Vence; Boyer, Joy; Brody, Larry; Brooks, Lisa; Collins, Francis;

Guttmacher, Alan; McEwen, Jean; Muenke, Max; Olson, Steve; Wang, Vivian Ota; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Vydelingum, Nadarajen; Warshauer-Baker, Esther. 2005, 'The Use of Racial, Ethnic, and Ancestral Categories in Human Genetics Research', American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 77, no. 4, pp: 519-532.

Bethesda, MD. 2006, 'Present-Day Non-Human Primates May Be Linchpin in Evolution of Language' Terra Daily. 25 Jul., p. 4

British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection, 2007, the Zero option, Available at http://www.buav.org/campaigns/primates/zerooption.html
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Human Resources Development in the

Words: 997 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80766840

A number of companies put into practice an ethnocentric direction in which the management is focused on the home market. Ideas that begin from the headquarters are thought to be better than to those that come from the foreign subordinate. Top organization in the foreign business is usually managers that come from the head office. Some of the businesses take a polycentric approach, in which each market is thought to be exclusive. Supervision in home companies is typically taken on by local people. The third approach is geocentric, which is rather like the ethnocentric approach as it shifts the authority back to the head office for employing managers. These supervisors are hired from dissimilar areas around the world. Essentially the geocentric approach looks for the most part appropriate employees from a collection of gifted people and they are employed on their value and not because of where they came from.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Cultural Savvy." 2010, viewed 2 October, 2010, from

"Managing Global Human Resources." 2010, viewed 2 October, 2010,

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Human Resources Information Systems --

Words: 891 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95377882

Second, the assumption of a phased roll-out in each of the global geographies of Cincom makes the most sense, concentrating on localization of languages and variation in key human resources processes by region prior to the formal introduction of the system. This is critical, in our experience, to ensure there is a higher probability of adoption of the system. Third, the assumption that the system will be integrated with payroll and accounting systems has been made in this initial business case. From our previous conversations it is clear you would like to manage human resources to a tighter budget given these difficult economic times, and the system we've chosen is flexible enough to allow for costing and integration. Fourth, the assumption that the outsourcing businesses of Cincom, now in its formative stages, will grow. Our criteria in the evaluation of the recommended system take the potential growth of this exciting…… [Read More]

Resources Management System. Our thorough review of potential systems have shown this to be the most cost-effective and best aligned with your company's needs. At your request our team can provide you with further analysis and potential cost and time savings to Cincom for adopting this potential strategy. Thank you and we look forward to hearing from you soon.
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Socially Constructed Geography

Words: 1925 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4034831

Social Geography

Socially Constructed Geography

As a society, humans by nature relate to the world and define norms by identifying with the environment around them. In America for example, the foundation for the society was built on idealisms that suggested that the first entrants into this society were pioneers, overcoming a vast wilderness and pristine landscape in order to build the foundation upon which modern society now reigns supreme. People by nature identify with social constructed realities that bring them together in a communal and socially responsible manner. In order to help civilians learn about society and social norms, it is often necessary to deconstruct and reconstruct the geographic landscape of a land to build a culture from a blank template.

Human beings have socially constructed the view that the landscape of this nation prior to discovery was naked, raw, virgin; basically one might conclude that it was a pristine…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bogaards, Peter J. "The Underlying thinking of how people learn, acquire knowledge and understand." BogieLand Information. September 2003. {Online}. Available:  http://www.bogieland.com/postings/post_construct.htm 

Denevan, William M. "The Pristine Myth: The Landscape of the Americas in 1942." Department of Geography, University of Wisconsin. 2004.

Dicken, P. "The Roepke Lecture in Economic Geography." Economic Geography, Vol. 70, 1994

Hanson, S., Lawson, V., McDowell, L., Nagar, R. "Locating Globalization: Feminist readings of the subjects and spaces of globalization." Economic Geography, Vol, 78, 2002.
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World Regional Geography

Words: 2680 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29821841

Regional Geography

hy could Africa be considered on of the richest continents on Earth? Discuss some of sub-Saharan Africa's Assets. Then address why, despite these facts, the majority of African states remain poor. Be sure to include several factors relation to this region's unique physical geography, complex human geography, history.

The spectrum of environments which exist in Africa spans entire moisture and temperature gradients, from perhaps the most arid to among the well-watered places on earth, from the coolness of the Cape to the furnace that is the Sahara. This environmental diversity is mirrored in the proliferation of its fauna and flora, for Africa has seemingly every conceivable combination of climatological, geological, and pedological factors; the plant and animal communities have evolved over time to reflect this heterogeneity. Moreover, it is an ancient continent that has provided a cradle for a wide range of taxonomic groups, from among the very…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Chen-Young, et al. Transnationals of tourism in the Caribbean. London: Commonwealth Secretariat. 2001.

2. Richard Wiffin, William Phettipace, Anas Todkill; Imagining Distance: Spanish Explorers in America. Early American Literature, Vol. 25, 1990.

3. Stephen Zunes; The United States and the Western Sahara Peace Process. Middle East Policy, Vol. 5, 1998.
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Jameson Defined Geography Components Global Business Jameson

Words: 1494 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47607095

Jameson Defined Geography Components

Global usiness

(Jameson (2007) has defined geography as one of the possible components of cultural identity needed for cross cultural communication in global business. Discuss how a company might take this component into account in managing their business.

Over the last several years, globalization has been causing firms to begin establishing operations in different areas of the world. Part of the reason for this, is because many regions can offer them significant benefits such as: lower labors costs and the ability to maximize their profit margins. Evidence of this can be seen by comparing labor costs of many developing countries with the United States. As, the below table is illustrating how they are significantly lower in comparison with the U.S.

Table 1: USA Labor Costs vs. Developing Nations

Country

Hourly Labor Costs

USA

$7.25

angladesh

$.25

China

$.69

India

$.57

Mexico

$2.30

Kenya

$.62

South Africa…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Diener, E. (2009). Cross Cultural. Culture and Well Being, 38, 71 -- 91.

Greenway, D. (2009). The World Economy. Malden, MA: Wiley.

Hartel. C. (2006). How Emotions Shape the Process. East Lansing, MI: Academy of International .

Jameson, D. (2007). Reconceptualizing Corporate Identity. Journal of Business Communication, 44 (199), 200 -- 238
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World Regional Geography

Words: 1682 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88229337

postindustrial transformation of the United States and Canada? What are its impact on the human geography of this realm?

The term "postindustrial transformation" can be thought of as the alteration of an area in response to an ending of the age of industry. This postindustrial age is dominated by the production and manipulation of information, technology, and highly skilled workers. This age indicates that the area manufactures and operates on a global scale, rather than retaining a framework of regional business interactions. The transformation that occurs in this postindustrial age is one in which new business and regions emerge, while older businesses and regions attempt to reinvent their concepts and ideas to appeal to the new global market. These alterations to human geography are accompanied by an alteration of the use of space, since technology advancements create the possibility of new ways to create and sustain space.

In terms of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Girhard, S. (2005). Chapter 2: Europe. Retrieved October 8, 2005 from Alamo Community College database. Web site: http://www.accd.edu/sac/earthsci/sgirhard/1303.090/chap2.htm.

Lehner, B. (2003). Europe's Hydropower Potential Today and in the Future. Retrieved October 8, 2005 from the Institute for Applied Technologies database. Web site: http://www.iset.uni-kassel.de/abt/w3-w/projekte/europes_hydropower_bernhard.pdf.

Rodriguez, F. (2005). North America: The Post Industrial Transformation. Retrieved October 8, 2005 from Delmar College. Web site: http://www.delmar.edu/socsci/Faculty/Rodriguez/pptlecture/PPTLECNAM.htm.

Vershbow, A. (2003). The Reflections of the U.S. Ambassador to Moscow on the U.S.-Russian Partnership. Retrieved October 8, 2005 from Center for Defense Information. Web site:
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Geography When I Even Thought About It

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84984597

geography (when I even thought about it) was that it was a class that I had to take in high school as part of my graduation requirements. Additionally, I believed that it was the study of land including a wide variety of areas such as; mountains, lakes, streams, hills, desert and forest areas. If I considered it, I would also think of it as a subject that I was not very knowledgeable in, nor did I really entertain any thoughts about gaining any knowledge about it.

After attending the lecture and reading the article, I learned (much to my surprise) that geography as a study was much more diverse, interesting and intriguing than what I had previously imagined. I discovered that geography is a field that studies much more than just the physical attributes of Mother Earth. Geography studies more than just the mountains, hills, streams and lakes; it also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Schlemper, M.B.; Adams, J.K.; Solem, M.; (2014) Geographers in business, government and nonprofit organizations: Skills, challenges and professional identities, Professional Geographer, Vol. 66, Issue 3, pp. 480-493
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Geography Cartography

Words: 738 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54727286

Cartography

The geographic coordinate system basically refers to longitudinal and latitudinal lines and the reference points on them. The lines of longitude and latitude are based on the Earth's polar axis. Latitude lines are parallel to the equator, and are measured in degrees, with the equator's value set at 0 degrees. From the equator to each of the poles there are ninety latitude lines, for a total of 180. Latitudes north of the equator are distinguished from lines south of the equator, which divides the earth into the north and south hemispheres. Latitude lines are parallel to the Earth's polar axis and are therefore also referred to simply as parallels.

Longitude lines are perpendicular to latitude lines. They are drawn parallel to the arbitrarily created Prime Meridian, which runs through Greenwich, England and therefore establishes the reference point for international time zones as well. Like latitude lines, longitude lines are…… [Read More]

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Geography on Political Cultural and Economic Development

Words: 994 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81771943

Geography on Political, Cultural, and Economic Development of Early Civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley

The focus of this study is the effect of geography on the political, cultural, and economic development of early civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley. The characteristic that Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley all have in common is that they were all river valleys. Therefore, the geography of these locations was very much alike and likewise their culture, political landscape, and economic development were all very much the same.

Statement of Thesis

The civilization of Mesopotamia, Egypt and the Indus Valley were highly affected by the geography of these regions, which resulted in rapid expansion, and growth of these civilizations and which affected the cultural, political, and economic environment of these areas of the world.

Mesopotamia & Egypt

What is known as the Urban revolution occurred in Mesopotamia and Egypt…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ancient Civilizations to 300 BC Introduction: The Invention and Diffusion of Civilization (2006) The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Retrieved from: http://www.uncp.edu/home/rwb/lecture_ancient_civ.htm

Guisepi, R.A. (nd) The Indus Valley and the Genesis of South Asian Civilization. Retrieved from:  http://history-world.org/indus_valley.htm
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Humans Have Been Contemplating Their

Words: 1076 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94761475

g. stealing bread in Les miserable), and allowing the nature of punishment be focused more on the crimes that tend to hurt society the most.

Part 2 -- Developmental Theories and Understanding of Criminal Behavior - the basic idea of development theories of crime have at their core the idea that humans are actually either inherently good (more Locke) or more of a blank slate in which society/culture leaves its mark. Any antisocial behaviors must develop over time and are the result of some sort of underlying behavior or condition that occurs and is amplified during life's processes and activities. Circumstances, not an inherent bent on being deviant, is what makes this theory work.

The theory changes the position of how we view criminal activity in that some actions increase the possibility of deviance, while others decrease crime. It is not, however, as simple as nature vs. nurture. People who…… [Read More]

References Taken From:

Cullen, F. & Agnew, R. (2011). Criminological Theory: Past to Present. New York:

Stafford, M. & Warr, M. (2011). Reconceptualizing Deterrence Theory. In Cullen & Agnew. Criminological Theory: Past to Present. New York:

Oxford University Press, pages 394-99.
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Human Activity on the Environment

Words: 1487 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50066375

Tehran's geography makes air pollution worse: the Alborz Mountains at its north side trap the increasing volume of pollutants and lead these to remain and hover over Tehran when the wind is not strong enough to blow them away. Furthermore, Tehran's high altitude makes fuel combustion inefficient and adds to the problem. Its altitude is between 3, 300 and 5,000 feet and it is in this space that the pollutants are trapped since the destruction of orchards and other vegetation especially in northern Tehran in the past decades by rapid development and human activity pressures. These natural and man-made factors together have made Tehran one of the most polluted cities in the world. Air pollution reached critical level in December 1999 when high levels of carbon monoxide and other pollutants filled Tehran for many weeks. Deaths, diseases and skin conditions are attributed to extreme air pollution. Records say that more…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Energy Information Administration. (2002). Iran: Environmental Issues. http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cabs/iranenv.html

2005). Iran. Country Analysis Briefs. http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cabs/iranenv.html#envir

Marcoux, A. (1996). Population Change-Natural Resources-Environment Linkages in Central and South Asia. Sustainable Development Department: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. http://www.fao.org/sd/wpdirect/wpan001.html

Spooner, B. (1984). The Case of Iran. Ecology in Development: a Rationale for Three-Dimensional Policy. The United Nations University: the United Nations University Press. http://www.unu.edu/unupress/unupbooks/80458e/80458E09.htm
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Geography's Role in the Spread of Epidemics

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82185845

Diseases that are not native to a certain population and are introduced by outsiders or foreigners can have devastating effects. Native populations are vulnerable to germs and viruses brought in by outsiders because they lack the immunological strength and ability to combat these illnesses. Such was the case during the conquest of both North and South America during early colonial times. The native population was blindsided and crippled by the various diseases that the white man brought with them.

The white man overpowered the Indigenous populations of America with their superior weaponry and battle tactics. These two factors contributed greatly to the white man's dominance, another factor that contributed was, undoubtedly the spread of disease and germs. Some of the diseases that were introduced to the native population by Europeans included: smallpox, measles, typhus, and venereal diseases (Ashburn 199). Small pox was one of the diseases that absolutely decimated the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ashburn, P.M., and Frank Davis Ashburn. The ranks of death, a medical history of the conquest of America . Ann Arbor, Mich.: Xerox University Microfilms, 1975. Print.

E. Cowdry, Albert. This land, this South: an environmental history . Lexington: The University of Kentucky Press, 1996. Print.

J. Bollet, Alfred. Plagues and Poxes: the impact of human history on epidemic disease. New York: Demos Medical Publishing, 2004. Print.
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Human History the Concept of

Words: 5712 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60516710

Those who went took with them knowledge of Mesopotamian customs, ideas, and skills, but many chose to remain, having put down firm roots during the decades of exile (LeMiere 19). Mesopotamia itself became even more cosmopolitan than before, since not only did the Persian court at times visit and contribute to local administration, but also foreign levies and mercenaries did tours of military service there. Anti-Persian feeling in conquered lands led to scurrilous rumors, such as the tale that Xerxes destroyed the statue of Marduk-Bel in Babylon (LeMiere 20).

This story has proved to be a fabrication: the cult statue continued unscathed to embody the presence of the god in his undamaged temple in Babylon during subsequent centuries, and so Herodotos' description of the golden statue of Marduk-Bel in the time of Artaxerxes I (464-424 BC) need not be doubted. Continuity of cult and architecture are thoroughly attested by the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adams, R. Architecture of Ancient Samaria. New York: Prentice Hall, 1989. Print.

Akkermans, P. "Tell Sabi Abyad: Preliminary Report on the 1986 Excavations." Akkadica 52 (1987): 10-28. Print.

Blackham, M.. "Further Investigations as to the Relationship of Samarian and Ubaic Ceramic Assemblages." Iraq 53 (2006): 1-16. Print.

Boethius, a. The Golden House of Nero. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000. Print.
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World Regional Geography

Words: 1755 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26051413

Geography

Questions On World Regional Geography

Generally speaking, African colonies during the colonial period were seen as expensive liabilities by the great European powers, especially in relation to trading concessions. Toward the end of the 19th century, the attitudes of these powers altered as rival industrial nations like Great Britain, Germany, France and Belgium, attempted to locate and develop overseas markets for their goods. In 1885, the Berlin Conference was convened to resolve conflicts of interest in Africa by allotting areas of exploitation to these colonial powers. As a result, the so-called "scramble for Africa" began in which these powers sought to establish their "rightful" claims to vast expanses of land.

When this conference was convened, most of Africa was under colonial control and was subsequently broken up into numerous states, made up of some fifty separate countries with very irregular geographical boundaries. One major problem linked to this break-up…… [Read More]

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Modern Issues in Human Rights

Words: 976 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73792384

Human Rights

One of the major issues for the United Nations is human rights, which are defined by the organization as "right inherent to all human beings, regardless of race, sex, nationality, ethnicity, language, religion or any other status." These rights include "the right to life and liberty, freedom from slavery and torture, freedom of opinion and expression, the right to work and education, and many more" (UN.org, 2016).

A challenge with respect to human rights is that the nation-state is relied upon to safeguard or provide these rights to its citizens, and that this is far from the case. The head of Amnesty International discussed the need for people to stand up for their rights, and to hold accountable those regimes that do not respect these fundamental rights, pointing to the social media-driven events in 2011 such as the Arab Spring. One thing that the Arab Spring demonstrated, however,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"AI: World poised for human rights changes." World Geography and Culture Online. Facts On File, Inc. 13 May 2011. Web. 24 Apr. 2016.

Certoma, C. (no date) "Human rights." No source. In possession of the author.

"Report: Countries cracking down, restricting universal human rights ." World Geography and Culture Online. Facts On File, Inc. 28 Feb. 2014. Web. 24 Apr. 2016.

UN.org (2016). Human rights. [web]. Accessed April 27, 2016 from https://www.un.org/en/globalissues/humanrights/
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International Human Resource Similarity and Differences

Words: 2091 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74463394

International Human esources. This project sheds light on an Indian company that has decided to adopt the international human resource management plan. In doing so will allow the Indian company to explore many new opportunities that once wasn't available.

The economy is in a struggle and hopes for a better tomorrow are fading away. As a result, Larsen and Toubro decided to expand internationally. Soren Kristian and Henning Larsen founded Larsen and Toubro in 1938. The value of the company sits at 8.5 billion. According to www.larsentoubro.com, the value of Larsen and Toubro sits at 11.7 billion. It specializes in manufacturing and engineering services. It's quite evident that the company has experienced much success in the international world. The company has made the following achievements:

• Implemented hydrocarbon projects In India, Middle East and South East Asia

• Implemented power projects in India, the Gulf, and Sri Lanka

• Has…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Robert, S. Pindyck., and Daniel, L.Rubinfeld, (2004). Micro Economics. 6th Edition. Pearsons Education International: New Jersey

Andrew, B.Abel. And Ben, S. Bernake., (2004). Macro Economics. 5th Edition. Addison- Wesley: United States

Desatnick, R.L. & Bennett, M.L. (1978). Human Resource Management in the Multinational Company. New York: Nichols

Jupp, V. (2006) "The sage dictionary of social research methods," Sage Publications, London, UK, pp. 110, 111
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California Geography Fresno The Desert

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16494747

1). Ironically, these workers who feed others are often hungry themselves, even when they bring home some of the rejected crop they harvest to feed their families. A 2007 study of agricultural workers in the area found that nearly half (45%) met the criteria of food insecurity. 34% of respondents were food insecure without hunger while an additional 11% were food insecure with hunger (irth et al. 2007, p.1). "Nearly half (48%) of eligible respondents reported utilizing the food stamp program, which is comparable to 53% of eligible Fresno County residents. However, food stamp participation varies by season. hereas 55% of eligible respondents utilized the program in the winter, only 37% of eligible respondents did so in the summer. Many respondents interviewed during the summer believed they were not eligible for this program because they were working or earned too much" (irth et al. 2007, p.24). They had little or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fresno California. Greenwich Mean Time. February 29, 2009. November 29, 2009.

http://wwp.greenwichmeantime.com/time-zone/usa/california/fresno/index.htm

Drury, Pauline. "Fresno." Ancestry.com. November 29, 2009.

 http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hummingbird/Fresno-County/fresno_county.htm
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Globalization of Human Well Being Globalization Has

Words: 725 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81465481

Globalization of Human Well Being

Globalization has been held responsible for increasing the gap between rich and poor countries and thus giving rise to social and economic inequalities between higher and lower income groups. However the best indicator for measurement of economic inequalities has always been per capita income. Goklany contends that it is not the per capita income, which is important instead there are some other indicators, which can better explain the impact of globalization on poor countries. These indicators include, access to food, elimination of hunger, access to safe drinking water, mortality rate etc. Goklany thus writes: "While wealth or per capita income...is probably the best indicator of material well-being," but there are more important indicators of human well being too including, "such as freedom from hunger, health, mortality rates, child labor, educational levels, access to safe water and sanitation and life expectancy." These indicators are important since…… [Read More]

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Divergence Between Humans Beings Was

Words: 1230 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39919561

A 1400-year-old volcanic or other induced "winter" likely spurred the divergence possibly even later than 150,000 years ago, brought about by an explosion of Toba in Sumatra. The elimination of this bottleneck 10, 000 years later allowed another wave of emigration from Africa. Volcanic winter may have succeeded in the reductions of populations to levels low enough for founder effects, genetic drift and local adaptations to produce rapid population differentiation (Ambrose 623 -- 651) .

This new research posits new assumptions about evolutionary rates, anagenesis, gene flow and population stability. Most biological evolution consists of the following two processes: anagenesis and cladogenesis. Anagenesis describes the transformations that occur within a single lineage, that is, as a population develops new characteristics. Cladogenesis, describes the splitting of a single species into two or more groups that later subsequently diverge in their individual traits through the anagenetic process. Gene flow and population stability…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ambrose, Stephen H. "Late Pleistocene human population bottlenecks, volcanic winter, and differentiation of modern humans." Journal of Human Evolution. 34. (1998): 623 -- 651. Print.

Johanson, Donald. "Origins of Modern Humans: Multiregional or Out of Africa?" Action

Bioscience.org. 2011. Web. 6 May 2011.

.
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International Human Resources

Words: 3739 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92099512

International Human Resources

Culture, Political, Economic and ocial Contexts of Nigeria Under the ubject of International Human Resource Management.

This paper is solely related to the International human resources practices, the uses of international human resources aspects as well as implementation within Nigeria. The paper has been explored several positive and negative aspects of Nigeria related to IHRM and whether it is feasible for global companies to operate and use the labor of Nigeria for making higher profits over there.

International HRM growth and significance

After attaining global scale, any company may be bound to utilize numerous resources and opportunities like global scale, scope, local differences adaptation and tap into best resources and locations associated with global presence in Nigeria and other countries. These are important opportunities in Nigeria because after exploiting such opportunities, the global image can be transformed into top global image (Hollinshead 2010, pp.233-262).

The opportunities can…… [Read More]

Schuler, R., Dowling, P., & De Cieri, H. 1993, 'An integrative framework of strategic international human resource management', deciding An IHRM Approach 449 International Journal of Human Resourc Management, Vol.1, pp.717 -- 764.

Taylor, S., Beechler, S., & Napier, N. 1996, 'Toward an integrative model of strategic international human resource management', Academy of Management Review,, vol21, pp. 959 -- 985.

Tomkins, R. Battered 1997, PepsiCo licks its wounds. The Financial Times, vol.26.
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Water Geography - Definitions -

Words: 2268 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15979937

They can also enable countries to become more self-reliant rather than relying on international sources of energy. In these five ways, dams may prove very beneficial to countries utilizing them.

Many cities that build dams take advantage of damns as a resource for tourism and revenues. Because dams often pose a majestic view, and provide the opportunity for recreation in the form of boating and camping, many cities use them as a secondary source of revenue. In this sense dams are positive because they attract commerce in cities that need additional capital or revenues. However, along with these advantages come some disadvantages or problems, discussed below.

Disadvantages

As with anything dams also have many disadvantages. For every five advantages dams provide, five disadvantages may be defined. For example, Qing & Sullivan (1999) note that while dams can stimulate economic growth and provide greater energy and power for a city, they…… [Read More]

References

EPA. (2006). Safe Water Drinking Act. Environmental Protection Agency, Retrieved October 16th, 2007: http://www.epa.gov/safewater/sdwa/index.html

Mayhew, S. (2004). A dictionary of geography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved October 16th, 2005:

 http://www.answers.com/topic/cloud-seeding?cat=technology 

University of Texas. (2005). Water surplus and deficit. UTexas.com. Retrieved October
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Ngos Geography Groundwork and Initial Steps for

Words: 3166 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 263798

NGOs

Geography

Groundwork and Initial Steps

For this research and analytical paper, we have chosen to work as the members of a small NGO and conduct a research as an executive director of a small non-governmental organization that would utilize its funding of one million dollar donation by establishing its branch in Pakistan, a third world country in order to improve and strengthen the country's educational arena. In this phase, we first had to decide a third world country that actually deserved a good financial aid in the form of a million dollar donation to improve its educational facilities. I came up with Pakistan, because this is one country that unfortunately has one of the most appalling literacy rates and percentages. So, in order to solve the problem at hand that is to answer the question as to where invest the donation, I chose Pakistan. Since, we have twenty years…… [Read More]

References

Bryson, J.M. (1995). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

State of Education in Pakistan, Care. Retrieved September 6, 2003 at http://www.care.org.pk/pakistan_facts/state_of_education.htm

Coffman J. (1997). Private Higher Education in Pakistan: The Need for Order. Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. Retrieved September 6, 2003 at http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/soe/cihe/newsletter/News09/text2.html

Ecotourism Society Pakistan (1999). Role of Non-Governmental Organizations in Pakistan.
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History Geography During the Beginning of Ancient

Words: 1245 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14863458

History Geography

During the beginning of ancient times, Classical civilization still lived as hunters and gatherers. They used the resources available to them and learned to gather grains, berries, and other plant foods and store them for the winter. This required them to live where the geography and climate could support them, and where supplies of water were easily available. Early settlements clustered around rivers and streams for this reason. y the end of the Classical Era, The Roman Empire had fallen. European cultures had been influenced by Rome's accomplishments, however, and Europeans knew how to build aquifers to bring the water to them. They had learned to build both roads and bridges. They had tamed livestock and used them for transportation. y the Classical Era, many of geography's limitations had solutions. Thus people could live in villages, towns and cities, farm the surrounding countryside and transport it to where…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Garraty, John A., and Gay, Peter, Eds. The Columbia History of the World. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1999.
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Water Geography Part One Terms

Words: 2762 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16776764

But after local wastewater plants were "...upgraded and farms' management practices were improved, the amount of phosphorus declined and the copper sulfate was no long considered necessary" (Royte, 2007). The Times' story reports that to prevent the dumping of partially treated sewage water into the waterways, septic tanks need to be upgraded and "cleaning the water in sewage treatments plants even more thoroughly before it is discharged into the watershed..." is necessary. That will be quite a job, because "more than two dozen of the roughly 100 wastewater treatment plants that discharge into the city's watershed use a suboptimal cleaning process."

TO: The flooding problem. hy has it become a more serious problem in recent years? Taking New York City as an example of the problem and its roots, the New York Times article alluded to in the previous section points out that recently, as developers began clearing more and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clausen, Jan. (2000). Northwest Tribes Fight Against Formidable Odds to Save Endangered

Salmon. Nation. 270(3), 22-24.

Gelt, Joe. (2005). Managing the Interconnecting Waters: The Groundwater-Surface Water

Dilemma. University of Arizona. Retrieved Oct. 16, 2007, at http://cals.arizona.edu/axwater/arroyo/081con.html.
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LO1 Human Resources Management Applies the Concept

Words: 3542 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81731889

LO1

Human resources management applies the concept of hiring and developing employees so they ultimately contribute more value to an organization or business. As it applies to tourism, people hired by the tourism industry are often instructed to work low paying, low skill jobs that do not encourage better workers, nor improvement within the workplace. This can hurt the industry because it is important to understand that tourism as a whole needs its workers to be above the expected standard in order to keep customers interested, satisfied, and desire to come back to the region they offer their services. In chapter 1 of Human esource Management for the Hospitality and Tourism Industries, Nickson explains the need for HM within the Tourism industry: "...recruiting, developing and maintaining a committed, competent, well managed and well-motivated workforce... focused on offering a high-quality 'product' to the increasingly demanding and discerning customer...allows for higher return…… [Read More]

References

Armstrong, M. And Armstrong, M. 2009. Armstrong's handbook of human resource management practice. London: Kogan Page.

Bratton, J. And Gold, J. 2000. Human resource management. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Butler, D. 2004. Bottom-line call center management. Amsterdam: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann.

ESCAP. 2013. Draft plan of action for sustainable tourism development in the Asian and Pacific region (E/ESCAP/1137). [online] Available at: http://www.unescap.org/55/e1137e.htm#E. Implementation [Accessed: 11 Nov 2013].
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Theory Methodology and Human Development

Words: 1376 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85685601

Theory Methodology and Human Development

Analyze a selected topic from a social scientific perspective by doing the following

Explain the significance of a suitable question, which you have formulated, for social scientific analysis.

The impact that video games, as a form of media entertainment, have been a matter of concern for politicians, parents, and legislators. However, the results generated from the scholarly literature are not in agreement; researchers continue to disagree about the impact that video games have on people.

Analyze three research problems (i.e., subordinate questions) that will help answer the social scientific question that you have formulated.

For purposes of this research, a quantitative research design is utilized.

Question #

What is the relationship of playing video games to increased levels of obesity?

Justification:

Walsh, Gentile, Walsh, & Bennett (2006, p. 2) found that "children who spend more time playing video games are heavier, and are more likely…… [Read More]

References:

Bergman, E.F., & Renwick, W.H. (2008). Introduction to geography: People, places and environment (4th ed.)

Brown RIF. (1991) Gaming, gambling and other addictive play. In Kerr JH, Apter MJ, eds. Adult play: a reversal theory approach. Amsterdam: Swets & Zeitlinger, pp. 101 -- 18.

Brown RIF. (1993) Some contributions of the study of gambling to the study of other addictions. In Eadington WR, Cornelius JA, eds. Gambling behavior and problem gambling. Reno: University of Nevada, pp. 241 -- 72.

Perry, J.A., & Perry, E.K. (2009). Contemporary society: An introduction to social science (12th ed.)
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Group Involvement Humans Tend to Be Social

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7853616

Group Involvement

Humans tend to e social and group animals. Some anthropologists even elieve that it is cohesive nature of eing group animals that contriuted to the eventual civilization of humanity. Because we are group animals y nature, it is typical for us to compare ourselves with others. Social motives are the interaction or the glue that helps the group stick together and descries the people in the group are either satisfied or dissatisfied. One way to account for this is called Equity Theory; theory that helps us understand satisfaction in terms of fair or unfair distriution of resources within groups or interpersonal relationships. These resources may e monetary, emotional, intellectual, ut center on the issue of how an individual perceives themselves as either under-rewarded or over-rewarded, and the stress this causes that person. Equity theory holds that the actual perception of unfairness is a significant and powerful motivating force…… [Read More]

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William Renwick The Content of

Words: 5769 Length: 21 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76841378

The biosphere consists of all living organisms on the planet. The atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere function collectively to provide he environment which sustains the biosphere. These four spheres interact to create ecological systems. These ecosystems, as they are called, are groups of organisms and the nonliving environment which they exist in.

In the process of living and working in an area, people modify the landscape to suit their purposes or tastes. These are called cultural landscapes. Many geographers maintain that the entire surface of the earth constitutes a cultural landscape, as humans have changed the face of the planet to such a great degree. Some geographers also put forth environmentalist theories, which emphasize the role of the environment in human life. The interaction between humans and the environment is a circular effect- environment affects human life and culture, while humans alter and transform the environment. Geographers have studied the ways…… [Read More]

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Naming Streets

Words: 449 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69407957

power and describe the three ways that the authors suggest this subject may be viewed and modeled. The essay will conclude with comments on the criticalness of this article and discuss the aims of this article and what the authors are wishing to transform or modify.

Power

The authors suggested that the process of naming streets was directly linked to expressing explicit power over a situation or territory. This can be compared to a dog marking his territory by spreading his marking or scent. They wrote " the discursive act of assigning a name to a given location does much more than merely denote an already existing place. ather, as scholars from various fields have suggested, the act of naming is itself a performative practice that calls forth the 'place' to which it refers by attempting to stabilize the unwieldy contradictions of sociospatial processes into the seemingly more 'managable' order…… [Read More]

References

Rose-Redwood, R., Alderman, D., & Azaryahu, M. (2010). Geographies of toponymic inscription: new directions in critical place-name studies. Progress in Human Geography, 34(4), 453-470.
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Globalization Fostered by Free Flow of Information

Words: 1644 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35048602

Globalization, fostered by free flow of information and rapid progress in technology, is a driving force that no country can turn back. It does impose market discipline on the participants which can be harsh, but is the mechanism that drives progress and prosperity. Globalization emerged as a buzzword in the 1990s but the phenomena it refers to are not entirely new. As a ubiquitous term, what does "globalization" mean? Some observers emphasize the rapid and free flow of capital as the essential element. Others emphasize labor-that capital flows to where labor is highly productive while relatively cheap, that different parts of the production process can be performed in various far flung places by multiple sources of labor, and that workers themselves move within and between nations often and more easily.

According to Micklethwait and Wooldridge there are "three engines" driving globalization today. The first of those three engines is technology.…… [Read More]

References

Bowring, Philip. Thinking at Cross-Purposes About Globalization., International Herald Tribune, 02-01-2001.

Godfrey, B.J. 1984. Inner-City Revitalization and Cultural Succession: The Evolution of San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury District. Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers 46: 79-91.

1985. Ethnic Identities and Ethnic Enclaves: The Morphogenesis of San Francisco's Hispanic Barrio. Yearbook of the Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers 11: 45-53.

Godfrey, Brian J., Urban development and redevelopment in San Francisco. (California). Vol. 86, The Geographical Review, 07-01-1997, pp 309(25).
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Mastery Over Nature Exotic Animal Trade

Words: 1388 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92993858

Mastery Over Nature and the Exotic Animal Trade

Humankind has always had a fascination with nature and specifically animals in nature and even more specifically with conquering the animal or gaining mastery over the animal. The exotic animal has been the focus of great aspiration of humankind to attain mastery over. The reasons for this are varied in nature with some individuals obtaining exotic animals for their own pleasure and as examined in this particular informative study there is desire for obtaining exotic animals so that human beings can experience the animals of nature.

Adelaide Zoo, Adelaide, South Australia

The setting examined in this study is that of the Adelaide Zoo, located Adelaide, South Australia. The work of Kay Anderson entitled "Culture and Nature at the Adelaide Zoo: At the Frontier of Human Geography" reports that in the suburban backyard, people unknowingly "make their more routine interventions in nature by…… [Read More]

References

Adams, G., Fisher, L., Le Blond, D., Mazur, N., McMahon, C., Peckover, T., Schmiechen, J. And Sharrad, N. 1991, The role of the Adelaide Zoo in conservation, Report prepared for the Royal Zoological Study of South Australia, Mawson Graduate Centre for Environmental Studies, The University of Adelaide.

Anderson, K (1994) Culture and Nature at the Adelaide Zoo: At the Frontiers of Human Geography. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers. N.S. 20(3) 275-294. Retrieved from: http://www.uws.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/150953/Anderson95_CultureNatureAdelaideZoo_CCRCopyFinal.pdf

Tarpy, C. 1993, 'New zoos -- taking down the bars', National Geographic, July: 2-38.

Thomas, K. 1983, Man and the natural world: changing attitudes in England 1500-1800, Allen Lane, London.
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French Associate Their Country With a Geometrical

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11459333

French associate their country with a geometrical shape.

Hexagon

Circle

Octagon

Square

Having read the section on geography and weather, which one of the following regions is best known or most typically known for this type of weather:

Hot summers and cold sometimes snowy winters

North and Western Coastal Regions

Vosges, Jura, Alps, Pyrenees

Central and Eastern France

The South (also known as the Midi)

Having read the section on geography and weather, which one of the following regions is best known or most typically known for this type of weather:

Hot summers and mild winters often made colder by the cold Mistral wind

North and Western Coastal Regions

2.

Vosges, Jura, Alps, Pyrenees

3.

Central and eastern France

4.

The south (the Midi)

Question 4

Having read the section on geography and weather, which one of the following regions is best known or most typically known for this type…… [Read More]

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Baraka Geographical Reflections on Baraka

Words: 572 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6942748

While observers are often keen to note that the second half of Baraka seems preoccupied with the destruction of the natural environment, it should also be noted that the film also features numerous peaceful, productive interactions between human beings and the natural environment. One need only look at the vast architectural accomplishments that have survived for hundreds and thousands of years to see that culture and nature can indeed work together in harmony. Baraka also shows us that, for many world religions, honoring nature by working to preserve it is a key part of existence.

The relationship between culture and nature is not always harmonious, however. The footage of loggers cutting down trees that have stood for thousands of years, effectively destroying the rainforest and disrupting the biodiversity of these terrains, is extremely difficult for more sensitive souls to watch. But one must face up to the fact that such…… [Read More]

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Determinism And Probabilism Environmental Determinism

Words: 1601 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15430546

Therefore, probabilism is more about making an informed and educated choice based on the realm of probabilities available. Probabilism brings with it the theory of prediction, and also positivism, with which it is closely associated. However, probabilism is always referred to as being the half way point between determinism and possibilism. ("Infrastructure Possibilism and Probabilism," 2006)

To conclude, it must be said that while environmental probabilism states that almost all or any behaviors may be probable within one or in any environment, while determinism states that it is the physical environment, and not social conditions, that would shape a person's character and behaviors. Herein lies the basic difference between the two theories. There can be no doubt that several more theories related to these theories will emerge soon, and perhaps these would explain human behavior in a more succinct and terse manner.

eferences

Banning, Carolyn S; Banning, James H. (1994)…… [Read More]

References

Banning, Carolyn S; Banning, James H. (1994) "Use of Nonverbal Cues of the Physical

Environment in Campus Consultation" Campus Ecologist, vol. 12, no. 4, pp: 36-38.

Blair, Alasdair; Hitchcock, David. (2001) "Environment and business"

Routledge.
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How International Organizations Impact Incarceration and Prison Management in Brazil

Words: 3190 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3422744

International Organizations Impact Incarceration and Prison Management in Brazil

People incarcerated in prisons from developing countries like Brazil face long years of confinement in dirty and cramped quarters. Some of the harsh conditions the prisons present include inadequate hygiene, insufficient food allocations, and no clothing or other basic amenities. Even as the conditions do not form a pattern across the continent, the prevalence hits higher concerns requiring intervention from international organizations. The interactions allow resident prison managers to address inadequacies through prison reform and increased attention towards human rights. Various barriers include state secrecy, absence of public interest, and weak civil society inhibiting collection of sustainable information on the deplorable prisons. The veil of ignorance on the kinds of prison conditions that fuel abuse and neglect of people incarcerated makes it imperative for investigation of prison trends. International organizations generate information regarding issues that affect the penal system of the…… [Read More]

References

Adetula, G. A, Adetula, A., & Fatusin, A. (2010). The prison subsystem culture: Its attitudinal effects on operatives, convicts and the free society. Ife Psychologia. 18(1): 232-251

Austin, J.E. (2008). Strategic Management In Developing Countries. New York: Simon and Schuster

Baer, L.D., & Ravneberg, B. (2008). The outside and inside in Norwegian and English prisons. Geografiska Annaler Series B: Human Geography, 90(2), 205-216.

Friedman, A., & Parenti, C., (2013). Capitalist Punishment: Prison Privatization and Human Rights. New York: SCB Distributors
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About Egypt

Words: 1533 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65027965

History Of Egypt

Civilization Emerges in the Nile Valley 2-3

The Age of the Pharaohs (3200 CE - 30 CE) 3-4

ritish Colonial Rule (1914-1954) 4-5

Modern Egypt (1954 -- Present Day) 5-6

Conclusion & Suggestions

Egypt has always remained one of the most intriguing areas on the planet, with historians, archaeologists and laymen alike flocking to the country on a steady basis throughout the last two centuries to indulge their curiosity and explore the heart of human civilization. The home of iconic monuments built by the world's first civilizations -- including the Great Pyramids of Giza, the Sphinx and a wide assortment of temples and ruins -- Egypt has come to represent the age of humanity's emergence for modern society. The age old cities of Cairo, Alexandria and Luxor have become modernized during the last century, but visitors and residents to Egypt have come to recognize the nation's seemingly…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Fouberg, Erin H.; Murphy, Alexander B. (4 December 2009). Human Geography: People, Place,

and Culture. John Wiley & Sons. p. 91.

Issawi, Charles. (1961). Egypt since 1800: A study in lop-sided development. The Journal of Economic History, 21(1), 1-25.

Janick, J. (2000, October). Ancient Egyptian agriculture and the origins of horticulture.
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China Water Political Ecology in

Words: 1864 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80257996

Yeh (2009) argues that ecological projects in China must be examined form a political ecology perspective, in which certain state-sponsored projects are seen to be damaging to many of the citizens immediately affected by the ecological pursuits. While this author certainly has a political point to make, it is hardly an ecological one, and ultimately seems to argue for continuing ecological harm out of a sense of political fairness that would ultimately lead to much greater inequalities for the disadvantaged who will, out of sheer political reality, always reap the worst of any situation. That is, of the projects sponsored by the Chinese government were not allowed to go forth in order to provide short-term economic and political benefit to the populous, the resulting ecological damage would impact these people in far worse ways within a generation.

Conclusion

The political ecology perspective is a political perspective on ecological issues, and…… [Read More]

References

Ho, K.; Chow, Y. & Yau, J. (2003). "Chemical and microbiological qualities of the East River (Dongjiang) water, with particular reference to drinking water supply in Hong Kong." Chemosphere 52, pp. 1441-50.

Ma, C. (2010). "Who bears the environmental burden in China -- an analysis of the distribution of industrial pollution sources?" Ecological economics 69, pp. 1869-76.

Qin, B.; Zhu, G.; Gao, G.; Zhang, Y.; Li, W.; Pearl, H. & Carmichael, W. (2010). "A Drinking Water Crisis in Lake Taihu, China: Linkage to Climatic Variability and Lake Management." Environmental management 45, pp. 105-12.

Tilt, B. (2007). "The political ecology of pollution enforcement in China." China quarterly 192, pp. 915-32.
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End Game of Globalization Nothing Is More

Words: 2052 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5458185

End Game of Globalization

"Nothing is more insidious than the liberal fain of equality between people who are demonstrably and desperately unequal…American liberalism, in other words, remade itself to fulfill the task that social democracy fulfilled elsewhere. It became a progressive force, absorbing yet dampening the leftward impulse of socialism…a liberalism quite at home with racism and class exploitation, yet one which responded when necessary to political pressure (as in the granting of female suffrage). Liberalism expanded into a bipolar role of co-opting any progressive urge among the multiracial working class while also viciously repressing that same force when it organized too much of a challenge to the power of capital or the liberal state."

~Smith, 2005

There are many countries that perceive the United States of America as an example of imperialism. There are many cultures that adamantly resist western culture, western practices, and western ideals. They are enraged…… [Read More]

References:

Smith, Neil. (2005) The End Game of Globalization. Routledge: United Kingdom.
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Sales Promotion Techniques Used in

Words: 12044 Length: 44 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53541405



Since the 1970s, the global retail clothing industry has experienced intense international competition and major shifts in the pattern of consumer demand. These pressures have had far-reaching implications for the clothing industry in the areas of pricing, design, quality, manufacturing processes and employment (Rath, 2002). According to this author, "In the 1970s, traditional manufacturers, particularly High Street retailers with their own manufacturing capacity, found themselves unable to compete with low wage producers in newly industrialized countries. Standard garments such as suits, rainwear and jeans, where seasonal fashion changes tended to be minimal, were particularly susceptible to competition" (p. 77).

The early 1980s witnessed a 'retail revolution' which was occasioned by demands for more frequent style changes and garments with a high fashion content. Retail clothing stores such as the Burton Group, Sears, Storehouse and Next tried to lure consumers away from relatively cheap mass-marketed clothes by promoting a new coordinated…… [Read More]

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European Union Member States Relations With Their Overseas Territories

Words: 17554 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16781713

political framework of EU and OCT

European Union (EU) and Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) are in association with each other via a system which is based on the provisions of part IV of the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU (TFEU), consisting of detailed rules and measures which are laid down in the document issued on 27th November 2001 title Oversees Association Decision. The expiry date of this association decision is 31st December 2013. Stress has been laid down by the European Council in its conclusions issued on 22nd December 2009 that the relationship between OCT and EU should continuously be updated in order to reflect latest developments not only in EU and OCT but thorough out the world. The commission has also been encouraged to make revisions to the Overseas Association Decision and present it in front of the council prior to July 2012 (Hill et al.,…… [Read More]

References

Agnew John, "Geopolitics re-vision world politics," Routledge Taylor & Francies Group, pp 1-5

Alan Taylor, American Colonies: New York: Viking, 2001, pp. 57 -- 8.

Baldwin, David. Ed. Neo-Realism And Neoliberalism: The Contemporary Debate, New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.

Balzacq, T. (Ed.). Understanding securitization theory. The design and evolution of security problems. Oxon: Routledge, 2010.
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Cod a Biography of the Fish That Changed the World

Words: 1383 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57776111

Cod: Fish That Changed the orld

Environmental science is not just one science and is not concerned only with the environment. Instead, environmental science covers a wide variety of topics from several different areas. The additional areas also go beyond science and link environmental science to subjects such as politics, history, economics, and human geography. One way to consider the interdisciplinary nature of environmental science is to look at an example from the real world. The book Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the orld by Mark Kurlansky offers a good example. The book describes the impact that cod has had on the world and its basis is environmental science. It also shows the other topics and subjects that became part of the story of cod. This book will now be considered, with a focus on how it shows that environmental science is interdisciplinary.

Cod: A Biography of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kurlansky, M. Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World. New York: Walker and Company, 1997.
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Sociology of Crime it Was Argued by

Words: 909 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4108472

Sociology of Crime

It was argued by Greek historian, Herodotus, that there are no universal ethics and that all ethical systems were somehow relative to factors concerning the population (Ishay, 2008). The historian argued that different cultures had different perceptions about what is acceptable behavior and what constituted the moral norms in the societies. Herodotus illustrates this argument by comparing burial rituals that were used by two different cultures -- one culture used a cremation ritual while the other used a cannibalistic practice. The same argument could also be extended to the sociology of crime -- different societies place different values on behaviors in a criminal justice system.

Globalization is steadily working to change the environment in which crime can be committed. When Herodotus was alive up until the recent present, most crimes were limited to a geographic area. However, with the rapid development of technology and communications, people and…… [Read More]

References

Banisadr, A., 2014. Isis is a monster created by many countries. It requires an international solution. [Online]

Available at:  http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/oct/27/isis-monster-international-solution  [Accessed 31 May 2015].

Hall, T., 2012. Geographies of the illicit: Globalizaiton and organized crime. Progress in Human Geography, 37(3), pp. 366-385.

Ishay, M., 2008. The History of Human Rights. 1st ed. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.
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Faulkner and Time Fragmented Time

Words: 6888 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51400850



Reading The Sound and the Fury can be frustrating for the reader, particularly the reader who is used to the linear march of time and the orderly unfolding of the events. Classic chronology provides a sense of order and a sense of time for the reader. They can easily relate to their own experience and concept of the passage of time. Faulkner steps into an uncomfortable area for many readers, making his work difficult to follow in terms of linearity. It appears as if he is randomly leaping off in different directions with no sense of purpose or direction at time. However, if we look at the way in which time acts as a character one can glean a different perspective of time and gain a glimpse into the eternal nature of time. Jean-Paul Sartre explains that, "A fictional technique always relates back to the novelist's metaphysics" (Sartre). Such is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baldwin, M. Faulkner's Cartographic Method: Producing the Land through Cognitive

Mapping. Faulkner Journal. Vol. 7, No. 1 & 2. Fall 1991 / Spring 1992

Cape, J. And Smith, H. The Sound and the Fury: Commentary. October 7, 1929. William

Faulkner On the Web.
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Metes and Bounds The History

Words: 2934 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84834281



Source: Hockett 1940:264

This land surveying method proved to be highly accurate, a feature that was in sharp contrast to the methods that had been used in some American colonies such as Virginia that allowed the use of so-called "indiscriminate locations," a practice that caused an enormous amount of land boundary disputes (Hockett 1940). hile the land surveying method used pursuant to the Land Survey Ordinance of 1785 was partially based on techniques that had evolved in New England, the origins of some of the features included in the legislation remain unclear (Hockett 1940). Notwithstanding this lack of historical precision concerning the origins of the features contained in the Land Survey Ordinance of 1785, the land surveying methods it set forth were so efficient and effective that the same techniques were applied to the rest of the country as westward expansion continued, eventually dividing all of the public lands in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Allen, John L. North American Exploration, Vol. 3. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press,

1997.

Ariel, Avraham and Nora Ariel Berger. Plotting the Globe: Stories of Meridians, Parallels, and the International Date Line. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2006.

Black's Law Dictionary. St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co., 1991.
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Role and Process of Suburbanization in Creation

Words: 1246 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81131562

ole and Process of Suburbanization in Creation of Metropolitan Areas

The divide between city and rural areas and the rise of the metropolis were features of the previous century. While the development of cities had its own problems, the development of the cities into metropolises created new hinterlands that other cities did not have. The new type of development across the metropolitan areas and its periphery came to be called urbanization. The process of suburban development in the United States was a result of the growth of the middle and upper classes. But there was also urbanization in industrial cities resulting in employment by the working-class that created settlements in industrial suburbs. Modern scholars identify three types of suburban growth- One the residential suburbs created by the rich and the second the industrial suburbs and the third, the development of 'unincorporated districts at the urban fringe.' (Harris; Larkham, 91)

One…… [Read More]

References

Banfield, Edward C; Grodzins, Morton. Government and Housing in Metropolitan Areas.

McGraw-Hill: New York.

Clawson, Marion. Suburban Land Conversion in the United States: An Economic and Governmental Process. Resources for the Future: Baltimore, 1971.

Fellmann, Jerome Donald; Getis, Arthur; Getis, Judith. (1997) Human geography: landscapes of human activities. William C. Brown Pub.
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Ems System in King County

Words: 5883 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83973579

King County, WAshignton

Emergency Medical Service (EMS)

"Measure and improve" is the motto that drives King County EMS

Demographics of the System

King County, Washington - Overview

Service Area

Population Density

Economic Indicators from Census Data

Structural Attributes of the EMS System

Geographic Scope

Standard Setting and Enforcement

Division of Functions

Market Allocation

Failure to Perform -- Consequences

Business Structure

Management Level

King County EMS System Outputs

Prevention and Early Dectection

Bystander Action and System Access

911 Call Taking

First esponse Dispatch and Services

Ambulance Services

eceiving Facility Interface

Medical Oversight

HallMarks of HPEMS

Accountability

Independent Oversight

Accounting of Service Costs

System Features that Ensure Economic Efficiency

System Features that Ensure Long-Term High Performance

King County EMS Performance Measures

Clinical Level 22

Esponse Time STandard 22

Cost Per Transport 25

Cost Per Unit Hour 25

Unit Hour Utilization 26

System Cost Per-Capita 26

Subsidy Per-Captia 26

Conclusion 27

eferences 29…… [Read More]

References

Anderstone, B. (2014, January 21). Seattle as liberal bastion? Think again. . Retrieved from Crosscut: http://crosscut.com/2014/01/political-heat-map-shows-seattle-not-liberal/

Bissel, R., Eslinger, D., & Zimmerman, L. (1998). The Efficacy of Advanced Life Support: A Review of the Literature. Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 69-79.

Blackwell, T., & Kaufman, J. (2002). Response Time Effectiveness: Comparison of Response Time and Survival in an Urban Emergency Medical Services System. Clinical Practice, 288-295.

Chapter 5. (n.d.). Becoming Responsive by Building Long-Term Customer Relationships. In Relevance Regained.
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Seventeenth Century Novel

Words: 3024 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51794716

Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, by John Cleland (commonly known as "Fanny Hill"). Specifically, it will answer the question, "is Fanny Hill an unrepentant woman or a contrite woman? It will draw parallels between another fallen woman in "The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders," by Daniel Defoe. Fanny Hill was a highly controversial and compelling novel about a prostitute, written when prostitution was certainly not an everyday topic of conversation. The book was the first to be banned in the United States. Today, it seems tame compared to our modern day versions of sex, but it still tells a compelling story of how women were forced to survive at a time in history when they had little other method of supporting themselves.

FANNY HILL

Fanny Hill" was a highly controversial and compelling novel, first published in 1749, and called the first pornographic novel by some reviewers.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cleland, John. Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure. Ed. Sabor, Peter. New York: University of Oxford, 1999.

Defoe, Daniel. "The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders." Bibliomania.com. 2003. 21 April 2003.  http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/17/30/frameset.html 

Novak, Maximillian E. Defoe and the Nature of Man. London: Oxford University Press, 1963.

Nussbaum, Felicity A. "One Part of Womankind: Prostitution and Sexual Geography in Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure." Differences, 7.2 (1995): 16-40.
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Strategic Management at Jiffy Lube

Words: 788 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54860240

S. corporation; say for instance that a Jiffy Lube subsidy in France is involved in a scandal; however the managements are different, the scandal will reflect upon the entire corporation, and consequently the American facility

Multi-Country Approach

The advantages and disadvantages of a multi-country approach are rather similar to those of a global approach, with the particularity of reduced numbers of participants. Aside from the already mentioned features, the advantages and disadvantages of a multi-country approach can be summarized as follows:

Advantages of a multi-country approach increased possibility to only select those countries which fit a certain set of demands, such as reduced number of population living below the poverty line, increasing automobile sales or increased standards of living the limited number of partner-countries, carefully selected, can easily consolidate their position and enforce the capabilities of Jiffy Lube

Disadvantages of a multi-country approach reduced diversification and the possibility that most…… [Read More]

References

Murray, W.E., December 2005, Geographies of Globalization, Routledge Contemporary Human Geography, Taylor & Francis Inc.

2007, Official Website of Jiffy Lube, http://www.jiffylube.com/about/aboutjiffylube.aspxlast accessed on May 6, 2008
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An Annotated Bibliography on Terrorism

Words: 797 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43954726

errorism

Description of the issue and its global reach;

Bachmann, S., & Gunneriusson, H. (2014). errorism and Cyber Attacks as Hybrid hreats: Defining a Comprehensive Approach for Countering 21st Century hreats to Global Risk and Security. he Journal On errorism and Security Analysis, http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2252595

his article discusses cyber terrorism and its growing threat in the digital age. he author present finding covering a continuous Hybrid hreat experiment undertaken by researchers at the Swedish Defense College focusing on cyber-attacks and its role in asymmetric conflict.

Graham, M., & Ramiah, V. (2012). Global terrorism and adaptive expectations in financial markets: Evidence from Japanese equity market. Research in International Business and Finance, 26(1), 97-119. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ribaf.2011.07.002

his article examines five terrorist attacks and the impact they had on Japanese industries. he information provides an indicator of how terrorist attacks affect global markets and economies.

Source 3: Pain, R. (2014). Everyday terrorism: Connecting domestic violence…… [Read More]

This article discusses the variations in NGOs' responses to post-2001 variances in counterterrorism regulation in various parts of the world like the United States and the United Kingdom. They present various type responses such as shirking, hiding, and vocal opposition.

Source 3: Cole, J. (2013). 9/11 and the design of counterterrorism institutions. Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism, 8(1), 99-101. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/18335330.2013.790123

This article highlights the design of counterterrorism institutions after the 9/11 attacks. It discusses the Karlsson theoretical framework and how it might aide in define differences as well as the drivers behind them.