Malcolm X Essays (Examples)

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Malcolm Martin Luther King Was

Words: 3783 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87160459



A few thousand people gathered at the venue that evening, and when Dr. Martin Luther King took up the mike and spoke that he was 'tired' of being discriminated against and segregated all the time and that it was time to start changing. The principles to use, he stated were those of non-violence and non-co-operation, and these would bring about justice and freedom for his people who were undergoing constant humiliations at every step in their lives. Persuasion, and not coercion, and Christian love, and a basic desire to listen to one's own conscience and act according to the dictates of the conscience must be the motto to be followed, he said, and this would bring about more results than those of violence and bloodshed. During his speech, Martin Luther King Jr. stated that if his people would protest against these constant indignities with courage, and not with violence, with…… [Read More]

References

Biography of Malcolm X Retrieved at http://www.africawithin.com/malcolmx/malcolm_bio.htm. Accessed on 7 December, 2004

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. October 19, 2004. Retrieved at  http://www2.lhric.org/pocantico/taverna/98/king.htm . Accessed on 7 December, 2004

Lincoln, C. Eric. The Meaning of Malcolm X Retrieved at  http://www.nathanielturner.com/meaningofmalcolmx.htm . Accessed on 7 December, 2004

Malcolm Little X (1925-1965). Leadership Studies Program: Ripon College. Retrieved at http://www.ripon.edu/academics/leadership/CLN/MalcolmX.htm. Accessed on 7 December, 2004
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Ballot or the Bullet Malcolm

Words: 954 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38249450

" He explained that the ballot of 1964 represented a catalyst for the time being, "When all of the white political crooks will be right back in your and my community ... with their false promises which they don't intend to keep." He stated further that the Democrats lied about their support of the civil rights bill and had no actual intentions of passing it. He stated that they were simply out to play games and were using African-Americans as bait. Essentially, Malcolm stated that all African-Americans must use the ballot or the bullet. They must defend themselves and also push for equality and black nationalism as well as human rights (Malcolm X).

The experiences of the Black Panther were decidedly more militant but took their inspiration directly from him. In Oakland, California, in October of 1966, Huey Newton and Bobby Seale founded the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense. The…… [Read More]

References

Black panther party. Marxists.org. Web. 24 Mar 2012.


X, Malcolm. "The Ballot or the Bullet." Edchange.org, 03 April 1964. Web. 24 Mar 2012.

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King X

Words: 1333 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79977437

Creative Minds Critical Thinking Famous Thinkers Paper Subjects: Martin Luther King Malcom XS

It is not easy to readily deconstruct the ideas and courses of action that Malcolm X advocated, for the simple fact that those ideas and courses of action changed so much during his relatively short lifetime. It is far easier to do so for Martin Luther King Jr., who was fairly consistent in his ideology and actions. However, when attempting to compare these aspects of these two salient African-American leaders in the middle of the 20th century, there are both points of similarity and of dissimilarity. For the most part, these men supported drastically different ways of accomplishing what was relatively the same objective. That objective, of course, serves as the primary similarity between these men -- each of them was actually working to solve the same problems that African-Americans faced during the Civil rights movement. If…… [Read More]

References

Coates, T-N. (2011). The legacy of Malcolm X: Why his legacy lives on in Barack Obama. Atlantic Monthly. 307(4), 100-107.

Haley, A. (1964). The Autobiography of Malcolm X New York: Ballantine Books.

King Jr., M.L. (1963). Letter from a Birmingham jail. www.africa.upenn.edu. Retrieved from  http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html 

Worthington, B. (2013). Martin Luther King Jr. As identifactory conglomerate. Black Theology: An International Journal. 11(2), 219-239.
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American History X Suggests That

Words: 1000 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58418181



Derek's racist beliefs are cemented, and became the springboard to his activism and leadership of the skinheads when his father is killed by a black man, fighting a fire in a crack house in an inner-city neighborhood. hen two young African-Americans try to steal his car, Derek is determined that he, unlike his beloved father, will emerge the winner. The film makes it clear that Derek has been waiting for this to happen. Again, the film does not excuse the theft of his vehicle, but indicates that the world is filled with potential justifications for racism, and Derek is looking for such 'reasons' to engage in hateful action. Derek is both a product of his environment and his simmering male adolescent rage.

Derek sent to prison for three years. His younger brother tries to assume Derek's role by harassing immigrants and other non-whites. He also finds himself, like Derek, of…… [Read More]

Work Cited

American History X. Directed by Tony Kaye. 1998.
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Homemade Education

Words: 1293 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79767462

Malcolm X

"A Homemade Education" is a chapter in The Autobiography of Malcolm X The chapter details the formative experiences Malcolm X had while in prison, teaching himself how to read, write, and also be critically aware of what he was reading and writing. "A Homemade Education" is important to the development of Malcolm X's ideas and his character. Learning how to read and write in prison empowered the author, and enabled him to become the powerful public speaker and influential political activist that he became. The chapter also reveals some of the rhetorical devices and strategies Malcolm X uses throughout the autobiography.

The chapter begins with X stating plainly, "It was because of my letters that I happened to stumble upon starting to acquire some kind of a homemade education." Just as Elijah Muhammad was having a great impact on Malcolm X's thought processes and worldview, the desire to…… [Read More]

Reference

Malcolm X "A Homemade Education." In The Autobiography of Malcolm X Retrieved online: http://www.usi.edu/libarts/english/EnglishUCC/eng100/Malcolm_X_A_Homemade_Education.pdf
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Neo-Confucianism Is a Philosophy Which Was Born TEST1

Words: 978 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

Malcolm X on education

A school dropout, Malcolm X illustrates the dichotomy between a formal and what he calls a "homemade" education: "In the street, I had been the most articulate hustler out there -- I had commanded attention when I said something. But now, trying to write simple English, I not only wasn't articulate, I wasn't even functional," (171). Street smarts vs. book smarts: Malcolm X's survival and success depended on both. Practically illiterate when he first entered prison, Malcolm X wrote letter after letter to Elijah Muhammad, forging for himself a homemade education: "It was because of my letters that I happened to stumble upon starting to acquire some kind of a homemade education," (171). His desire to communicate with Elijah Muhummad was the initial spark that inspired Malcolm X to teach himself how to read and write. Painstakingly, he would copy page after page from the dictionary…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Malcolm X, with the assistance of Alex Haley. The Autobiography of Malcolm X New York: Grove, 1966.
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Traditional Story of the Underdog

Words: 1320 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64846448

' It was much like a horse might be pulled up from the finishing line. And indeed this is what happened, in actual fact, to the 'underdog'-racing racing prospect, named eabiscuit, when the horse was a colt. Like Malcolm X's parentage to two strong parents, eabiscuit, the direct descendant great racehorse Man O'War, was born with great geological assets of speed and intelligence. But the horse was underestimated, and eventually used to train more promising racehorses by having jockeys pull up the animal, so that the animals being 'really' trained could gain confidence, however false.

eabiscuit, like Malcolm was judged harshly for his appearance. In eabiscuit's case, he was born a small animal in a sport that favored giants like the towering stallion War Admiral. eabiscuit was knock-kneed and had what some observers called an 'eggbeater' gait, rather than a proper galloping stride. This was why eabiscuit was put forth…… [Read More]

Seabiscuit was an athlete with many physical obstacles as well -- a tendency to put on weight, a love of sleep, as well as the fact he always looked like he was about to go lame. But through sheer heart, pluck, determination, and the fact that the strange trio of Pollard, Smith, and Howard seemed to understand Seabiscuit and believe in him, enabled the racehorse to realize his early promise.

The story of the little racehorse that could overcome such tremendous early obstacles had great resonance during the American Great Depression, the depression that had such a negative impact upon young Malcolm X's early childhood. Perhaps one reason Malcolm X's Islamic conversion story, of a coming back from the spiritually dead, did not have as much resonance during its day was that the early 1960's when Malcolm X had his greatest influence was a time of great optimism and faith in the American dream of possibility, which Malcolm was so critical of in his speeches.

Also, unlike the more uncomplicated rags to riches tale of Seabiscuit, Malcolm demanded change of his listeners who would become his followers; even through Malcolm's story was also an act of affirmation of faith in the self. Malcolm called upon his Black listeners to give up their lives of crime and of attaining white material success, and instead strive for the harsher and long-term gratification of community unity and spiritual rewards for their children and children's children. However, today, after his death, Malcolm X, like Seabiscuit during the horse's heyday of popularity, has become a symbol of promise. Particularly for young Black men, although for many others who have read Alex Haley's version of his Autobiography, or seen Spike Lee's cinematic incarnation of the tale, Malcolm X stands along with Seabiscuit as a triumph over societal limits. But neither of these individuals was truly an underdog, in the sense that both individuals showed early promise, promise that society attempted to stifle or refused to recognize. And they rose not simply though their own self-determination, but with the help and mentoring of others, in Malcolm's case, through the social institutions of Black Islam, and in Seabiscuit's case, in the hands of individuals who believed in the horse's potential glory.
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Learning a Language Gaining Fluency in a

Words: 1741 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37044938

Learning a language: Gaining fluency in a language to be free

The acquisition of language is never a culturally neutral process. When someone learns his or her first or even a second language, that individual also acquires a status in the eyes of the world, based upon how that language is perceived. The race of the speaker, his or her perceived level of education, gender, and race all interact with the stereotypes that exist in the gazer's mind. In Christine Marin's essay "Spanish Lessons," Marin chronicles how her unsteadiness in Spanish did not initially bother her, given the fact that she grew up in a society that prized whiteness. Gradually, as she grew older and her attitude towards her heritage changed, her lack of fluency in her native tongue became a burden. Similarly, Malcolm X was forced to grapple with his complex relationship with the English language. On one hand,…… [Read More]

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Culture and Race

Words: 1049 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40172763

speak the word of peace and write to enable to establish the end of racism, poverty, and everything seems wrote wrong with the world. People such as Malcolm X, Richard Rodriguez and others wrote beautiful pieces on the importance on peace and harmony surrounding everyone in the world. Through the written word and the methods of the Contact Zone, these writers tried to accomplish their goal of making a difference in today's society, which the changes were for the better. Along with that, these writers have a great impact on how people view the world today on issues such as racism and harmony. Therefore, people like Malcolm X and Richard Rodriguez made a difference through their writings and speeches of peace.

Intelligent and articulate, Malcolm was appointed a minister and national spokesman for the Nation of Islam. Elijah Muhammad also charged him with establishing new mosques in cities such as…… [Read More]

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Political Science Black Representation

Words: 3350 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3745896

political representation of African-Americans in the southern United States. The author explores many different theories as well as the ideas of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King to explore the under presentation of Blacks politically. There were eight sources used to complete this paper.

African-Americans have come a long way since the nation's inception. From the days of slavery, to the present time many bridges have been crossed and many battles have been won. Gone are the days that Blacks were required to sit at the back of the bus.

No longer can Blacks be told they must eat at a certain restaurant. Black and white children go to school together daily, they grow up on the same streets and they marry into each other's race with increasing frequency. It is becoming the America that the founding fathers envisioned at the time the nation was created. One of the reasons…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ellison, Ralph. Invisible Man

Cornell, Stephen. The Return of the Native: American Indian Political Resurgence

Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (October 1990)

Swain, Carol. Black Faces, Black Interests: The Representation of African-Americans in Congress
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Film and Perspectives on History

Words: 2572 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82644447

The newsreels are a successful thematic device as they are used to guide the viewer through the details of the events. It was the decision more so of the studio executives to leave some things out as they only used what would drive the story of the horse. Only upon further investigation of the history does one gain a fuller knowledge. Still the filmmaker's intention of getting the story to the forefront of the American consciousness was successful and met critical review.

Malcolm X

In the film Malcolm X, Spike Lee misleads the viewer about the full nature of racism held by the Nation of Islam. The Nation of Islam characters in the movie say that whites are "blue-eyed devils," but never revealed to viewers is the doctrine about whites being eliminated in racial Armageddon. Furthermore, Lee did not limit the film's context to historical accounts; instead he chose to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Malcolm X Dir. Spike Lee. Perf. Denzel Washington and Angela Bassett. 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks, 1992.

Seabiscuit. Dir. Gary Ross. Perf. Tobey Maguire, Jeff Bridges and Chris Cooper.

DreamWorks Pictures, 2003.

The Best Years of Our Lives. Dir. William Wyler. Perf. Myrna Loy and Fredric March.
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Radical Groups Individuals and Organizations

Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44473299



The Black Arts Movement refers specifically to the rise of African-American literature in the 1960s. Writer and activist Amiri Baraka started the movement in Harlem in response to the assassination of Malcolm X and actively encouraged black writers to use their voices to tell their stories. The movement went outside of the realm of written art to include theater and other forms of expression. It led to the development of cultural studies programs at universities that focused on the idea that being black in the United States was a different cultural experience than being white, and helped highlight social differences between black and white America.

The Black Student Movement is an organization at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. It was established because of Black student dissatisfaction with both the growth of the black student population at the school and the NAACP chapter at the school. It became an…… [Read More]

References

Estate of Malcolm X (2012). Biography. Retrieved May 13, 2012 from Malcolm X website:

http://www.malcolmx.com/about/bio.html

Huey P. Newton Foundation. (2012). What was the Black Panther Party? Retrieved May 13,

2012 from BlackPanther.org website: http://www.blackpanther.org/legacynew.htm
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Spike Lee Filmography Spike Lee's

Words: 2379 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69110928

Despite the more commercial and thrilling aspect of this film, Lee retains his trademarks, from close-up shots to his signature floating shot and infusion of music and athletic iconography.

Lee continues to infuse his films with social and political commentary. Although he has not made as many feature films in recent years as he did in the past, he continues to produce and direct works that focus on social issues, as well as the black experience. Although Lee may be outspoken at times, his viewpoints and socio-political beliefs have not changed during the course of his career. His ability to retain his identity in an ever changing world have made Lee a truly unique director.

Annotated Filmography

Jungle Fever. Dir. Spike Lee. United States: 40 Acres & a Mule Studios, 1991.

Jungle Fever explores the concept of interracial relationships and how they are viewed by the community. The film, like…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bollag, Brenda. "NY Independent Cinema at Cannes: Jim Jarmusch's "Down by Law" and Spike

Lee's "She's Gotta Have it." Film Quarterly, Vol. 40, No. 2 (Winter, 1986-1987), pp. 11-

13. JSTOR. 21 April 2012.

Diawara, Manthia and Kolbowski, Silvia. "Homeboy Cosmopolitan." October, Vol. 83 (Winter,
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Jensen Communications Studies Professor and

Words: 1342 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78951435

After World War Two, Carson realized the extent to which the government was permitting the use of toxic chemicals and wrote a book to expose the practice. That book was called Silent Spring, and it "challenged the practices of agricultural scientists and the government, and called for a change in the way humankind viewed the natural world."[footnoteef:8] Jensen includes an excerpt from Silent Spring to show that Carson was up against one of the most lucrative industries in the world, and that although her work is unfinished, Carson made a huge impact on raising awareness and eventually her work got DDT banned. [8: "The Life and Legacy of achel Carson," Accessed May 3, 2013, http://www.rachelcarson.org/Biography.aspx#.UYOWMCshKII]

Malcolm X's autobiography was arguably not a project undertaken as a form of muckraker journalism. The author started writing when he was in prison, and he comes to learn the power of the written word…… [Read More]

References

Carson, Rachel. "Silent Spring." Excerpt in Stories that Changed America, edited by Carl Jensen, 117-123.

Daily Censored. "Carl Jensen." Accessed May 3, 2013,  http://www.dailycensored.com/writers/carl-jensen/ 

The Daily Show. "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart," Accessed May 3, 2013, http://www.thedailyshow.com/

Jensen, Carl. Stories that Changed America. New York: Seven Stories, 2002.
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Learning Power American Education Has

Words: 1346 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22192579

While his loss of accent brought himself and his teachers a sense of pride, it brought sorrow to his parents, who saw the change, however gradual, in their child. The author furthermore admits that for children like him, from a non-white American background, the home and school environment are at cultural extremes. This creates conflict that the young Rodriguez handled by conforming to his school environment. In effect he replaced the importance and roles of his parents in his life with those of his teachers, and as such became an academic success.

The author however admits that this is a shameful and lonely type of success. Nonetheless, it is a success that the author has chosen to conform to. Instead of therefore being successful because he has been educated, Rodriguez emphasizes that his success was chosen. He worked towards academic success with great passion, because this is what he wanted.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cremin, Lawrence a. (1957). Horace Mann and the 19th century Education Reform movement. http://www-scf.usc.edu/~clarkjen/Horace%20Mann.htm

Gatto, John Taylor. (2003). Against School. http://www.spinninglobe.net/againstschool.htm

Malcolm X Learning to Read. http://www-scf.usc.edu/~clarkjen/Malcolm%20X.doc

Rodriguez, Richard. The Achievement of Desire. http://www-scf.usc.edu/~clarkjen/Richard%20Rodriguez.doc
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Buggin' Out Tells Mookie to

Words: 1573 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11817284

Mookie's frustrated acts show that violence is sometimes justified as a means of "self-defense," in Malcolm X's words. Bigger did not have access to the words of wisdom of either Malcolm X or Martin Luther King Jr. More importantly, Bigger did not have access to a community of like-minded African-Americans who could sympathize with if not totally condone the use of violence to preserve cultural integrity and pride.

Mookie and Bigger are remarkably similar, proving that little has actually changed for African-Americans in terms of gaining social and political power even after the Civil Rights movement. Richard Wright's novel Native Son illustrates the extent of racial discrimination during the early half of the twentieth century; Spike Lee's movie "Do the Right Thing" reveals the extent of racial discrimination during the latter half of the century. The protagonists in Native Son and "Do the Right Thing" live in different times and…… [Read More]

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Africans at the Crossroads

Words: 653 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75080081

African-Americans have been and are still continuing to be affected disproportionately by poverty, mortality rates for treatable diseases and employment discrimination, as recent studies show. A study last month resolved that black patients die from cancer at higher rates than whites, and still another study found that employers still practice a form of racial profiling that prevents many African-Americans from entering or moving up in the job market. While these and other finding point to the continued existence of institutional racism, conservatives have conducted efforts in the last years to dismantle affirmative action programs, arguing that they are no longer needed. Many say that the U.S. is unable to recognize and deal with contemporary racism because it has also been unable to deal with its past history of slavery, and with slavery's legacy.

One of the most influential and monumental leaders for the freedom of Blacks was one Malcolm Little…… [Read More]

Philip Randolph stepped into the limelight and became a very visible national spokesperson for African-American rights in the 1940s and 1950s. He focused his attention on the rising number of blacks on relief and the number of defense industry jobs that were increasing with the war effort heating up. These jobs traditionally excluded blacks. Randolph proposed the March on Washington - a mass action protest to demand change. He was also a great leader and helped the Blacks get their freedom.

James Farmer was also a great black leader and his efforts paid seed into the black freedom movement although he himself could never see through to the end of his dream. Rather than become an ordained Methodist minister, Farmer, who told his father he would rather fight that church's policy of segregated congregations, chose instead to go to work for the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR). Farmer was FOR's secretary for race relations, helping the Quaker, pacifist organization craft its responses to such social ills as war, violence, bigotry, and poverty.

Information on the leaders from: http://www.stanford.edu/~tommyz/
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Homemade Education Deals With How He Learned

Words: 358 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5384790

Homemade Education" deals with how he learned to read and write in prison. The thing that impressed me most about this essay is that Malcolm X taught himself how to do these things instead of relying on someone else to show him the way. He decided that he needed to learn how to read and write, and he would not be able to do many of the things that he wanted to do otherwise, so he made sure that he learned. Asking for a dictionary and pencils and tablets in prison got him started, and it was nice to read about how seriously he took his task once he realized that there was so much that he could learn. He never knew that there were that many words and after he discovered them he could not leave them alone. It is part of made him such a good speaker, and…… [Read More]

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Playwright Israel Zangwill Is United States of

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69359704

Playwright Israel Zangwill

Is United States of America in the second decade of 21st century a melting pot -- the kind of melting pot that was envisaged by Israel Zangwill close to 104 years ago? The answer is an overwhelming no. Today more than ever there is no one idea of Americanness or American culture that is acceptable across the board. Most of this is attributable to the differences in the immigration patterns as they existed in 1908 and today. In 1908 most of the immigrants were of European background with a European heritage. Over a generation or two, these immigrants groups assimilated and integrated fully into American society as Americans. One notable exception was of course the African-American experience.

Latter half of the 20th century however saw migration from areas that were as diverse as China, Vietnam, the Indian subcontinent and the Arab world. These migrants have brought their…… [Read More]

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Black Films as a Reflection

Words: 4019 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90025348

"

The Aftermath

Uncle Tom characters were common in both white and black productions of the time, yet no director before Micheaux had so much as dared to shine a light on the psychology that ravages such characters. By essentially bowing to the two white men, Micheaux implied that Old Ned was less than a man; an individual whittled down to nothing more than yes-man and wholly deprived of self-worth. At this point in the history of black films, with some of the most flagrant sufferings of blacks exposed to the American public, the only logical path forward that African-Americans could take was to begin making cogent demands to improve their collective social situation.

Slowly, black characters in film took on greater and more significant roles in film. Sidney Poitier was one of the most powerful film stars of the mid twentieth century. In roles like the 1950 film by…… [Read More]

Reference List

Finlayson, R. (2003). We Shall Overcome: The History of the American Civil Rights

Movement. Lerner Publications Company, Minneapolis, MN.

King, Jr., M. And Jackson, J. (1963). Why We Can't Wait. Signet Classic, New York,

NY.
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Social Marginalization by Race Economic Deprivation and

Words: 1262 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26965752

Social Marginalization by Race: Economic Deprivation and White American Resistance in the allot or the ullet by Malcolm X

The rigorous history of African-Americanism and their emancipation within the American society reflects the struggles and perpetuation of discrimination among black Americans even during the 20th century. Malcolm X, considered one of the most radical and influential leader of the black American civil rights movement, centers on the issues of discrimination and white American resistance among the blacks in his famous discourse, The allot or the ullet, delivered in April 3, 1964.

The relevance and significance of Malcolm X's discourse must be put into context in the events happening during his time. Historically, the socio-political landscape of the United States during the 1960s is characterized by the emergence and development of the civil rights movement for the marginalized sectors of the society, such as the youth, women, poor, and particularly, African-Americans.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Malcolm X (1964). The Ballot or the Bullet. Available at: http://www.indiana.edu/~rterrill/Text-BorB.html.
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Oppression Community Action Against Racial

Words: 1793 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86000860

Freire's discussion of the oppressive activities that discriminate students is similar to the racial discrimination experienced by the black Americans. Thus, even though Freire, Malcolm X, and King talked about various strategies, they ultimately aim to deter the effects and eliminate completely the occurrence of oppression in the society.

Reflecting on the significant contributions of each individual to the progress of the civil rights movement and educational reform in the history of American society, it is evident that there cannot be one superior or best strategy that must be adopted to eliminate or deter oppression. What these readings and analyses of the works of Malcolm X, King, and Freire say about social change is that history provides us with various ways or perspectives to find a solution to a problem; each insight is helpful to the improvement of social changes in society. Freire's critical analysis of the educational system is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Freire, P. (1990). "The Banking Concept of Education." In Ways of Reading. Boston: St. Martin's Press, Inc.

King, M.L. (1964). "Martin Luther King -- Acceptance Speech." Available at http://nobelprize.org/peace/laureates/1964/king-acceptance.html.

Malcolm X (1964). "The Ballot or the Bullet." Available at http://www.indiana.edu/~rterrill/Text-BorB.html.
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Martin Luther King's Non-Violent Protesting

Words: 312 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10183685

Of corse, there were some African-Americans like Malcolm X, an
otspoken champion of black activism, who felt that King's non-violent
ideals wold never work and ths spported the se of violence or at least
the threat of violence in order to win the concessions they demanded.
Ironically, Dr. King was assassinated in 1968 and in the weeks and months
that followed his death, the American Civil Rights movement seemed to
flonder in ftility while the militants like Malcolm X gained new
inflence and new followers among yonger African-Americans living in
rban/city ghettos and on college campses across the contry. Bt King's
legacy lived on and by the end of the 1960's, segregation had been otlawed
and all African-Americans achieved eqal rights related to employment,
voting and the ability to rn for pblic office at the state…… [Read More]

urban/city ghettos and on college campuses across the country. But King's
legacy lived on and by the end of the 1960's, segregation had been outlawed
and all African-Americans achieved equal rights related to employment,
voting and the ability to run for public office at the state and federal
levels.
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Garvey the Duality of Garveyism

Words: 6231 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36988088

e must canonize our own saints, create our own martyrs, and elevate to positions of fame and honor black women and men who have made their distinct contributions to our history." (Garvey1, 1)

Taken in itself and absent the implications to African repatriation that we will address hereafter, this is a statement which seems to project itself upon both Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, mutually driven as they would be by a belief that African men had been deprived of a humanity which it was their duty to see restored. But it is here that we can also begin to observe the elements of Garvey's rather poetic and frequently biblical rhetoric as producing multifarious responses in its future champions. Certainly, the greatest and most daunting common ground between King and Malcolm X in this instance is in their mutual 'creation' of 'martyrs.' They would both sacrifice themselves to the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Associated Press (AP). (1963). MALCOLM X SCORES U.S. And KENNEDY; Likens Slaying to 'Chickens Coming Home to Roost' Newspapers Chided. New York Times.

Edward, W. (1996). "A Lunatic or a Traitor" by W.E.B. DuBois. African-American Political Thought, 1890-1930: M.E. Sharpe.

Edward1, W. (1996). "The Negro's Greatest Enemy" by Marcus Garvey. African-American Political Thought, 1890-1930: M.E. Sharpe.

Garvey, a.J. (1967). The Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey. Routledge.
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Sampling in Authentic Hip-Hop According

Words: 3167 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13071802

In the "hard-core" sub-genre of hip-hop, one sees a much clearer emphasis on street and urban authenticity -- rather than on sampling. For N.W.A., hip-hop is an expression of lived life -- a kind of militant message passed down to urban blacks from men like Malcolm X

But not all hip-hop comes from such types. The Beastie Boys are an example of hip-hop artists who thrive on a different message. Much of their music is centered on adolescent/teenage angst -- white suburban kids enraged by suburban living, but moved by urban beats. They inter-mingle their own white perspective with samplings from an assortment of other artists -- thus making their mark on the hip-hop scene. Their aggression appears to be real, like 50 Cent's -- even if it is different in its source. The Beastie Boys are, of course, legends in hip-hop -- but Mickey Hess denies that their authenticity…… [Read More]

Reference List

Alridge, DP 2012 'From Civil Rights to Hip Hop: Toward a Nexus of Ideas', the Hip

Hop Project, pp. 1-28

Arewa, OB 2006 'From JC Bach to Hip Hop: Musical Borrowing, Copyright and Cultural Context', North Carolina Law Review 84, pp 548-558

Best, S; Kellner, D 1999 'Rap, Black Rage, and Racial Difference', Enculturation 2:2
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African-American Discrimination

Words: 3977 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84650386

African-Americans are second only to Native Americans, historically, in terms of poor treatment at the hands of mainstream American society. Although African-Americans living today enjoy nominal equality, the social context in which blacks interact with the rest of society is still one that tangibly differentiates them from the rest of America. This cultural bias towards blacks is in many notable ways more apparent than the treatment of other people of color, such as Asian immigrants, as is reflected in disparate wages and living conditions experienced by these respective groups. Common stereotypes hold the successful, college educated black man or woman as the exception rather than the rule, whereas Asians are commonly thought of as over-achievers. Although any bias undermines social interaction in that it shifts attention away from individual merit, the bias towards African-Americans can be said to be worse than most, and lies at the root of discrimination and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Tamar Lewin. Growing Up, Growing Apart. New York Times, June 25, 2000. http://query.nytimes.com/search/article-page.html?res=9402E1DF1730F936A15755C0A9669C8B63

Thomas Dolan. Newark and its Gateway Complex. Rutgers Newark Online, September, 2002. http://www.newarkmetro.rutgers.edu/reports/2002/09/gateway/gateway2.php

George Breitman (Ed.), Malcolm X Speaks: Selected Speeches and Statements, published in 1990 by Grove Weidenfeld: New York, NY. pp 4-17 http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/malcolmxgrassroots.htm

High Rises Brought Low at Last. The Economist: July 9, 1998. http://www.economist.com/displayStory.cfm?Story_ID=142018
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The Moral Landscape of Pre

Words: 6045 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57381349


On the threshold of the Civil Rights movement, Baldwin would publish
Notes of a Native Son. Though 1953's Go Tell It On The Mountain would be
perhaps Baldwin's best known work, it is this explicitly referential
dialogic follow-up to right's
Native Son that would invoke some of the most compelling insights which
Baldwin would have to offer on the subject of American racism. This is,
indeed, a most effectively lucid examination from the perspective of a
deeply self-conscious writer enduring the twin marks in a nation of
virulent prejudice of being both African American and homosexual. The
result of this vantage is a set of essays that reaches accord with right's
conception of the socially devastating impact of segregation on the psyche,
conscience and real opportunity but also one that takes issue with the
brutality of Bigger, a decidedly negative image to be invoked of the black
man in America.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Baldwin, J. (1955). Notes of a Native Son. Beacon Press.

Gilliam, F.D. (2002). Farther to Go. University of California at Los
Angeles

Wikipedia. (2009). James Baldwin. Wikimedia, Ltd. Inc.
Wright, R. (1940). Native Son. Chicago: First Perennial Classics, edition
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Angela Davis Is One of

Words: 1256 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68433024



Over time -- in fairly short order, in fact -- Davis got over this sense of secretiveness, and soon many of her actions were matters of national news. She reflects that this celebrity has made it difficult at times both for her to arrive at and explain the truth of her own role in the movement, and the motives and constructs that allowed for the movement to happen in the manner it did: "I know that almost inevitably my image is associated with a certain representation of Black nationalism that privileges those particular nationalisms with which some of us were locked in constant battle" (Davis 322). Davis (somewhat) clarifies this statement in explaining that the "nationalism" with which many typify the Civil Rights struggle -- especially the Black Panthers -- was perhaps radical but did not aim at isolation, and she cites several instances where cooperation with other marginalized groups…… [Read More]

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Civil Rights Mean in Post

Words: 2255 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77261728

Because of the fact that they ae Negos, they have been oppessed and intimidated on seveal occasions. Malcolm X also makes some histoical claims when demanding the civil ights. He states that Nego evolt has been going on since 1945 in the whole wold and in 1964 will see that it then emeges to be a black evolution. He claims that this evolution has been happening in Asia, Afica and Latin Ameica fo the not white individuals. The blacks who wee colonized by the Euopeans I Asia have been involved in the stuggle fo since 1945. Fo the Mexican-Ameican stuggle fo equality also involves some histoical statement especially in 1965 when efeing to Cesa Chavez who has had majo contibution fo the La Raza Unida quest fo the ights though non-violent means.

Reason fo the timing of the civil ights demands

In the Montgomey bus boycott, the people ae demanding…… [Read More]

references to his citizenship and the democracy. As for Malcolm the rights are also provided by the constitution. In the Mexican -- American, the rights are provided by the democratic system.

Consequence of failure

The civil rights activists for the Montgomery bus boycott are using non-violent approaches in demanding their rights. This is in line with the approach that Martin Luther King always uses therefore it's expected that the people will continue with the peaceful demonstration until their plights are heard. As for the Malcolm protesting people, they are at this moment peaceful. However if their rights i.e. voting rights are denied, the black man will start using the bullet as a new way to advocate for their rights. They will turn into violent movements and use violence so as to gain their rights.

Conclusion

The civil rights movements in the post was a reaction by most of the war veterans who came from the war hoping to be respected because of the sacrifice that they had given only for them to find that they are still stuck in a segregated and racist nation. This was also in sharp contrast to the freedom principals that they had fought for overseas. Therefore the civil rights seeds were sowed as the as demands were then put forth by the black leaders for equal rights. Martin Luther King was one of the leaders and in this instance he is seen leading the boycott of the Montgomery bus. He advocates for the equal rights of the blacks that they may be respected by their counterpart white citizens particularly in the bus stations. Malcolm X is also advocating for the civil rights of the black people in his expression of the ballot or the bullet. He is expressing the importance of the voting right to be granted because it will be useful in a bloodless revolution. He warns however that the failure to grant the right will lead to retaliation by violence of the bullets. The last incidents considered by the paper is the Mexican-Americans rights group through the faction called La Raza Unida. The members of this group seek to advocate the right of the Mexican-American having realized that there are no equal provisions of opportunities.
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Healthcare Drawbacks That Exist Within the Structure

Words: 537 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91094003

Healthcare

Drawbacks that exist within the structure of healthcare institutions include the lack of universal implementation of the electronic health records, and the lack of consistency in service quality and delivery. Moreover, there are different systems for different classifications of patients depending on their insurance coverage. For instance, seniors on Medicare use different products and services within the system and may be processed differently at different institutions. The nature of healthcare insurance is also overly complicated. Because each state also has different rules, regulations, and healthcare issues, there is a potential for service disruptions and inconsistencies. Patients living in more than one state or who travel often will frequently encounter the inconveniences of the American health care system.

Not all healthcare institutions have the same structure, but many hospitals and other large healthcare organizations are structured similarly. Lack of consistency in healthcare is especially apparent among the elder population, which…… [Read More]

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Harlem During 1920-1960 the United

Words: 8300 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50358846

This is why people that had financial resources to move away from the agitated center often chose Harlem. At the same time however,

On the periphery of these upper class enclaves, however, impoverished Italian immigrants huddled in vile tenements located from 110th to 125th Streets, east of Third Avenue to the Harlem iver. To the north of Harlem's Italian community and to the west of Eighth Avenue, Irish toughs roamed an unfilled marshlands area referred to by locals as "Canary Island."

In this sense, it can be said that in the beginning, Harlem represented the escape place for many of the needy in search for a better life. From this amalgam, the Jews represented the largest group, the reason being the oppressive treatment they were continuously subject to throughout the world. Still, the phenomenon that led to the coming of a black majority of people in this area was essential…… [Read More]

References

African-American Odyssey. "World War I and Postwar Society." Library of Congress Web site:  http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart8b.html ,(accessed 16 September 2007)

Ames, William C.. The Negro struggle for equality in the twentieth century. New dimensions in American history. Lexington, Massachusetts: D.C. Heath and Company.. 1965, 90-1

Black Americans of Achievements. "Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.." Home to Harlem website. http://www.hometoharlem.com/harlem/hthcult.nsf/notables/a0d3b6db4d440df9852565cf001dbca8,(accessed 16 September 2007)

Capeci, Dominic. The Harlem Riot of 1943. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1977.
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Carter G Woodson's the MIS Education of the Negro

Words: 3339 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23361076

Mis-Education of the Negro

Carter G. oodson was a historian and educator with a prominent role in the Black community and a great interest in issues facing the Black community. Especially in terms of the role of education in the first half of the twentieth century, aspects of the Black experience that impacted the education of Black people, and what they themselves might want to achieve through an education. His book The Mis-Education of the Negro addresses such issues in terms of a number of specific dimensions, such as the impact of slavery on the African-American psyche, the degree to which African-Americans had been mis-educated, the need for greater self-reliance among members of the Black population, that Blacks needed to develop their own social order and not imitate the white order, and the meaning of political education in the African-American community.

The Mis-Education of the Negro

oodson wrote his book…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blauner, Bob. Black Lives, White Lives. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989.

Davidson, Basil. The African Slave Trade. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1961.

Haley, Alex, The Autobiography of Malcolm X New York: Ballantine Books, 1965.

Kunjufu, Jawanza. "Introduction." In The Mis-Education of the Negro, Carter G. woodson. Chicago, Illinois: African-American Images, 2000.
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WASP Elites and Discriminatory Methods Against Blacks

Words: 1265 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72336197

acial Discrimination

The social problem studied in this paper is racial discrimination. acial discrimination is any discriminatory act against a person based on race. A subtype of racial discrimination would be racial harassment. The magnitude of racial discrimination is very high: according to the FBI's most recent HCSA report, 51% of reported hate crimes are based on race (Hate Crimes in America, 2015). However, as Blank, Dabady and Citro (2004) point out, "simply identifying an association with race is not equivalent to measuring the magnitude of racial discrimination or its contribution to differential outcomes by race" (p. 72). In other words, it is not easy to define the magnitude of racial discrimination because distilling the cause-and-effect relationship requires testing and in complex socio-economic environments, experiments are difficult to conduct with adequate controls. Nonetheless, a qualitative magnitude may be discerned in the narratives of men like Malcolm X and Martin Luther…… [Read More]

References

Blank, R., Dabady, M., Citro, C. (2004). Measuring Racial Discrimination. NY: NAP.

Hate Crimes in America. (2015). Civil Rights. Retrieved from http://www.civilrights.org/publications/hatecrimes/nature-and-magnitude.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

Jones, E. M. (2000). Libido Dominandi: Sexual Liberation and Political Control.

South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press.
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Letter to Birmingham Letter to

Words: 987 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78452556



You carefully outline the four steps to your non-violent approach of ending segregation: determining the existence of injustice, attempting to negotiate, purifying and preparing individually and as a group, and finally engaging in peaceful direct action. The case you make for these points is strong, and the evidence in Birmingham supporting this pattern of behavior on your part, and on the part of our enemies as well, is equally apparent. I do not understand, then, why you insist that the same methodologies that have proven ineffective in the past will somehow work with continued pressure. Your insistence on this non-violent approach is no better than the constant cries of "Wait!" which you claim -- correctly -- echo so painfully in the ears of the so-called Negro men, women, and children who have yearned for freedom for centuries.

Another rising leader of the so-called Negro, Malcolm X, has insisted that "Truth…… [Read More]

References

Du Bois, W.E.B. (1906). "Harper's ferry Speech." Accessed 17 September 2009. http://www.africanamericanstudies.buffalo.edu/ANNOUNCE/niagaramovement/harpers/harperspeech.html

King, M.L. (1963). "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Accessed 17 September 2009.  http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html 

X, Malcolm. (1963). "The Black Revolution." Accessed 17 September 2009.  http://www.malcolm-x.org/speeches/spc_06__63.htm
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Right Thing Spike Lee's Do

Words: 1635 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59759565



Mookie is similarly conflicted. He rants about Italian-Americans after a falling out with Pino early in the film, calling as many stereotypes as he can name. When Sal uses the "N" word, Mookie feels betrayed and chooses to fight back. He "fights the power" of racism, and the institutions that he feels support racism. His act of violence was in express solidarity with Radio Raheem, who he pledged support to as a brother. Mookie also never seems to completely trust or even like Sal, in spite of Sal's kindness. His mistrust of Sal reveals Mookie's own internal prejudices that prevent racial harmony in America. Spike Lee demonstrates Mookie's attitudes by his cavalier approach to work and his not being willing to allow Pino to insult him. Mookie's lack of decisiveness is part of his personality, though, and does not have a bearing on his attitude towards Italian-Americans. Mookie is nonchalant…… [Read More]