Literary Analysis Essays (Examples)

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literary analysis essays

A literary analysis essay is a very specific type of analytical essay that focuses on a work or works of literature.  An analysis breaks a work down into its component parts, and then examines how those component parts help contribute to the whole.  However, an analysis might focus on a specific idea or theme, not on the entire work.  For example, you could have a literary analysis that focuses on misogyny in Shakespeare’s Hamlet, or you could use the same details to help describe a larger theme.  Whatever your focus, you want to ensure that your entire analysis supports your thesis statement. 

In the introduction to your literary analysis essay, you will introduce your thesis statement and provide an outline of the material you will use to support your statement.  The thesis statement should refer to the work that you are analyzing, as well as to the focus of your analysis.  If you are analyzing multiple works, you should make that clear in your thesis statement.

The body of your literary analysis essay is where you fully develop the arguments that you want to make in support of your statement.  It is easy to go off-topic in a literary analysis essay.  Therefore, you want to ensure that all of the details in the body of your essay work together to support your thesis statement.  If the connection between the evidence you are using and your thesis statement is not clear, you either need to engage in a more in-depth analysis or consider eliminating that evidence. 

The conclusion of your literary analysis will reiterate your thesis statement and remind your reader of the evidence you used to support your statement. 

To see how a well-written literary analysis examines the smaller components of a work of literature, check out one of our sample literary analysis essays. 

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literary work

Words: 768 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43753350

.....space below to complete this section. Include the number and first sentence of the prompt you chose from the list of prompts.)

Prompt 2: 'In some stories, characters come into conflict with the culture in which they live.'

For this literary assignment, I have chosen Prompt 2, which explains that the characters of some tales enter into discord with their surrounding culture. Usually, a character may feel estranged and different from the society on account of his/her ethnic/racial group, sex, or social class.

What interests you most about this prompt and why?

The above prompt interests me as it addresses the subject of heritage and culture. Modern-day individuals depict greater cultural sensitivity and awareness and are more mindful of the distinctions between themselves and others, compared to their forebears. Humanity has now permitted its cultural disparities and backgrounds to guide its social interactions with individuals belonging to other backgrounds. Some,…… [Read More]

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Analysis of Inclusion in Special Education Curriculum

Words: 2205 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45085666

inclusion" is not part of the law; instead, it states that each student must be educated in the least restrictive educational environment (LRE). Analyze all sides of "inclusion," (1. full inclusion; 2. inclusion in special classes like physical education, art, or lunch; and 3. inclusion in all classes except for reading or math).

Inclusion

The term 'inclusion' means complete acceptance of every student which leads towards sense of acceptance and belonging in the classroom. Over the years, there has not been any fixed definition of inclusion, but different groups and organizations have provided their own definitions. The most basic definition of 'inclusion' states that every student with special needs are supported in 'chronologically age appropriate general education classes' in schools and get the instructions specialized for them by the Individual Education Programs (IEPs) within the general activities of the class and the main curriculum. The idea of 'inclusion' is to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cologon, K. (2013). Inclusion in Education. Children with Disabiliity Australia.

Constable, S., Grossi, B., Moniz, A., & Ryan, L. (2013). Meeting the Common Core State Standards for Students With Autism. Council for Exceptional Children.

Evers, T. (2011). Common Core State Standards for Literacy in all subjects. Madison: Wisconsin Department of Public Intrusion.

FDDC. (2012). What is Inclusion? Florida: Florida State Univeristy Center for Prevention and Early Intervention Policy.
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Upstairs Analysis To the One Upstairs God

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43524541

Upstairs analysis

"to the One Upstairs:" God as Boss

In "To the One Upstairs," Charles Simic personifies God by comparing the deity to a boss at an office or workplace. While Simic's references and analogy may be considered to be somewhat unorthodox, and possibly heretical and blasphemous. There are several aspects of the poem that help to make it unique and discriminate it from other literary works. Some elements that allow "To the One Upstairs" to be engaging and draw the reader in include the poem's theme, the personification of God, and the analogy that Simic is able to draw between a boss and God.

"To the One Upstairs" draws upon Simic's personal background and his beliefs on religion, and God, are reflected in this highly religious poem. Though the poem does not name God as its subject, it is highly religious, a theme that carries through the entire poem.…… [Read More]

References

Charles Simic. (n.d.). Poets.org: From the Academy of American Poets. Retrieved 9 January

2012 from, http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/27.

Simic, C. (1999)."To the One Upstairs." From Jackstraws.
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Carver's Cathedral an Analysis of Theme and

Words: 1072 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7133761

Carver's "Cathedral"

An Analysis of Theme and Plot in Carver's "Cathedral"

Raymond Carver states that by the mid-1960s he had tired of reading and writing "long narrative fiction" ("On riting" 46). Shorter fiction, he found, was more immediate. Flannery O'Connor states a similar idea in The Habit of Being: for her, the novel was a literary medium that could bog down all of one's creative powers. Turning to a short story was a way of escape: "My novel is at an impasse. In fact it has been at one for as long as I can remember. Before Christmas I couldn't stand it any longer so I began a short story. It's like escaping from the penitentiary" (O'Connor 127). This mode of thought may help us to understand why Carver turned to composing shorter works of fiction like "Cathedral," a work that acts as a brief glimpse into how one man's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carver, Raymond. "Cathedral." 1983. Web. 25 Sept 2012.

Carver, Raymond. "On Writing." Mississippi Review, vol. 14, no. 1/2 (Winter, 1985), pp.

46-51). Print.

O'Connor, Flannery. The Habit of Being. NY, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1979.
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Cold Blood an Analysis of

Words: 1315 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94405379

He has to object to it to keep from confronting it in himself. The Oklahoman is not so cynical, however, for he immediately grasps hold of Parr's contradiction and cries out, "Yeah, and how about hanging the bastard? That's pretty goddam cold-blooded too" (Capote 306). The Oklahoman objects to the murder, which he views as a product of that coldness which he hears in Parr's words. The Oklahoman may represent a kind of outsider, not yet tainted by the American thirst for blood and sentimentality. To save the killer, he is willing to grant mercy, if only it will help put an end to the coldness.

At this point another man, the Reverend Post, interjects his thoughts. He seems to understand something of mercy, but at the same time he despairs of ever seeing it: "ell,' he said, passing around a snapshot reproduction of Perry Smith's portrait of Jesus, 'any…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Capote, Truman. In Cold Blood. NY: Vintage, 1994.
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Gemma Bovary Analysis and Discussion

Words: 337 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55166328

Also, the use of the French language by the characters in a different type shows how the English regard French and France as exotic, in contrast of course, to Flaubert's own provincial French characters. The culture clash between French and English language and culture is a running theme in the novel.

The use of different fonts also allows for far more text on the page than is typical of most graphic novels. This befits the subject, given that it is a literary satire, and a satire of how art affects life. For example, in one dinner party, Gemma is distracted, ignoring what other characters are saying, and thinking about her lover in a similarly distracted state thinking about Gemma. This is shown by depicting thought balloon within thought balloon ad infinitum.

orks Cited

Simmonds, Posy. Gemma Bovery. Pantheon,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Simmonds, Posy. Gemma Bovery. Pantheon, 2004.
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Creation Narrative Analysis of Genesis Myth or History or Myth and History

Words: 15782 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9755140

Creation Myth Analysis

Case Study of the History of iblical Creation Narratives

What Is Myth?

What Is History?

Manetho

Josephus

Jeroboam

Is Genesis 1:1-2:4 Myth?

Is Genesis 1:1-2:4 History?

Is Genesis 1:1-2:4 oth Myth and History?

An Analysis of the iblical Creation Narrative of Genesis 1:1-25 and Egypt's Possible Influence on the Historical Record

God created the world in just six days, and rested on the seventh, but scholars have not rested at all over the millennia in their investigation of its account in the historical record, particularly Genesis 1:1-25. Given its importance to humankind, it is little wonder that so much attention has been devoted to how the universe was created and what place humanity has in this immense cosmos. Indeed, the creation of the universe and the origin of mankind are the subject of numerous myths around the world, with many sharing some distinct commonalities. According to S.G.F.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aldred, Cyril. The Egyptians. London: Thames & Hudson, 1961.

Andrews, E.A.. What Is History? Five Lectures on the Modern Science of History. New York:

Macmillan Co., 1905.

Austin, Michael. "Saul and the Social Contract: Constructions of 1 Samuel 8-11 in Cowley's 'Davideis' and Defoe's 'Jure Divino,' Papers on Language & Literature 32, 4 (1996),
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Ot Analysis -- Numbers 15

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80877042

According to Hebraic tradition, the chronological period in the book consists of the second month of the second year (measured from Exodus) to the beginning of the eleventh month of the fortieth year -- in all, roughly 39 years 9 months of wandering, with, of course, fewer in number at the end of the journey than at the beginning. Again, according to tradition, Moses was the author of all five books of the Torah, but stylistically, at least in both Hebrew and then Aramaic, the prose in Numbers is far dryer and more scholarly, leading most to believe that this particular section was derived from several priestly sources tentatively dated at 4th-6th century BC (Harris, 1985).

Since Numbers is divided into three parts, it is useful to provide an overview of the literative focus and consequences of each section:

Number's the eople of the Lord -- God ordered Moses to…… [Read More]

Preparations for crossing the River Jordan -- Moses disobeys God and is punished, as are the tribes for speaking against God and Moses, and a new census is taken to be used to organize the tribal units into their new home. The Israelites conquer the Midian population, and the land of the Jordan is divided among the tribes.

Numbers ends with a summary technique, common in ancient Middle Eastern writings, called a colophon. Their usage as both a literary and historical tool was not understood until recently, and their form is more of an oral legal tradition, designed to state the place and circumstance of each composition, thus also organizing the story for posterity (Friedman, 2005).

Part II -- Analysis of the text -- the story of Numbers is actually rather simplistic -- it is a recounting of transition, and, like Job, a psychological organization of the manner in which God, through Moses, tested the Israelites to see if they were worth of having their own land. There are repeated trials and tribulations suffered by the people if they either do not obey God or Moses, or simply move apart and try to accomplish their own sense of organizing the world (Spence and Excell, 2009).. The message is quite clear: "Obey God and you will be rewarded, it may take some time, but eventually it will happen. Doubt God, and you will be punished." Structurally, it is more chronological than thematic, symbols are used within the original language of place names, events, and even phrases "the land of milk and honey," likely meaning, for instance, fertile land that will support
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Close Reading Analysis

Words: 1276 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73824705

Unfair

Robert Francis was an American poet whose work is reminiscent of Robert Francis, his mentor. Francis' writing has often compared to other writers such as Frost, Emily Dickinson, and Henry David Thoreau. Although Francis's work has frequently been neglected and is "often excluded from major anthologies of American poetry," those that have read his work have praised him and his writing. In "Fair and Unfair," Francis comments on balance in nature and in society. Like Frost, Francis contends nature has the ability to provide guidance if only man is smart enough to observe it. In "Fair and Unfair," Francis is able to find balance through what is written and how it is written.

The poem is told from a first person, omniscient perspective and the narrator appears to be addressing the general public; it appears as though the narrator seeks to bring attention to how nature has become disregarded…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Francis, Robert. "Fair and Unfair." Web. 7 November 2012.

"Robert Francis." eNotes. Web. 7 November 2012.
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Moomins by Tove Jansson Literary

Words: 1622 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17672365



In fact, one of the principle facets of Moominpappa's character is to introduce didactic messages to his family, particularly to his children. Doing so is part of his job as a father and as the head of a household. Unfortunately, not all of his methods of teaching his family are as entertaining as his memoirs, as the following quotation from Moominpappa at Sea, in which he warns his family of the dangers of forest fires, proves.

He had warned the family. Time and time again he had explained how necessary it was to be careful in August. He had described the burning valley, the roar of the flames, the white-hot tree trunks, and the fire creeping along the ground underneath the moss. Blinding columns of flame flung upward against the night sky! aves of fire, rushing down the sides of the valley and on toward the sea… (Jansson).

The hyperbolic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jansson, Tove. Moominpappa's Memoirs. London: Square Fish. 2010. Print.

Jansson, Tove. Moominpappa at Sea. London: Square Fish. 2010. Print.

Janson, Tove. Tales from Moominvalley. London: Square Fish. 2010. Print.
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Traditional Lit Analysis Seasons Change

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68480969

"The rain, of course. It came midway though the third day, clouds the color of iron filings, the lake hammered to iron too, and the storm that crashed through the trees and beat at their tent with a thousand angry fists (p.4)." This quotation is all the more salient for the fact that in the subsequent paragraph the author mentions that the lovers have neglected to bring sufficient protection. The imagery of the angry fists and the grey storm ravaging trees foreshadows the consequences of such neglect.

Boyle employs a similar sense of foreboding by utilizing imagery inherent in Winter to foreshadow the trouble which the will beset upon the characters when China gives birth. Although the setting is in mid-December, the following quotation, in which China is going to meet Jeremy at a hotel to give birth and then destroy her child, is definitely like Winter in tone and…… [Read More]

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Alcohol vs Coffee Literary Reaction The Sweet

Words: 571 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19617674

Alcohol vs. coffee: Literary reaction

"The sweet Poison of the Treacherous Grape/....Drowning our very Reason and our Souls." The 18th century marked the beginning of what would come to be known as the neoclassical era of art and literature. It was the era of satire, marked by a belief in reason over emotion, an age which prized what was artificial, man-made and constructed over what was natural and instinctive. It was also the era of coffee and the coffee house. In this poem, coffee is celebrated as a beverage that sharpens the intellect, rather than dulls it like alcohol, the 'poison' that drowns reason. Throughout the poem, a dichotomy of coffee vs. alcohol is created. The values of the Age of Enlightenment are exemplified in this contrast, as well as many of the literary features of the era, including rhyming couplets, metrical verse, and poems that 'say' what they mean…… [Read More]

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Isaiah 6 Analysis

Words: 1286 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97500426

Bible

Isaiah Chapter 6 addresses Isaiah's commission, and is a perfect example of the use of narrative structure, format, and style in the Hebrew Bible. A plethora of Tate's literary elements pertain directly to Isaiah, and reading Isaiah with Tate's elements in mind enhances understanding of the text. In particular, Isaiah 6 reflects Old Testament narratology: the method by which the story is being told. Hebrew narratology retains core elements, some of which are adhered to and some of which are subverted in Isaiah 6. Isaiah 6 is told from a first person point-of-view, evident from the first line: "In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord, high and exalted, seated on a throne; and the train of his robe filled the temple," (Isaiah 6:1). The first person point-of-view establishes a literary, thematic, and semantic bond between implied reader and implied narrator. Moreover, the first person point-of-view…… [Read More]

References

Tate, W.R. (2012). Handbook for Biblical Interpretation. Baker.
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Wild Geese Analysis Oliver's Wild Geese Mary

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29117966

Wild Geese Analysis

Oliver's "Wild Geese"

Mary Oliver is an American poet who explores an individual's relationship with nature through her work. Oliver's poetry has been described as "an excellent antidote for the excesses of civilization for too much flurry and inattention, and the baroque conventions of our social and professional lives. She is a poet of wisdom and generosity whose vision allows us to look intimately at a world not of our making" (Mary Oliver, n.d.). In "Wild Geese," Oliver uses imagery, content, and form to explore the relationship between an individual and nature.

In "Wild Geese" (1986), Oliver use of imagery helps to establish the bond that she is advocating between individuals and nature. The first six lines of the poem focus on the individual and establish that the individual does "not have to be good" and does "not have to walk on [their] knees/for a hundred miles…… [Read More]

References

Mary Oliver. (n.d.). Poets.org. Accessed 7 April 2012 from, http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/265

Oliver, M. (1986). Wild Geese. Dream Work. Accessed 7 April 2012 from,  http://peacefulrivers.homestead.com/maryoliver.html#anchor_14792
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Hardship Letter - Nutritional Analysis

Words: 1376 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30738672

Subject should also increase fat intake to better balance his diet.

Subject's fiber consumption was so far in excess of DV that negative digestive consequences cannot be ruled out.

Salt intake was more than the DV, but could be easily corrected with some minor dietary changes.

The Food Standards Agency has developed the Eat Well Plate as an easy to follow nutritional guideline.

The Eat Well Plate is a visual display and quick reference for consumers to better balance their diets in compliance with the DV's. Analysis revealed a shortfall in fruits and vegetables as well as bread, rice and pasta - the two largest sections of the plate. Subjects fat consumptions were well below the DV's, but per the Eat Well Plate are the smallest category recommended.

ecommendations for Subject's improved nutritional balance would include increased caloric intake, weighted heavily in the fruits and vegetables, breads, rice and pasta…… [Read More]

References

Nutritional Analysis Tool 2.0, created July 1999, retrieved January 31, 2009 http://www.nat.uiuc.edu/nat.pdl  http://www.nutrition-matters.co.uk/misc/1991COMAreport.htm 

http://www.nutritiondata.com/help/analysis-help#cp-pyramid http://www.who.int/bmi/index.jsp?introPage=intro_3.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=11360147

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/waist-to-hip-ratio/AN01794
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ELL Writing Sample Analysis Instruction

Words: 2999 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2564198

The student jumps from one tense to another in the space of two sentences, revealing a discussion which is largely uncertain of its own chronology. Naturally, this makes the work a very unclear experience for the reader such as in the pair of sentences in the second paragraph, which declare that "A few days later 'This alarms the Crows.' Father Crows discussed the matter with the other animals that live in the banyan tree." Again, only with respect to tense changes, the pattern of error in this sentence jumps from present tense (alarms), to past tense (discussed) and then back to present (live). These examples all come from the first few sentences of the essay, and are consistently observable throughout, indicating that verb conjugation is an area of particular need for this student where written expression in concerned.

Other issues that are often encountered by ELL students will concern the…… [Read More]

References:

Christensen, L. (2003). The Politics of Correction: How We Can Nurture Students In Their Writing. The Quarterly, 25(4).

Manley, J. (1988). Telling lies efficiently: terminology and the microstructure in the bilingual dictionary. in: Jensen Hyldgaard (ed.), 281-302.
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Feminist Analysis of Dryden's Marriage

Words: 2348 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23810315

Adultery and any sort of infidelity turns out to be a different story for men as Rosenthal stresses: "prohibition against adultery is not about property, pregnancy, misdirected male desire, or bloodlines, as one might have thought, but about the prevention of female comparison" (Rosenthal, 2008) as sharing men would be established by the size of their sexual organs.

A recurrent theme in the play from a gender perspective relates to the fact that the play is generally a patriarchal type of play in which paternal figures are predominant and the evolution of the other characters is a direct result of this way of using power. The women in this play, especially Doralice and Melantha are victimized as women had lesser rights to speak their minds or act according to their decisions. The paternalistic environment is also observed in the way Palamede and Rhodophil behave, as all four of them find…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Denman, J. (2008) "Too hasty to stay": Erotic and Political Timing in Marriage a la Mode. Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700, Volume 32, Number 2, pp. 1-23

Dryden, J. (1981) Marriage a la Mode. University of Nebraska Press

Frank, M. (2002) Gender, Theatre, and the Origins of Criticism: From Dryden to Manley. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Hansen, C. (1993) Woman as Individual in English Renaissance Drama: A Defiance of the Masculine Code. New York: Peter Lang
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Mythical Analysis Myths of Freedom

Words: 1052 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39988293

"In eloved, Morrison allows the reader to share the legacy of slavery as the characters Sethe, Paul D, and Denver attempt to make a new life in freedom. However, they cannot put the past, lived in slavery, behind them; they must reveal it to themselves, to each other, and to the reader in 'digestible pieces.'" (Nigro) The traumatic events which were experienced by slaves cannot be wiped clean, and the past will continue to have an effect on the future. Today, the concept of post-traumatic stress disorder -- the psychological consequences of experiencing traumatic events -- would perhaps be identified in Morrison's characters. (Feldspar) Nightmares, flashbacks, irritability, emotional detachment, and other distress are common symptoms, and certainly experienced by Sethe and others in eloved, all of which are a kind of continued mental slavery.

In addition to freedom being a myth because of legal and psychological reasons, there are also…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Davis, Kimberly Chabot. "Postmodern blackness': Toni Morrison's 'Beloved' and the end of history." Twentieth Century Literature. Summer, 1998. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0403/is_2_44/ai_53260178/print

Elliott, Mary Jane Suero. "Postcolonial Experience in a Domestic Context: Commodified Subjectivity in Toni Morrison's Beloved." MELUS, 2000. 181. http://www.geocities.com/tarbaby2007/beloved4.html

Feldspar, Antaeus, et al. "Post-traumatic Stress Disorder." Wikipedia. 28 July 2005. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PTSD

JW1805, et al. "Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution." Wikipedia. 12 August 2005. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
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Synge's Riders to the Sea Analysis of

Words: 1414 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21754

Synge's iders To The Sea

Analysis of structure, narrative, and irony in Synge's "iders to the Sea"

John Millington Synge is considered to be one of Irish literature's most influential writers. Born near Dublin in 1871, he was highly interested in studying music before turning his attentions to literature. In 1898, Synge made his first visit to the Aran Islands, which he continued to visit at various intervals for the next four years (J.M. Synge, n.d.). It was during this time that he began to study the way of life on the islands. "On they rocky, isolated islands, Synge took photographs and notes. He listened to the speech of the islanders, a musical, old-fashioned, Irish-flavored dialect of English. He conversed with them in Irish and English, listened to stories, and learned the impact that the sound of word could have apart from their meaning" (J.M. Synge, n.d.). The influence of…… [Read More]

References

J.M. Synge. (n.d.). The Poetry Foundation. Accessed 17 February 2013, from  http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/j-m-synge 

Notes on Synge's "Riders to the Sea." (n.d.). Bielefeld University. Accessed 17 February 2013,

from  http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/lili/personen/fleischmann/archsuse03/notesirl6onsynge.htm 

Synge, J.M. (1902). Riders to the Sea. Chapter 13.
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Poem Analysis The Very End by Tom Sleigh

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51234718

The poem that is reviewed in this brief essay is The Very End, as written by Tom Sleigh. As is indicated by the essay assignment prompt, the poem is about Sleigh’s grandmother. This is made quite clear on the page with the poem. Indeed, there is the text “For my grandmother” just below the title of the essay. What follows is a poem that is not terribly long. However, there is obviously a lot going on and the verbiage on display is both profound and nebulous at the same time. This is true in terms of what is said about his grandmother. It is also true about what is said about others. While Sleigh’s message is shrouded and dressed with some interesting references, the intent of the poem’s author is quite clear.
Analysis
One thing to point out about the poem is how Sleigh swings back and forth in terms…… [Read More]

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Modernism Depth Analysis European Art Works 1860-1935

Words: 1716 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15417991

Modernism: Depth Analysis European Art Works 1860-1935

Modernism, in its widest meaning, is considered to be modern belief, eccentric, or practice. To add a little more, the word gives a description of the modernist movement occurring in the arts, its set of cultural propensities and related cultural actions, initially rising from wide-scale and extensive differences to Western civilization in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (aker 2005). In specific the expansion of modern industrial cultures and the quick growing of cities, trailed then by the dismay of the First World War, were among the issues that fashioned Modernism. Connected expressions are modernist, modern, present-day, and postmodern. In art, Modernism openly rejects the philosophy of realism (aker 2005) and creates usage of the works from previous times, through the request of return, incorporation, redrafting, recapitulation, review and at times mockery in new methods. (aker 2005) Innovation also discards the lasting…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Armstrong, Carol and de Zegher, Catherine. Women Artists as the Millennium. Cambridge, MA:: MIT Press, 2005.

Baker, Houston A., Jr.,. Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. Chicago: University of Chicago Press,, 2005.

Nicholls, Peter,. Modernisms: A Literary Guide . Hampshire and London:: MacMilian, 2005.

Pollock, Griselda, and Florence, Penny,. Looking Back to the Future: Essays by Griselda Pollock from the 1990s. New York:: G&B New Arts Press,, 2004.
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Fiction Analysis of Passage From

Words: 1309 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95964709



Analysis of passage from The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Other Stories by Carson McCullers (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1951; rpt. 1971), pp.3-5

Carson McCullers' short story "The Ballad of the Sad Cafe" is set in a town that is immediately established as remote, rural, and Southern: it is located near a cotton mill, there are peach trees all over the area, and there is only a single church. Even the buses are three miles away, which suggest the stranded and isolated nature of the residents. The main street is only two miles long, and there is "nothing whatsoever to do" during the long, hot summers. Even the nearest train stop (the significantly named 'Society' City) is far away. The largest building looks lonely and is boarded up completely. This large building, half-painted and left unfinished becomes a kind of metaphor for the town, as well as the woman…… [Read More]

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Personal and the Literary in American Literature

Words: 1917 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96749839

Blurring the Gap Between Fiction and eal Life

This is a paper that outlines how modern literature integrates personal experiences of the writers into works of fiction. It has 5 sources.

It is quite interesting to note the means by which eminent writers attract attention to their ideas and literary content. On closer examination, we may come to the conclusion that the means by which public attention may be grabbed has followed a definite pattern through the years. While writers like Shakespeare and his contemporaries used fiction to project their literary geniuses, modern day writers strive to catch the attention of the masses by presenting their own personal conflicts and tragedies to the public. The modern writer has lessened the gap between a literary piece of work and real life. However, literature in the classical period is known for its often unnatural and over-dramatized perspectives on life. Today, the stories…… [Read More]

References

Wright, Richard A., Black Boy, Perennial, September 1, 1998

Williams, Tennessee. The Glass Menagerie, New Directions Publishing; June 1999

Ward, Jerry, M. "Richard Wright-Black Boy," retrieved at  http://www.newsreel.org/guides/richardw.htm . On April 2, 2004

King Thomas, L. Irony and distance in the Glass Menagerie in Tennessee Williams. Ed. Harold Bloom, New York: Chelsea house, 1987, 85-94
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Religion in the Literary Works

Words: 1076 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96785449



Machiavelli shared Douglass' opinion concerning the role of religion in one's society. He believed that religion is instrumental in bringing about not only a moral society, but also a just one. In his discourse, "The Prince," he asserted that the ideal leader, the Prince, must not "...deceive friends...be without faith, without mercy, without religion..." This invoked the belief that a leader, in order to become effective, efficient, and respected by the civil society, must also be of moral character. This means that in the same way as people let their lives be influenced by religion and its values and beliefs, so too must the Prince engage in a lifestyle dominated by religion. A religious individual is a moral individual, hence commanding the respect of his people and giving him credibility to lead over society.

However, it is also vital to note that while he put premium to religiosity, Machiavelli's characterization…… [Read More]

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Machiavelli's Literary Message Katherine Phillipakis

Words: 832 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72422130

Cleandro has learned everything from Nicomaco, but is not grateful enough to share the prize with Nicomaco. (Phillipakis, 2011, p. 13). According to Phillipakis, "…they are competitors for a prize that cannot be shared. Fortune is a kingdom 'safeliest when with one man manned.'" (Phillipakis, 2011, p. 13)

Phillipakis concludes that Machiavelli "must remain the philosopher who generates thoughts but not deeds," simply "…because he cannot be anything more." (Phillipakis, 2011, p. 13).

Critique

Phillipakis appears to have something against philosophers and bookish men in general. Men who are thinkers, rather than doers. Or perhaps only against bookish men who presume to be manly men, such as Machiavelli.

Phillipakis' rage seems to stem from certain passages in Machiavelli's The Prince that could be perceived as misogynistic. She appears to dwell particularly on Machiavelli's comments about raping "Fortuna," the female characterization of fortune. Machiavelli is, of course, speaking metaphorically here. Though…… [Read More]

References

Phillipakis, K. (2011). "On Machiavelli's Literary Message." APSA 2011 Annual Meeting Paper.
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Rhetorical Analysis of the Story of an Hour

Words: 1560 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50425121

Kate Chopin, "The Story of an Hour"

Kate Chopin's 1894 short story "The Story of An Hour" depicts a major event in a minimalist fashion -- most of the action of the tale takes place in the mind of the protagonist, Louise Mallard. The story fits well with modern summaries of Chopin's achievement in longer fiction: her well-known novel The Awakening, published five years after "The Story of An Hour," would revisit many of the same themes depicted in the earlier story, but will dramatize them in large broad colorful strokes, endeavoring accurately to depict the vanishing world of Creole New Orleans at the same time as they depict, in Martha Cutter's words, "stronger, less conventional female characters" (Cutter 34). In his survey of the nineteenth century American novel, Gregg Crane notes that in The Awakening "Chopin convincingly dramatizes how an unnameable and relatively faint discontent grows into a very…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bender, Bert. "Kate Chopin's Quarrel with Darwin Before The Awakening." Journal of American Studies 26.2 (Aug 1992): 185-204. Print.

Berkove, Lawrence I. "Fatal Self-Assertion in Kate Chopin's 'The Story of an Hour'." American Literary Realism 32.2 (Winter 2000): 152-8. Print.

Crane, Gregg. The Cambridge Companion to the Nineteenth Century American Novel. New York and London: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Print.

Cutter, Martha J. "Losing the Battle but Winning the War: Resistance to Patriarchal Discourse in Kate Chopin's Short Fiction." Legacy 11.1 (1994): 17-36. Print.
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Media Critical Analysis Hamlet Hamlet

Words: 4649 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32409674

Yes, the Oedipus complex aspect of Shakespeare it gives us and which in turn invites us to think about the issue of subjectivity, the myth and its relation to psychoanalytic theory. (Selfe, 1999, p292-322)

Hemlet and Postcolonial theory

Postcolonial theory was born as a result of the publication of the famous work of Edward Said, Orientalism (1978). This theory claim that some authors (Paul Gilroy, Achille Mbembe, Francoise Verges, etc.) and that seem so elegant in its formulation, in my opinion raises three fundamental problems: At a time when we are witnessing the emergence of new expressions of colonialism (colonialism, cultural, political and economic globalization, neo-colonialism nestled in the relationship between the hegemonic colonial past and their old colonies, colonialism in disguise that structure the relationship between international institutions and developing countries, institutions from the rest behest of the former colonial powers according to their interests), speak of post-colonial era…… [Read More]

References

Aragay, Mireia, and Gemma Lopez. 2005. "Inflecting Pride and Prejudice: Dialogism, Intertextuality, and Adaptation." Books in Motion: Adaptation, Intertextuality, Authorship. Ed. Mireia Aragay. Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, p201-19.

Aragay, Mireia, ed. 2005. Books in Motion: Adaptation, Intertextuality, Authorship. Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, p88-96.

Baetens, Jan. 2007. "From Screen to Text: Novelization, the Hidden Continent." The Cambridge Companion to Literature on Screen. Ed. Deborah Cartmell and Imelda Whelehan. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, p226-38.

Balides, Constance. 2000. "Jurassic Post-Fordism: Tall Tales of Economics in the Theme Park." Screen 4 I .2: p139-60.
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Anna Laetitia Barbauld Analysis of

Words: 1402 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26544056

Note in the above two lines the way that the coming "doom" is emphasized by word order and the placement of active verbs at the end of each line. Use is also made telling adjectives such as "lowering sky" to emphasize the apparent awesomeness of the coming washing day.

The following lines express an obviously ironic comparison between the mundane images of washing day and tragic events in history.

Saints have been calm while stretched upon the rack,

And Guatimozin smil'd on burning coals;

ut never yet did housewife notable

Greet with a smile a rainy washing-day.

Lines 29 -32)

The reference to the death of the Mexican Emperor Guatimozin makes the concerns and work of the maids and housewives seem extremely trivial and are a good example of the way that the mock-heroic expresses a point-of-view through satire.

The poem continues in this fashion to present a view of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Washing-Day. April 29, 2007. http://ssad.bowdoin.edu:9780/snipsnap/eng242?s05/space/Washing-Day>

Joseph Michel Montgolfier and Jacques-etienne Montgolfier were the inventors of the hot air balloon.
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1st Peter 2 1-10 Analysis

Words: 3290 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67404439

Exegetical Analysis of 1st Peter 2:1-10

The New Testament's two documents, ascribed to Peter, represent a work in contrasts. Peter's first letter depicts a writing style, which reflects most of his letters. A reason behind this statement appears in 1 Pet. 5:12, where it is stated that the brief letter is written through Silvanus, who is regarded as a devoted brother, for encouraging readers and testifying that this truly is God's grace. This implies that the letter was not written by Peter himself, but by Silvanus (Latin name for Silas), who wrote it as directed by Peter. An ancient universal system for writing formal letters was through an amanuensis (Latin for writing secretary). Predictably, an individual who spent the major part of his adulthood traveling with Paul, the apostle, and had most probably also written some letters of Paul, would write Peter's ideas with a distinct Pauline quality to them.…… [Read More]

References biblestudytools. 1 Peter 2. n.d.  http://www.biblestudytools.com/commentaries/jamieson-fausset-brown/1-peter/1-peter-2.html  (accessed August 1, 2015).

Constable, Thomas L. Notes on 1 Peter . Sonic Light, 2015.

Cranford, Lorin L. "1 Peter 2:1-10."  http://cranfordville.com  . n.d.
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A Scene of Dialogue in the Crucible Contextual Analysis

Words: 1344 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80603857

Conflict in the First Scene of Dialogue in Miller's The Crucible

The piece of dialogue at the beginning of The Crucible in which Abigail and Parris reveal their respective characters through snippets and snatches of admissions is an important scene that sets the tone and initial conflict of the drama. The tone is serious but chaotic: a child is in danger; the doctor has no cure; foul play in the form of "possession" is suspected by the community, many members of which are talking in the parlor where the "rumor of witchcraft is all about" (Miller 9). Parris, who is a Reverend in the community, and who himself is at odds with his parish, is afraid because such talk will put him in a very bad light: "There is a faction that is sworn to drive me from my pulpit. Do you understand that?" Parris cries to Abigail. He is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Miller, Arthur. The Crucible. NY: Dramatists Play Service, 1982. Print.
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Borrower's Analysis &Copy 2003-2009 Critical Analysis

Words: 926 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1617885

For Arrietty, the boy represents the unknown elements of adult life. She has no young men within the walls with whom she can form relationships, marry or start a family. The boy is the first young male she has ever met. One of the first things he points out to her is the obviousness of her situation. "One day," he told her, smiling triumphantly, "you'll be the only Borrower left in the world!" (87). The boy's purpose is to shake the family out of isolation and inertia and force them out into the larger world.

Question 4

Mrs. Driver, the cook, was created by Mary Norton to represent the adult double standard of "do as I say, not as I do." She mistrusts children and Borrowers because they are disruptive elements to her system of order and authority. These disruptions have the potential to threaten her livelihood and her personal…… [Read More]

References

Norton, Mary. The Borrowers. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1981. Print.
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American Literature Adding Richness and Variety to Our Literary Tradition

Words: 1074 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53681260

Shannon, Jr.

"Outsiders" in a Multicultural Society

The United States is generally recognized for the multitude of cultural values present in the country as a result of the wide range of ideas that have been introduced here across the years. hile the majority of individuals in the country have often discriminated against people that they considered "outsiders," many notable non-white persons in the country's history have managed to emphasize the fact that they too are an active part of its culture and that they are able to contribute to making society as a whole acknowledge its complex nature. Langston Hughes and Jhumpa Lahiri are two of the most prominent artists responsible for making the American community accept its multicultural character and for influencing Americans to adopt less discriminatory attitudes concerning non-white individuals. Hughes got actively involved in changing the way that the masses and African-Americans in particular saw discriminated groups…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hughes, Langston. "Song for a Dark Girl." Create ed. McGraw-Hill, 2011. 223. Print.

Lahiri, Jhumpa. "The Third and Final Continent." Create ed. McGraw-Hill, 2011. 417-430. Print.
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Queensryche Analysis Operation Mindcrime Queensryche

Words: 1409 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81296927

In this stanza, mainline and dragon are used as metaphors for his drug of preference, although these drugs can be seen as metaphors for the other addictive substances and behaviors that people can become dependent on regardless of if these substances are legal or illegal. The last two lines of this stanza insinuate that Nikki has come to an impasse and does not know what to next with his life, which is possibly why he turned to drugs. The last two lines state, "No regrets, you've got no goals/Nothing more to learn" (Queensryche). These concluding lines indicate that Nikki is waiting for some sort of direction, regardless of whether it is good or bad, simply to not be a slave to the drug.

The third stanza offers Nikki a solution for his dilemma and proposes that the doctor will give his life purpose, which ironically, is the price Nikki will…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Titus, Christa. "Queensryche Ink New Record Deal, Next Album Due June 11." Billboard Biz.

4 March 2013. Web. 18 March 2013.

Queensryche. "Operation: Mindcrime." Operation: Mindcrime. EMI America, 1988.

"Queensryche." Official Band Page. Web. 18 March 2013.
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Sea and Poison Analysis

Words: 669 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46633116

Sea and Poison

Shusaku Endo's novel The Sea and Poison was published in 1958. Although it is set during orld ar II, The Sea and Poison is about much more than the war. The novel is about bioethics. The fact that The Sea and Poison is set against the backdrop of one of the bloodiest wars in history is appropriate from a literary perspective. Morality of war is juxtaposed with the morality of self-serving doctors. The decisions that doctors make in their own interest is depicted alongside the decisions that generals make to take prisoners of war and strip them of their humanity. Therefore, Endo's novel is multilayered and complex. The lessons Endo tries to teach through the moral turpitude of The Sea and Poison remain salient today, especially in light of the growing conflicts of interest in a for-profit American healthcare system.

The Sea and Poison is as realistic…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Endo, Shusaku. The Sea and Poison. Trans. Michael Gallagher. Tokyo: New Directions, 1958(1972).
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Snatch Film Analysis Employing a

Words: 2056 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63214071



Cinematography

As with any film, what is captured by the eye of the camera in this film is done with skill, expertise, and a high level of perfection in direction. The locations are captured by the camera in a way that supports and adds to the film's satire. For instance, in the gypsy camp, where Turkish and Tommy have gone to purchase a caravan to serve as an office for Turkish to work out for the fight he has to fix, the pair must walk around what appears to be large pile of excrement - and it doesn't appear to be animal in nature. Gross, yes, but it works with the conveyance of the stereotypical image that the director is attempting to convey.

Much the same holds true when Brick Top is giving Turkish and Tommy a tour of the pig pens. It is a harsh looking environment that successfully…… [Read More]

Reference List

Ritchie, G. (dir), 2000, Snatch, Columbia Pictures and SKA Films, UK.
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Faustus and Everyman an Analysis

Words: 3798 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8354078

Faustus, who sees his time also coming to a close, becomes a kind of Hamlet-figure and doubts that he can be forgiven. Faustus' problem is more than a life of misdeeds -- it is a problem of lack of faith. The faith of Everyman may have been lukewarm, but it was not corrupt. The faith in the time of Everyman has been polluted by Lutheran and Calvinist doctrines.

Considering the form of the narrative, this is not surprising: Faustus is obsessed with fame and renown. Everyman has no name proper -- and neither does his author. That the author of the medieval morality play should be anonymous is nothing out of the ordinary, and indeed seems all the more fitting when one considers that the second most printed book after the ible was The Imitation of Christ, a work whose author never put his name on the original (and which…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Craig, H. Morality Plays and Elizabethan Drama. Shakespeare Quarterly 1(2), 1950, 64-

72. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/pss/2866678

Everyman. NY: Fox, Duffield and Company, 1903.

Gardiner, H. Introduction. The Imitation of Christ (Thomas Kempis). NY:
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Interpretation Analysis Evaluation of a Poem

Words: 1431 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25650472

Idyllic, Idolizing, Late Victorian Tears

The poem by the Victorian poet laureate Alfred Lord Tennyson entitled "Tears, idle tears," has the unfortunate status of having its become such a common phrase in modern parlance, that the reader finds him or herself bracing his or her ear for more and more cliches as the poem progresses. In other words, one hears that tears are idle so often, one can easily forget, not only that Tennyson said, "I know not what they mean," but that the poem attempts to express the seriousness of futility of grief, or outward displays of affection by calling tears idle, in that they do no real work in the world. The use of 'idle' in multiple variances of meaning, from impractical and lazy, to idyllic, to idolizing is in fact quite profound and sophisticated, yielding a poem with a compact linguistic and stylistic structure.

It is also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Flanders, Judith. Inside the Victorian Home. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2004.

Hilton, N. "Tears, Ay, Dull, Tears" Lexis Complexes. Chapter 6. 2004. http://www.english.uga.edu/nhilton/lexis_complexes/chap6.html

Tennyson, Alfred. "Tears, Idle Tears." From The Bedford Reader. Sixth Edition, 2000.

Tears Idle Tears." Poetry Page. 2004.  http://glenavalon.com/idletears.html
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Understanding Literary Development With Social Media

Words: 2279 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51989998

changing because of advances in technology. How we communicate with each other has changed dramatically with the implementation of powerful and popular social media platforms, like Facebook. Today, both teams and adults spend a surprising amount of time on the social media sites. The question here is whether or not such activities can actually be a positive potential in regards to the growth of literacy and language development.

Social media is a trend that is only continuing to grow. It is used by most adolescents and young adults, who are still rolling in terms of their literacy and reading skills. This current dissertation aims to explore how we use and prevalence of social media can actually assist in developing literacy skills. As teenagers and young adults spend so much time on social media sites like Facebook, they are bombarded with visual and textual material. The current research was aiming to…… [Read More]

References

Ronda, Natalia Sinitskaya. (2011). Facing the Facebook challenge: Designing online social networking environments for literacy development. Graduate Programme in Language, Culture, and Teaching. York University.
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Apollonian and Dionysian Analysis of

Words: 1249 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84479502



The horn, like Saturn,

Is suspended in its ring of steering wheel;

And below is the black tongue of the gas pedal,

The bulge of the brake, the stalk

Of the stick shift,

Lines 17-21)

The simile, "like Saturn" succeeds in expanding on the image of the car in adding a sense of its larger symbolic meaning. The other images also tend to provide the car with natural attributes - such as a tongue.

In the final lines of the poem, there is a suggestion of Apollonian individualism. The protagonist overcomes the fear of the car and drives. This can be seen as an assertion of individuality over the Dionysian mystery or, on the other hand, acceptance and entrance into that mystery. The last lines of the poem tend to favor the latter interpretation.

The world's open gate, eternity

Hits me like a heart attack.

There is a sense of…… [Read More]

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Literature Critical Analysis of Russel Banks Rule of the Bone

Words: 2169 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19152911

Rule of the Bone

About the author

The author Russell Banks writes in the manner that infused his stories with a sadistic honesty and moral goodness that his characters strive to live up to. He writes in striking and most often sad tones about the drama of daily life (Anderson, eye net).

Furthermore, his themes of failure, of weakness, of the complexity of living an honest life were often desolating, but all his stories does contain a positive wisdom to them along with a sense of optimism found in the details that he carefully draws out of his characters' routine and everyday realities (Anderson, eye net). Hence, in my opinion no modern author writes more delicately about common man's uncertain search for the American grail of material ease and self-esteem than Russell Banks.

About the book

In writing Rule of the Bone the author Russell Banks took almost a year…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, Jason. Eye. Russell Banks.

A www.eye.net

Donahue, Deirdre. Russell Banks' Bone cuts right to the flawed family. USA Today.

A www.bri-dge.com
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SLP and International Business Analysis

Words: 11586 Length: 34 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33149230

political scenario illustrated that governments all over the globe are making their immigration rules more stringent because of the rise in terrorism; the implication of this phenomenon is a decrease in international traveling, which endangers continuance of a number of airlines, including Nigeria's Arik Air (Eze, 2010). Hofstede's power distance dimension denotes the degree to which unequal distribution of power is anticipated and accepted by the lower ranking members (in terms of authority), of organizations and institutions in the nation under consideration. UA's score on this dimension is relatively low (40). Power distance deals with members of a society not being on an equal footing with one another; the dimension conveys a particular culture's outlook towards power imbalances among countries, as well. Furthermore, the inequality that prevails in a given society is equally approved of by its leaders and followers. Nigeria demonstrates a high power distance score (80), signifying its…… [Read More]

Shih, S. C. (2010). Network Process Model for Group Choice of a Multinational Enterprises' Entry Mode. Contemporary Management Research, 6(3).

Stewart, M. R., & Maughn, R. D. (2011). International joint ventures, a practical approach. Davis Wright Tremaine LLP, Available at http://www. dwt. com/files/Publication/Article_Stewart.pdf

Venkateswaran, N. (2012). Chapter 8. Country evaluation and selection. International Business Management. New Age International. Daryaganj, IND. [Ebrary]
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Queer Literary Studies

Words: 914 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37471503

Queer Theory and Oscar Wilde

Analysis of "Queer Theory" by Annamarie Jagose in relation to Dorian Gray's character in "The picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde

In her discussion of "Queer theory," author Annamarie Jagose provides a distinction between the concepts 'queer' and the dichotomous relationship between 'lesbian' and 'gay.' Jagose argued in her discussion of this theory that queer was a concept that had politically evolved through the years in relation to the proliferation of gay and lesbian studies.

What makes the queer concept vital to the study of gays and lesbians, as well as issues of homosexuality and heterosexuality is that it provides a 'gray area' in which no distinctions between male and female and gay and lesbian are found. Queer appeals to the 20th century philosophers and social scientists simply because it offers an avenue through which gender and sex can be discussed without the political…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Jagose, A. (1996). "Queer Theory." Australian Humanities Review web site. Available at: http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au/AHR/archive/Issue-Dec-1996/jagose.html.

Wilde, O. (1994). The Picture of Dorian Gray. NY: Penguin Books.
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Hope Leslie Analysis

Words: 1847 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54963930

Hope Leslie Strong Female Characters of the 17th Century

Strong Female Characters in Sedgwick's Hope Leslie

The United States has not always been a free space for strong female characters. In fact, in its earliest stages, most women were confined to very strict gender rules and restrictions. That is definitely true in the case of the Puritan culture that settled in the North East in the 17th century. Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie presents a surprisingly strong and independent female protagonist who fights for what she believes in and against the constraining gender norms of the very conservative Puritan culture in the early days of the Massachusetts colony. This represents a connection between the American idea of independence and individualism and women's role in American history. Sedgwick is also standing up against the gender norms face d in her own era with such a strong female lead.

The novel itself…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Pelegri, Teresa Requena. "Bringing Out Censored Stories and Reassessing the Past in Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie." Coolabah. Vol. 3. 2009.

Sedgwick, Catharine Maria. Hope Leslie: Or, Early Times in the Massachusetts. Harper Brothers.