Humanistic Psychology Essays (Examples)

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Psychology Personality There Are Six Approaches for

Words: 1094 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50862091

Psychology Personality

There are six approaches for studying the personality development of a person. Two of the most popular ones are the biological and humanistic approaches. The other four of these approaches include the trait, cognitive, behavioral and psychoanalytic. Each of these approaches are used to describe the system through we acquire our personality and factors that influence this personality development. The use of the approach is determined by the psychotherapist as well as the client, as they can differ from one person to another with respect to their effectiveness. However, it is the responsibility of the therapist to make sure that the approach used by him would be appropriate for the particular client he is dealing with. Even though it is not expected of the therapist to specialize in all the approaches, he should at least have an idea about each one of them. In this paper, we will…… [Read More]

References

Lawrence, Sawyer (2009). "Biological vs. Humanistic Approach to Personality." University of Phoenix.

Vigil, Jeremy (2002). "Biological v. Humanistic." Psychology 250.
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Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychologies Existential-Humanistic

Words: 1357 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69311945



Both Existential and Transpersonal psychologies have this in common, a respect for and utilization of Eastern techniques to reach a state of stress-free maintenance of human psychological health.

But the differences lie in their origins. While Transpersonal psychologies are related to the Eastern or Western indigenous epistemologies, Existential-Humanistic psychologies have a Freudian origin, coming through Freud and his descendents. While Transpersonal psychology is considered to be a "fourth force" in psychology, psychoanalysis, behaviorism and humanistic psychologies are outside of the "transegoic" elements, ignoring insights from the world's contemplative traditions in both Eastern and Western religions. Labeled "Western," Existential and Humanistic psychologies are focused mainly on prepersonal and personal aspects of the psyche.

Existential and humanistic psychologies are based on the writings not only of Freud, but Kierkegaard, Nietzche, Heidigger, Sartre, Camus and other European intellectuals who had experienced European wars and chaos during the twentieth century. Important to them were…… [Read More]

References

Cortright, B. (1997). Psychotherapy and spirit: Theory and practice in transpersonal psychology. New York: State University of New York Press.

Daniels, M. (2005). Shadow, self, spirit: Essays in transpersonal psychology. Charlottesville, VA: Imprint Academic.

May, R. (1969) Love and Will, New York: W.W. Norton & Co., Inc.

Sartre, J.P. (1956). Being and nothingness (H. E. Barnes, Trans.). New York: Washington Square Press.
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Psychology and Education Psychological Counseling

Words: 1302 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14134490

Shame and Doubt, according to Erickson, children develop a sense of self-control as they control their bodily functions. This makes them feel confident and able to handle problems independently. But Tom's mother would not relinquish her control over his bodily functions at this time. Her forcing him to void on her schedule and not his, gave him a sense of shame and the feeling that he was not in control of his world. He therefore felt inadequate and doubtful of his ability to cope with anything. As she continued to control him by denying him food, love and choices of clothing, he became increasingly angry at the world, frustrated at the impression that his body and whole life was under the control of someone other than himself. This created anger and depression.

It is a wonder that Tom was as normal as he was during his teen years. He was…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Association for Humanistic Psychology. Website: http://ahpweb.org/aboutahp/aboutahp.html.

Berger, Kathleen S. The Developing Person Through Childhood and Adolescence, Sixth Edition. New York: Worth Publishers. 2002.

Thompson, Ross a. "Child development." Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia 2007. http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761557692_2/Development_Child.html.

Thorpe, G.L., Olson, S.L. (1997) Behavior Therapy: Concepts, Procedures, and Applications, Second Edition (Paperback). New York: Allyn & Bacon.
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Psychology - History of Psychology

Words: 1415 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59949647



Whereas the behaviorist and psychodynamic models contradict each other in their fundamental assumptions and focus, humanistic perspective does not necessarily contradict behaviorism or the psychodynamic approach, except that it considers both of those views as explanations of only portions of human behavior rather than all human behavior.

The Cognitive Perspective:

The Cognitive perspective broadens the study of human psychology even further than the humanistic perspective. In addition to considering all of the influential elements within the behaviorist, psychodynamic, and humanistic views, cognitive psychology also studies the combined contributions of knowledge, memory, previous experience, subconscious desires, external factors, and volitional thought on external behavior (Gerrig & Zimbardo 2005).

Cognitive psychology accepts many of the fundamental concepts of other schools of psychological thought, and much like the humanistic point-of-view, merely considers them incomplete explanations of human behavior rather than oppositional theories.

According to cognitive psychologists, even the most inclusive theories like humanistic…… [Read More]

REFERENCES Coleman, J.C., Butcher, J.N., Carson, R.C. (1984) Abnormal Psychology and Human Life. Dallas: Scott, Foresman & Co. Gerrig, R, Zimbardo, P. (2005) Psychology and Life. 17th Edition.

New York: Allyn & Bacon.
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Psychology Take-Home Alan Alan's Quote Clearly Illustrates

Words: 1173 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22326837

Psychology take-Home

Alan

Alan's quote clearly illustrates the concept of 'emotional intelligence.' The theory of emotional intelligence is associated with Daniel Goleman, who suggests that success in life cannot be solely attributed to intellectual ability as measured on conventional IQ tests. (Intelligence testing is a form of cognitive psychology.) Emotional intelligence has become more accepted as a 'real' intelligence in recent years because of the growing popularity of Howard Gardner's concept of multiple intelligences, or the idea that intelligence can defined according to specific ability groupings. Alan's sense of self-reflection about his own life underlines the fact that it is possible to develop emotional intelligence, even if someone is not naturally gifted in this particular area of his or her life.

Alan is an engineer, a profession that has traditionally valued technical capacities rather than feelings. But unlike some highly successful engineers, Alan has come to realize the importance of…… [Read More]

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Psychology in the Year 2005 United States

Words: 1275 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94081965

Psychology

In the year 2005, United States experience one of the biggest, deadliest and costly hurricanes of that period. The hurricane was named Hurricane Katrina; it cost loss of lives, property and flooding across different states. The emergency situation had to be dealt with immediately and strategies to do so had to be all rounded. This is because those affected were either directly involved or witnessed the occurrence. This discussion is aimed and analyzing the victims of the emergency following two approaches that is humanistic and behavioral while comparing and contrasting their effectiveness.

How do therapists using each of these perspectives view the client and client's problem?

Behavioral approach is concerned with theoretical and measurable aspects of human behavior. Human behavior can either be learnt or unlearnt depending on whether they are acceptable on a social and cultural basis. Humanistic approach in the other hand is concerned with individual responses…… [Read More]

Reference

Cervone, D., & Pervin, L.A. (2010). Personality: Theory and research. Hoboken;NJ: . Wiley.

Plante, T.G. (2011). Contemporary clinical psychology. Hoboken, NJ:: Wiley.

Sue, D., & Sue, D.M. (2008). Foundations of counseling and psychotherapy: Evidence-based practices for a diverse society. Hoboken, N.J:: John Wiley & Sons.
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Psychology the Text Discusses Several

Words: 2699 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75926438

Self-Concept is what one believes about themselves. These beliefs stem from the notion of unconditional positive regard and conditional positive regard. Unconditional positive regard takes place when individuals, especially parents, demonstrate unconditional love. Conditioned positive regard is when that love seems to only come when certain conditions are met. ogers's theory states that psychologically healthy people enjoy life to the fullest and thus they are seen as fully functioning people (Humanistic Perspective, n.d.).

Abraham Maslow felt that individuals have certain needs that must be met in a hierarchical fashion. These needs are grouped from the lowest to the highest. These needs are seen as including basic needs, safety needs, love and belonging needs, achievement needs, and ultimately, self-Actualization. According to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, these needs must be achieved in order. This means that one would be unable to fulfill their safety needs if their physiological needs have not been…… [Read More]

References

Advantages and Disadvantages of the Survey Method. (2009). Retrieved September 28, 2009,

from Colorado State Web site:

http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/research/survey/com2d1.cfm

Anxiety Attacks and Disorders. (2008). Retrieved from Helpguide.org Web site:
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Psychology Theories in Psychology Personality Can Be

Words: 1438 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67545435

Psychology Theories

In psychology, personality can be described as the "the patterns of behavior, thought, and emotion unique to an individual, and the ways they interact to help or hinder the adjustment of a person to other people and situations" ("personality," 2013). Psychologists may make use of idiographic or nomothetic techniques in order to study personality of an individual. Many characteristics of human behavior can be examined while studying one's personality. To put in simple words, personality theories are utilized for organizing what is known, stimulating new research, and specifying a view of personality in a formal way (Kasschau, 1985). Psychoanalytic theory, person-centered theory and existential theory are three such theories which have been developed in the precedent century and cover a lot of information regarding the pathology, health/wellness, treatment and the weight or significance of early life.

Freud's Psychoanalytic Theory

The Psychoanalytic Theory was put forwarded by Sigmund Freud…… [Read More]

References

Diem-Wille, G. (2011). The Early Years of Life: Psychoanalytical Development Theory According to Freud, Klein and Bion. London: Karnac.

Gurman, A.S., & Messer, S.B. (2003).Essential Psychotherapies: Theory and Practice. New York: Guilford Press.

Kasschau, R.A. (1985). Psychology: Exploring Behavior. New Jersey: Englewood Cliffs. Print.

Kitano, M.K., & LeVine, E.S. (1987). Existential theory: Guidelines for practice in child therapy. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 24(3), 404-413. doi:10.1037/h0085732
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Humanistic and Existential Personality Theories Worksheet Abraham

Words: 462 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72938416

Humanistic and Existential Personality Theories Worksheet

Abraham Maslow proposed the Hierarchy of needs theory of personality.

According to Maslow, self-fulfillment and realization of one's full potential are examples of self-actualization needs.

Maslow's hierarchy of needs proposes that basic needs must be satisfied before secondary/higher level needs will become motivators for behavior.

The belief that matter evolves from simpler to more complex forms is evolution.

The ideal self according to Rogers, is one's view of self as one wishes to be.

Carl Rogers believed that conditions of worth, incongruence, defensiveness, and disorganization are all considered undifferentiated.

Rogers believed that counselor congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathy are necessary elements of psychotherapy.

Intentionality is the structure that gives meaning to experience and allows people to make decisions about the future.

May proposed that existential freedom is the freedom of action, whereas essential freedom is the freedom of being.

10. The basic concepts…… [Read More]

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Psychology and Behavior Discuss Antipsychotic

Words: 1555 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39699085



Therapeutic communities are important and valuable tools, but certainly not for all patients. Often, the community is made up of a certain ward or unit of the hospital, rather than the entire facility. Clearly, some patients, such as those suffering from serious debilitating diseases such as dementia or severe schizophrenia might not be physically or mentally able to exist in such a facility. However, for others, who have specific issues or health problems, and are in the facility hoping for a cure, the community concept can help them become more sure of themselves, more able to function outside the facility, and give them confidence in their decision-making abilities.

Often this term describes those in a substance abuse facility, but it can relate to other disorders and treatment facilities as well. Some of these communities are all group based, while others combine individual counseling and therapy with group activities. The main…… [Read More]

References

Butler, Gillian, and Freda McManus. Psychology: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Smith, David L. Approaching Psychoanalysis: An Introductory Course. London: Karnac Books, 1999.
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Humanistic and Existential Personality Theories Worksheet Abraham

Words: 318 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45544846

Humanistic and Existential Personality Theories Worksheet

Abraham Maslow proposed the _humanistic__ theory of personality.

According to Maslow, self-fulfillment and realization of one's full potential are examples of _self-actualization____ needs.

Maslow's hierarchy of needs proposes that _lower____ needs must be satisfied before ____higher____ needs will become motivators for behavior.

The belief that matter evolves from simpler to more complex forms is formative tendency.

The _actualizing tendency, according to Rogers, is one's view of self as one wishes to be.

Carl Rogers believed that conditions of worth, incongruence, defensiveness, and disorganization are all considered _shattered self-concept__.

7. Rogers believed that ____empathy____, ____unconditional positive regard____, and ____congruence____ are necessary elements of psychotherapy.

8. ____Intentionality____ is the structure that gives meaning to experience and allows people to make decisions about the future.

9. May proposed that __self-awareness____ is the freedom of action, whereas _essential freedom____ is the freedom of being.

10. The basic concepts…… [Read More]

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Psychology Is a Multifaceted Field

Words: 1705 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85096253



eferences

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101936297

Blocher, DH (2000). The Evolution of Counseling Psychology. New York: Springer. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102034235

Darlington, Y., & Scott, D. (2002). Qualitative esearch in Practice: Stories from the Field / . Crows Nest, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=10079016

Hoagwood, K., Jensen, P.S., & Fisher, C.B. (Eds.). (1996). Ethical Issues in Mental Health esearch with Children and Adolescents. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99086817

Lewis, D. (1960). Quantitative Methods in Psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=9395983

Newman, I., & Benz, C.. (1998). Qualitative-Quantitative esearch Methodology: Exploring the Interactive Continuum. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5006987353

Poyrazli, S. (2003). Validity of ogerian Therapy in Turkish Culture: A Cross-Cultural Perspective. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development, 42(1), 107+. etrieved February 28, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101936297

Blocher, DH (2000). The Evolution of Counseling Psychology. New York: Springer. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102034235

Darlington, Y., & Scott, D. (2002). Qualitative Research in Practice: Stories from the Field / . Crows Nest, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=10079016

Hoagwood, K., Jensen, P.S., & Fisher, C.B. (Eds.). (1996). Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Children and Adolescents. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99086817
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Psychology - Personality Psychoanalysis Humanism

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46548720

Humanism takes the position that the human intellect is sufficient to deduce moral principles and that all human beings have the same natural right to dignity and personal autonomy.

The humanistic perspective does not absolutely reject the underlying principles of psychoanalytical theory, but places more focus on conscious self-reflection than on any assumption that the roots of all human conduct is necessarily a function of repressed trauma, sexual urges, and unresolved psychological conflicts. Humanism also rejects anthropocentrism in that it does not consider human life to be different in kind from other biological life forms, but only different in degree of development and complexity.

Existentialism:

Existentialism rejects many of the same concepts as humanism in the realm of religious or supernatural sources of human morality. Whereas humanists start with an assumption that human beings are inherently good and that the prosperity of human societies is necessarily good, existentialism recognizes no…… [Read More]

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Psychology and Education Psychological Studies

Words: 874 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40420546

253). When asking questions the teacher begins the cognitive process of understanding how the parents think and this is an important step for the educator to gather pertinent information to further analyze the learner's needs with the parents or guardians.

Step three in the LAFF process is for the teachers to focus on the issues throughout the communication process with the parents. The cognitive perspective encourages focusing and problem-solving when focusing on the mental process of how individuals think, perceive, remember, and learn (Sternberg & Mio, 2006). McNaughton and Vostal describe this as the time when a teacher begins the process of "checking for understanding" and once the understanding of the issues has been explored the teacher and parent can move forward on problem-solving solutions (2010, p.254).

The final step of the LAFF process is for the teacher to identify the first step. This part of the cognitive process displays…… [Read More]

References

McNaughton, D., & Vostal, B. (2010, March). Using active listening to improve collaboration with parents: The LAFF don't CRY strategy. Intervention in School and Clinic, 45(4).

Sternberg, R.J., & Mio, J.S. (2006). Cognitive psychology (4th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Higher Education.
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Cardsmax Humanistic Theory Humanistic Learning Theory as

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80110921

Cardsmax

Humanistic Theory

Humanistic learning theory as explained by Lipscomb, & Ishmael (2009 p. 174) emphasizes feeling, experience, self-awareness, personal growth, and individual / psychic optimization. Learning, from this perspective, is positioned as both social process and psychological/intellectual endeavor. Humanism aspires to place lecturers alongside students in mutually constituted, cooperative enquiry, variously described, this form of 'peer learning community 'situates the lecturer as an authority rather than in authority. It is a form of education that, by traditional or historical standards, places novel demands upon students who are now expected to act intentionally in pursuit of learning and understanding. Humanist principles require students to join with lecturers in this endeavor, and they are implicitly expected to develop and share values concerning the importance of scholarship.

Humanistic and experiential psychotherapies coalesced around the humanistic movement that emerged in the United States and Europe in the 1950s and 1960s. A number of…… [Read More]

References

Farber, E.W. (2010). Humanistic -- existential psychotherapy competencies and the supervisory process. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 47(1), 28-34. doi:10.1037/a0018847

Friedman, H. (2008). Humanistic and Positive Psychology: The Methodological and Epistemological Divide. Humanistic Psychologist, 36(2), 113-126. doi:10.1080/08873260802111036

Lipscomb, M., & Ishmael, A. (2009). Humanistic educational theory and the socialization of preregistration mental health nursing students.International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 18(3), 173-178. doi:10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00603.x

Watson, J.C., Goldman, R.N., & Greenberg, L.S. (2011). Humanistic and experiential theories of psychotherapy. In J.C. Norcross, G.R. VandenBos, D.K. Freedheim, J.C. Norcross, G.R. VandenBos, D.K. Freedheim (Eds.), History of psychotherapy: Continuity and change (2nd ed.) (pp. 141-172). American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/12353-005
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Post-Modern to Contemporary Psychology

Words: 3161 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16183152



Diversity and Psychology

There were two major developments that influenced the field of psychology and the professions' views regarding multicultural competence, emphasized in 2003. The American Psychological Associations' 2002 Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct and the Guidelines on Multicultural Education, Training, Research, Practice and Organizational Change for Psychologists published in 2003 both stressed the importance of moving from a mono-cultural school of thought to a multicultural perspective and that these 'new rules' acknowledge an appreciation of differences as well as an "understanding of the inherent ambiguity and complexity in psychological practice (Pack-rown & Williams, 2003; Manesse, Saito, & Rodolfa, 2004). Knapp and VandeCreek (2003) said of these new guidelines that they articulate a need for greater sensitivity regarding linguistic and cultural minorities. The development of the new Code of Ethics and the APA's positioning were purported to be in response to a long awaited recognition of the need for…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Psychological Association (2003). Guidelines on multicultural education, training, research, practice, and organizational change for psychologist. American Psychologist, 58(5), 377-402.

Barbour, I. (2000). When science meets religion: Enemies, strangers, partners? San

Francisco: Harper.

Blumenthal, A. (2001). A Wundt primer: The operating characteristics of consciousness.
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Anti-Psychology Wherefore Art Thou Psychology

Words: 880 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90495728

The discipline or disciplines of various schools of psychology are continually evolving, and contrary to the idea that psychology looks to find excuses for behavior, psychology seeks to find ways to make life, and behaviors better. New therapies like Dialectical-Behavior Therapy (DBT), which stresses the replacement of negative coping mechanisms with positive coping mechanisms demands not extensive excavation of the past, one of the critiques of therapy, but aims to decrease patient behaviors that destroy the quality of their life such as self-harm. It helps the patient not focus on the past and live in the "present moment," with an almost Zen Buddhist like orientation of mindfulness (Sanderson, 1997). But it is also focused on setting practical life goals, and the therapy often has a fixed duration, in contrast to the assumption that psychotherapy is only available to the wealthy who have a great deal of free time. DBT offers…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Goldberg, Carl. (2000). "A Humanistic Psychology for the New Millennium."

Journal of Psychology. 134 (6). 677-682.

Marano, Hana. (2002). "Wrestling with bipolar disorder." Psychology Today.

Last reviewed Jun 2002. Revised 2005. Retrieved 16 Mar 2007 at http://psychologytoday.com/articles/index.php?term=pto-20&page=2
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Buddhist Psychology Compared to Western

Words: 3167 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88236416

In this field attachment is seen, as it is in uddhism, as a continual pattern of never-ending desire for further attainment and objects. "Social psychological research on subjective well-being supports the assertion that people's desires consistently outpace their ability to satisfy their desires."

McIntosh 39) further issue that relates to Western psychology and the uddhist view of attachment is the nature of existence as impermanent.

The nature of existence is that nothing is permanent. Therefore, even when people attain the object of their attachment, it is only a temporary situation, and people's attempts to maintain the object of their attachment are ultimately doomed to fail. As people struggle to maintain possession of things to which they are attached, those things inevitably continue to slip through their fingers, so people with attachments suffer.

McIntosh 40)

There have been many psychological studies on the effects of attachment structures as a form of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Buddhist Practice and Postmodern Psychotherapy. Accessed January 14, 2005. http://mindis.com/CONTENT/Buddhist%20Practice%20&%20psychotherapy.htm

Conze, Edward. Buddhism: Its Essence and Development. New York: Harper & Row, 1959.

Coward, Harold. "Response to John Dourley's "The Religious Significance of Jung's Psychology." International Journal for the Psychology of Religion 5.2 (1995): 95-100.]

Cummins R. David. Person-Centered Psychology and Taoism: The Reception of Lao-Tzu by Carl R. Rogers. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, Vol. 6, 1996.
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Clinical Psychology Approaches of the

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72560358



In contrast to dynamic or behavioral models, humanistic therapy places the patient (or "client") in the center of the session. This often relegates the therapist to a coaching role or, even more passively, to serve as an example of sincere interest in the client's chosen direction. Since the goal is often to build self-esteem (Branden, 1994, p. 1), this gives the client (for example, a timid child or neglected widow) experience with supportive, open relationships that may have been absent from prior life.

With its roots in intervention-oriented social work, family systems therapy has evolved into a sophisticated theoretical approach in its own right. By seeking the source of disturbances in the relationships between family members and other individuals, family therapists often derive insight from studying how two or more people -- any one of whom may be the putative "patient" (Barnhill, 1979, p. 94) -- transmit information and emotional…… [Read More]

References

Aveline, M. (2001). Very brief dynamic psychotherapy. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 7, pp. 373-380.

Barnhill, L.R. (1979). Healthy family systems. The Family Coordinator, 28(1), pp. 94-100.

Bateman, a., Brown, D. & Pedder, J. (2000). Introduction to psychotherapy: An outline of psychodynamic principles and practice. 3rd edition. New York: Brunner-Routledge.

Branden, N. Working with self-esteem in psychotherapy. Directions in Clinical Psychology, 4(8), pp. 1-6.
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Organizational Behavior Psychology Applied Comprehension

Words: 4268 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87584890

With this approach, consultation psychology focuses on the issues of the group as a whole and therefore typically uses group discussions, interviews and observations as opposed to singling out specific individuals. The result is that, by using consultation psychology in the field of industrial and organizational psychology, the focus is on the group and the roles the individuals who make up the group play. With this focus, industrial and organizational psychology is better able to meet its goals of increasing organizational productivity, well-being and success.

Case Example

In the case sample cited in the introduction of this paper, the issue was how consultation psychology could be utilized as a method for providing industrial and organizational psychological services to a mental health related organization. From the overview provided in the previous section, it can be seen that utilizing consultation psychology, as opposed to clinical psychology, will be the best method of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bass, Bernard M. (1960): Leadership, Psychology and Organizational Behavior. New York: Harper and Brothers.

Bass, Bernard M., and Pieter JD Drenth. (1987): Advances in Organizational Psychology: An International Review. Newbury Park: Sage Publications.

Brehm, S.S., Kassin, S. And Fein, S. (2005): Social Psychology. Boston: Charles Hartford.

Cameron, Kim S., and Robert E. Quinn. (2006): Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture Based on the Competing Values Framework. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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Generally Speaking Psychology Concerns the

Words: 312 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41685091


On a personal level, by utilizing the principles of psychology as
they relate to the operation of the human mind, it is obvious that on a
daily basis most people (as well as myself) encounter individuals which
they do not fully understand, especially if these individuals react to a
situation in a very different manner. For example, some people have phobias
or intense fears of various things and objects which most people do not
find frightening nor disturbing. But by understanding the psychology of
such fears, they become less mysterious and may even inspire a person to
explore his/her own mind in order to become a better person, both mentally
and socially.… [Read More]

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Clinical Psychology

Words: 60005 Length: 200 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12402637

Deam Content as a Theapeutic Appoach: Ego Gatification vs. Repessed Feelings

An Abstact of a Dissetation

This study sets out to detemine how deams can be used in a theapeutic envionment to discuss feelings fom a deam, and how the theapist should engage the patient to discuss them to eveal the elevance of those feelings, in thei pesent, waking life. It also discusses the meaning of epetitious deams, how medication affects the content of a deame's deams, and if theapists actually "guide" thei clients in what to say. This "guidance" might be the theapist "suggesting" to thei clients that they had suffeed some type of ealy childhood tauma, when in fact, thee wee no taumas in thei ealy childhoods. The oigin of psychiaty is not, as it would have people believe, medicine, theapy o any othe even faintly scientific endeavo. Its oiginal pupose was not even to cue mental affliction.…… [Read More]

references. This may be related to the large decrease in familiar settings in the post-medication dreams. Although Domhoff (1996) does not list a high percentage of elements from the past as an indicator of psychopathology, he does mention that people suffering post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a type of anxiety disorder, tend to have dreams in which distressing events are relived again and again. It may be that other anxiety disorders invoke a similar response in which the dreamer has a tendency to dwell on past events, which merits further research.

A final observation is that the results of this study provide support for Hartmann's (1984) biological model of the effects of drugs on dreams. An early study which focused mainly on long-term sleep patterns found little change in dream content associated with psychotropic drug administration (Hartmann & Cravens, 1974), but a later study conducted in Hartmann's laboratory indicated that increased levels of dopamine resulted in more vivid, nightmarish dreams (Hartmann, Russ, Oldfield, Falke, & Skoff, 1980). Based on his own research and the literature on drugs and nightmares, Hartmann (1984) proposed that drugs that increase the neurotransmitters dopamine or acetylcholine, or decrease norepinephrine or serotonin, produce nightmares and more vivid and bizarre dreams.

Drugs that have the opposite effects would decrease the incidence of disturbing dreams. The dreamer in this study was taking a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which served to increase the effects of serotonin. According to the biological model, with the onset of medication the dreamer should have experienced a decrease in nightmares, or, in Hall and Van de Castle's terms, lower aggression, negative emotions, and other unpleasant factors. This was, in fact, the case.

The emphasis on statistically significant differences without regard to effect sizes slowed progress in the study of dream content by creating unnecessary polarities and focusing energy on methodological arguments. The introduction of effect sizes into the study of dream content makes it possible to suggest that the controversy over home and laboratory collected dream reports never should have happened. The emphasis in dream content studies henceforth should be on effect sizes and large samples. Then future dream researchers could focus on testing new ideas using dream reports collected either at home or in the sleep laboratory.

Summary
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Clinical Psychology Krzysztof Kieslowski's a

Words: 2433 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3428760

We are engaged in what happened then. We are the same ones who were involved in the action; the memory brings us back as acting and experiencing there and then. Without memory and the displacement it brings we would not be fully actualized as selves and as human beings, for good and for ill (71).

Jacek is very clearly stuck in a place in his mind where he believes that he was to blame for what really happened. He was there and he remembers it as such and so it is so. The other element that feeds this is his imagination. According to Sokolowski, memory and imagination are structurally very alike and it is easy for one to slip into the other. The question is whether or not Jacek sees his true self in that memory or if it is an imagined being of himself. This matters because if Jacek…… [Read More]

References

Camus, Albert. (2002) Albert Camus and the philosophy of the absurd. Rodopi Bv

Editions.

De Beauvoir, Simone. (2000) The ethics of ambiguity. Citadel.

Mahon, Joseph. (1997) Existentialism, feminism and Simone de Beauvoir. Palgrave MacMillan.
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The Humanistic Theory and Relationship to Learning

Words: 1564 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63696321

Elucidating Abraham Maslow and His Theory

Learning theories influence today's instructional systems. Emerging studies point towards a dearth of efficiency in the educational systems. Apparently, humanistic psychology is a third force in most fields among them educational psychology (Gonzalez-DeHass & Willems, 2013). However, while the root of most pioneer and most recent approaches in education is humanistic psychology, there is a lack of a comprehensive humanistic learning theory. Therefore, numerous theorists have tried to explain how people learn, for instance, constructivists, humanists, cognitivists, and behavioralists. The following study focuses on Maslow's concept of humanism learning theory which holds that learning is intrinsic and its goal is to generate some aspect of self-actualization.

Humanistic learning theory is a concept popularized by Abraham Maslow and Carl ogers, which highlights the human capacity for growth and choice (Poetter et al. 2004). Here, the basic assumption is that human beings possess free will and…… [Read More]

References

Gonzalez-Dehass, A. R., & Willems, P. P. (2013). Theories in Educational Psychology: Concise Guide to Meaning and Practice. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Education

Legge, K., & Harari, P. (2000). Psychology and Education. Oxford: Heinemann.

Mangal, S. K. (2007). Essentials of Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Prentice-Hall of India

Maslow, A. H. (2012). A Theory of Human Motivation.
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Humanistic Theory in Case Study

Words: 2134 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44675190

A good example of this can be seen with the fact that she has limited intimate relationships with men. This can be linked directly to her relationship with her father. As she would be close with him and then when she was arguing with her mother, he would become withdrawn. This is important, because the disconnection with her father, when she was having these issues would cause her to feel abandoned. When combine this with the feelings she would have at early age in school, this event would help Julie to view men from a distance. As she wanted to be close to them, yet because of her relationship with her father she would often become withdrawn.

To create change, the trained mental health professional must encourage Julie to overcome these emotions, by discussing the underlying meaning of what is taking place. At which point, they would begin to talk…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aversive Conditioning. (2010). Psychological Techniques. Retrieved from: http://psychologicaltechniques.com/aversive-conditioning/

Away Point. (2010). Psychological Techniques. Retrieved from: http://psychologicaltechniques.com/away-point/

Behavioral Modification. (2010). Psychological Techniques. Retrieved from: http://psychologicaltechniques.com/behavioural-modification/

Humanistic Theory. (2010). Hub Pages. Retrieved from: http://hubpages.com/hub/Humanistic-Theory-Hierarchy-of-Needs
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Psychology Degree Does Mean Something

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82138485



Thus, studying psychology is morally and intellectually improving. Psychology is so all encompassing as a field of study that it makes a person's mind more flexible. In psychology classes, a student must learn about analysis from a qualitative, even literary approach, as encompassed in the words of Sigmund Freud and William James. In other psychology classes, a student must understand how to interpret an Excel spreadsheet used in a research study to prove the efficacy of a particular antidepressant drug. Or, he or she must understand a more scientific and neurological approach to the human brain than more humanistic approaches to psychology might suggest in other classes. All of these different approaches are integral to modern psychology. A psychology major must be fluent in the liberal arts, the social sciences, and the natural sciences, and so he or she will be able to apply many approaches to solving problems in…… [Read More]

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Psychology A Brief History of

Words: 512 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33848317

Implicit in ogers' belief system was that clients must be in control of the therapy, and the therapist merely functioned as the guide.

Major School4: Cognitive-behavioral psychologists

Cognitive behavioral psychology is often a very time-sensitive type of therapy, with a specific goal, such as the elimination of a phobia or behavior. In contrast to humanistic or ogerian therapy, the cognitive-behaviorist directly challenges the client about his or her irrational belief systems.

The biology of psychology

The discipline of psychology has gradually shifted to a disease-based model, from Freud's psychoanalytic framework, reflecting the knowledge gained about how biological aspects of the brain affect learning, language memory, and behavior (Granek 2010). The more simplistic assumptions of the Freudian era, such as the idea that cold mothers produced autistic or schizophrenic children, or that sexual repression was the root of all diseases has fallen out of fashion. However, understanding how to heal individuals…… [Read More]

References

Beins, Bernard. (2010, February). Teaching measurement through historic sources. History of Psychology, 13(1): 89-94.

Granek, Leeat. (2010, February). Grief as pathology: The evolution of grief theory in psychology

from Freud to the present. History of Psychology, 13(1): 46-73.

Nyman, Lawrence. Documenting history: An interview with Kenneth Bancroft Clark. History of Psychology, 13(1): 74-88.
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Comparison of Humanistic Theory With Other Similar Theories

Words: 2182 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1658723

Humanistic Theory and Its Position Among Other Counseling Theories

Humanistic Theory

The obvious limitations associated with the Psychodynamic theories led to the adoption of the humanistic approach as a response to these limitations, especially in Psychoanalysis. People like Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers felt that the psychodynamic theories that were still in existence were unable to address certain important issues such as the nature of healthy growth and the meaning of behavior adequately. Nevertheless, the outcome was not just a new variation in the theory of psychodynamic, but rather, a new approach.

The Founders of the Accepted Theories

Carl Rogers

Carl Rogers wasn't just one of the several theorists who founded the Humanistic Approach, but possibly the most important therapist that lived in the 20th century. Several surveys, which include a number of surveys carried out after the death of Carl Rogers, discovered that several other therapists named Rogers as…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (U.S.). (1999). Brief Humanistic and Existential Therapies. In S.A. (U.S.), Brief Intervention and Brief Therapies For Substance Abuse. Rockville (MD): Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (U.S.).

Cater, J. (2011). Combining Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Motivational Interviewing. La Jolla, CA.

McLeod, s.(2007).Humanism. Retrieved from http://www.simplypsychology.org-humanistic.html.

Chong, C.L., Ng, A.M., Ching, J.Y., Beh, J.H., & Lim, P.P. (2015). A Critical Comparison of t he Psychoanalytic and Humanistic Theory. New Hampshire: Southern New Hampshire University.
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Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches to Personality Psychodynamic

Words: 1656 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20697898

Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches to Personality

Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches

Personality can be defined as the unique characteristics that various individuals possess. These characteristics differentiate individuals from others. In other words, personality can also be defined as a unique system of feelings, thoughts and behaviors that prevail over time and that is evident in various situations. Different psychologists have determined different approaches to study personality. Some psychologists try to examine various aspects of personality that an individual possesses, whereas, others try to understand why there are differences in the personalities of various individuals. (Morris et al., 2010)

Listed below are the two different approaches to personality;

Psychodynamic Approach

Psychodynamic theories establish the thought that our personality is an outcome of inner psychological forces which are not under the control of our conscious mind. Psychodynamic approach basically studies the energy of our unconscious mind and it also explores how this energy…… [Read More]

References

Morris, C. And Maisto, A. (2010). Understanding Psychology . Oxford: Orford University Press. pp.45-65. http://ftp.cleary.edu [Accessed: 11 Jun 2013].

Unknown. (2008). Theoretical Perspectives on Human Behavior. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publishers. pp.53-65. http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/36524_PE_Chapter2.pdf [Accessed: 11 Jun 2013].

Unknown. (2005). Personality. Thousand Oaks: Cluj-Napoca: University of Medicine and Pharmacy. pp.1-5.  http://psychiatry-psychology.ro/file/Stiintele%20Comportamentului%20ENG/Lecture6_Personality.pdf  [Accessed: 11 Jun 2013].
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Biological Humanistic Approaches Personality The Paper Cover

Words: 935 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11424023

biological humanistic approaches personality. The paper cover areas. *Use Maslow's hierarchy discuss extent growth influence personality formation. *Describe biological factors influence formation personality.

Biological and humanistic approaches to personality:

An overview of the debate

Biological theories have become increasingly popular in the field of psychology, as scientists seek to understand the roots of human behavior. Several reasons are at the heart of this shift in emphasis from 'nurture' to 'nature': the first is our expanding knowledge of neuropsychology and how different components of the brain affect behavior. A change in the physical matter or the environment of the brain can result in a change in personality. The second is the expansion of psychopharmacology, whereby aspects of the human character once thought beyond conscious control, such as hyperactivity or a tendency towards melancholy, can be shifted when medications change the individual's brain chemistry. Finally, changes in behavior are evident at different…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, Kendra. (2012). Hierarchy of needs.

http://psychology.about.com/od/theoriesofpersonality/a/hierarchyneeds.htm

Coccaro, Emil F. & Larry J. Siever. (2008). The neuropsychopharmacology of personality disorders. Psychopharmacology: The Fourth Generation of Progress,

Davidson, Richard. (n.d). Towards a biology of personality and emotion. Annals New York
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Biological and Humanistic Approaches to Personality

Words: 1254 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58448739

Biological & Humanistic Approach to Personality

Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs follows two distinct categories: deficiency motive, which include needs that must be fulfilled in order to move a person towards self-actualization (Burger, 2008). An example of deficiency needs would be basic needs like hunger or being safe. The second category is growth needs, which include a person progressing towards their unique potential, as well as giving love in an unselfish manner (Burger, 2008). For the purposes of this essay, growth needs will be discussed at length. The official hierarchy of needs follows a pyramid, with the bottom need being physiological needs like hunger and thirst; and up the pyramid with safety needs like protection or structure; belongingness and love needs like finding a mate or being close to someone; esteem needs like finding respect in ones work; and, lastly, the need for self-actualization, where a person fulfills their true…… [Read More]

References

Burger, J.M. (2008). Personality. (7th ed., pp. 299-301). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Burger, J.M. (2011). Personality. (8th ed., pp. 223-225). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books?id=bZY7I2_8yRMC&printsec=frontcover&dq=personality&hl=en&ei=BP7nTt3TEeSNsQLM2930AQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDUQ6AEwAA

Buss, D.M. (1990). Toward a biologically informed psychology of personality. . Journal
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Abnormal Psychology Is a Field in Psychology

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15792418

Abnormal psychology is a field in psychology that addresses dysfunctions in behavior which are determined abnormally by standards of behavior .These standards have been established by clinical professionals in the field such as medical doctors, psychiatrists and psychologists. Behaviors considered to be abnormal are; schizophrenia, depression, attention deficit disorder, eating disorder, sexual deviance, obsessive compulsive disorder and anti-social disorder (Cherry, 2012). These disordered function outside the normal parameters of the functional behaviors considered to be standard. The paper will look at the origins of abnormal psychology and challenges when it comes to the classification and definition of normal and abnormal behavior. It will also look at how abnormal psychology has evolved into a scientific discipline. It will finally look at the theoretical models that have led to the advancement of understanding psychopathology.

Origins of Abnormal psychology

Abnormal psychology has been undergoing tremendous changes and progress. It is a very controversial…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (2012).What is Abnormal Psychology? Retrieved May 10, 2013 from http://psychology.about.com/od/abnormalpsychology/f/abnormal-psychology.htm

Crawford, O. (2010). Psychopathology Analysis: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives of Abnormal Behavior and Psychopathology. Retrieved May 10, 2013 from http://voices.yahoo.com/psychopathology-analysis-6147988.html
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History of Psychology Although the

Words: 857 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53888937

An early influence on Gestalt psychology was the philosopher Immanuel Kant, who stressed that humans do not perceive the world as it is. Rather, they impose cause and effect relationships on it and therefore our perceptions are influenced by their experiences. Max Wertheimer was the strongest proponent of this approach. Gestalt psychology greatly declined when Nazis came to power in Germany and many scholars were forced to flee. In the United States, behaviorism was too strong to overcome, and many of its ideas were in opposition to Gestalt beliefs.

Humanistic therapy overlaps with CBT and both are very common in today's society. It emphasizes the growth and fulfillment of the self or self-actualization through self-mastery, self-examination and creative expression. Although the influences of the unconscious and society are taken into account, freedom of choice in creating one's experience is essential and is often referred to as self-determination. A humanistic therapist…… [Read More]

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Discovery of Psychology at the

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8563197

They developed several laws and principles to describe human experiences and perceptions. The cognitive movement was pioneered by the works of Chomsky and Piaget and focused on the role of cognition in relation with the outer environment (which provides input for information processing) and behavior.

The most important findings so far regard the components of visual perception, the most important stages of development (according to Piaget), how do most of our complex mental processes work (for instance memory, attention, decision-making etc.), how do processes like the orienting response, habituation, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and imitation influence behavior, how does the speech develop, the components of an emotional reaction, the relationship between cognition and emotion, how does the infant attachment develop and what impact it has on adult life, how the concepts of self-concept, self-awareness develop, the concept of self-esteem, the different temperamental types and personality etc.

This multitude of problems…… [Read More]

References

Pillsbury W.B. (1917). The New Developments in Psychology in the Past Quarter Century

The Philosophical Review, Vol. 26, No. 1,Jan., pp. 56-69 Johnson, D. (1998)The Future of Psychology Minds in Brains in Bodies in environments, Science Communication, Vol. 20, No. 1, 28-48
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Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Words: 3177 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56691092

Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Personality is defined as a person's exceptional deviation on the general evolutionary design for human temperament. A personality trait refers to a durable disposition to act in a certain manner in different situations. Personality traits represent some of the most significant sets of individual disparities in organizations. It is the comparatively set of psychological characteristics that differentiates one person from another. People should strive to comprehend fundamental personality attributes and the manner in which they influence a person's behavior (Griffin 2007).Most perspectives to personality presuppose that some traits are more fundamental compared to others. This concept underlie that a small number of basic personality traits determine other, more superficial traits. With respect to the biological approach to personality, personality traits are determined by human genetic inheritance, behavioral tendencies that develop from evolutionary history and human conduct that generate through intricate biological…… [Read More]

References

Andrewes, D. (2001). Neuropsychology: From theory to practice. New York: Psychology Press.

Ashton, Q. (2012). Advances in Nervous System Research and Application: 2011 Edition. New York: Scholarly Editions.

Carducci, B. (2009). The psychology of personality: Viewpoints, research and applications.

London: John Wiley & Sons.
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Clinical Psychology Module Five Questions Based on

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78344967

Clinical Psychology

Module Five Questions

Based on the results obtained in Santa's (1977) classic study, in what brain area would you expect that geometric information is analyzed? In what area of the brain would you expect verbal information to be analyzed?

I would expect that verbal information (words) would be analyzed in the left half of the brain while geometric information would be analyzed in the right half of the brain in a right-handed person.

I am following Brooks' procedure to scan a block letter. I began my scan at the bottom left point of the letter. The correct sequence of responses is: yes, yes, yes, no, no, yes. What is the letter?

The letter is "L."

I would like you to compare your god/divinity/first-cause (select one) constructions to those presented by Kunkel et al.

Kunkel et al. (1999) describe a number of the concepts that their subjects have developed…… [Read More]

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Clinical Psychology Psychodynamic Cognitive-Behavioral Humanistic

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71685561

Also known as person-centered or client-centered, Rogerian therapy, it "places much of the responsibility for the treatment process on the client, with the therapist taking a nondirective role" Person-centered therapy, 2009, Mind disorders). However, although effective with some clients: "Person-centered therapy, however, appears to be slightly less effective than other forms of humanistic therapy in which therapists offer more advice to clients and suggest topics to explore," as the client may use the therapy sessions more to complain or go over old grievances, than use the therapy to move forward in his or her life (Person-centered therapy, 2009, Mind disorders).

Another type of therapy that has radically escalated in popularity is that of family or marital therapy, which, like cognitive-behavioral therapy, tends to be focused on specific problems and of a fairly short duration. "Marriage and family therapists regularly practice short-term therapy; 12 sessions on average" FAQs, 2009, AAMFT). The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

FAQs about marriage and family therapy. (2009). American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://www.aamft.org/faqs/index_nm.asp

Mulhauser, Greg. (2009). An introduction to cognitive therapy and cognitive-behavioral approaches. Counseling Resource. Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://counsellingresource.com/types/cognitive-therapy/

Park, C. (2006, October 18). Best evidence summaries of topics in mental healthcare.

BEST in MH clinical question-answering service.
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Abnormal Psychology Theories Issues Diagnosis

Words: 2437 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61912524

The DSM explicitly "strives to be atheoretical, using merely observationally referent terms. The hope with this is to make the manual as acceptable as possible to professionals with different theoretical orientations (Gilles-Thomas 1989, Lecture 2). Specific criteria and systematic descriptions are offered as guidance for making diagnoses. "Essential features, associated features, prevalence rates, sex ratios, family patterns, and differential diagnoses are listed" and it is noted when "alternative or additional diagnoses…should be considered," such as the possibility that a manic episode could mask itself as schizophrenia (Gilles-Thomas 1989, Lecture 2). This might occur if the clinician was unacquainted with the patient and the patient's past history of depression, for example, and/or mood disorders in the patient's family.

Also key to the efficacy of the DSM in approaching the ideologically and theoretically charged world of abnormal psychology is its multiaxial system. The multiaxial system "allows for a more holistic and comprehensive…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abnormal psychology. (2009). a2psychology. Retrieved September 23, 2009 at http://www.a2zpsychology.com/articles/abnormal.htm

Gilles-Thomas, David L. (1989). Definitions. Abnormal psychology: Lecture 1. University of Buffalo. Retrieved September 23, 2009 at  http://ccvillage.buffalo.edu/Abpsy/lecture1.html 

Gilles-Thomas, David L. (1989). Classifications. Abnormal psychology: Lecture 2. University

of Buffalo. Retrieved September 23, 2009 at  http://ccvillage.buffalo.edu/Abpsy/lecture2.html
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Gordon Allport and Psychology of the Individual

Words: 2834 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18885570

Gordon Willard Allport, one of the most influential of American psychologists in the 1900s, was the youngest of four brothers. He was born in Montezuma, Indiana in 1897. One of his elder brothers, Floyd Henry Allport, was also an influential psychologist, and it is said inspired him (Hall & Lindzey). Allport, who graduated from Harvard with a Ph.D. In 1922, was a long time member of the faculty at Harvard University from 1930 until his death in 1967. He produced a number of influential books and professional works over his career such as the influential book The Nature of Prejudice. Allport was initially exposed to Freudian notions of behavior as a graduate student, but he rejected the notions of Freudian psychology and later notions of behaviorism (in fact there is the famous story of his meeting with Freud that often used to explain the development of his own theories). Allport…… [Read More]

References

Allport, G.W. (1937a). Personality: A psychological interpretation. New York: Holt and Company.

Allport, G.W. (1937b). The functional autonomy of motives. American Journal of Psychology, 50, 141-156.

Allport, G.W. (1955). Becoming: Basic considerations for a psychology of personality. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Allport, G.W. (1961). Pattern and growth in personality. New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.
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Personality Is a Branch of Psychology That

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71883399

personality is a branch of psychology that deals with personality and variations among individuals. Personality is an organized and dynamic set of characteristics possessed uniquely by individual, and influenced by emotion, cognitions, motivation, and environment. In other words, the personality is referred as pattern of feelings, thoughts; social adjustments as well as behaviors exhibited by individual that strongly influence one's self-perceptions, expectations, attitudes and values. (Vink, Nawijn, Boomsma, & Willemsen, 2007).

Humanistic Theory

The paper uses the Humanistic theory to explain the concept personality. The humanistic theory argues that people generally possess freewill that determines the way they behave. The reason for chosen humanistic theory to explain personality concept is that the theory focuses on individual subjective experiences and definitive factors that determine human behaviors. The basic idea of humanistic theory is that it focuses on the present rather than the future. The goal of humanistic theory is to assist…… [Read More]

On other hand, the cognitive theory believes that depression is often caused by the self-deprecating thoughts and cognitive approach try to change people negative thinking by assisting them to change the way they view themselves and the world. Social and behavioral learning approach points out that depression can be learnt through an interaction with social world and environment. These include thing people observe, and the depression can be overcome by learning the cause of depression from others. Trait approach suggests that depression is caused from an individual's character. (McCrae, 2001).

Dunlop et al. (2013) suggests different methods of overcoming depression. The authors suggest not all depressions can be treated using a medication. For example, a person suffering from bipolar disorder should consult a psychiatrist for treatment, and a medication such as mood stabilizer should be avoided in a bipolar disorder case. OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) is a type of depression in which its treatment may be challenging. In this case, antidepressants doses are necessary to overcome the OCD.

On the other hand, a patient suffering from psychotic disorders should consult a
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Allport's Psychology Gordon Allport Main Emphasis Has

Words: 555 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25095470

Allport's Psychology

Gordon Allport main emphasis has been on uniqueness of each individual, and he built a theory of personality in criticizing the non-humanistic positions of psychoanalysis and animal-based learning theory. Nevertheless, he became free in his approach and incorporated various ideas from other theorists.

The proprium

Allport believes that personality should be described as a simple bundle of unrelated traits. It is made up of consistency, unity, and integration of traits. Therefore it is genuine to think that a general principle that unifies, attitudes, traits, motives, experiences, and values exists. On his part, Allport has a view that the problem of identifying and describing the nature of integration needs a fully inclusive construct, for instance the ego, self, or style of life; formerly called soul. Allport later introduced a "proprium" as the new term due to the term losing its taste.

Allport's trait theory is based on the underlying…… [Read More]

Reference

Louise Barkhuus (1999) "Allport's Theory of Traits" Retrieved April 24, 2013. http://www.itu.dk/~barkhuus/allport.pdf
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Psychological Perspectives - Evolutionary Psychology

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38420394



Evolutionary psychologists therefore explain current human behaviors, especially instinctive ones, in terms of adaptive successes. A baby would feel safer in the secure space of a crib rather than an expansive lawn. A small fluffy mouse initially presents no threat, as our human ancestors likely preyed on smaller animals. Loud noises, however, can mean danger, so a child instinctively cries in alarm.

Cognitive psychology

Cognitive psychologists look at the internal mental processes that enable humans to learn skills such as languages, memory and problem solving. Notive cognitive psychologist Jean Piaget believed that humans go through different stages of cognitive development, and each stage should be marked by the acquisition of certain skills. In the Sensorimotor stage, which last from birth through two years old, babies learn to move and master their different senses. At the preoperational stage, from ages two to seven, a child should master motor skills such as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baum, W. 2005. Understanding behaviorism: Behavior, Culture and Evolution. New York: Blackwell.

Tavris, C. And Wade, C. 2000. Psychology in Perspective. New York: Prentice Hall.
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Environmental Psychology Securing Its Future by Harold

Words: 733 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20472726

Environmental Psychology: Securing its Future" by Harold M. Proshansky

Relatively young field, is it secure?

Epistemology: study or theory of the nature and grounds of knowledge

How did field begin, where is it going?

Environmental Psychology: Yesterday and Today

Yesterday

Empiricism -- theory of relying on observation, experiment, experience

Positivism -- theory that considers religion, metaphysics imperfect means, and relies on natural phenomenon and empirical sciences

Field developed in 1960s during social and political upheavals

But even before, after WWII -- new structures built, rapid growth -- increased research in social psychology, emphasis on attitude change, group processes, intergroup conflicts

Lewin (1948), Festinger, Schacter, and Back (1950) and Deutch (1949) students of Lewin (1948) -- began applying field theory conceptions to various social problems

Confluence of Forces

laboratory-experimental model but failure to apply to real world -- leads to loss of credibility and "malaise" in the social sciences in 1960s…… [Read More]

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Maslow's Humanistic Approach Article

Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28973934

Maslow's work, specifically his hierarchy of needs theory that provided insight into basic human needs and a potential hierarchical structure of said needs. This is a great way to introduce Maslow's concept of self-actualization and helps the reader gain insight into the nature of the concept by addressing the background and theoretical framework. "The five needs that were originally enlisted were physiological, safety, love and belonging, esteem and self-actualization. Maslow further expanded self-actualization into four needs, namely cognitive, aesthetic, self-actualization, and self-transcendence" (D'Souza & Gurin, 2016, p. 210). Although the information is a great addition to the introduction, there is no real development of thesis.

Literally for the entire paragraph, it is more of a regurgitation of information on Maslow's humanistic approach to development. Some of the lines even sound very similar from textbook descriptions of his work. The authors only begin to lean more towards their own examination of…… [Read More]

References

D'Souza, J., & Gurin, M. (2016). The universal significance of Maslow's concept of self-actualization. The Humanistic Psychologist, 44(2), 210-214. doi:10.1037/hum0000027
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Existential Psychology and Christianity Existential

Words: 496 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25849263



C. Philosophical aspects of existentialism as applied to psychology and therapy.

D. Kierkegaard and German existentialism.

E. Sartre and French existentialism.

F. Religious aspects of existentialism.

G. Humanistic aspects of existentialism.

II. Tenets of Christian therapy

A. Historical origins of Christian therapy.

B. Relationship of Christian therapy to Jungian therapy.

C. Function of Christian therapy.

1. Reconciliation of Christian beliefs and daily stressors

2. Reconciliation of Christian advocacy of selflessness and modern capitalist society

D. Goals of Christian therapy.

III. Intersection of existential psychology and modern Christian thought.

A. Exploration of ways in which Christian thought and humanistic discourses intersect

B. Exploration of the ways in which the practice of Christian therapy and humanistically-based modes of therapy intersect.

C. Expectations of Christian clients.

1. Will Christian clients feel that they are being appropriately served by existential psychology given its roots in humanistic and philosophical traditions rather than in Christian doctrine?…… [Read More]

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Learning Educational Psychology Multiple Choice

Words: 3789 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64594759



A behavior resulting from injury or disease behavior resulting from experience behavior resulting from disease or drugs biologically determined behavior

Evidence that learning has occurred is seen in published research studies changes in thinking changes in behavior emotional stability

Change in performance is preceded by bad reviews scientific research the behavior of others change in disposition

If-then statements may also be referred to as principles generalization hypothesis laws

Statements which summarize relationships are restricted to the physical sciences known as hypothesis known as generalization never used in the social sciences

Rules which govern the gathering of information are known as rigid and dogmatic scientific method being flexible

APA rules for research studies

Informed consent is given by the researcher judicial review the American Psychological Association the research subject

Laws are to beliefs as truth is to untruth accuracy is to inaccuracy convictions are to facts are to convictions

Trace conditioning…… [Read More]

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State Laws and the Rules of State Psychology Board

Words: 1392 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23416766

Professional Licensing

State Laws And The ules Of State Psychology Board

Professional qualifications: Questions

State rules and laws

The education and training of psychologists

In the state of Washington, according to Chapter 18.83 CW, 246-924 WAC, all psychologists must obtain a doctorate from an accredited institution. They must spend one year in a residency program, submit a dissertation, and complete a practicum and internship.

Qualification for licensure

The internship must be verified to consist of 1500 hours of supervised experience and must be completed within 24 months.

Certificate of professional qualification

Candidates must list the credentials they have held previously, answer personal questions about mental fitness and take the Professional Exam Services (PES).

Administrative process for misconduct

State boards are governed according to the laws of the state, "disciplinary actions start with an initial complaint or multiple complaints, and proceed through a series of investigative and adjudicative stages" (Bricklin 2003:…… [Read More]

References

Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB), (2012).Official Website.

Retrieved:

http://www.asppb.net/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=1

Bricklin, Patricia, Bruce Bennett, & William Carroll. (2012). Understanding licensing board disciplinary procedures. APA Publication.
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Maslow's Models in His Experiments

Words: 3835 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94561422

Maslow gave them that self-meaning and appreciation and became one of the pioneers of a movement that brought the focus of individual feeling, yearning and wholeness into psychology. He sort of read them out and spoke their thoughts, feelings and aspirations for them. He devoted much energy to humanistic psychology and the human potential and inaugurated the "fourth force" in psychology towards the end of his life. The first force consisted of Freud and other depth psychologists; the second force, the behaviorists; his own humanism and European existentialism, the third. This fourth force was made up of transpersonal psychologies that derived from European philosophies, which examined meditation, higher consciousness levels and para-psychological phenomena and which reacted against the then dominant psychoanalysis and behaviorism schools of the 20th century. Among the most prominent European philosophers were Kierkegaard, Husserl and Heidegger and the most prominent in the humanist/existential group were Carl Rogers,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beneckson, Robert E Personality Theory. Florida International University.  http://vorlon1.com/PersonalityTheory2b.htm 

Boeree, George C. Motivation and Personality by Abraham Maslow. Understanding Human Motivation. Personality Theory, 1970

http://www.psy.pdx.edu/PsiCafe/KeyTheorists/Maslow.htm

Dickinson, Dee. Revisiting Maslow. Transforming Education: New Horizons for Learning, 2002. http://www.newhorizons.org/trans/dickinsonmaslow.htm
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Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow Treatment Approach for Out Patient Therapy

Words: 2609 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55179211

Carl ogers and Abraham Maslow Treatment Approach for Outpatient Therapy

Carl ogers and Abraham Maslow treatment approach for out-patient therapy.

The study of human psychology is important in understanding personality of individuals. One can study personality of individuals, but there is no scientific method of studying personality of the whole humanity. Human are different from person to person and vey unique to some degree. This paper prompts a thesis, and it digs into the psychology of humans. It dwells on the person-Centered approach by Carl ogers and on the Humanistic Approach by Abraham Maslow.

Both Carl ogers and Abraham Maslow have an influence on today's outpatient therapy. Both scholars have had an influence on the humanistic psychology and personal centered approach to therapy. Although humanistic psychology gained its popularity in the mid 20th century, both scholars have further entrenched theories and practices that make it important in today's outpatient therapy.…… [Read More]

References

Kazantzis, N., Reinecke, M.A., Freeman, A. (2009). Cognitive and Behavioral Theories in Clinical Practice. New York: Guiford press

Clark, A.J. (2010). Empathy: An integral model in the counseling process. Journal of Counseling & Development, 88(3), 348-356.

Wong, P.T. (2011). Reclaiming Positive Psychology A Meaning-Centered Approach to Sustainable Growth and Radical Empiricism. Journal of Humanistic Psychology,

51(4), 408-412.
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Inter-Relationship of Various Psychological Perspectives

Words: 934 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89593096

Psychoanalytic and Humanistic Perspectives on the Person Conflicting, Co-Existing or Complementary

Psychoanalytic And Humanistic Perspectives On A Person

Humanistic and psychoanalytic perspectives have played an active role in influencing how we think of ourselves for a long time. Both humanistic and psychoanalytic psychology are perspectives that are conflicting, commentary and co-existing. According to scholars, the psychoanalytic perspective and revolves around an outsider's viewpoint and an insider's viewpoint of a psychoanalyst. Conversely, the humanistic standpoint privileges the insider viewpoint making an individual believe his or her own accounts to be unproblematic. This report endeavors to explain about the extent at which humanistic and psychoanalytic perspectives on an individual co-exist, complement, or conflict.

Extent at which they are conflicting

Both the humanistic and psychoanalytic psychology tend to have different models of what an individual entails. Both psychologies have different stands on fixity and the possibility of change. They also tend to produce…… [Read More]

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Psychological Treatment for Gender Dysphoria

Words: 3198 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11557244

Clinical Psychology and Gender Dysphoria

Advancement of Clinical Psychology with Gender Dysphoria

Clinical psychology is recognized as a psychology branch that deals with the assessment and treatment of abnormal behavior, mental illness, and psychiatric problems (Brennan, 2003). Clinical psychology integrates the science of psychology with treatment of complicated human problems, which makes it a challenging and rewarding field. American psychologist Lightner Witmer introduced the term in 1907. Witmer defined clinical psychology as a field that studies individuals by experimentation or observation, with the intent of promoting change. A clinical psychologist will try to reduce any psychological distress suffered by a patient and enhance their psychological well-being. Previously clinical psychology focused on the psychological assessment of the patients, and there was little or no attention been paid to treatment. This scenario changed after World War II in the 1940s because there was increased demand for trained clinicians. A clinical psychologist will…… [Read More]

References

Brennan, J.F. (2003). History and systems of psychology. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Prentice Hall.

Colomb, J., & Brembs, B. (2010). The biology of psychology:'Simple'conditioning? Communicative & integrative biology, 3(2), 142.

Eliason, M.J., Dibble, S.L., & Robertson, P.A. (2011). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) physicians' experiences in the workplace. Journal of homosexuality, 58(10), 1355-1371.

Leahey, T.H., Greer, S., Lefrancois, G.R., Reiner, T.W., Spencer, J.L., Wickramasekera, I.E., & Willmarth, E.K. (2014). History of Psychology. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education.
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Carl Rogers Was Probably the Most Important

Words: 1843 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54275109

Carl ogers was probably the most important psychologist and psychotherapist of the 20th Century apart from Sigmund Freud, and his humanistic, person-centered approach has been applied to many fields outside of psychology, such as education, business, nursing, medicine and social work. Many of the basic textbooks in all of these fields reflect his influence, including the concept of learner-centered education and the use of the term 'clients' instead of 'patients'. He wrote over 100 academic books and articles, the most famous one being On Becoming a Person (1961) which clearly describes his main ideas and is summarized below. Originally trained for the ministry and then in Freudian psychoanalysis, ogers gradually broke with this school of psychology as a result of his work with abused children and his study of phenomenology and existentialist psychology. Central to his theory was the development of a healthy self-concept that was open, expressive and spontaneous…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Cornelius-White, J.H.D. (2007). "Learner-centered Teacher-Student Relationships are Effective: A Meta-analysis. Review of Educational Research, 77 (1), pp. 113-143.

Demanchick, S., & Kirschenbaum, H. (2008). "Carl Rogers and the CIA." Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 48(1), 6-31.

Kramer, R. (1995) "The Birth of Client-Centered Therapy: Carl Rogers, Otto Rank, and 'The Beyond." Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 35.4, pp. 54-110.

Rogers, C. (1951). Client-centered Therapy: Its Current Practice, Implications and Theory. London: Constable.
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Counseling Theories

Words: 2191 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31525156

Counseling Theory

Existential therapy, person-centered therapy, and gestalt therapy all fall under the rubric of humanistic psychology. They share a considerable amount of theory, philosophy, and practice. Yet each of these practices is stemmed in its own theoretical framework; therefore, existential, person-centered, and gestalt therapies differ in key ways. ecent scholarship on existential, person-centered, and gestalt therapies builds on the rich canon of literature in these three core humanistic traditions, but is more than just summative. The following review of literature shows how existential therapy, person-centered therapy, and gestalt therapy are practiced in the 21st century, and in so doing, reveals the similarities and differences between these three humanistic psychological frameworks.

Existential Therapy

Existential therapy has been called "a way of thinking rather than…a particular style of practicing," (Corey, 2008, p. 216). Corey (2008) claims that existential therapy is "not a separate school or a neatly defined, systematic model with…… [Read More]

References

Ceil, C. (2012). Person-centered therapy. Social Science Electronic Publishing. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2051484 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2051484

Corey, G. (2008). The existential approach to groups. Chapter 9 in Theory and Practice of Group Counseling. Cengage.

Crocker, S.F. & Philippson, P. (2005). Phenomenology, existentialism, and Eastern thought in gestalt therapy. Chapter 4 in Gestalt Therapy: History, Theory and Practice. Sage.

Geller, J.D. (2003). Self-disclosure in psychoanalytic-existential therapy. Journal of Clinical Psychology 59(5): 541-554.