Last Of The Mohicans Essays (Examples)

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Last of the Mohicians James Fennimore Cooper's

Words: 1162 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69549632

Last of the Mohicians

James Fennimore Cooper's The Last of The Mohicans was published in 1826, part of a pentology, but the best known work for contemporary readers. The story takes place in 1757 during the French and Indian War, when France and Great Britain were at odds for dominance of the North American Colonies. During this war, the French made treaties and allied themselves with many Native American tribes to up the balance between the far more numerous British and colonialists. It was written in a popular genre of the time in which historical accuracy came second and numerous inaccuracies in terms of Native culture were simply overlooked, or became part of White popular culture (Peck). Ironically, there is a famous American author who took great pains to deride the material, Mark Twain. Twain found the novel lacking in variety with excessive verbiage, and even suggested that before praising…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Boles, J., ed. A Companion to the American South. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004. Print.

Cooper, J.F. The Last of the Mohicans. New York: MacMillan, 1921. Print.

Franklin, W. The New World of James Fenimore Cooper. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982. Print.

Meacham, J. American Lion. New York: Random House, 2008. Print.
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James Cooper's the Last of

Words: 1177 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21039616

Hawkeye again reminds us that "there is no cross" in his veins, that he is a pureblooded white man.

The book does not segregate itself to the discussion of only Native Americans and the feelings thereof, but also has occasion to discuss the prevailing sentiment in regards to African-Americans as well. As General Monro reveals in Chapter Sixteen, we find that Cora has a "cross" in her blood:

There it was my lot to form a connection with one who in time became my wife and the Mother of Cora. She was the daughter of a gentleman of those isles, by a lady whose misfortune it was, if you will" said the old man proudly, "to be descended, remotely, from that unfortunate class who are so basely enslaved to administer to the wants of a luxurious people." (Cooper 201)

It is perhaps a little difficult to discern but the General…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cooper, James Fenimore. The Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757. Cleveland, OH: World

Publishing, 1957.

Smith, Lindsey Claire. "Cross-Cultural Hybridity in James Fenimore Cooper's the Last of the Mohicans." ATQ (the American Transcendental Quarterly) 20.3 (2006)
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James Fenimore Cooper the Last

Words: 1887 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95397823

Fenimore is responsible for having provided the public with an adventurous history of the old American landscape.

In spite of the fact that James Fenimore Cooper has been born in New Jersey, his father decided to move the whole family to an area around Otsego Lake, near New York, a place where he owned some land. This presented James with the chance of coming across a vast forested territory where Indian tribes roamed free.

James's father had attempted to give the boy a good education, but he had not been enthusiastic his boys academic achieving, as the latter was dismissed from Yale and later resigned from the navy. The reason for his resignation had been that he wanted to spend more time with his wife, Miss Susan De Lancey. Consequent to several divergences he and his wife had over his writing style vs. his capabilities, with the latter mocking him,…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Dennis Ian, "The Worthlessness of Duncan Heyward: A Waverley Hero in America," Studies in the Novel 29.1 (1997).

2. Fenimore Cooper James, the Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757 (Cleveland, OH: World Publishing, 1957)

3. Lamberton Becker May, "Introduction How This Book Came to Be Written," the Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757 (Cleveland, OH: World Publishing, 1957) 5.

4. Pitcher Edward W., "The Beaver and His Cousin in Cooper's the Last of the Mohicans," ANQ8.2 (1995): 11.
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Good and Bad

Words: 1955 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27835180

goal of early Americans was to expand out est. Early settlers believed the est housed new opportunities, gold, land, and most of all freedom. However with the expansion came controversy. Native Americans, the people that lived in America before European settlement, were pushed and forced out of their homelands. Little by little Native Americans endured not only racism and ridicule, but also involuntary migrations to new and less fertile areas. Because of the difference in political and social arrangement of Native Americans to American ones, the white settlers went under the assumption that Native Americans were not capable of possessing land. However they were seen as spiritual and in harmony with nature. That is why in literature, Native Americans often became romantic heroes in one light and negative stereotypes in the other. In the 19th century, the literature of the time represented Native Americans based off of perceived racial stereotypes,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Daniel, Clay. "Cooper's the Last of the Mohicans." The Explicator 56.3 (1998): 126-129. Print.

Kuiper, Kathleen. Native American culture. New York, N.Y.: Britannica Educational Pub./Rosen Educational Services, 2011. Print.

McWilliams, John P. The last of the Mohicans: civil savagery and savage civility. New York: Twayne Publishers; 1995. Print.

Merchant, Peter. "The Last of the Mohicans reconsidered." Children's Literature in Education 24.2 (1993): 85-100. Print.
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Spade Walking Down to Examine a Murder

Words: 1622 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72362108

Spade walking down to examine a murder makes use of shadows as well as high black-white contrast in order to convey drama and suspense. This is commonly referred to as the film noir lighting technique because it conveys a sense of mystery and danger. The lighting highlights the most extreme contours of the character's faces, but none of the moderating details such as texture or color. This makes the facial expressions look much more dramatic than they would under normal lighting.

The costumes are also very typical of the film noir genre. Spade is wearing a black wool overcoat and a fedora and his counterpart from the police station is wearing the same outfit. This is a style of dress associated with detectives, who sometimes had to conceal their identity and not stand out. The overcoat conceals much of the person's figure and could conceal weapons or other objects.

The…… [Read More]

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Movie Adaptations it Is Often

Words: 772 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63671572

In this respect, it relishes on surprises that you find David Gamut missing in the movie, while Munro dies and Alice commits suicide. Indeed, it makes the reader doubt on whether or not he has skipped some parts in reading the novel. However, once the confusion is solved and the reader is able to let go of any regrets that the screening does not follow the plot of the book entirely, the result is a good script, following a coherent course of actions with well conceived settings. In this particular case, that the historical truth in Cooper's book was no followed accurately by Mann seems to have helped the latter into creating indeed a movie and not a documentary. Without the element of surprise, without the drama, the humor, or the love story, the script would have least resembled a movie.

In fairness, the only possible way to enjoy the…… [Read More]

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White Europeans and Indians in America

Words: 1362 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12034709

White European Authors Depicted Native Americans in Fiction

The objective of this study is to examine how white European authors have depicted Native American in Fiction. Examined to inform this study are two specific works in writing and specifically those entitled: "The Last of the Mohicans" and "The Searchers" written by James Fenimore Cooper and John Ford, respectively.

There can be no doubt that the native American Indians are misrepresented in literature written by white European authors as the Indians are portrayed as ignorant, uneducated, ungodly, barbarians and villains. IN the literature of White European authors, the Native American Indians lived a life that was wild, unprincipled and ungodly however, study that has examined the life of the Native American Indians since those earlier works has related an entirely different story of the Native American Indians.

Coleman on Social Construction of Indians in the Cinema

The work of Cynthia-Lou Coleman…… [Read More]

References

Kellner, Leon (1915) The American Books: A Library of Good Citizenship. Garden City, New York. Doubleday, Page & Company 1915.

Coleman, Cynthia-Lou (nd) Framing Cinematic Indians within the Social Construction of Place. Retrieved from: https://journals.ku.edu/index.php/amerstud/article/viewFile/2963/2922

Ebert, Roger (2001) The Searchers. Retrieved from: http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20011125/REVIEWS08/111250301/1023

Gregor, Theresa Lynn (2010) from Captors to Captives: American Indian Reponses to Popular American Narrative Forms. May 2010. Retrieved from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/item/etd-Gregor-3488.pdf
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Leadership in the 1992 Adaptation of the

Words: 653 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95226824

Leadership

In the 1992 adaptation of The Last of the Mohicans, Hawkeye, played by Daniel Day-Lewis is forced to become a leader as he attempts to provide safe passage for Alice and Cora Munro and the daughters of Colonel Edmund Munro, a British officer during the Seven Years' War, and Major Duncan Heyward, who was originally tasked with escorting the sisters to safety.

Two of the theories that can be applied to Hawkeye's leadership and managerial style are the Path-Goal Theory and the Leader-Member Exchange Theory. Moreover, aspects of French and Raven's Five Bases of Power can also be attributed to Hawkeye's successes and failures as a leader. The Path-Goal Theory maintains that followers' satisfaction, motivation, and performance is dependent on a leader's behavior. As such, the leader is forced to adapt to his or her followers' needs with such adaptations and behavioral modifications made with the purpose of fulfilling…… [Read More]

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James Fenimore Cooper the Life

Words: 1897 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79388459

According to Mctiernan (1997), "James Fenimore Cooper's the Spy is interesting precisely because no genre had yet hardened around spying when he wrote it. Cooper relies instead on the conventions of other genres -- primarily, the domestic romance and the historical adventure, which, unlike spy fiction, did not evolve in part to justify the dishonesty and covert manipulation central to espionage" (3).

As noted above, Cooper was also able to draw on the inspiration of an unspoiled American wilderness that few people today can imagine without his help. It is this aspect of Cooper's early works, perhaps, that continue to make them popular today just as they did in his own time. As Ringe (1962) advises, though, this is unfortunate because Cooper matured as a writer over the years and some of his best work was during the last part of his career. "Ironically, Cooper is best known for what…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Becker, May Lamberton. "Introduction" to the Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757. Cleveland, OH: World Publishing, 1957.

Davis, Randall C. (1994). "Fire-Water in the Frontier Romance: James Fenimore Cooper and 'Indian Nature.'" Studies in American Fiction 22(2): 215.

Dekker, George and John P. Williams (Eds.). James Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge, 1997.

Mctiernan, Dave. (1997). "The Novel as 'Neutral Ground': Genre and Ideology in Cooper's 'The Spy." Studies in American Fiction 25(1): 3.
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History of Western Art Looking

Words: 1837 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54328299

To illustrate these different views, he creates Starry Night over the Rhone. This shows the sense of anticipation that is occurring before the evening begins. As he is depicting, a quit outdoor cafe that is waiting for: the customers to begin arriving and the festivities to commence. To illustrate this sense of anticipation he uses different colors and lighter brush strokes. As there is: yellow, black, blue, tan and gray; to highlight the overall emotions that Van Gogh is feeling (when he reflects on his life in Paris). At the same time, the lighter brush strokes are used to show the changes of time that are taking place, by making the background somewhat blurry. This is important, because it is illustrating how the artist is trying to create that sense of realism and the passage of time, by showing their positive emotions about their past lives. ("Vincent Van Gough," 2011)…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette. (2011). Web Museum Paris. Retrieved from:  http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/renoir/moulin-galette/ 

Frans Hals. (2011). ABC Gallery. Retrieved from:  http://www.abcgallery.com/H/hals/hals.html 

Hudson River School. (2011). Visual Arts. Retrieved from:  http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/history-of-art/hudson-river-school-landscape-painting.htm 

Jean -- Antione Houdon. (2011). Scholar Resource. Retrieved from:  http://www.scholarsresource.com/browse/artist/637
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Preservation of Captain Smith by Pocahontas 1825

Words: 1495 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95911179

Captain Smith by Pocahontas

Antonio Capellano's sculpture The Preservation of Captain Smith by Pocahontas (1825) is still in the Capitol Rotunda along with other works of the same period such as illiam Penn's Treaty with the Indians and The Landing of the Pilgrims, although they no longer resonate with audiences in the same way as they did in the 19th Century. In the 20th and 21st Centuries, more sophisticated and educated viewers at least would realize that these are all the product of an era of estern expansion and a highly romanticized view of history that is heavily tinged with racism and white nationalism. hen these sculptures were first commissioned by the U.S. government, the early republic was engaged in westward expansion that would result in the destruction, displacement or removal of most Native Americans, a process that most white Americans of the era regarded as necessary and beneficial. All…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Fryd, Vivien Green. "Two Sculptures for the Capitol" in Mary Ann Calo (ed). Critical Issues in American Art: A Book of Readings. Perseus Books, 1998: 93-108.

Scheckel, Susan. The Insistence of the Indian: Race and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century American Culture. Princeton University Press, 1998.

Tilton, Robert S. Pocahontas: The Evolution of an American Narrative. Cambridge University Press, 1994.
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Peace Keepers of the Northeast

Words: 2241 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92147282

This dance was very powerful as it did scare the European people. They did not fully understand the reason behind the dance and the religion, but they were very clear as to what the apocalypse was and they wondered if the Indians were somehow summoning the end of the world. Not soon after this Ghost dance caused such a commotion, an Indian by the name of Handsome Lake who was a leader for the Seneca tribe brought a new message to the Iroquois people. His message was to end the drinking. The Iroquois people had began to drink a lot of alcohol that was often offered to them from the European people during the fur trade. Handsome Lake believed that many of the problems that the Iroquois people faced was related to the alcohol. Many of the Indian people were drunk when they were trying to handle problems of poverty…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Kehoe, Alice Beck. North American Indian Tribes, Chapter 5. 1992 Prentice Hall.

Biolsi, Thomas and Zimmerman, Larry. Indians and Anthropologists, Chapter 9. 1997 Prentice Hall.

Iroquois Website. Retrieved December 19, 2009 from http://www.iroquois.net/.
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Male Without Female in the Classic Films

Words: 2048 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13490103

Male ithout Female

In the classic films of the 1940s and 1950s, filmmakers tended to use very strict representations of gender in their characters. omen could be either virgins or tramps and men could be either heroes or villains. There was very little transgression of the stereotypical boundaries of character. Society as a whole during this period was heavily masculine. Men made up the executives and the politicians and of course the majority of the powerful filmmakers. Consequentially, the perspective of most films and literature of the era was decidedly masculine. Female characters were heavily marginalized and forced into one of the two categories listed above. In two works from the period, The Big Sleep and The Maltese Falcon, the women characters are portrayed as useless or as venomous and evil. Some scholars have speculated that the reason behind such portrayals is the basic male fantasy which is a world…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Ahearn, William. "The Mystery of the Maltese Falcon." 2008. Print.

Chandler, Raymond. The Big Sleep. New York: Vintage, 1992. Print.

"Marlowe, Carmen and Vivian: An Interpretation of The Big Sleep." Word Press. Web. 2012.

http://thoralv.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/thebigsleep.pdf