Mass Media Essays (Examples)

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Media's Stereotyical Portrayal of Blacks

Words: 2333 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57955821

But Martin Lawrence bugs out his eyes a little and he's a coon. It makes no sense.'7

The defense seems somewhat warranted. After all, if all characters in the sitcom Martin were white, and acted the same way, such behavior would be attributed to the standard stupidity showcased on television. Much like the quote earlier about sitcoms and stereotypes leveling things, television in general fails to showcase the brightest and most sublime of human endeavors.

Lawrence is not alone in criticisms aimed at contemporary black actors. In her essay, "Stereotypes of History: Reconstructing Truth and the Black Mammy," Jennifer Kowalski claims, "actors such as Martin Lawrence, Eddie Murphy, and Tyler Perry, have once again recycled the first existence of the Mammy/Aunt Jemima character." The "mammy" stereotype is "represented as full-figured women with strong and defensive attitudes, especially toward men who may bring harm to their loved ones." Lawrence recently starred…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aristotle. "Poetics." The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. Ed. Vincent B.

Leitch. New York. W.W. Norton and Company, 2001, 90-117.

"Blackboard Jungle Fever." Martin. By John Bowman. Martin Lawrence, Tisha

Campbell-Martin, Carl Anthony Payne II, Thomas Mikal Ford. The WB. January
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Media Society Book Section Summary Croteau

Words: 947 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64535589

Vietnam films have rewritten the winners and the losers of that saga and action-adventure films reinforce cultural norms of violence and power (175). Despite the increased real presence of women in positions of power, often media representations of women and other formerly disenfranchised groups remain stereotyped or relegated to marginal or token roles, although this is changing. Still, certain outlets like women's magazines often function as advertisements that perpetuate corporate images that make women feel worse, rather than better about themselves (188). Furthermore, a hegemonic ideology is implied by supposedly mainstream news organizations. Consider the construct of 'economic news.' This implies that the 'economy' is in a neat little box, and that social issues of race and political disenfranchisement, limits on wealth and access to education and power, have no role in who possess wealth and who lacks wealth in society. Economics as separate from other issues is essentially an…… [Read More]

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Media Injustice and the Media There Was

Words: 672 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99052329

Media

Injustice and the Media

There was a point in the not-too-distant past when it was reasonable to perceive the media as a force collectively aimed at informing the public, exposing corruption, surfacing scandal and general performing the responsibility of protecting the people's right to know. However, several forces have permeated the so-called 'fourth estate,' diluting the media's acceptance of this responsibility. At one end of the spectrum, the growth in value of cable news such as CNN or MSNBC has created a highly monetized and commercially-motivated form of news. At the opposite end of the spectrum, the increasing visibility of social media such as Facebook and Twitter in spreading news stories has removed much of the accountability or professionalism from our media outlets.

The result is that our media outlets rarely have the motivation to ensure that a well-informed public is made aware of injustice in all its forms.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Boettger, B. (2012). The Social Responsibility of Social Media. Media Post.

Chiyamwaka, B. (2008). Media Ethics: A Call To Responsible Journalism. Hippo Lodge Liwonde.

Christians, C.G. (2007). Utilitarianism in Media Ethics and Its Discontents. Journal of Mass Media Ethics, 22(2-3), 113-131.

Daily Graphic. (2009). Ethical, Responsible Journalism Essential for Media's Success. Modern Ghana.
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Media as the Linguistic Discourse Analysis Object

Words: 971 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90450527

Media as the Linguistic Discourse Analysis Object

esearch in Discourse Analysis - Linguistics

Discourse analysis' focus is noteworthy semiotic events. Discourse analysis aims to understand not only the nature of the semiotic event, but also the socio-psychological traits of the participants of the event. The proposed subject of research is media discourse analysis or media as the linguistic discourse analysis object. Media is highly relevant and almost fundamental to life in the 21st century. There is no doubt that there are social, perceptual, psychological, linguistic, and behavioral affects of technology and media upon users and communities. Objects of discourse analysis vary in their definition of articulated sequences of communication events, speech acts, etc. Media is nothing but a series of coordinated sequences of various communications events operating semiotically. Therefore, media discourse analysis is a worthwhile linguistic research endeavor. The hypothesis of the research contends that media discourse analysis, as part…… [Read More]

References:

Chen, L. (2004) Evaluation in Media Texts: A Cross-Cultural Linguistic Investigation. Language in Society, 33(5), 673 -- 702.

Chigana, A., & Chigana, W. (2008) Mxit It Up in the Media: Media Discourse Analysis on a Mobile Instant Messaging System. The South African Journal of Information and Communication, 9, 42 -- 57.

Constantinou, O. (2005) Multimodal Discourse Analysis: Media, modes and technologies. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 9(4), 602 -- 618.

Gamson, W.A., Croteau, D., Hoynes, W., & Sasson, T. (1992) Media Images and the Social Construction of Reality. Annual Review of Sociology, 18, 373 -- 393.
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Mass Comm Final One Theme That Is

Words: 1998 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56439736

Mass Comm Final

One theme that is a constant throughout the study of contemporary mass communication is the function that mass communication holds in the democratic political process. Although the present-day concepts of "media" or "mass communication" would have been unknown at the time of the Bill of Rights, it is nonetheless clear that the First Amendment's guarantee of freedom of the press essentially enshrines in law the notion that an informed and intellectually engaged electorate is crucial for the health of the American political system. And certainly the drafters of the U.S. Constitution were familiar with the notion that clear reasoned argumentation that could reach a broad majority of citizens was necessary for the political system they envisioned: there would not be a U.S. Constitution if there had not been Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," a widely-reproduced pamphlet laying out the basic argument for American independence. However, in different ways,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baym, "The Daily Show and Political Journalism"

McChesney, "Policing the Unthinkable," "Response to Compaine"

Compaine, "Myths of Encroaching Global Media Ownership," "Response to McChesney"

Koch, "Cyber Citizen or Cyborg Citizen"
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Media Worlds

Words: 753 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59385442

MEDIA & GLOBAL POLITICS

Culture

Shirky's piece is about the potential for media to change the course of government and politics across the world. He writes of ways that specifically the technology of social media has the power and/or potential for political activism and social change. The 21st century has seen an increase in the frequency and the efficiency of grassroots activism and social movements around the world, due in great part because of the Internet and social media. In fact, the drastic increase in this kind of activity began in the late 20th century:

Since the rise of the Internet in the early 1990s, the world's networked population has grown from the low millions to the low billions. Over the same period, social media have become a fact of life for civil society worldwide, involving many actors -- regular citizens, activists, nongovernmental organizations, telecommunications firms, software providers, governments…As the…… [Read More]

References:

Castells, M. (2009). Communication Power. Oxford University Press. Pp. 299-432.

Morozov, E. (2011). Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom. Public Affairs: New York. Pp. 1- 32, 179-204.

Shirky, C. (2011). The Political Power of Social Media. Foreign Affairs, Jan/Feb2011, 90(1), 28-41.
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Media Manipulation Does the American

Words: 2199 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79243485

"

Meanwhile, "False Balancing" is where "both sides are seldom accorded equal prominence," Parenti asserts. As an example of this tendency, Parenti writes that when it comes to a conservative issue, NPR (National Public Radio), perceived as a liberal institution, interviews a "right wing spokesperson" alone. But when it's a liberal issue being discussed, NPR has a liberal and a conservative on together.

Endorsement / Disparagement: Some media use "labels" like "the president's firm leadership" and "a strong defense" without offering any details as to why the president's leadership is "firm" or the defense is "strong." The campaign in California (Proposition 226) against unions used the phrase "union bosses" often, to give a negative tone to unions, but corporate executives were never alluded to as "corporate bosses."

Framing: Another kind of manipulation mentioned by Parenti is "Framing": this involves "bending the truth rather than breaking it." Examples of framing include:…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aufderheide, Patricia. (1999). General Principles in Media Literacy. Media Literacy:

Resource Guide.

Goldstein, Patrick. (2005). 2 reminders that journalists once pursued greatness. LA Times

Calendarlive.com (October 18, 2005).
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Media How Technology Shapes Society a Society

Words: 1689 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12162383

Media

How Technology Shapes Society

A society is a conglomerate of people who, for some reason, are throw together in a particular bounded region. The group has to make laws that will govern their actions and they also determine how they will live together in the most productive manner. But, there are events and devices that some say can change the way this group of people behaves and what laws they will make for one another. For example, an early hunter-gatherer society subsisted on what they could kill and find. Then someone invented the hoe, and they became cultivating societies (Keel, 2011). This meant that the people did not have to roam so far afield to find they needed to exist. Thus they could stay closer together and build up societies. Small events sometimes shape great changes in society without the people within the society realizing that the invention will…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, P., & Tushman, M.R., (1990). Technological discontinuities and dominant designs: A cyclical model of technological change. Administrative Science Quarterly, 35(4), 604-619.

Beals, G., (1997). The biography of Thomas Edison. Retrieved from  http://www.thomasedison.com/biography.html 

Carlson, W.B., (1992). "Artifacts and frames of meaning: Thomas A. Edison, his managers, and the cultural construction of motion pictures," in W.E. Bijker and J. Law Shaping technology/building society: Studies in sociotechnical change. Cambridge, MA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, pp. 175-198.

Chandler, D., (2002). Technological or media determinism. Retrieved from http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/tecdet/tdet01.html
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Media's Effect on Culture Annotated

Words: 335 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81648004

28, No. 4, 603-625 (2006) Sage Publications.

Aeron avis states that the work in writing "Media Effects and the Question of the Rational Audience: "... offers evidence for an alternative perspective on the media effects debate. Early work on media influence, be it conservative or critical, assumed a causal link between mass media and mass behavior. In contrast, decades of effects and audience research has established the inadequacy of this 'strong effects' paradigm. The main thrust of this counter-research is the realization that audiences actively consume and use the media for self-serving purposes. The alternative perspective offered here comes from a study of elite fund managers, their communications and decision-making in the London Stock Exchange. The research findings suggest that such individuals do respond actively to media, but, collectively, the results can be both self-defeating and on a mass scale. That is, individuals do not have to be ignorant nor…… [Read More]

Davis, Aeron (2006) Media Effects and the Question of the Rational Audience: Lessons from the Financial Markets. Media, Culture & Society, Vol. 28, No. 4, 603-625 (2006) Sage Publications.

Aeron Davis states that the work in writing "Media Effects and the Question of the Rational Audience: "... offers evidence for an alternative perspective on the media effects debate. Early work on media influence, be it conservative or critical, assumed a causal link between mass media and mass behavior. In contrast, decades of effects and audience research has established the inadequacy of this 'strong effects' paradigm. The main thrust of this counter-research is the realization that audiences actively consume and use the media for self-serving purposes. The alternative perspective offered here comes from a study of elite fund managers, their communications and decision-making in the London Stock Exchange. The research findings suggest that such individuals do respond actively to media, but, collectively, the results can be both self-defeating and on a mass scale. That is, individuals do not have to be ignorant nor act irrationally to contribute to media-instigated, collective irrationality."

Media Effects on Culture
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Media Worlds

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18559874

Media Worlds

These four readings were written between 1944 and 1955, and to a certain extent represent an outmoded era of media criticism. This does not mean these studies are obsolete, but it does mean that they must be considered in light of the current sea-change that is taking place in media overall -- most notably with the Internet, but also with the effect that the Internet is having upon other forms of media (such as the decline and instability of newspaper journalism). But we must acknowledge the limitations of these studies.

The most basic study is presented by Lasswell (1948), who is interested in defining the terminology, as scientifically as possible, as to what constitutes "communication." Lasswell draws parallels between various biological processes (of how organisms gather information through sensory apparatus, and how they attempt to control the amount of information they give out) to come up with a…… [Read More]

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Media Worlds

Words: 780 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73618705

MEDIA WORLD & CULTURE

The Media World in Today's Culture

The Media World and Today's Culture

The Media World and Today's Culture

The media is the most indispensable medium that most urbanized and developing countries have adapted to accessing first hand and vital information. It is also in the branch category of the most growing industries in today's global economy. However, the industry is faced with controversies from other sectors such as culture and politics. Implications of the social media and media personalties have always been at the limelight, especially with how the youth and children perceive what they see and hear from the media. It is therefore, necessitated to review how the current global culture allows for the continuity of the world of media.

Reading Discussions

According to Kaya and Cakmur, media has been a centre-stage in Turkey die to the linkage it has to politics. Turkish media is…… [Read More]

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Media the Telegraph Marked the

Words: 1110 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4011455

Yet, every major aspect of the Internet builds on the strengths of those prior media forms.

Cultural Acceleration

The development of technology has allowed for cultural acceleration, as each media form starting with the telegraph represents an improvement in the speed and/or scope of communication (Carey, 2010). The telegraph separated transportation from communication, which was the first step. The telephone increased speed further, and wireless telegraph set the foundation for later wireless technologies. Radio and television, for example, were based on wireless broadcast, which enabled communications to reach a broader audience. here the telephone and telegraph introduced an accelerated pace to communications, the impacts of any one given communication were individual. News of the Titanic sinking, for example, was carried through a network of different messages on different media (Carey, 2010). Such large-scale impacts of communication on society became commonplace with radio. Television had yet more potency as a communications…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Carey, J. (2010). Electricity creates the wired world. In possession of the author.
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Media Framing Interactive Teaching Plan

Words: 1244 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97449124

201). This degree of media coverage, in fact, would likely provide a worthwhile goal for all responsible journalism; to this end, operational framing would provide a comprehensive and balanced analysis of the event without resorting to rhetoric or base appeals to emotion (Peterson, 2001). Therefore, throughout this exercise, this term will refer to completely objective news reporting that is absent of any discernible contextual framing efforts as defined above on the part of the reviewer.

Materials equired

Computers with Internet access (one for every three students); free online survey accounts for each team.

Suggested Procedure.

Opening. Students' interest will be gained by describing a current event that affects their lives as well such as the incidence of cell phone or Internet usage among young Chinese people today, drug use, or the profound environmental issues facing emerging nations that threaten everyone through global warming or otherwise, for example. In this lesson,…… [Read More]

References

Gitlin T. (1980). The whole world is watching: Mass media in the making and unmaking of the New Left. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Nelson, R.A. (1996). A chronology and glossary of propaganda in the United States. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Peterson, M.A. (October 2001). Getting to the story: Unwriteable discourse and interpretive practice in American journalism. Anthropological Quarterly, 74(4), 201.
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Media Critical Analysis Hamlet Hamlet

Words: 4649 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32409674

Yes, the Oedipus complex aspect of Shakespeare it gives us and which in turn invites us to think about the issue of subjectivity, the myth and its relation to psychoanalytic theory. (Selfe, 1999, p292-322)

Hemlet and Postcolonial theory

Postcolonial theory was born as a result of the publication of the famous work of Edward Said, Orientalism (1978). This theory claim that some authors (Paul Gilroy, Achille Mbembe, Francoise Verges, etc.) and that seem so elegant in its formulation, in my opinion raises three fundamental problems: At a time when we are witnessing the emergence of new expressions of colonialism (colonialism, cultural, political and economic globalization, neo-colonialism nestled in the relationship between the hegemonic colonial past and their old colonies, colonialism in disguise that structure the relationship between international institutions and developing countries, institutions from the rest behest of the former colonial powers according to their interests), speak of post-colonial era…… [Read More]

References

Aragay, Mireia, and Gemma Lopez. 2005. "Inflecting Pride and Prejudice: Dialogism, Intertextuality, and Adaptation." Books in Motion: Adaptation, Intertextuality, Authorship. Ed. Mireia Aragay. Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, p201-19.

Aragay, Mireia, ed. 2005. Books in Motion: Adaptation, Intertextuality, Authorship. Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, p88-96.

Baetens, Jan. 2007. "From Screen to Text: Novelization, the Hidden Continent." The Cambridge Companion to Literature on Screen. Ed. Deborah Cartmell and Imelda Whelehan. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, p226-38.

Balides, Constance. 2000. "Jurassic Post-Fordism: Tall Tales of Economics in the Theme Park." Screen 4 I .2: p139-60.
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Media Portrayal of Sexes Babies When Born

Words: 1054 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40828073

Media Portrayal of Sexes

abies, when born, have no inherent knowledge about how girls and boys, men and women, are "supposed to act." They learn their cultural roles from the culture around them -- their adult and older-child role models, and more and more, through the media. As one writer quoted lum, "Nothing in biology labels behaviors as right or wrong, normal or abnormal. Any stereotypes we impose on children -- and by extension, adults -- are purely cultural, not biological" (Abels, 2002). Depiction of males and females in popular media is in a constant change of flux, partly based on inaccurate stereotype but partly reflecting the very real diversity seen in both sexes.

Experts in the field believe that children begin to learn what gender role is expected of them early in childhood, and that these expectations are communicated to them both purposefully and in unintended lessons. Part of…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Abels, Lori. 2002. "Sex-role stereotypes in TV Programs aimed at the preschool audience: an analysis of Teletubbies and Barney & Friends." Women and Language, Sept. 22.

Giuliano, Traci A. 2003. "Blood, sweat, and jeers: the impact of the media's heterosexist portrayals on perceptions of male and female athletes." Journal of Sport Behavior, Sept. 1.

MacKenzie, Nancy R. 1998. "Effects of television viewing on children's development." Pediatric Nursing, Sept.

Shugart, Helene A. 2003. "She shoots, she scores: mediated constructions of contemporary female athletes in coverage of the 1999 U.S. women's soccer team." Western Journal of Communication, Jan.
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Media Negatively Effects the Body Image Concerns of Adolescent Girls

Words: 1518 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68105579

Media Negatively Affects the Body Image Concerns of Adolescent Girls

Among adolescent girls, body image concerns are not uncommon. The hypothesis of this paper believes that media negatively affects the body image concerns of adolescent girls. The independent variable is the adolescent girls and the dependent variable is the media. This is because adolescent girls can be affected by a lot of other things when it concerns body image, this can come in the form of their peers, society and even history. These variables can affect the concerns on body image of adolescent girls in both a positive and a negative way. However, this paper will only discuss the negative affects which body images are supplied by media to adolescent girls with.

The theoretical approach which best suits this study is the Psychodynamic Approach. This is because the concerns regarding body images are implanted in the minds of these adolescent…… [Read More]

References

Anschutz, D.J., Van Strien, T., & Engels, R.C. (2008). Exposure to Slim Images in Mass Media: Television Commercials as Reminders of Restriction in Restrained Eaters. Health Psychology. 27(4); 401-408.

Cheng, H.L. & Mallinckrodt (2009). Parental Bonds, Anxious Attachment, Media Internalization, and Body Image Dissatisfaction: Exploring a Mediation Model. Journal of Counseling Psychology. 56(5); 365-375.

Clark, L., & Tiggemann, M. (2008). Sociocultural and Individual Psychological Predictors of Body Image in Young Girls: A Prospective Study. Developmental Psychology. 44(4); 1124-1134.

Dohnt, H. & Tiggemann, M. (2006). The Contribution of Peer and Media Influences to the Development of Body Satisfaction and Self-Esteem in Young Girls: A Prospective Study. Developmental Psychology. 42(5); 929-936.
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Media Tares Test in the

Words: 1066 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95665506

The ad also says that it is America's #1 weight loss patch. Says who? Just them. There does not appear to be any proof that backs up any of the claims that they make in regards to this product.

Advertising is an essential part of marketing. The intention of an ad campaign is to reach a lot in order to increase the demand for the products being endorsed. In this campaign the advertisers used Highlighting Features. The features of the product should be clearly stated. An advertisement campaign that talks on and on about a product without affirming its features will fail to do any good. A high-quality weight loss product campaign should start by discussing about that the weight loss product has been designed to help people lose weight fast, or lose weight safely or lose weight without regaining the lost weight. People who are troubled about losing weight…… [Read More]

References

Advertisement Techniques: Creative Advertising Techniques and Tricks. (2010). Retrieved May

1, 2010, from Buzzle Web site: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/advertisement-techniques-creative-advertising-techniques-and-tricks.html

Baker, Sherry and. Martinson, David L. (2001). The TARES Test: Five Principles for Ethical

Persuasion. Journal of Mass Media Ethics.16 (2&3), p, 148 -- 175.
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Media Favorite Form Media You Choose

Words: 1332 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27116073

media / favorite form media. You choose . Analysis

In my opinion, the most preferable form of mass media is the fairly conventional compact disc. CDs are an excellent sociological tool in learning about one's environment and the relevant issues that affect society today. Additionally, CD's allow for a highly limited form of intervention between the message that the music artist is attempting to convey and its reception by the listener. Conversely, I believe that one of the least preferable forms of media is the internet. Despite the fact that there are vast amounts of information accessible to users on it, there are a number of ways in which using the internet inherently impinges on the privacy of a particular user. Cookies and other sorts of intelligence metrics track the particular activity of people. Moreover, this capability of the internet, when combined with aspects of data governance, data stewardship, and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Godwin, Allotey. "Libertarian V. Social Responsibility." Allotey Godwin.  http://alloteygodwin.blogspot.com/2009/05/libertarian-v-social-responsibility.html 

No Author. "Introduction to Mass Communication." Zeepedia.com. No date. Web. http://www.zeepedia.com/read.php?media_theories_libertarian_theory_social_responsibility_theory_introduction_to_mass_communication&b=78&c=39

No author. "Theories of Communication." www.peoi.org. 2012. Web.  http://www.peoi.org/Courses/Coursesar/mass/mass2.html 

Naveed, Fakhar. "Normative Theories of Mass Communication." Ask For Mass. 2012. Web.  http://mastermasscommunication.blogspot.com/2012/02/normative-theories-of-mass.html
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Media Has Been Continually Evolving

Words: 2052 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66951574

Where, the images of: various icons, symbols and ideas are going beyond national borders. This is significant, because it shows how improvements in technology, are playing a role in determining the way various forms of content is presented in the media. Where, globalized awareness within the different organizations has an impact, on shaping how individuals will view these various cultural icons. (Grossberg 421 -- 432)

What the different chapters show, is that the overall role of the media is continuing to change. The reason why this is occurring is because of: improvements in technology (which are helping to make the world smaller). This is causing the total number of media outlets to become: larger, more focused on specific demographics and aware of what content they should be providing for audiences. This is significant, because over the course of time, this is changing the way various forms of content are presented.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Grossberg, Lawrence. Media Making. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2006. Web. http://books.google.ca/books?id=IfCiG4fh_-YC&dq=MediaMaking:+Mass+media+in+popular+culture&printsec=frontcover&source=bn&hl=en&ei=BLzsS7vfAYSdlgeeq-y1CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q&f=false

Kanadah, Karen. Media Making. AC Journal, 1998. Web. 23 Jun. 2010.
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Media Audiences

Words: 3186 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41413857

New Media Implications

The improvement of internet and other technology and its ready availability to more and more people has revolutionized the structure and population of the media around the world. People that would normally be members of the audience have become the creators of news and vice versa. The lines that separate news makers and people that normally would be making news or expected to make news have blurred significantly and in several different ways. There are many examples of countries that could be focused on for this subject but one of the best is the United States.

Media Structure

There are multiple ways in which the structure of news creators has changed and evolved over recent months and years. One way in which the idea regarding audience and news sources has been altered significantly is the corporate structure of the people that are providing the news. The companies…… [Read More]

References

Babad, E. (2005). The Psychological Price of Media Bias. Journal of Experimental

Psychology. 11 (4), 245-255.

Barkow, J., O'Gorman, R. & Rendell, L. (2012). Are The New Mass Media Subverting

Cultural Transmission. Review of General Psychology. 16 (2), 121-133.
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Media's Role in Influencing Public Opinion

Words: 1111 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48900724

Media: Public Attitudes and Belief

The media impacts and shapes public opinion by highlighting preferred views and explanations to influence public understanding of an issue or event. The media accomplishes this through its content, which is mostly determined by powerful groups in the society (Happer & Philo, 2013, p.327). In most cases, powerful groups in the society influence ideologies, which in turn affect and shape public attitudes and beliefs. As a result, the media is involved in an ongoing process of shaping the news based on the usual competing needs and interests of leaders and the people (Baum & Potter, 2008, p.40). Leaders, especially political elites, usually determine news media content, which plays a major role in shaping public opinion.

The media impacts and shapes public opinion through setting the agenda of the country or focusing people's attention to certain public issues. In this case, the media acts as a…… [Read More]

References

Baum, M.A. & Potter, P.B.K. (2008). The Relationships Between Mass Media, Public Opinion, and Foreign Policy: Toward a Theoretical Synthesis. Annual Review of Political Science, 11, 39-65.

Danilova, V. (2014, July 16). Media and Their Role in Shaping Public Attitudes Towards Migrants. Retrieved from United Nations University website:  https://ourworld.unu.edu/en/media-and-their-role-in-shaping-public-attitudes-towards-migrants 

Fiducia. (2012, August 14). The Media's Influence on Criminal Justice Policy. Retrieved August 24, 2016, from  http://www.fiduciaproject.eu/new/15/the-media-s-influence-on-criminal-justice-policy 

Happer, C. & Philo, G. (2013, August 27). The Role of the Media in the Construction of Public Belief and Social Change. Journal of Social and Political Psychology, 1(1), 321-336.
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Media Framing in Relation to

Words: 3388 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62570744

The argument being advanced is that since, the Muslim extremists were responsible for the 9/11 disaster, the construction of the Muslim religious center would inculcate the jihad teachings and dishonor to the memory of the 9/11 victims. The question one would ask is this, what about the strip clubs, bars and other activities that are zero blocks away from the hallowed ground, do they honor the victims of the attacks. Consequently, it can be argued that Politicians and anti-Muslim groups found an easier way to agitate the crowds by exploitation of their Islamophobic instincts with the aid of the media framing of the issue. In same the interview, what comes out clearly is that Pamela fights against what she perceives as Islamization of America as opposed to Americanization of Islam. he later describes the center, which she refers to as ground zero mosque as a war memorial against the Americans…… [Read More]

Stone, D.A. (2002). Policy paradox: The art of political decision making. New York: Norton.

Payser, a (May 13, 2010).Mosque madness at Ground Zero.

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/mosque_madness_at_ground_zero_OQ34EB0MWS0lXuAnQau5uL
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Media's Influence Sexual Behaviors Values 20 Years

Words: 1995 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70665306

media's influence sexual behaviors values 20 years. Examine sexual behaviors values changed time frame. Investigate types media print, film, music. Consider questions: •How laws changed? •How affected acceptable today vs. acceptable time periods? •How cultures differ media influence? •How cultures differ sexual behaviors values? •How cultures portray sexuality media? Include a minimum 10 scholarly references.

That the media exerts a rather dominant influence in the modern world is not debatable. That it has been influencing decision making, patterned thinking, behavioral responses, is also unquestionable. Much has been studied and speculated on the reasons why this has happened and why is it that our societies seem to rely extensively on the media for certain answers, guidance, etc. In this paper however, it is not the why's that interest us but rather to trace the how of what the media has brought about in terms of change in relation to behaviors and…… [Read More]

Park, Eunice. (1998). Physician-assisted suicide: State legislation teetering at the pinnacle of a slippery slope. William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal 7(1): 277 -- 304. Retrieved from http://scholarship.law.wm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1432&context=wmborj

Smith, M. (1993). The Rodriguez case: A review of the Supreme Court of Canada decision on assisted suicide. Library of Parliament Background Paper No. BP -- 349E. Retrieved from  http://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection-R/LoPBdP/BP-e/bp349-e.pdf 

Tiedemann, M., Nicol, J., & Valiquet, D. (2011). Euthanasia and assisted suicide: International experiences. Library of Parliament Background Paper No. 2011-67-E. Retrieved from http://www.parl.gc.ca/content/lop/researchpublications/2011-67-e.pdf
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Media Ethics

Words: 4981 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58882093

Media in America as the Fourth Estate: From Watergate to the Present

During the 1970's, the role of the media changed from simply reporting the news to revealing serious political scandals (Waisbord, 2001). The media's role during Watergate was viewed as the mirror that reflected the most that journalism could offer to democracy: holding powers accountable for their actions. This became a trend in the American media and journalism had high credibility in the years that followed, and a great increase in journalism school enrollment followed.

However, during the 1980's and 1990's, this trend withered away. Investigative journalism is no longer rampant the firmament of American news. While the tone of the press was self-congratulatory in the post-Watergate years, the state of American journalism is currently viewed in a less positive light.

For the elite, the shift in journalism is welcomed. For example, according to John Dean, an American journalist,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Altbach, Philip. (1995). International book publishing, and Encyclopedia. Fitzroy Dearborn.

Bagdikian, Ben. (1993). The Media Monopoly. Beacon Press.

Barton, C. Franklin, Jay B. (1994). The First Amendment and the Fourth Estate: the Law of Mass Media,6th ed. Foundation Press.

Coronel, Sheila. (July 31, 2000). Investigative Reporting: The Role of the Media in Uncovering Corruption. Southeast Asian Press Alliance.
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Media a Day Without the Media the

Words: 699 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52344683

Media

A Day Without the Media

The different mass media channels have become an important factor of influence on society. In order to determine how a day without the media would look like, it is important to analyze the roles that the media play. The most important roles of media refer to information, education, and communication (Foulger, 2003). Therefore, an important effect of lack of media is represented by lack of information. As a consequence, people would have no information about subjects of interest to them. They would not benefit from the latest news on political, social, and economic issues. This could affect their professional life, but also their daily activities. Some of this news is of public interest, while others concern certain groups of the population.

The educational role of the media is also important. The lack of media in this direction could lead to the lack of principles…… [Read More]

Reference list:

1. Foulger, D. (2003). Roles in Media. Retrieved February 19, 2012 from  http://evolutionarymedia.com/papers/rolesInMedia.htm .

2. The Role of Media in Democracy: A Strategic Approach (1999). Center for Democracy and Governance. Retrieved February 19, 2012.

3. Coronel, S. (2010). The Role of the Media in Deepening Democracy. Retrieved February 19, 2012.

4. Ragone, N. (2010). The Role of Media in Government. Retrieved February 19, 2012 from http://www.netplaces.com/american-government/the-media/the-role-of-media-in-government.htm.
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Media Psychology the Topic of the Proposal

Words: 872 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52671520

Media Psychology

Psychology

The topic of the proposal is related to media psychology and reality television. Media psychology is an interdisciplinary field that works in collaboration with fields such as neuroscience, computer science, international relations, and philosophy. Media psychology seeks to understand the perceptions, interpretations, uses, responses, and relationships among media and media consumers. Media psychology identifies both the benefits and the drawbacks of media consumption. Media psychology reads media as a text and as an entity with behaviors, relationships, and cultures. Media psychology receives increasing attention in the 21st century as the media landscape of the times is much more rich, diverse, and abundant than other periods in human history. Media is a much larger fixture in more people's lives around the world in the 21st century. The growing consensus among media critics, researchers, theorists, producers, consumers, and distributors is that media affects human behavior and attitudes. Therefore, the…… [Read More]

References:

Bagdasarov, Z., Greene, K., Banerjee, S.C., Krcmar, M., Yanovitsky, I., & Ruginyte, D. (2010) I Am What I Watch: Voyeurism, Sensation Seeking, and Television Viewing Patterns. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(2), 299 -- 315.

Giles, D. (2003) Media Psychology. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates: Mahwah, New Jersey.

Hall, A. (2009) Perception of Authenticity of Reality Programs and Their Relationships to Audience Involvement, Enjoyment, and Perceived Learning. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 53(4), 515 -- 531.

Reiss, S, & Wiltz, J. (2004) Why People Watch Reality TV. Media Psychology, 6, 363 -- 378.
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Media Consolidation Issues and Ethics

Words: 713 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69607337

Consumers often do not know that, for example, Disney owns ABC, when they are watching ABC present an ostensibly objective business story about the children's entertainment industry. Consumers may have the illusion of choice because they are watching different channels, without realizing that they may be watching many channels, all owned by the same network or media mogul.

Fewer media outlets means less diversity in terms of the range of news stories that is covered, not simply ideology. A narrower range of what is deemed 'important' and 'newsworthy' limits consumer awareness about the world. Although channels have proliferated, watching more channels does not necessarily translate into a new perspective, or even more knowledge. Gaining an audience is an expensive and daunting task for new media companies and FCC regulations that would allow for more mergers, permitting consolidation of up to 45% control in a geographic market, would make it all…… [Read More]

References

Blosser, Larry (2010l). Introduction. The case against media consolidation: Evidence on concentration, localism and diversity. Edited by Mark Cooper. Retrieved May 5, 2010 at http://www.fordham.edu/images/undergraduate/communications/caseagainstmediaconsolidation.pdf

The Fairness Doctrine. (2003). PBS. Retrieved May 5, 2010 at  http://www.pbs.org/now/politics/fairness.html
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Media Worlds

Words: 1187 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56242667

Parallels in Journalism Studies

Culture

Chapter 11 by Coleman et al. is primarily concerned with the importance and methods of agenda setting in mass media, communication, and journalism studies. Agenda setting is a set that should come very early on in the production process of media for critical reasons. Without an agenda, the media lacks direction. Without an agenda, it is nearly impossible to judge or evaluate the success of a piece of media. Agenda setting is like knowing one's audience: if a media producer or journalist does not know his/her audience and lacks a concise & clear agenda, then there really is no point in producing such a piece of media. It would be a waste of time and resources. According to this chapter, agenda setting did not begin in mass media specifically nor journalism. Methods and research into agenda setting in the United States began with several presidential…… [Read More]

References:

Coleman, R., McCombs, M. & Shaw, D & Weaver, D. (2009). Agenda Setting. In K. Wahl-Jorgensen & T. Hanitzsch (Eds.), The Handbook of Journalism. (pp. 147-160). New York, NY: Routledge. (chapter 11)

Cottle, S. (2009). Journalism and Globalization. In K. Wahl-Jorgensen & T. Hanitzsch (Eds.), The Handbook of Journalism. (pp. 341-356). New York, NY: Routledge. (chapter 24)

Entman, R.M., Matthes, J. & P. Pellicano, L. (2009). Nature, Sources, and Effects of News Framing. In K. Wahl-Jorgensen & T. Hanitzsch (Eds.), The Handbook of Journalism. (pp. 175-190). New York, NY: Routledge. (chapter 13)

McNair, B. (2009). Journalism and Democracy. In K. Wahl-Jorgensen & T. Hanitzsch (Eds.), The Handbook of Journalism. 237 -- 249. New York, NY: Routledge. (chapter 17)