Literary Essays (Examples)

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A literary essay is a non-fiction essay about any literary topic.  The term “literary” simply means of or having to do with literature, therefore an essay that is about literature is a literary essay.  Generally, the point of a literary essay is to determine a person’s in-depth understanding of a particular novel, short-story, or other work of literature.  Topics for literary essays can be extremely broad, like “the role of emotion in Shakespeare’s plays” or narrower, like “the role of jealousy in Iago’s treatment of Othello in Shakespeare’s Othello.”  Therefore, when asked to write a literary essay, it is critical to tailor your response to the prompt or directions you are given.

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Unifies and Permeates an Entire

Words: 1176 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91474170



Short story -- A brief story where the plot drives the narrative, substantially shorter than a novel. Example: "Hills like White Elephants," by Ernest Hemingway.

Allusion -- A casual reference in one literary work to a person, place, event, or another piece of literature, often without explicit identification. It is used to establish a tone, create an indirect association, create contrast, make an unusual juxtaposition, or bring the reader into a world of references outside the limitations of the story itself. Example: "The Wasteland" by T.S. Eliot alludes to "Paradise Lost" by John Milton.

epetition -- The repeating of a word or phrase or rhythm within a piece of literature to add emphasis. Example: The story of Agamemnon in The Odyssey by Homer.

Blank verse -- Unrhymed lines of ten syllables each with the even-numbered syllables bearing the accents, most closing resembling the natural rhythms of English speech. Example: "The…… [Read More]

References:

Wheeler, Dr. L. Kip. "Literary Terms and Definitions." Web.

"Word List of Literary and Grammar Terms." Web.
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Master and Margarita Born in

Words: 1561 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72801960

Although the novel ends with an open-ended question about the fate of the two titular characters, it is clear that Margarita has the power to create her own reality.

Mikhail ulgakov uses three literary elements in the novel the Master and the Margarita: a multiple layered reality, symbolism, and magical realism. Each of these three literary devices helps the author to convey the central themes of greed, corruption, and social control during and after the Russian Revolution. The multiple layers of reality allow ulgakov to explore the central themes from multiple points-of-view and perspectives. The multiple layers of reality also prevent the novel from becoming a didactic commentary on life in Moscow. Symbolism also permits the exploration of greed, corruption, and social control without directly implicating Stalin or Soviet bureaucracy in the degradation of humanity. Finally, magical realism allows the author -- and his readers -- to imagine how human…… [Read More]

Bibliography." Library of Congress: European Reading Room. Retrieved online:  http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/bulgaklc.html 

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. Mikhail Bulgakov. The Master and Margarita (1997). Retrieved online: http://lib.ru/BULGAKOW/master97_engl.txt
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Pirates vs Modern Day the

Words: 1241 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27649534

An even more recent case of piracy, which occurred when a cruise ship was captured off the coast of Somalia, suggests the violence of piracy. Armed security personnel on the cruise ship traded fire with the pirates, who fled. Though no one was hurt, trading gunshots at sea was probably not what the passengers of the cruise ship had in mind when they signed up for the vacation (infield). It would not be surprising if the passengers and crew of the ship were forever scared by this frightening experience. These two incidents show that piracy today is not the piracy of literature; instead, it is a dangerous crime for both perpetrator and victim.

Thus, while pirates have traditionally been the beloved characters of adventures and children's novels, they no longer amuse and entertain us. Instead, they commit crimes that result in death and ruined lives. Because of this, Vandergrift wonders…… [Read More]

Winfield, Nicole. "Italy cruise ship fires on Somali pirates." Google News. 26 April

2009. The Associated Press. 26 April 2009.

In this short news article, the author describes Somali Pirates' attempt to take an Italian cruise ship, which carried around 1500 passengers and crew. The attempt was thwarted when the cruise ship's security guards fired on the pirates. No one was hurt.
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Harlot House Life in Victorian

Words: 860 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71214947

And yet, the clockwork puppet, certainly but a shadow of a living woman, can only try to sing, try to move out from the shadows, out from the stereotype crushing her. The horrible marionette, in contrast, rather than singing, smoked its cigarette and tried to pretend it was alive. Finally, the utter hopelessness of the dark side of Victorian society comes out with the phrase, "The dead are dancing with the dead, the dust is whirling with the dust," evoking the funeral speak of "ashes to ashes, dust to dust," and the dead -- the underside of society, those with whom the proper Victorian had little use, pass from love to lust, from light to dark, tire of the game as they do the synthetic waltz, their shadows morphing into nothing as they continue to wheel and whirl, finally weary of it all.

The literary images of this poem, coupled…… [Read More]

REFERENCES and WORKS CONSULTED

Hay, C. "A Glimpse at Lust Redeemed." The Victorian Web. 2003.Cited in:

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/workshop/citmla.htm

"Welcome to the Twilight City." HistoricalEye.Com., (n.d.). Cited in:

 http://www.historicaleye.com/Lost1.html
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Personal Exploration in Hope Leslie

Words: 2208 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74411107



The narration of Hope Leslie also offers some other insights into the radical nature of the novel. Sedgwick's personal experiences in her home town as well as in New England and Massachusetts helps to add to the realism and beauty of her own descriptions of these very same places within the novel. However, Sedgwick uses these beautiful, serene, and sometimes melancholy characterizations of the landscape to both enhance the novel's themes and underscore the interactions of the many characters as well as literary devices of their own accord (Schweitzer, 100). One excellent example of this is during Everell's captivity, where Sedgwick uses the vivid and sometimes philosophical landscapes as an integral part of the dramatic action that takes place.

In this way, Sedgwick is one of the first novelists to use this sort of technique in a way that both highlights the natural surroundings in the story and how these…… [Read More]

References

Emerson, Amanda. "History, Memory, and the Echoes of Equivalence in Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie." Legacy. Vol. 24, No. 1, 2007, pp. 24-49.

Samuels, Shirley. "Women, Blood, and Contract." American Literary History. Vol. 20, No. 1-2, pp. 57-75

Schweitzer, Ivy. Perfecting Friendship: Politics and Affiliation in Early American Literature. The University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, 2006.

Sedgwick, Catharine Maria. Hope Leslie, or, Early times in the Massachusetts. Harper and Brothers: New York, 1842.