Julius Caesar Essays (Examples)

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Julius and Octavian Caesar the History of

Words: 1479 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42589092

Julius and Octavian Caesar

The history of ancient Rome is divided into eras based on the leader at the time. Two such leaders were Julius Caesar and Octavian, later Augusts, Caesar. The two men were alike in genealogy, close in time and temperament, and yet one was a pronounced success, heralded centuries and even millennia later, while the other is considered a failure when it came to creating a role for himself as sole ruler. hat determines a man is successful or unsuccessful? Historically, little is considered of individual successes or failures or who gained or lost the most domains for their empire. It is the will of the people that ultimately decides which is the better man. A tyrant may be an angel if he wins over the people, so too a benefactor may become a monster. History is written by the memory of the survivors. In the case…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brown, Frazer. "The Achievements of Augustus Caesar." (2009). Web. 29 Nov. 2010.

De, Damas Nicolas. Life of Augustus. Bristol: Classical, 1984. Print.

Kreis, Steven. "Lecture 12: Augustus Caesar and the Pax Romana." The History Guide. 17 Oct.

2010. Web. 28 Nov. 2010. .
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Caesar the Conquest of Gaul

Words: 1283 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15973617

Gaul

Classical and Historical Book Review:

Caesar, Julius. The Conquest of Gaul. New York: Penguin Books, 1983.

The author, Julius Caesar, of The Conquest of Gaul has been variously described as a "Roman patrician, politician, writer, reformer, general, dictator and," according to the decree of the Roman senate, later "a god." (Seindal, 2003) The military leader Julius Caesar's book upon his Gallic conquests famously begins, "Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres..." Or that Gaul is divided in three parts. The authorship of the book was motivated in part to define his legacy, as he fought these wars, as a great general and a great leader to the adoring Roman populace and the disapproving Roman senate. Thus, even during his lifetime, before he became an official God of the Roman world, Caesar was attempting to formulate his own following and legacy in print. Rather than allowing even his followers to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Caesar, Julius. The Conquest of Gaul. New York: Penguin Books, 1983.

Lendering, Joan. "Julius Caesar: A biography in 12 parts." 2003. ancientRome.  http://www.livius.org/caa-can/caesar/caesar04.html 

Seindal, Renee. "Julius Caesar." 2003. Romans: Historical Persons.  http://sights.seindal.dk/sight/766_Julius_Caesar-3.html .
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Comparison of Julius Cesar to George W Bush

Words: 1963 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99987865

Julius Caesar and George ush

William Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar explores the social and political underpinnings of perhaps one of the most famous assassinations of all time, the assassination of Julius Caesar by his friends. Currently we live in a time of major upheaval in the world, the combination of war and economic hardships have made this first decade of the new millennium a turbulent one. These two timeframes can be connected through their respective leaders. Shakespeare's Caesar bears a great deal of resemblance to our current leader, George W. ush. The following paper will attempt to make a comparison between these two figures, the Shakespearean Caesar and the real life President of the United States.

At the top of Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar is returning to Rome in a parade, triumphant in his victory over the Roman general, Pompey. This particular man is painted as Caesar's archrival, his nemesis…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Shakespeare, William. (1599) Julius Caesar. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Hatfield, J.H. (2001) Fortunate Son: George W. Bush and the Making of an American President. Brooklyn: Soft Skull Press.

Associated Press. (2003, May 1) Bush Experiences Aircraft Carrier Landing. Las Vegas Sun.

Martin, Patrick. (2002, December 24) U.S. Senate Leader Trent Lott Resigns. Retrieved May 6, 2003 from World Socialist Web Site. Website: http://www.wsw.org/articles/2002/dec2002/lott-d24.shtml
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Caesar Cesar's Work The Gallic

Words: 985 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47903322



One aspect at which Cesar's work excels in the interrelation between the descriptive geography and the characterization of the Germans is the political geography approach. In fact, much of Cesar's work is relevant exactly because it is a very scientific description of the way the tribes lived together in tribal formations during that time and how they came in contact with one another. Cesar is always very descriptive in his approach and clearly marks the areas in which these tribes lived, including the Germans, but also many of the neighboring tribes (his focus is certainly on the Gauls).

The Rhine is obviously central to the existence of the Germans and Cesar mentions it several times in his work, although most of the time only so as to limit the theatre if his own operations in Gaul. As such, his approach is that the Rhine marks the delimitation and border between…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Caesar, Julius. De Bello Gallico. Translation by Emanuel Hoffman. Oxford -- Clarendon Press. 1898

Caesar, Julius. De Bello Gallico. Translation by Emanuel Hoffman. Oxford -- Clarendon Press. 1898

Ibid.
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Constant Traits of Human Nature

Words: 566 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19222963

Bush and His Presidential Administration:

Alternatively, inflated self importance can also be caused by messages communicated throughout the formative years and subsequent reinforcement, such as are typical for many individuals born into lives of wealth, power, and social privilege

(Branden, 1999). In that regard, former U.S. president George W. Bush may share some of the consequences of having been born into a privileged family. His characteristic

"swagger" and defiance to objective criticisms, all the while displaying a degree of intellectual ignorance rarely witnessed among heads of states (at least in the free world)

may be the product of a privileged upbringing in conjunction with the unconscious realization that he did not earn admission to prestigious universities and graduate schools on the merits of his academic achievements, that he was never qualified to lead a Texas

National Guard squadron, and that his election to both a state governorship and a national…… [Read More]

References

Branden, N. (1999). The Psychology of Self-Esteem. New York: Basic Books.

Scheuer, M. (2004). Imperial Hubris: Why the West Is Losing the War on Terror.

Washington: Brassey's.

Uden, G. (1989). Longman Illustrated Encyclopedia of World History. London: Ivy Leaf.
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Elizabethan Culture Elizabethan England A

Words: 1399 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1311012

But Shakespeare does not try to render Republican Rome in faithful and accurate historical detail. "Peace! count the clock," says Brutus (2.1) although the play is ostensibly set during ancient times, and the practice of bear-baiting is referred to when Octavius says "e are at the stake / And bayed about by many enemies" (4.1)The entertainment of bear-baiting, a reminder of the brutality of the Elizabethan age, was even enjoyed by the queen and often took place near the Globe theater where Julius Caesar was first performed: "The bear was tethered to a stake in the middle of the ring, able to move only a short distance before being drawn up sharply when it got to the end of its tether. That's where the phrase 'at the end of my tether' comes from - the frustration and agony of not being able to go any further. Dogs would be released…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Elizabethan education. William Shakespeare Info. 2005. April 16, 2009. http://www.ask.com/bar?q=Elizabethan+school&page=1&qsrc=2417&ab=0&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.william-shakespeare.info%2Fwilliam-shakespeare-biography-childhood-and-education.htm

Entertainment at Shakespeare's Globe Theater. No Sweat Shakespeare. 2004. April 16, 2009.

http://www.ask.com/bar?q=Julius+Caesar+bear-bating&page=1&qsrc=2417&ab=2&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nosweatshakespeare.com%2Fresources%2Fglobe-theatre-entertainment.htm

Greenblatt, Stephen. Will in the World: How Shakespeare became Shakespeare. New York:
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Elizabethan Age Its History Culture

Words: 1125 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7540042

The fear of "disorder" "had significant political ramifications. The proscription against trying to rise beyond one's place was of course useful to political rulers, for it helped to reinforce their authority. The implication was that civil rebellion caused the chain to be broken, and according to the doctrine of correspondences, this would have dire consequences in other realms," whether the king was good or bad ("The Great Chain of Being," CUNY Brooklyn, 2009). Because rebellion was a sin against God, the whole order of the universe would be thrown in disarray if people rebelled against a sovereign, and this disturbance would be reflected in disturbances in the animal world and the heavens. "The need for strong political rule was in fact very significant, for the Renaissance had brought an end for the most part to feudalism, the medieval form of political organization," and the era oversaw the establishment of effective…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Peters, M.J. "Elizabeth I and the Elizabethan Period: a Brief Introduction

Springfield High School English Department. 1996. April 8, 2009

http://www.springfield.k12.il.us/schools/springfield/eliz/introelizperiod.html

"The Great Chain of Being." Borrowed from "The Renaissance" at CUNY:
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Shakespeare it Seems That William

Words: 308 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43854653

Antony offered Caesar a diadem, but Caesar refused it, saying Jupiter alone is king of the Romans, "possibly because he saw the people did not want him to accept the diadem, or possibly because he wanted to end once and for all the speculation that he was trying to become a king" (Julius1 pp). In Shakespeare's account, Antony says at the funeral, "I thrice presented him a kingly crown, hich he did thrice refuse. as this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious, And sure he is an honourable man" (Julius III.ii)

orks Cited

Julius Caesar. orld of Education. Retrieved August 30, 2005 at http://library.educationworld.net/s26/index.html

illiam Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. Retrieved August 30, 2005 at http://www.entrenet.com/~groedmed/jc.html

Julius1 Caesar: Historical Background. Retrieved August 30, 2005 at http://www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/caesar.html… [Read More]

Works Cited

Julius Caesar. World of Education. Retrieved August 30, 2005 at  http://library.educationworld.net/s26/index.html 

William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. Retrieved August 30, 2005 at http://www.entrenet.com/~groedmed/jc.html

Julius1 Caesar: Historical Background. Retrieved August 30, 2005 at  http://www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/caesar.html
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Didacticism in English Literature From

Words: 2121 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72486128

Thisclearly implies that this sort of perception was more of a weakness than an advantage.

Samuel Johnson's "The Vanity of Human ishes"

In this poem, the author demonstrates to the audience the reality of struggle in life. The author, just like, he mentions in the poem's title demonstrates how human wishes are, in many cases egoistic and useless. According to Meyers (p 1), Johnson had his reflection long years of human struggle, unavoidable fates, and theerroneous hopes. The author demonstrates some of the common situations that ordinary human being experience under the authority of certain political powers, which seem to have a hand in the sealing of their destinies. The author, in exploring this demonstrates how cruel, humiliating, and unwarranted such treatments are. The actions that the persona witnesses in the society make life to him more of a tragedy than anything else does. He in fact states that the…… [Read More]

Works cited

Chaucer, Geofrey. & Purves, Laing, D, the Canterbury Tales, Auckland: The Floating Press, 2012

Cunningham, J. S, Samuel Johnson: The vanity of human wishes and Rasselas, London: Edward Arnold, 1982

Flohr, Birgitt, Swift's Attitude to Reason in Book IV of Gulliver's travels "Swift Was a Rationalist with No Faith in Reason." Retrieved August 5, 2013,http://www.itp.uni-hannover.de/~flohr/papers/m-lit-18-century1.pdf

The Life and Death of Julies Caesar Shakespeare homepage | Julius Caeser | Entire play, Retrieved, August 5, 2013,  http://shakespeare.mit.edu/julius_caesar/full.html
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Figures of Legend in History

Words: 3464 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90699573

Conventional literature would
come to see Cleopatra as an exploitive whore, responsible for the downfall
of virtuous men like the Ptolemies, Julius Caesar and, inevitably, Marc
Antony as well. So is this reported by historical accounts such as that by
Cassius Dio who reflected that "Indeed she so enchanted and enthralled not
only Antony but all others who counted for anything with him that she came
to entertain the hope that she would rule the Romans as well, and whenever
she took an oath, the most potent phrase she used were the words, 'So
surely as I shall one day give judgement [sic] on the Capitol.'" (Cassius
Dio, 39) The argument given here in defining her persona would be the
clear understanding of her imperialist intent, so to say that it had been
always an ambition for this ruler to extend the Egyptian influence to new
heights. The Roman perspective…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Ashmawy, A.K. (1995). Cleopatra: The Last Pharoah, B.C. 69-30. History
of Alexandria. Online at <
http://ce.eng.usf.edu/pharos/alexandria/History/cleo.html>

Burstein, S.M. (2004). The Reign of Cleopatra. Greenwood Publishing
Group.
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Shakespeare's Women There Is a

Words: 1536 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31286656



ork Cited

Antony and Cleopatra. Retrieved September 30, 2005 from:

http://www-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/cleopatra/full.html

Brown, Lenora Inez. "Enter the Body: omen and Representation on Shakespeare's Stage." American Theatre. May 01, 2001. Retrieved September 30, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library eb site.

Desmet, Christy. "omen's Matters: Politics, Gender, and Nation in Shakespeare's Early History Plays." Comparative Drama. September 22, 2000. Retrieved September 30, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library eb site.

Hunt, Maurice. "Shakespeare's Venetian paradigm: stereotyping and Sadism in The Merchant of Venice and Othello." Papers on Language & Literature. March 22, 2003. Retrieved September 30, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library eb site.

Julius Caesar, The Life and Death of. Retrieved September 30, 2005 from:

http://www-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/julius_caesar/full.html

Othello, The Moore of Venice. Retrieved September 30, 2005 from:

http://www-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/othello/full.html

Starks, Lisa S. "Like the lover's pinch, which hurts and is desired: The Narrative

of Male Masochism and Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra." Literature and Psychology. December 22,…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Antony and Cleopatra. Retrieved September 30, 2005 from:

http://www-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/cleopatra/full.html

Brown, Lenora Inez. "Enter the Body: Women and Representation on Shakespeare's Stage." American Theatre. May 01, 2001. Retrieved September 30, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library Web site.

Desmet, Christy. "Women's Matters: Politics, Gender, and Nation in Shakespeare's Early History Plays." Comparative Drama. September 22, 2000. Retrieved September 30, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library Web site.
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Shakespeare Final Opportunity for Reflection and Writing

Words: 2240 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12727035

Shakespeare

Final Opportunity for Reflection and riting

Identifications:

"Stand and unfold yourself"

This quote comes from Shakespeare's Hamlet. Francisco and Bernardo are two guards standing watch in the middle of the night at the castle Elsinore. This is the second line of the play, spoken by Francisco in response to Bernardo's question of who goes there. It is an important part because it sets the tone for the rest of the play. Much of the story involves secret presences and the knowledge that people are being watched. This happens with Polonius as he is stabbed by Hamlet and with Hamlet when he is being watched by his uncle/stepfather. Uncertainty about being alone and who or what may be around lends to the overall confusion and mania of the characters which invariably leads to the tragedies which each of the characters then experience.

"tis the sport to have the enginer /…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Shakespeare, William. As You like It. 2000. Print.

Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Pub., 2006. Print.

Shakespeare, William. Julius Caesar. Cambridge [England: Cambridge UP, 1988. Print.
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Learn Others Learning -- and

Words: 902 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46631593



The Merchant of Venice, though ostensibly a comedy, is one of the more serious plays in the comedic genre. The Taming of the Shrew is far more humorous and light hearted, but it is not without its lessons. The specific lessons vary greatly depending on one's interpretation of the play, especially in performance, but one key lesson that most of the female characters fail to learn is the advantage of working in tandem with their husband. Petruchio manages to win a substantial amount of money through his new wife Kate's quick obedience; she has learned through the course of the play to at least give the appearance of docility and subservience, which the other women lack -- they have failed to learn anything from her transformation, seeing no problems in themselves form the outset. This failure costs them some cold, hard, cash.

It is in Julius Caesar, however, that Shakespeare…… [Read More]

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Elizabethan Age Culture Alchin L K

Words: 1031 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35056028

He exemplifies the expansion of the middle class and commercialism during the era. The book is a kind of inventive biography -- little is known for certain of hakespeare's life but Greenblatt uses the skeleton of hakespeare's plays to fill in details of common concerns of many figures of the period.

Long, William J. "The Elizabethan Age: 1550 -- 1620." From Outlines of English and American

Literature. April 4, 2009. http://www.djmcadam.com/elizabethan-age.html

This is an excerpt from a survey book on literature that is well-reputed in the field, although somewhat out of date. It examines the philosophy and history of the Elizabethan age and how it affected the literature of the period. It suggests the patriotic zeal and cultural vigor that resulted from the defeat of the Armada, scientific discoveries, and foreign travel and exploration were the reasons for the substantial literary output of this period's authors. It covers pencer, hakespeare,…… [Read More]

Shakespeare, William. "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar." From the Language of Literature.

Edited by Arthur N. Applebee. New York: McDougall Littell, 2006.

"Julius Caesar" is one of Shakespeare's 'Roman plays.' It reflects the Elizabethan reverence of the classical age. However, it also reveals anxieties over succession and usurpation of royal authority. It exemplifies the Elizabethan fascination with the supernatural's influence upon world events. And the contrast between Brutus' nobility and the political fallout from his assassination -- or political naivete in the face of Mark Anthony -- highlights Shakespeare's ambiguous characterization.
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Hamlet and the Renaissance Do

Words: 346 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66592229



Hamlet clearly melancholic view of the future of humanity, although he is capable of acknowledging goodness, as he does when he praises Horatio's character before the play-within-a-play, and he even praises Fortinbras' action in the name of the Norwegian's own father, although it goes against the interest of the Danish state. Finally, Hamlet admits that Laertes has a right to be angry on Polonius' account, as Hamlet's rash actions killed Laertes' father, even while Hamlet strove to avenge his own father. Thus, rather than a desperate view of human morality, Hamlet's inaction seems to arise from a combination of paralyzing depression about the nature of acting in a meaningless world and internal self-doubt. He also has an over-active intellect that enables him to rationalize both the murderous instincts of people going against his own interests like Laertes, and as well as his own revulsion at murder, as when he foolishly…… [Read More]

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Principal Ideas or Arguments Advanced

Words: 941 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99510345



The metaphor of the jigsaw puzzle-- "what good would it do to finish early? Three, the jigsaw puzzle isn't the important thing. The important thing is the fun of four people (one thin person included) sitting around a card table, working a jigsaw puzzle"-- illustrates that fat people enjoy the process of life and live in the moment, versus thin people who are purpose-driven and obsessed with completing tasks, even leisure-time activities that are supposed to be fun.

Q5. Identify the author's purpose and discuss whether or not she achieved that purpose.

The purpose of the author is to deflate society's obsession with perfection and to turn a bit of conventional wisdom -- the superiority of thinness and perfectionism -- on its head. The essay, through humor, achieves this purpose. Asserting the position in a serious way would likely have given rise to a debate about the health problems fostered…… [Read More]

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Southern & Northern Renaissance the

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56547404

Even in Catholic France, the Protestant sentiment that God's grace alone can save His fallen, human creation was evident in the humanist king, Francis I's sister, Margaret, Queen of Navarre's novel when she wrote: "We must humble ourselves, for God does not bestow his graces on men because they are noble or rich; but, according as it pleases his goodness, which regards not the appearance of persons, he chooses whom he will."

Shakespeare's Hamlet is haunted by the ghost of his father from Purgatory. Purgatory was a Catholic concept. But rather than trusting the vision of the divine on earth, Hamlet is suspicious about the ability of fallen human beings to enact justice. Rather than finding good in the face of women, Hamlet sees only evil. "In considering the cultural conditions that allow tragedy to revive, we may also want to consider that the plays occurred in Christian Northern Europe;…… [Read More]

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Cicero Marcus Tullius Cicero Was

Words: 2477 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56238511

This is clear enough from the play in which the man said, "Let them hate provided that they fear." He found to his cost that such a policy was his ruin.

When Antony and Octavian later reconciled, forming the Triumvirate with Lepidus, the young Caesar made no real effort to save Cicero when Antony immediately proscribed him. He had been informed, privately, of Cicero's quip to friends that the young man "must get praises, honors and push." In December, 43, almost two years to the day from his dinner with Caesar, Cicero was caught by Antony's soldiers in a halfhearted escape attempt. His brother Quintus and nephew had already been murdered. Cicero died bravely. His head and hands, cut off, were brought back and nailed to the ostra from which he had so often moved the crowd. Fulvia, Antony's remarkable wife, drove pins through the golden tongue which had so…… [Read More]

References

Church, Alfred. "The Baldwin Project: Roman Life in the days of Cicero by Alfred J. Church." The Baldwin Project. 2000. Lisa Ripperton. 22 Mar. 2005. http://www.mainlesson.com/display.php?author=church&book=cicero&story=atticus.

Clayton, Edward. "Cicero: Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy." The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2001. The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 22 Mar. 2005. http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/c/cicero.htm.

Cluett, Ronald. "Bryn Mawr Classical Review 96.11.5." Ccat.sas.upenn.edu. 1996.

Ccat.sas.upenn.edu. 22 Mar. 2005. http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr/1996/96.11.05.html.
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Enforcing Social Order in History

Words: 6392 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88410986

Sumptuary Laws in the Roman Empire

The Roman Republic and the Roman Empire were both grandiose and both are a major part of the history of the world. However, they were quite different in many significant ways but they were also similar in some ways as it relates to social structure, the way people dressed and how society proceeded and developed. The major difference between the two was that the Senate and people had a lot of power in the Republic while the Emperor reigned supreme in the Roman Empire. However, the differences are a lot deeper than that in some ways. hile some people conflate the Roman Empire and Roman Republic, there is a lot more than meets the eye when it comes to Roman History.

Analysis

The main differences between the Roman Empire and the Roman Republic are fairly easy to list. hen it came to the Roman…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Encyclopedia.com,. 'Sumptuary Laws Facts, Information, Pictures | Encyclopedia.Com

Articles About Sumptuary Laws'. Encyclopedia.com. N.p., 2015. Web. 27 Apr.

2015.

Fashion Encyclopedia,. 'Sumptuary Laws Regulate Luxury - Fashion, Costume, And
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Shakespeare S Machiavellian Characters and the Prince

Words: 1036 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79733489

Machiavelli and Shakespeare:

The Influence of Machiavelli on Shakespeare's Plays

The Italian enaissance-era philosopher and political adviser Nicolo Machiavelli is one of the most famous and infamous writers on the subject of politics. Despite the common use of the synonym Machiavellian for evil, Machiavelli's seminal tract The Prince was considered so ground-breaking because of his emphasis on the practical nature of holding principalities versus a philosophy of the divine right of kings. Cunning rather than religion was the reason leaders triumphed, according to Machiavelli. Machiavelli was not necessarily opposed to democracy but rather advocated strong-armed techniques because simply from the prince's perspective that these methods were superior in holding territories. Machiavelli offered hard-headed words of wisdom versus ethical theories. Machiavelli's unsentimental and irreligious attitude towards kingship was very controversial at the time and influenced many of the depictions of villains in the Elizabethan playwright William Shakespeare's plays, including Julius Caesar,…… [Read More]

References

Machiavelli, N. (2013). The Prince. Project Gutenberg. Retrieved from:

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/1232/1232-h/1232-h.htm#link2HCH0006

Shakespeare, W. (1993). Julius Caesar. Shakespeare Homepage. Retrieved from:

 http://shakespeare.mit.edu/julius_caesar/index.html
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Biblical Themed Short Stories

Words: 2265 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55948231

prim geography teacher. She is a disciplinarian who adopts strict rules for her classroom. Her teaching style is a common-sense method with her former students and citizens of Liberty Hill regarding her as the embodiment of wisdom and gentility. Like Miss Dove, Leiningen believes in hard work, refusing to leave his estate despite a swarm of soldier ants nearing his property. Early in the story it is shown he is wise as well. "First he had vanquished primal forces by cunning and organization, then he had enlisted the resources of modern science to increase miraculously the yield of his plantation." However, there are some differences. For example, Miss Dove is strict, reprimanding David Burnham for swearing. "Nothing is achieved by swearing," Miss Dove's sentence read. "Twenty Times."

Leiningen is not like that with the people he works with on his estate. He encourages them to stay with him to fight…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beka, A. ABEKA World Literature Fourth Edition Grade 10. Edited by Jan Anderson, 2012.
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Tracing a Jewish Theme Through Jewish History

Words: 3791 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28097176

Jewish Monotheism

Historians of Judaism actually date the strong Jewish emphasis on monotheism somewhat later than expected within Jewish history. The archaeological discovery of idols and artifacts indicating cultic participation from the time of Israel's presence in Canaan has seemed to indicate a relative laxity in actual practice before the Babylonian captivity, while textual criticism seems agreed that most of the Torah's foregrounded statements of strong monotheism date from textual recensions during the Babylonian captivity, and thus substantially post-date both the J-writer and the E-writer of the Old Testament (Moberly 217). But the strong emphasis on monotheism which comprises the first commandment given by Yahweh to Moses is a defining feature of Judaism in prevailing polytheistic cultures where the Jews can define their religion in opposition, so to speak. I would like to examine three separate ways in which Jewish monotheism defined itself against a kind of prevailing cultural polytheism.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ferrill, Arther. Caligula, Emperor of Rome. London: Thames and Hudson, 1991. Print.

Freud, Sigmund. Civilization and its Discontents. Translated with an introduction by James Strachey. New York: W.W. Norton and Co, 1962. Print.

Freud, Sigmund. Moses and Monotheism. Translated by Katherine Jones. London: Hogarth Press, 1939. Print.

Gay, Peter. Freud: A Life for Our Time. New York: Norton, 1998. Print.
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Comparison of Rome and Athens

Words: 1861 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54289158

Roman Empire and the Athenian Empire were alike in many ways. oth developed a culture based on the same mythology in order to unite their people in belief (the Romans Latinized the Greek gods and goddesses but the narratives remained largely the same). Individuals like Socrates in Athens or the early Christians in Rome were persecuted for teaching a faith that opposed the native mythology (Haaren, 2010). oth empires expanded their influence through war: the Romans conquered lands as far away as England, while the Athenians kept mainly to Greece but did repel invaders (like the Persians) and war against other city-states (as in the Peloponnesian Wars) in order to secure their own routes, borders and dominance in the region (Rome similarly destroyed Carthage multiple times so as to maintain its dominance). oth Rome and Athens were culturally and militarily suited to dominate, and this paper will describe how both…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Haaren, J. (2010). Famous Men of Greece. NY: ReadaClassic.

This classic work by Haaren is certainly a scholarly source, as Haaren was a highly respected classics professor and president of the department of pedagogy at Brooklyn Institute. His Famous Men series has been used by educators for decades to inform students about the history of the ancient civilizations. In this book, Haaren describes the lives and times of various important Grecian figures, including Pericles and Socrates. I plan on using this source to provide information on Athens and what it achieved during its height of empire as well as how it achieved it.

Homer. (2004). The Iliad. NY: Cambridge University Press.

Homer's epic poem is a classic of literature that has been respected, admired, taught and read for centuries. It provides insight into the Grecian mind as well as how the Greeks used mythology in their own lives. I plan to use this source in order to support the argument that Athens used culture to maintain its empire -- by building temples to the gods and goddesses, by celebrating art (drama), and by memorializing the heroic deeds of its ancestors.
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Sallust in His Historical Writings

Words: 4545 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56288337

]

In 46 B.C., once again Sallust was given an opportunity to shine or fail, as he was made a practor and sailed to Circina where he proved himself by stealing the enemies' stores. In return, Caesar rewarded Sallust with the title of proconsular governor of all of the province of Numidia and Africa. Others with a much stronger background were expecting this position, but it may have just been that Sallust showed a greater skill at organization. Sallust, however, takes advantage of this situation and when returning to ome was cited for extortion. [footnoteef:16] Caesar quickly acquitted Sallust, but that was the end of his political career. It appears that Caesar may have made a deal with Sallust that if he quietly disappears, he would not be tried. [16: Ibid.]

At this point in Sallust's life, he says he made the decision to give up his political career. Or,…… [Read More]

References

Dorey, T.A. (Ed) Latin Historians. New York: Basic Books, 1966

Earl, Donald C. The Political Thought of Sallust. Amsterdam: Adolf M. Hakkert, 1966

Handford, S.A. translator (1963) The Jugurthine War Middlesex: Penguin Books.

Laistner, M.L.W. The Greater Roman Historians. Berkeley: University California Press, 1963
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Sallust Is the Saying What

Words: 4295 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68955797

In Bellum Iugurthinum he claimed that the state will gain more advantage from his otium than from the negotium of contemporary politicians

SALLUST'S HISTOICAL WOKS

Sallust wrote several historical works, but the two monographs that remain intact are the Bellum Catilinae and the Bellum Jugurthinum. There are also four speeches and two letters as well as approximately 500 parts of his Historiae that was published in five books. It is believed by historians that "Sallust's merits as an artist have obscured, or made his readers willing to forget, his faults. As a historical authority he is at best second rank…Yet Sallust's value to us is considerable, mainly because his writings contain an interpretation of oman history during the late epublic often differing from that in our other sources and opposed to optimate tradition."

Even his speeches are valuable historically, adds Laistner,

for they are full of ethos and convey Sallust's…… [Read More]

References

Allen, Walter Jr. Sallust's Political Career. Studies in Philology 51.1(1954):1-4.

Earl, Donald C. The Political Thought of Sallust. Amsterdam: Adolf M. Hakkert, 1966

Laistner, M.L.W. The Greater Roman Historians. Berkeley: University California Press, 1963

Levene, D.S. Sallust's Jugurtha: A Historical Fragment. The Journal of Roman Studies. 82 (1992): 53-70.
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Management and Leadership Strategies Were

Words: 5635 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38896307

Specifically, Caesar masterfully showed how through building alliances one may achieve power and rise to the top of the leadership tier even in a group or society as vast as the Ancient Roman Empire (Abbott, 1901, p.385).

The Roman Empire also provides an example of organizational systems within the public domain through the Republican system. In the Roman Republican system of government, one man did not have the power to make law. Instead, power was balanced amongst three different branches of government: the executive, the legislative, and the judicial ("The Roman Empire"). In fact, this form of government introduced the concept of a senatorial body to the public. In Rome, the Senate was designed as a separate body of government from that of the Emperor so as to avoid the tyranny of one leader. Through the advent of the Senate, the Romans laid the groundwork for leadership structure of Britain…… [Read More]

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Etruscans as a Monolithic Group in Fact

Words: 840 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94990077

Etruscans as a monolithic group, in fact, they covered a wide geographic area with a civilization that spans many centuries from a millennium BCE to their putative dissolution a couple of decades BCE (Time International, 2001). The sculpture Etruscan warrior supporting a wounded comrade, from the early fifth century BCE, was created in about the middle of the Etruscan era.

At the time this sculpture was created, the Etruscans had begun exploring the coast of what is now known as the Italian peninsula. The Etruscans enjoyed dominion on the seas at the time, giving them "tremendous potential for trade as well as piracy" (Time International, 2001). It is obvious from the embellishment on the clothing of the two warriors that the Etruscans enjoyed their sea-based wealth. It is also easy to believe, as Time (2001) contends, that the Etruscans were a more jovial people than were the omans who supplanted…… [Read More]

References

Dillard, Annie. (2004) Etruscans, losing their edge. American Scholar, March 22. Retrieved 20 October 2004 from www.highbeam.com.

Julius Caesar Historical Background. Retrieved 20 October 2004 from www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/caesar.html

Masters of power and pleasure: A display of Etruscan arts and crafts reveals a civilization that seemed to enjoy a good fight as much as a good party. (2001) Time International, February 12. Retrieved 20 October 2004 from www.highbeam.com.

Rehak, Paul. (2001) Aeneas or Numa? Rethinking the meaning of the Ara Pacis Augustae. The Art Bulletin, June 1. Retrieved 20 October 2004 from www.highbeam.com.
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History and Development of Master Builder and Design Build Tradition of Western Civilization

Words: 6891 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11303212

Architecture through the Ages

Mesopotamia

Construction in ancient times is second only to agriculture-it reaches back as far as the Stone Age and possibly further (Jackson 4). Before the existence of master builders in design and construction the Code of Hammurabi (1795-1750 B.C.) referred to design and construction as a simple process (Beard, Loulakis and undrum (13). Hammurabi was the ruler of Babylon, the world's first metropolis and he codified his code of laws (Beard 13). This is the earliest example of a ruler introducing his laws publicly. The code regulated the organization of society including the extreme punishments for violating the law. The builder's work is addressed in the code, however faulty design and improper construction were viewed as one (13). Six specific laws address the builder. These laws are;

228. If a builder build a house for some one, and does not construct it properly, and the house…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Albert the Great." The Masonic Trowel. Web. 26 Mar. 2010. .

"Architecture and the Medieval Builder." Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia. Web. 26 Mar. 2010. .

"Basilica of Santa Maria Novella." Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia. Web. .

Beard, Jeffrey, Michael Loulakis, and Edward Wundrum. Design-Build:planning through Development. McGraw-Hill, 2001. Print.
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Emergency Governmental Powers and the

Words: 1575 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55089356

..and it is unlikely that the military will attempt to take over the executive branch by a coup." (2007) the media is not informing the citizens of what is occurring in many cases and a recent attempt to make a citizens arrest by over 8,000 individuals in Washington of President ush relating to war crimes resulted in many of those individuals being tasered and arrested.

SUMMARY and CONCLUSION

The future of the United States, according to what is known of the history of Rome, the predecessor upon which the U.S. originally based the form of its democratic government, appears to be bleak indeed. However, there is hope that the next presidential election will progress in a democratic manner and that the newly elected president will have the stamina and integrity required to see the United States return to the democracy upon which it was based and with the least pain…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Smitha, Frank E. (1998) From Republic to Emperor Augustus:. MacroHistory Online available at  http://www.fsmitha.com/h1/ch18.htm 

Urbinati, Nadia (2002) the Criticism of Intellectual Critics. Online available at  http://logosonline.home.igc.org/urbinati.htm 

Johnson, Chalmers (2007) Republic or Empire: A National Intelligence Estimate on the United States. Harper's Magazine. Jan 2007. Online available at http://www.harpers.org/archive/2007/01/0081346

Tomgram: Chalmers Johnson on the Fall of the Republic (2003) TomDispatch.com 9 Sept. 2003. Online available at  http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/938/chalmers_johnson_on_the_fall_of_the_republic/
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Spartacus an Analysis of Stanley Kubrick's 1960

Words: 2126 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80798503

Spartacus

An Analysis of Stanley Kubrick's 1960 Spartacus

Gerald Mast (2006) notes that "as with enoir, Kubrick's social evils are human evils; the problem is human nature," (p. 542) and such can easily be applied to Kubrick's 1960 Spartacus -- despite the fact that the film cannot really be said to be his. Spartacus is more Kirk Douglas' vehicle than anything. Bought by Douglas, the story was meant to be his answer to Heston's Ben-Hur -- the same sweeping scope, the same omanic epic. (Douglas, in fact, fired several members of the crew -- including the director, which is how Kubrick, then only 30, got the job). Nonetheless, the Spartacus narrative does not shy away from the kind of lore that Kubrick would go on to make infamous. Douglas turns his Spartacus into a kind of Christ-figure (dying, of course, not for man's sins but for freedom -- liberation, after…… [Read More]

Reference List

Ebert, R. (1991). Spartacus. RogerEbert.com. Retrieved from http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19910503/REVIEWS/105030304/1023

Fitzgerald, J. (2009). Historical Accuracy Need Not Apply. Amog. Retrieved from http://amog.com/entertainment/historical-accuracy-apply-top-war-movies-fabrications/

Haaren, J.H. (1904). Famous Men of Rome. New York, NY: American Book

Company.
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Norman Cousins Gentleman Involve Internet Research Responding

Words: 1481 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53105867

Norman Cousins gentleman involve internet research responding men's achievements I needing an essay assignment information presented Norman Cousins.

The Roman Republic, it can be said, acted at first as an aristocratical form of governance because it was only the upper class that was allowed to hold public office and that was administrating every decision making. Due to pressures coming from the plebeians who represented the lower-class, concessions were made throughout the years that allowed for the latter to have more influence. However, these liberties were somewhat limited. hat's more, military force, which was unanimously supposed to have worked for the benefit of society, was disrupted by separated affinities with each general having his own army instead of a single one existing. Because of such discontinuities, the Roman Republic started to destabilize itself up to the point of the republic being overcome by a new form of government, the empire.

The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Craig, Albert M., Graham, William A., Kagan, Donald, Ozment, Steven, and Turner, Frank M. The Heritage of World Civilizations. Vol. 1. 9th ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Print.

Holland, Tom. Rubicon: The Last Years of the Roman Republic. New York: Anchor Books, 2003. Paperback.
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Ancient Roman Religion

Words: 3936 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33196915

Roman Religion

Although the ancient Roman religion might seem a far cry from today';s contemporary context, in reality Roman religion continues to inform and shape Western culture to this day (the celebration of Christmas being one example). While there are a number of literary sources which provide contemporary scholars with information about Roman religions, both in terms of belief and practice, this religions information is encoded into the landscape and physical space of Rome itself, from the layout of its forums to the sculptures which adorn its altars. y examining three such sources in detail, the Ara Pacis, the Forum of Augustus, and the grove of the Arval rothers, one will be able to understand how Roman religion permeated Roman social and political identity and organizations, and furthermore, how these concurrent strains of identity-formation and power relations etched themselves into the very physical objects left behind to be discovered and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ando, Clifford. The Matter of the Gods: Religion and the Roman Empire. Berkeley: University

of California Press, 2008.

Beard, Mary, John North, and Simon Price. Religions of Rome, Volume 1: A History. Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press, 1998.
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Epistle of Paul to Philemon

Words: 20604 Length: 60 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75843868

The divisions ere as such:

1. The highest class amongst the slave as of the slave minister; he as responsible for most of the slave transactions or trades and as also alloed to have posts on the government offices locally and on the provincial level.

2. This as folloed by the class of temple slaves; this class of slaves as normally employed in the religious organizations usually as janitors and caretakers of priestesses in the organization.

3. The third class of slaves included a range of jobs for slaves i.e. slaves ho ere appointed as land/property etc. managers ere included in this class as ell as those slaves ho ere employed as merchants or hired to help around the pastures and agricultural grounds. A majority of this class included the ordinary household slaves.

4. The last class amongst the slaves also included a range of occupations of the slaves extending…… [Read More]

works cited at the end.

If I were to conclude the significance of Paul's letter to Philemon and his approach to demand Onesimus' hospitality and kinship status, I can say that it was clearly his approach towards his demands that has made the letter such a major topic of discussion with regards to slavery. If Paul had taken an aggressive approach and straight away demanded the release and freedom of Onesimus, the letter would not been preserved in the history books for the generations to follow; that is a surety. I say this because it was Paul's approach and choice of language structure that caused for a large amount of debate to follow. It has been this debate, whether it has been on slavery or the various interpretations of his language structure, that has allows this letter and the relevant history to live on through the centuries. Of course, it is important to understand Philemon's role here as well, because it was his choice to treat the letter with a certain amount of respect and dignity that contributed to the letter's longevity as well. If Philemon had chosen to disregard Paul's requests and thrown away the letter as one that was not worthy of consideration, nobody would've even had the chance to debate the letter's significance in history. This again takes me back to the language structure adopted by Paul as he was able to soften his approach of the numerous demands as well that helped Philemon play his part of respecting what was demanded. Interestingly enough, Onesimus did go on to take on the duties as a bishop! To think that this line of action came about with only a choice of softening one's demands is extra-ordinary and the credit goes solely to Paul!

Bibliography

JM.G. Barclay, Colossians and Philemon, Sheffield Academic Press, 1997

Bartchy, S.S. (1973). First-Century Slavery and the Interpretation of 1 Corinthians 7:21 (SBLDS 11; Atlanta: Scholars Press) 175.
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Primary Source Critique Tacitus Life of Cnaeus

Words: 1048 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29707472

Primary Source Critique

Tacitus: "Life of Cnaeus Julius Agricola"

Unlike our own period of time, the ancient Romans experienced very little angst about the prospect of colonizing a geographically and ethnically distinct people for the enrichment of their own country. As is evident in Tacitus' "Life of Cnaeus Julius Agricola," the British resistance to Roman colonization is viewed as evidence of the British people's barbarity, not praiseworthy British fortitude against foreign domination. However, the Roman Tacitus also used the example of Britain not simply to praise his father-in-law Cnaeus Julius Agricola, but also to praise what he considered the true Roman values of freedom, austerity and military valor, in contrast to licentiousness and laziness, which he felt, was characteristic of contemporary Roman morality. This primary source text thus is less a fair portrayal of Britain of the era as it is an introduction to what Romans of Tacitus' class considered…… [Read More]

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Life of St Martin of Tours

Words: 903 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50135677

St. Martin of Tours

Sulpicius Severus, who wrote the work The Life of St. Martin of Tours, wrote the life story of St. Martin out of his great admiration for the man. In his preface he says to the one who urged him to write the story that he feared his skill with language would not be good enough for such an important task. He finally wrote the work because in his words, "because I thought it disgraceful that the excellences of so great a man should remain concealed." Sulpicius saw St. Martin's life as one others should try to emulate, and for that to happen, people would have to know something about how St. Martin had lived.

Martin was drawn to Christianity when he was 10 and immediately began studying his new religion. Following Christ's example, he gave all he could to those who needed it more, keeping back…… [Read More]

At the end of the book, Sulcipius states that no one ever saw Martin enraged, or excited, or lamenting, or laughing; he was always one and the same: displaying a kind of heavenly happiness in his countenance...." Perhaps Sulcipius does not realize he has made Martin sound better than Christ himself, who was occasionally angered. Sulcipius has presented a fascinating account of St. Martin's life, but one that has to be considered within the biases of the author.

SOURCE:

 http://www.users.csbsju.edu/~eknuth/npnf2-11/sulpitiu/lifeofst.html#1
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Timeline From Abraham to Birth of Christ

Words: 490 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24545816

Abraham to Jesus with other Major Historical Events

2100 BC: Abraham moves to Canaan under a direct order from God. Canaan later becomes Israel.

2000 BC: Jacob, grandson of Abraham, is born in Canaan. Jacob is later renamed Israel. His 12 sons become the heads of the 12 Tribes of Israel.

Hammurabi builds up Babylon in the Fertile Crescent.

The Minoan Bronze Age in Crete.

1900 BC: One of Jacob's sons (Joseph) is sold into slavery. Joseph rises to power in Egypt.

1500 BC: The Indian Hindu Scriptures the Rig-Veda are completed.

1400 BC: The Israelites (after being enslaved for four centuries by Pharaoh) are led by Moses out of Egypt. Joshua takes the lead after Moses dies. It is to Moses that the first five books of the Old Testament are attributed.

1200 BC: The Trojan War.

1000 BC: Saul becomes king of the Israelites. David is anointed. David…… [Read More]

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Roman World

Words: 724 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34743438

oman World

ome, whose beginning can be traced in 753 B.C., is the capital city of Italy. Initially, kings ruled the city; however, the last king, Tarquin the Proud, was overthrown. ome, then, became a republic for the next four hundred years. During this time, the republic was ruled by a Senate. The people to do different jobs in the senate were called Senators (Buckleitner, 58). However, not everyone was allowed to vote in these elections: women, slaves, and poor people were not allowed to vote. Those oman people who were not slaves were called 'citizens'.

In 55 B.C. The oman general Julius Caesar conquered France (At the time the country was called Gaul, and the omans called it Gallia). The Gauls fought hard against the omans and had been helped by Britain. Caesar was disappointed by their assistance and attempted to invade Britain, first in 55 B.C. And then…… [Read More]

References

Buckleitner, Warren. Ancient History: Lives and Times in Ancient Egypt, Greece, and the Roman Empire. School Library Journal, Vol. 50, No. 2, (2004): 58.

Dowling, Melissa Barden. A Time to Regender: The Transformation of Roman Time. KronoScope, Vol. 3, No. 2, (2003): 169-184.

Dyck, Ludwig Heinrich. CAESAR'S First Great Campaigns. Military History, Vol. 20 No. 6, (2004): 50-56.

Purcell, Nicholas. The Way We Used To Eat: Diet, Community, And History At Rome. American Journal of Philology, Vol. 124, No.3, (2003): 330-358.
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New Type of Leadership and

Words: 499 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7177232

The size of the army reached nearly 200,000 (Everitt 2007). Augustus also instituted programs to provide additional payments to both retired and active Roman soldiers for their duties.

idespread efforts were made by Augustus to reduce unnecessary excess by government while increasing spending on beneficial programs that presented utility rather than the perception of power (Everitt 2007). Consistent with these efforts, Augustus melted down dozens of silver and gold statues constructed in his likeness to emphasis the importance of modesty and the dangers of excess (Everitt 2007).

Augustus' institution of regulated taxation provided dramatically increased revenue for Rome and allowed for the increased expenses of social reform (Everitt 2007; Suetonius, Graves, and Grant 2002). Similarly, private taxation was abolished and increased the taxation purview of the Roman governance (Everitt 2007). Augustus prudently utilized the nascent taxation reform to provide funding for the maintenance of extensive road networks throughout Italy, among…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Everitt, Anthony. 2007. Augustus. Random House, Inc., October 9.

Suetonius, Robert Graves, and Michael Grant. 2002. The twelve Caesars. Penguin Classics, December 31.
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World During First Century CE

Words: 1350 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82327653

political, social and economical processes of the first century AD, it's important to distinguish main superpower, which dictated its values and spread its influence on other nations and ethnic groups. If to look on the problem from these perspective the problems that arose from such interaction will become obvious and clear. That's why we have to describe the processes that took place in the oman Empire, the only super state on the world's map of that epoch.

At the beginning of the first century the power of oman empire had expended over the territories of Mediterranean region: omans had conquered Britain, Spain in the West and reached eastern borders of their possessions on the territories of modern Armenia, Northern Mesopotamia in the East, omania in the North and Sarah in the South. oman emperors starting from Julius Caesar expanded and empowered oman Empire, its territories, increased army and turned into…… [Read More]

Reference:

Craig, Albert M. Heritage of World Civilizations, Combined Volume (6th Edition) Prentice Hall; 6th edition 2002
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Ivan the Terrible Ivan IV

Words: 4848 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13144931

The Southern Dvina flowed from the heart of Russia into the Baltic near Riga, but through hostile Livonia. The headwaters of the Dvina and the Volga were not far apart and could have been connected by canals, thus providing a water route that might atone for the disproportion of Russia's enormous landmass to her coasts and ports. The Baltic would unite with the Caspian and the Black Sea, and East and est would meet.

In 1557, Ivan sent an army to Livonia, which ravaged the country brutally, burning houses and crops, enslaving men and raping women until they died. hen Livonia appealed for help, Stephen Bathory roused the Poles and led them to victory over the Russians at Polotsk, and Ivan yielded Livonia to Poland. However, long before this set back, his campaign had led to revolts on the home front. Merchants whom Ivan had thought to benefit decided that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cavendish, Richard. 2002. Kazan falls to Ivan the Terrible: October 2nd, 1552. History

Today. 01 October. Available Online from HighBeam Research Library, accessed 12 October 2006.

Dolmatov, Vladimir. 2003. Britain and Russia. History Today. 01 July.

Available Online from HighBeam Research Library, accessed 12 October 2006.
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Growing Power of the Patricians During the

Words: 589 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36365413

growing power of the Patricians during the fifth century B.C. influenced the Plebeians in wanting to have political equality to the upper classes. The common people realized that they held great power in the state and that by emphasizing the important role they played they would succeed in persuading Patricians to share their power. The fact that ome was at war with neighboring tribes concomitantly with this conflict enabled Patricians to understand that they had to cede power in order to achieve success.

Plebeians were unsatisfied with the unimportant role they held in politics and they struggled to make Patricians provide them with the opportunity to occupy public offices. In spite of the fact that they were provided with access to all offices, the Plebeians continued to be control by Patricians through other means and the condition of the average Plebeian did not change significantly.

Augustus Caesar is the first…… [Read More]

References:

McKay, J.P., 2009, A history of world societies, 8th edition, Bedford / St. Martin's
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Democracy in Author Jacques Ranciere's Book on

Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12869994

Democracy

In author Jacques Ranciere's book On the Shores of Politics, he discusses what he believes are the important concepts in understanding democracy and how it is used by people. Most importantly in the chapter "The Uses of Democracy" is his belief that true democracy has yet to be envisioned. In the United States and other countries, as time progresses the nations which are built upon democratic systems of government move further away from the principles of that government's founding. After the fall of Communist regimes, the supremacy of the democratic viewpoint seems to have been strengthened but in reality the situation is only becoming more divisive, at least according to Ranciere's perspective. The differences between democracy as ideal and democracy in practice is growing with the advent of "liberal democracy" which itself demands a reorganization and reprioritizing of democratic ideals based on growing concern for individuals.

The word democracy…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Ranciere, Jacques. "The Uses of Democracy." On the Shores of Politics. Verso, 2007. 39-61.

Print.
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French Associate Their Country With a Geometrical

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11459333

French associate their country with a geometrical shape.

Hexagon

Circle

Octagon

Square

Having read the section on geography and weather, which one of the following regions is best known or most typically known for this type of weather:

Hot summers and cold sometimes snowy winters

North and Western Coastal Regions

Vosges, Jura, Alps, Pyrenees

Central and Eastern France

The South (also known as the Midi)

Having read the section on geography and weather, which one of the following regions is best known or most typically known for this type of weather:

Hot summers and mild winters often made colder by the cold Mistral wind

North and Western Coastal Regions

2.

Vosges, Jura, Alps, Pyrenees

3.

Central and eastern France

4.

The south (the Midi)

Question 4

Having read the section on geography and weather, which one of the following regions is best known or most typically known for this type…… [Read More]

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Military Strategies Employed by Alexander the Great

Words: 1866 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82746280

military strategies employed by Alexander the Great and how he was able to skillfully use his political and military skills in conquering most of Europe and Asia in his time.

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon reigned as the king of Macedonia from 356-323 B.C. He was born to King Philip and his third wife, Olympias in July 356 BC in Pella, Macedonia. He is remembered as one of the greatest military genius in history. During his lifetime, he conquered much of world, since his main ambition was to conquer the world and create world monarchy.

Alexander, was the strong, handsome commander leading his army using the best military strategies of his time. His army was armed with sarisses, the fearful five and half meter long spears. He was the first great conqueror to invade Greece, Egypt, and India. He was popular for creating ethnic syncretism between the Macedonians and the conquered…… [Read More]

References

Arrian. Campaigns of Alexander, The (~90-172 A.D.)

J.F.C. Fuller. Generalship of Alexander the Great (1958)

J. Keegan. Mask of Command, The (1987)

Lisa Jardine, Worldly Gods: A New History of the Renaissance (London: Macmillan, 1996) pp. 67-68
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Flavius Joephus Much of the

Words: 5117 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14765313

And he gained a following both among many Jews and among many of Greek origin. He was the Messiah. And when Pilate, because of an accusation made by the leading men among us, condemned him to the cross, those who had loved him previously did not cease to do so. For he appeared to them on the third day, living again, just as the divine prophets had spoken of these and countless other wondrous things about him. And up until this very day the tribe of Christians, named after him, has not died out (18.63-64)

This paragraph has also been very controversial, because many believe it would not be likely that Josephus would have written that Jesus "appeared to them on the third day, living again." Some scholars say that Josephus had given up all his Jewish leanings by this time, but others say that this was not the true…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Albright, William and C.S. Mann. The Anchor Bible. Matthew. New York: Doubleday, 1971

Benjamin, Jules R. A Student's Guide to History. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's Press, 2004

Broshi, Magen. The Credibility of Josephus. Journal of Jewish Studies: Essays in Honor of Yigael Yadin 1982 from Oxford Centre for Postgraduate Hebrew Studies.  http://www.centuryone.com/josephus.html  Accessed 10 April, 2010

Carr, Edward Hallett. What Is History? Random House. New York. 1961.
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Kings Ali as Artist Normative

Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60019768



The fight itself was beautifully orchestrated by Ali through the study of Foreman's technique, movement, strength, and weaknesses. hile preparing for the fight, Ali focused training on his weaknesses, and on Foreman's strengths as a fighter. Ali also took advantage of the public's support and encouragement and used it to build up his esteem, mentally and amongst the African peoples. Foreman, on the other hand, stayed out of the public eye and was reluctant to take part of the cheering for or against his opponent. Foreman was rather laconic during his stay, saying little and staying out of the spotlight. Ali took advantage of the publicity that the fight was receiving and was constantly in front of the camera, whether he was boasting his great skill, advocating his political views, or trying to psych Foreman out. Ali boasts include his great ability to be able to manipulate Foreman's actions stating,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

D'Silva, Roy. "History of Boxing." Buzzle.com. 2011. Web. 3 February 2011.

Gast, Leon. When We Were Kings. Gramercy Pictures, 1996. Film.

Graham, Gordon. Philosophy of the Arts: An Introduction to Aesthetics. New York:

Routledge, 2005. Print.