Media Violence Essays (Examples)

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Media and Violence Contradicting Causes

Words: 4155 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68376205



A in millions)

Current in millions)

Provided by Federal Bureau of Investigation as of September 18, 2006. www.whitehouse.gov/goodbye/3ae6b1ac94aa97e6650780f280890a7c81100e47.html"

CHART: National Correctional Populations

National Correctional Populations

The number of adults in correctional population has been increasing.

A in millions)

Current million in millions)

Provided by Bureau of Justice Statistics as of November 30, 2006. (Social Statistics Briefing Room, 2006)

More Statistics

Violence in the Media

Huston and colleagues have estimated that the average 18-year-old will have viewed 200,000 acts of violence on television (Huston, a.C., Donnerstein, E., Fairchild, H. et al. Big World, Small Screen: The Role of Television in American Society. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1992.)

41% percent of American households have three or more televisions (Nielsen Media Research, 2000).

56% of children ages 8-16 have a television in their rooms (Annenberg Public Policy Center, 2000. Media in the Home 2000)

Percentage of television-time children ages 2-7 spend watching alone and unsupervised: 81 (Kaiser Family Foundation, 1999. "Kids and Media @ the New Millennium.")

Television alone is responsible for 10% of youth violence. (Senate Judiciary Committee Staff Report, 1999.)

Average time per week that the American child ages 2-17 spends watching television: 19 hours, 40 minutes (Nielsen Media…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alter, Jonathan. "Moving Beyond the Blame Game. (Panel Discussion)," Newsweek, May 17, 1999.

Beyer, John. "PERSPECTIVE: How movie and TV violence hits children; Is there too much violence on television and is it time to curb it? John Beyer, director of the organization mediawatch-uk argues that media viol," Birmingham Post, March 21, 2007.

Chatfield, Joanne E.. "Influence of Media Violence on Children." American Family Physician, February 15, 2002.

Children's Hospital Boston. "Teen-Rated Video Games Loaded With Violence;
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Media and Violence Does Media

Words: 1423 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25976172

Television remains the single most influential medium in the lives of young people. However, a three-year National Television Violence Study found: "two-thirds of all programming contains violence; children's programs contain the most violence; the majority of all entertainment programming contains violence; violence is often glamorized; and the majority of perpetrators go unsanctioned" (Muscari 2002).

Television violence is graphic, realistic and involving, shows inequity and domination, and portrays most victims as women, children and the elderly (Muscari 2002). Children tend to focus on the more intense scenes, such as violent moments, rather than story components, and these "aggressive acts lead to a heightened arousal of the viewer's aggressive tendencies, bringing feelings, thoughts and memories to consciousness and can cause outwardly aggressive behavior" (Muscari 2002).

When video games were introduced in the 1970's, they quickly became a favorite pastime for children, and now make up a $10+ billion industry. Today, children average 90 minutes of game time per day, and may experts believe that the "mechanical, interactive quality of 'first-person shooter' games make them potentially more dangerous than television or movies" (Muscari 2002). In fact, many of the young school shooters, including those at Columbine, were obsessed with video games, yet had…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Chory-Assad, Rebecca M. (2005 December 01). Effects of affective orientation and video game play on aggressive thoughts and behaviors. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. Retrieved January 16, 2007 from HighBeam Research Library.

Kirn, Timothy F. (2006 September 01). Nature and media's nurture spawn girl violence.

Family Practice News. Retrieved January 16, 2007 from HighBeam Research Library.

Muscari, Mary. (2002 November 01). Media violence: advice for parents.
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Media Effects Slumdog Millionaire the

Words: 1377 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15494930



Slumdog Millionaire contains numerous violent scenes that adults are the most likely audience for this theatrical film. The scenes showing the police brutality in India depicted violence. They showed Jamal being interrogated rudely and tortured. The tortures included Jamal's head being forcefully submerged, Jamal being brutally beaten and later on electrocuted until he was unconscious. Other scenes that showed violence included killings showing Jamal's brother shooting people. A disturbing scene is when Jamal's brother shot a gangster when he was still in his teens. There were also scenes which showed anti-Muslims hitting, killing, and burning every person in Jamal's village. There were also scenes that showed women and children physically abused. The bombardment of violent scenes would most likely make the audience feel desensitized and less sensitive to the succeeding violent scenes in the movie. This is the possible effect of the violent content of Slumdog Millionaire as proposed by the Desensitization Theory.

Poverty was also strongly depicted in the movie. Scenes of the slum and the way of life of the less fortunate are showed scene after scene. There are scenes where children were shown being forced to work, begging money for the gangsters, getting hungry because they don't…… [Read More]

References

O'Rorke, K. (2006). Social Learning Theory & Mass Communication. ABEA Journal, 25 (Fall 2006). Retrieved April 20, 2009, from http://abea.asu.edu/v25/v25v22n2.pdf

Rockler-Gladen, N. (2008). Theories of Violence in the Media: Desensitization, Cultivation Theory, and Other Concepts. Retrieved April 20, 2009, from http://medialiteracy.suite101.com/article.cfm/theories_of_violence_in_the_media

Yates, B., Ballard, M., Ferguson, M.A., Filer, K., Villanueva, A., Knott, A., et al. (1998). Video Violence: Desensitization and Excitation Effects on Learning. Retrieved from  http://www.westga.edu/~byates/video.htm
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Media Is an Extremely Powerful Tool Which

Words: 1443 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65527355

media is an extremely powerful tool which can be used to change people's opinions regarding issues. However the effectiveness of media generally depends on how people use it. The two stories given to the news director are on completely diverse subjects. Both of the stories hold relevance to the society. The one about the celebrity death holds people's interest while enlightening the public about the park story is crucial to creating awareness in people's minds. In today's world, media ratings have become the most important part to media producers (Croteau & Honyes, 2001). Channels don't show news items for public welfare rather they concentrate on stories that make higher profits for them (Daily Source Org, 2005-2012). Keeping in mind the current media landscape, the news director should choose to air the park story as the lead story.

The role of media in the contemporary society has been restricted to the market model presented by Croteau and Hoynes. The market model says that media should be treated like any other commodity i.e. It should follow the same trends of demand and supply that all other products in the market follow (Croteau & Hoynes, 2001). The public sphere model however is completely…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Croteau, D., & Hoynes, W. (2001). The Business of Media. California: Pine Forge Press.

Tompkins, A. (2003, December 14). The physcological effects of media violence on children.
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Media Consumption

Words: 4745 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73159402

media consumption and subsequent behaviour?

Profiling the criminal behavior of rampage perpetrators is one of the main areas of focus in the social science research community. Gender, mental health issues, social exclusion, genetic susceptibility or predisposition, and ultimately, violent media, are most of the factors that guide researchers in the field, seeking to develop broader frameworks of understanding rampage violence. Over the past three decades, 78 cases of public mass shootings have been registered by the Congressional Research Service (2013). An FBI report indicated a rise in typical mass shootings, from 6.4 incidents occurring between 2000 and 2007 to an average of 16.4 incidents between 2007 and 2013 (2013). Most of these public mass shootings have been found to occur either at workplaces or at schools across the United States.

The proliferation of mass shootings over these past few decades has further brought into the public and academic's attention the issue of media consumption and its effects on people's behavior. Correlations have been made between media's continuous coverage of violent incidents and subsequent similar behavior from individuals (Signorielli, 2005). Other researchers have argued that such correlations do not have any real foundations and that scientific evidence does not support them…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, C.A., Berkowitz, L., Donnerstein, E., Huesmann, L.R., Johnson, J.D., Linz, D., Malamuth, N.M. And Wartella, A., 2003. The influence of media violence on youth. Psychological Science in the Public interest, 4(3), pp. 81-110.

Berkowitz, L. And Geen R.G., 1966. Film violence and the cue properties of available targets. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 3(5), pp. 525-530. [pdf]

Bjorkqvist, K., 1985. Violent films, anxiety, and aggression. Helsinki: Finnish Society of Sciences and Letters.

Bushmann, B.J. And Huesmann, L.R., 2001. Effects of televised violence on aggression. In D. Singer and J. Singer, eds. Handbook of children and the media. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. pp. 223-254.
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Media World and Its Power

Words: 574 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37198061

Social Influence

Media and the role it plays in shaping society

The media plays an essential role in shaping socially-acceptable behaviors in U.S. society, taking into account the way it succeeds in making people consider that it would be important for them to take on certain attitudes. TV media in particular tends to be biased in presenting the masses with information. By concentrating on sensational stories and on concepts like violence and sexuality, the media has the tendency to put across a false portrayal of society and thus influences people to believe that they need to uphold particular ideas.

In many areas violence rates remain constant, but the media has been seen to introduce more stories related to violence in these respective territories. This is largely because ideas like violence and sex make the masses more interested in wanting to become acquainted with the news. There is a relationship of interdependence between the media and people, as they influence each-other's thinking. People's attitudes are shaped by the media while the media tries to come up with stories that it knows are going to have a wide audience.

In order to be able to have a complex understanding of the media…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Barker, M., & Petley, J. (2013). "Ill Effects: The Media Violence Debate." Routledge

Fourie, P. (2008). "Media Studies: Media history, media and society." Juta and Company Ltd.
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Violence in the Media Can Create Violent

Words: 680 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62335334

violence in the media can create violent behavior in children and teens. Many studies show that watching violent media, such as video games, films, and even the television news can cause violent behavior in children and teens, and that behavior can continue into adulthood.

Several different studies have indicated that violence in the media can produce violent and aggressive behavior in children and teens. Two researchers note, "In the past decade, media-effects researchers have progressively reached consensus that exposure to television violence can result in aggressive behavior" (Greene & Krcmar, 2005). In addition, a fifteen-year study by the American Psychological Association (APA) also showed that both men and women are affected by media violence, and that adults who watched this media as children tended to be more violent, and convicted of more violent crimes (Partenheimer, 2003). In the past decade, violence has become much more common in the media, as well, and adults and children alike seem to be more immune to it. Children and teens are exposed to violence on television, in films, in video games, and other media, and society seems to be getting more permissive about how much violence occurs in the media. All of this is…… [Read More]

References

Editors. (2009). Children and media violence. Retrieved 4 Dec. 2009 from the MediaFamily.org Web site: http://www.mediafamily.org/facts/facts_vlent.shtml.

Greene, K., & Krcmar, M. (2005). Predicting exposure to and liking of media violence: A uses and gratifications approach. Communication Studies, 56(1), 71+.

Partenheimer, D. (2009). Childhood exposure to media violence predicts young adult aggressive behavior, according to a new 15-year study. Retrieved 4 Dec. 2009, from the American Psychological Association Web site: http://www.apa.org/releases/media_violence.html.
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Violence on the Web Computer Games

Words: 4827 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94965531

Violence in Web-Based and Computer Games on Adolescents

Playing video and computer games is a treasured leisure activity among many young people today, and these young players frequently prefer violent games. Studies suggest that exposure to media violence may adversely affect young people's attitudes and behavior. Further, self-concept is a key indicator of core attitudes and coping abilities, and, for adolescents, the evolution of the sense of self is a fundamental developmental activity (Buchman & Funk, 1996). The average adolescent in the United States spends over 6 hours a day in front of some sort of video screen such as a television, computer, video games, the Internet and movies, and the total actually exceeds the amount of time children spent in school today (Smoots, 2003). In fact, while watching or playing video games, children in the United States will have witnessed around 200,000 violent acts and 16,000 murders on television alone by the age of 18 years (Smoots, 2003). It is little wonder, then, that critics point to such activities as being especially harmful for adolescents, and seek to either ban them outright or ensure appropriate controls are in place to prevent impressionable young people from having access to them…… [Read More]

References

Ballard, M.E. & Lineberger, R. (1999). Video game violence and confederate gender: Effects on reward and punishment given by college males. Sex Roles: A Journal of Research, 541.

Buchman, D.D. & Funk, J.B. (1996). Playing violent video and computer games and adolescent self-concept. Journal of Communication, 46(2), 19-27.

Certain Toys Trigger Aggression. (December 2003). USA Today Magazine, 132(2703), 7.

Dietz, T.L. (1998). An examination of violence and gender role portrayals in video games: Implications for gender socialization and aggressive behavior. Sex Roles: A Journal of Research. Volume: 38(5-6), 425.
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Violence in the Media Tricking the Viewers

Words: 2256 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22611108

Attraction to Violence in the Media

Violence on Films and in Television

Filmmakers Technique to Grab the Audience

Violence Made to Swindle the Viewers

Making Violence Funny

Health Concerns

It is clear that one of the worthy changes in the social environment today is the advent and fullness of television. In this new setting, television, radio, videos, movies, computer networks and video games, have presumed central roles in people's day-to-day lives. Rather it be good or bad, it seems that the mass media are having some kind of a huge impact on people's standards, beliefs, and behavior. Regrettably, the consequences of one specific element of the mass media exposure has for the most part damaging effects on those that are watching' and others' health. There is much Research evidence that has been accumulating over a lot of ears that being exposed to violence on television and in video games does raise the danger of violent behavior on the observer's part just as growing up in an setting filled with real violence raises the risk of a person that starts developing violent behavior. With that said, this paper will explore how people are attracted to violence in the media.

Definitions

Before…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bishop, R. A P.J., 2006. Violence. Theory, Culture & Society. Theory, Culture and Society, 23(3), pp. pp.377-385..

BJ., B., 2007. Moderating role of. Journal . Pers. Soc.Psychol, 23(4), p. 950 -- 60.

Bushman BJ, H.L., 2008. Effects of televised violence on aggression.In Handbook of Children and the Media. In: Thousand Oaks: Sage, p. 223 -- 54.

Bushman, B. A A.C., 2001. Media violence and the American public: Scientific facts vs. media misinformation. American Psychologist, 56(7), pp. pp.477-489..
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Media and War The

Words: 1110 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10869707

In the novel, Howard is forced to serve as an U.S. secret Agent by the Blue Fairy, a career that eventually led to his own death.

Mother Night represents the fictional memoirs of Howard W. Campbell Jr., an American who served as a secret agent for the American Army during the Second World War. Giving that the actual author of the novel served himself as a soldier during the same war, the question of whether or not the author resembles the protagonist in the novel is understandable. Perhaps one of the visions they share is the reality of facts, Mother Night being Vonnegut's only novel that does not feature fantastic elements. Vonnegut wrote "We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be," as the final moral for his novel and one thing Campbell and Vonnegut share after all is their vocation and a sentimental attachment for who they really are, not for who they are perceived as being. As far as for Shakespeare, the author is known to have doubled his way with exploring the multiple facets of human nature. Like in Vonnegut's case, love was throughly explored within the depths…… [Read More]

references to such stories like "Jack the Giant Killer" and uses the image of some demons and serpents to create the background. The tone of the play is quite humourous and ironic, thus explained by the existence of the Fool. However, the King himself is quite intelligent, even though Shakespeare uses his insanity to address nonhuman objects. Like in many of his other writings, Shakespeare's style of writing is poetic, using iambic rhythms and free verse.

Therefore, it is quite interesting to observe that such aspects of human nature depicted in King Lear resemble other works like that of Vonnegut's and his Mother Night. The technique used by the later is ultimately different from that of Shakespeare's, less dramatic, but tragic nonetheless, written in a first-person journal style. This confessional style is bound to credit the protagonist-narrator because we only get his version of the events. Interesting enough though, it seems as though Campbell discovers more things about himself as the story unfolds than does the reader.
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Media Society Book Section Summary Croteau

Words: 947 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64535589

Vietnam films have rewritten the winners and the losers of that saga and action-adventure films reinforce cultural norms of violence and power (175). Despite the increased real presence of women in positions of power, often media representations of women and other formerly disenfranchised groups remain stereotyped or relegated to marginal or token roles, although this is changing. Still, certain outlets like women's magazines often function as advertisements that perpetuate corporate images that make women feel worse, rather than better about themselves (188). Furthermore, a hegemonic ideology is implied by supposedly mainstream news organizations. Consider the construct of 'economic news.' This implies that the 'economy' is in a neat little box, and that social issues of race and political disenfranchisement, limits on wealth and access to education and power, have no role in who possess wealth and who lacks wealth in society. Economics as separate from other issues is essentially an anti-Marxist stance by the modern media, not a neutral one (171). Advertising and corporate sponsorship also plays an ideological role: "Some people are more valuable [as audience members] than others," in short, wealthier Americans buy more things (216). But through some media, such as the arts, alternative points-of-view are articulated…… [Read More]

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Media Injustice and the Media There Was

Words: 672 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99052329

Media

Injustice and the Media

There was a point in the not-too-distant past when it was reasonable to perceive the media as a force collectively aimed at informing the public, exposing corruption, surfacing scandal and general performing the responsibility of protecting the people's right to know. However, several forces have permeated the so-called 'fourth estate,' diluting the media's acceptance of this responsibility. At one end of the spectrum, the growth in value of cable news such as CNN or MSNBC has created a highly monetized and commercially-motivated form of news. At the opposite end of the spectrum, the increasing visibility of social media such as Facebook and Twitter in spreading news stories has removed much of the accountability or professionalism from our media outlets.

The result is that our media outlets rarely have the motivation to ensure that a well-informed public is made aware of injustice in all its forms. According to the Daily Graphic (2009), "As the fourth estate of the realm, the media is expected by the public to play their watchdog role well and they should do this with a high sense of responsibility without infringing on the rights of individuals and society."

Unfortunately, a consideration of…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Boettger, B. (2012). The Social Responsibility of Social Media. Media Post.

Chiyamwaka, B. (2008). Media Ethics: A Call To Responsible Journalism. Hippo Lodge Liwonde.

Christians, C.G. (2007). Utilitarianism in Media Ethics and Its Discontents. Journal of Mass Media Ethics, 22(2-3), 113-131.

Daily Graphic. (2009). Ethical, Responsible Journalism Essential for Media's Success. Modern Ghana.
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Media Review Project the 1993 Film What's

Words: 1660 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31395513

Media Review Project

The 1993 film "What's Love Got To Do With It" presents many of the classic symptoms and effects of domestic violence. As such, it provides a great deal of insight into this phenomenon, both on the part of the abuser and on the one who is receiving the abuse. The film is a musical biography of Tina Turner, who was one of the late 20th century's most popular singers. The movie opens up with Tin Turner as a young girl singing in a church choir. Even at this early age her prowess as a singer, the power of her voice and the zeal she expresses through her musical performance, become readily apparent. It is crucial to note that despite such an enthusiastic performance, Tina Turner (who is going by her true name at this point, Anna Mae Bullock), is enduring a tumultuous home life. Her mother eventually abandons her (although hermother takes Tina's sister with her), leaving Tina to grow up under the care of her grandmother.

As a young adult, Tina reunites with her mother and her sister, the latter of whom takes the fledgling singer to a night club at which Ike Turner is performing.…… [Read More]

References

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. (1997. Substance Abuse Treatment and Domestic Violence. Rockville (MD): Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64430/ 

Ebert, R. (1993). "What's love got to do with it." www.rogerebert.com. Retrieved from http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/whats-love-got-to-do-with-it-1993

Maslin, J. (1993). "What's love got to do with it film review." The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9F0CE4D71539F93AA35755C0A965958260
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Media Obsession With Violence &

Words: 2292 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55109089

17). He is disgusted that news executives that direct what should be covered are less interested in "what's happening in Afghanistan" but more interested in "Michael Jackson and Laci Peterson" (Fenton, p. 20).

What are the excuses TV executives, editors and producers give for focusing on scandal, sexual trysts, and embarrassing situations for celebrities? Fenton claims that those "gatekeepers of the news" will tell anyone listening that "the average [viewer] simply cannot absorb that much hard news, especially about events abroad" (p. 20). The CBS veteran insists that the media power brokers believe that "Americans are too broadly under-informed to digest nuggets of information that seem to contradict what they know of the world" (p. 20). That would seem to be a very condescending, elitist attitude on the part of the TV industry in particular.

Fenton (p. 22) asserts that because of the very real threats of terrorism on the ground here in the U.S. "nothing can trump hard information about our security -- not even weight loss programs or the sex lives of politicians." American is alert to the dangers of junk food, Fenton concludes, now is the time "to launch the fight against junk news" (Fenton, p. 22).…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dorfman, Lori, Woodruff, Katie, Chavez, Vivian, and Wallack, Lawrence. "Youth and Violence

On Local Television News in California." American Journal of Public Health 87.8 (1997):

1311-1316.

Downie, Leonard, and Schudson, Michael. "The Reconstruction of American Journalism."
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Media Negatively Effects the Body Image Concerns of Adolescent Girls

Words: 1518 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68105579

Media Negatively Affects the Body Image Concerns of Adolescent Girls

Among adolescent girls, body image concerns are not uncommon. The hypothesis of this paper believes that media negatively affects the body image concerns of adolescent girls. The independent variable is the adolescent girls and the dependent variable is the media. This is because adolescent girls can be affected by a lot of other things when it concerns body image, this can come in the form of their peers, society and even history. These variables can affect the concerns on body image of adolescent girls in both a positive and a negative way. However, this paper will only discuss the negative affects which body images are supplied by media to adolescent girls with.

The theoretical approach which best suits this study is the Psychodynamic Approach. This is because the concerns regarding body images are implanted in the minds of these adolescent girls unconsciously. These adolescent girls are being influenced by underlying messages which they might pick up from the media, and this affects how they may see themselves. It is not of the case whether the media is portraying body image this way intentionally or unintentionally; it is the fact that…… [Read More]

References

Anschutz, D.J., Van Strien, T., & Engels, R.C. (2008). Exposure to Slim Images in Mass Media: Television Commercials as Reminders of Restriction in Restrained Eaters. Health Psychology. 27(4); 401-408.

Cheng, H.L. & Mallinckrodt (2009). Parental Bonds, Anxious Attachment, Media Internalization, and Body Image Dissatisfaction: Exploring a Mediation Model. Journal of Counseling Psychology. 56(5); 365-375.

Clark, L., & Tiggemann, M. (2008). Sociocultural and Individual Psychological Predictors of Body Image in Young Girls: A Prospective Study. Developmental Psychology. 44(4); 1124-1134.

Dohnt, H. & Tiggemann, M. (2006). The Contribution of Peer and Media Influences to the Development of Body Satisfaction and Self-Esteem in Young Girls: A Prospective Study. Developmental Psychology. 42(5); 929-936.
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Media the Content Dominance of Reality TV

Words: 788 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66153536

Media

The Content Dominance of Reality TV

Few forces have emerged with greater dominance or less artistic appeal than that of reality television, which has largely defined primetime content for the last decade. What at one time appeared to be a fad, or a phenomenon at worst, ultimately reached a crescendo as the best path to high ratings, bid advertising dollars and household names. This is the pattern of media content which perhaps best reflects certain cultural qualities distinct to our time and place. Indeed, our collective embrace of this form of television, which allegedly depicts real individuals living real lives or facing real problems in front of national viewing audiences, suggests both a desire to see ourselves on the screen and, simultaneously, a desire to feel better about ourselves by observing the lurid, embarrassing and pathetic moments experienced by the 'stars' of reality television.

Selected Image:

This idea is directly reflected in the image selected for assessment here. The illustration featured at the following website linked here below succinctly captures the implications of reality television: (http://aaliyah-miller.blogspot.com/2013/02/hook-line-and-sinker-reality-tv-and-its.html)

Logos:

The late 1990s brought about great change in the content of television. To that point, primetime television was fully dominated by sitcom…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Elite Daily. (2012). The Detrimental Effect Of Reality TV On Our Society. Elitedaily.com

Fahner, M. (2012). The real effects of reality TV. USA Today College.

Miller, A. (2013). Hook, Line and Sinker: Reality TV and Its Impact In Our Culture. In the Mix.
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Media and Terrorism Mass Media

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64912324

However, this is not a reason to treat the entire religion as a terrorist organization itself. After 9/11, many Americans and media outlets have begun to treat all Muslims, and even the concept of Islam as a terrorist organization. No other controversies show this strong enough as the controversy concerning the building of the mosque near the site of 9/11. In this case, there is a lot of public outcry regarding a huge mosque that was being proposed to be built beginning in 2009. The film here highlights both media sources and individual survivors of 9/11 and how they are threatened with the presence of the mosque being so close to the site of the twin towers of the World Trade Building. To many survivors it is a really emotional time still because the deaths of loved ones and friends are still very real in their minds. Yet, these individuals are making the mistake of assuming all Muslims are anti-American, and even terrorists.

Many people are directly correlating Islam with the terrorists that were responsible for 9/11. Yet, this is simply not true. The terrorists who were responsible were a small fraction of fundamentalist radicals, not representatives of larger Islam…… [Read More]

There are a number of things the media can do when being threatened by terrorist threats in order to stop the wave of fear the terrorists are looking to spread within American society. First, removing terrorists' access to the media will help decrease the media's relationship with spreading terror. Media outlets should refuse to print or highlight the terrorists own explanations of attacks and threats, as many terrorists often accompany threats with tapes or other sorts of verbal statements. This decreased attention will not continue to increase public fear as much, therefore not serving the terrorists on a silver platter.

Yes, there have been some radical Muslims that have taken extreme terrorist acts against the United States. However, this is not a reason to treat the entire religion as a terrorist organization itself. After 9/11, many Americans and media outlets have begun to treat all Muslims, and even the concept of Islam as a terrorist organization. No other controversies show this strong enough as the controversy concerning the building of the mosque near the site of 9/11. In this case, there is a lot of public outcry regarding a huge mosque that was being proposed to be built beginning in 2009. The film here highlights both media sources and individual survivors of 9/11 and how they are threatened with the presence of the mosque being so close to the site of the twin towers of the World Trade Building. To many survivors it is a really emotional time still because the deaths of loved ones and friends are still very real in their minds. Yet, these individuals are making the mistake of assuming all Muslims are anti-American, and even terrorists.

Many people are directly correlating Islam with the terrorists that were responsible for 9/11. Yet, this is simply not true. The terrorists who were responsible were a small fraction of fundamentalist radicals, not representatives of larger Islam itself. Those who were responsible for the extreme violence and pain that was 9/11 were not representative of the Islamic world as a whole. They were an extremist group that harbored political differences with the United States that had been building for generations. Thus, the act of terrorism was not necessarily religiously based. In this sense, blaming the religion for the act of terror would be a huge mistake. Muslims living in this country are still Americans. Therefore, they need to be able to experience the same rights to freedom of religion as other members of religious faiths do.
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Violence in Video Games the Cultivation of

Words: 888 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30854232

Violence in Video Games

The cultivation of violence in video games: causal or correlational?

Studies on media effects have always included the influential role that television and new media technologies such as the computer and Internet (ICTs). With the proliferation of both mass media, there is greater penetration of its content to children and the adolescent youth, who are frequent TV watchers and ICT users. Among the concerns of parents and scholars about the proliferation of this mass media is its unintended effects -- the cultivation of violence and development of violent behavior of the child through TV and ICT content. Focus is especially given to the youth who actively engage in video gaming, either through the TV, computer, or Internet. Parents and mass media research claim that video games harness an individual's violent behavior, resulting to aggressiveness and development of hostile attitude towards other people.

In this paper, the researcher intends to establish whether the claim that video games cause aggressive and violent behavior is indeed an empirical truth. The researcher has drawn from relevant literature contending that video games were causal factors resulting to violent behavior. However, a major finding from the research indicates that though there have…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brody, M. (2001). "Playing with death." Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter, (16)11.

Gaziano, C. (2001). "Towards a broader conceptual framework for research on social stratification, childrearing patterns, and media effects." Mass Communication & Society, (4)2.

Lynne Eagle, L., S. Bulmer, and A. de Bruin. (2003). "Marketing communications implications of children's new electronic media use: a survey of parental opinions and perceptions." Journal of Marketing Communications, (9)3.

Wagner, C. (2004). "Aggression and violent media." Futurist, (38)4.
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Violence in Video Games Guiding Question Should

Words: 1052 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15949233

Violence in Video Games

Guiding Question: Should the government have to be involved in legislation regarding video game content?

Proof 1: Explain how First Amendment ensures freedom of speech, including video game content.

"It is not the government's job to forbid content in media. It is the responsibility of the parents to decide what their children should play.

Body Paragraph 1: Music censorship case and ratings system for video games

Body Paragraph 2: Research evidence

Body Paragraph 3: Sociological implications and blaming

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution insists that citizens of the U.S. have the right to free speech. This Amendment has been utilized by artists from a wide variety of genres and talents to preserve their right to express themselves and prevent any form of censorship. Most calls for legislation regarding censorship have actually come from the parents of America's youth. Rather than take responsibility for determining whether or not a film or video game is suitable for their child, the adults call upon the government to create laws to limit content. It is not the government's role to forbid content, but the cause of the parent to decide what games their child should or should…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Anderson, Craig (2003). "Violent Video Games: Myths, Facts, and Unanswered Questions."

Psychological Science Agenda.

Benedetti, Winda. (2008). "Playing the Blame Game." MSNBC. Retrieved from http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23204875/

Chalk, Andy. (2007). "Inappropriate Content: a Brief History of Videogame Ratings and the ESRB." The Escapist.
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Violence in American Sports Today

Words: 3564 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28418040

Given that people engage in sporting events for a wide range of reasons, the authors assert that it is time for athletes to develop a moral code that embraces higher standards of conduct that will help reverse these recent trends and once again provide American sports with a sense of fair play and respect.

Fredenburg, Karen, Rafer Lutz, Glenn Miller et al. (2005). "Dismissals and Perceptions of Pressure in Coaching in Texas High Schools: Similarities and Differences with Previous Studies Show the Contemporary Face of Coaching Pressure." JOPERD-- The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance 76(1):29.

In this essay, the authors report that there have been a number of recent studies and reports that suggest that the pressure in high school sports is growing, rather than declining. The authors cite an article in Sports Illustrated that described the alarming trends of parental misbehavior at youth sport events. The president of the National Alliance for Youth Sports reported that the incidence of parental misconduct at youth athletic events rose from 5% in 1995 to 15% in 2000; further Staffo (2001) (reviewed below) has reported numerous incidents of criminal violence by athletes in recent years. The authors provide some insightful observations…… [Read More]

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TV Violence on TV Has

Words: 1578 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20673318

Attitudes and practices varied by age of the child and the gender of the parent.

Colorito, Rita. (2002) "Violence on Television News Programs is a Serious Problem." Is Media Violence a Problem? Ed James Torr San Diego: Greenhaven, 2002. 24- 30.

Colorito says that even though rates of crime decreased in the 1990s, television news coverage of violent crime increased. TV news shows like 20/20 and Dateline frequently show stories on horrible crimes, sometimes with bloody crime scenes and re-enactments of the crime. This makes people think that there is more violent crime than there really is.

Felson, Richard. "Mass Media Effects on Violent Behavior." Annual Review of Sociology 22. 1996. [Electronic Version]

The topic of violence in the media has been continually debated over the past several decades. There are a lot of empirical studies that show the effects of TV on aggression. However, no review looked at the criminal aggression. The author concluded that even though the possibility of TV and film violence can lead to violent crime remains, most of the studies show that viewing violence does not cause crime.

Kirsh, Steven. Children, Adolescents, and Media Violence. A Crtical Look at the Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage…… [Read More]

The topic of violence in the media has been continually debated over the past several decades. There are a lot of empirical studies that show the effects of TV on aggression. However, no review looked at the criminal aggression. The author concluded that even though the possibility of TV and film violence can lead to violent crime remains, most of the studies show that viewing violence does not cause crime.

Kirsh, Steven. Children, Adolescents, and Media Violence. A Crtical Look at the Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2006

This book gives a very good overview of variety of studies about media violence and children and adolesence. The book includes information on what is aggression and different theories about aggression and human behavior. Kirsh wants readers to be critical of the studies they read and make sure they are scientific. Although he does not believe that violence in the media is harmful based on the studies, he does say that it should not be ignored. He concludes by saying that there should be more positive media for younger children when they will be effected most.
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Gendered Violence the Intersection of

Words: 1733 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81690462



By examining violence and women in both Sin City and the Tekken series, one is able to see how seemingly similar representations of gender and violence actually create wildly different meanings depending on the particular medium. While Sin City and Tekken participate in the visual language of gender, when it comes to the relationship between gender and violence, Sin City focuses on the victimization of women's bodies at the hands of men while Tekken disavows any connection between the violence committed and the gender of those committing it. This analysis reveals an important distinction between violence committed by or against gendered individuals and violence committed because of gender, because as Tekken demonstrates, the former situation actually offers the possibility for a more expansive representation of gender.… [Read More]

References

Bryce, J.O., & Rutter, J. (2003). Gender dynamics and the social and spatial organization of computer gaming. Leisure Studies, 22(1), 1-15.

Funk, J.B., Baldacci, H.B., Pasold, T., & Baumgardner, J. (2004). Violence exposure in real-life, video games, television, movies, and the internet: is there desensitization? Journal

of adolescence, 27(1), 23-39.

Namco Bandai (2009). Tekken 6 [videogame]. Tokyo: Katsuhiro Harada.
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Video Violence Assessing and Curbing the Effects

Words: 1367 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18924617

Video Violence: Assessing and Curbing the Effects of Television

Violence within Youth Programming in the United States of America

In today's day and age, technology has become a cornerstone of the American existence. With each passing day, new and improved technological devices turnover in order to bring the outside world into the individual American home, but the television has remained unaffected. The television and its programming have remained a constant yet changing staple in the country that brings with it an unparalleled ability to shape its watchers, with the most affected being the children and youth of America. While so many individuals immediately connect the phrase "children's programming" to harmless programs like Sesame Street and Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood, the truth remains that along with this wholesome educational programming, violence has also become a constant in many of the television programs geared toward children today. In viewing the research that is available on the topic of violence in television geared towards children and youths, a question of how such violent programming affects the minds and actions of the country's children must be addressed as well as: "how much is too much," when it comes to violence on TV.

Violence on television…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hesmann, L.R. et al. "Early Exposure to TV Violence Predicts Aggression in Adulthood."

Developmental Psychology, 39(1): pp. 201-221.

Keer, Gregory. "The Effects of Seeing TV Violence." Parenthood. 2010. Web. 8 November

2012. http://www.parenthood.com/article-topics/the_effects_of_seeing_tv_violence.html.
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Tale Violence in Fairy Tales

Words: 1663 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80068822

Media presentations of justified violencemay also change the belief that violent behavior is wrong, encouraging the development of pro-violence attitudes. […] Violence is acceptable because it is not real, therefore "victims" do not really suffer (Funk et al. 26).

Given this serious -- and well-documented -- consequence of even imaginary violence, writers and readers of fairy tales should exercise care that their depictions of violence are truly relevant to the moralistic issues at stake. The "blood in the shoe" must be justified; otherwise, it simply desensitizes the (often juvenile) reader to no real advantage.

Works… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, Craig a., Leonard Berkowitz, Edward Donnerstein, L. Rowell Huesmann, James D. Johnson, Daniel Linz, Neil M. Malamuth, and Ellen Wartella. "The Influence of Media Violence on Youth." Psychological Science in the Public Interest 4.3 (2003): 81-110. Print.

Bascom, William. "Cinderella in Africa." Cinderella: A Casebook. Ed. Alan Dundes. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1982. Print.

Bettelheim, Bruno. The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. New York: Alfred a. Knopf, 1977. Print.

Funk, Jeanne B., Heidi Bechtoldt Baldacci, Tracie Pasold, and Jennifer Baumgardner. "Violence Exposure in Real Life, Videogames, Television, Movies, and the Internet: Is There Desensitization?" Journal of Adolescence 27 (2004): 23-39. Print.
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Children Exposure to Violence Through the Media

Words: 2785 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17371982

Children: Exposure to Violence Through the Media

The extent to which exposure to violence creates violent children and/or aggressive behavior is a subject which has been debated in a comprehensive manner. However, the fundamental research findings are consistent. The research continues to demonstrate that exposure to violence creates negative manifestations in the behavior of children. "While violence is not new to the human race, it is an increasing problem in modern society. With greater access to firearms and explosives, the scope and efficiency of violent behavior has had serious consequences. We need only look at the recent school shootings and the escalating rate of youth homicides among urban adolescents to appreciate the extent of this ominous trend" (Beresin, 2010). Given the fact that children are manifesting violent behavior in more and more disturbing ways, making places like schools -- previously dens of safety -- into places where children feel unsafe is a strong enough reason to study the various influences that can cause children to act violent. One of these factors, as it is well understood, is exposure to violence through sources of media.

Research Review

Chronologically, the research has pointed to the negative impact of violent television programs or…… [Read More]

References

Beresin, V .E. (2010). The Impact of Media Violence on Children and Adolescents: Opportunities for Clinical Interventions. This article examines the biophysiological impact of violent images on children and how those exact dynamics work. Retrieved march 25, 2013 from http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/developmentor/the_impact_of_media_violence_on_children_and_adolescents_opportunities_for_clinical_interventions

Grayson-Mathis, C.E. (2005, June 10). Media violence may affect children's minds.

Offers a thorough appraisal on how violent media images impact the minds of children using relevant literature to support the case.

Retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20050610/media-violence-may-affect-childrens-minds
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Teens and the Media One

Words: 4544 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39988476

The extreme power of this new cultural tool is the very nature -- it depends on nothing but an electronic connection. it, like many things in the modern world, is instantaneous, satisfying the 21st century need to have both dependence and independence based on our own decision or whim. Therein lies the confusion for many -- just how real is an electronic friendship that can exist without really "knowing" the person physically? How robust are virtual relationships except in the mind of those participating? and, how do we know with whom we are actually chatting or forming a bond -- could the mother of three living in Scotland be something quite different on the Internet? and, specifically, what impact might these social networks from a psychological perspective? (Gross, 2004).

Besides community, technology has changed entertainment for teens. Violence in the entertainment genre is not something that is new to the 20th century. If we think back on history, examples are rife regarding different societies and their use of violence, all which were available for children. However, over the past century or so, the entire culture of media has changed so dramatically that heavier exposure to violence is available to teens…… [Read More]

References

Ahn, J. (2011). Digital Divides and Social Network Sites: Which Students Participate in Social

Media. Jounral of Educational Computing Research, 45(2), 147-63.

Anderson-Butcher, D., et.al. (2010). Adolescent Weblog Use: Risky or Protective. Journal of Child and Adolescent Social Work, 27(2), 63-77.

Anderson, B. (1999). Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso Publications.
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Causes of Teen Violence Missing the Mark

Words: 901 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69341937

causes of teen violence, "Missing the Mark" by Jackson Katz and Sur Jhally, and "Stop Blaming Kids and TV" by Mike Males. Katz and Jhally argue that teen violence is a male-centric occurrence caused by socialization that promotes violent masculinity. Males provide a gender-neutral view of teen violence that he believes is caused by parents who engage in domestic violence.

Because of the obvious differences in these theories, it's tempting to try to advocate one premises over the other, but further thought shows that these two theories are complimentary because the family plays such a large part in the male socialization process.

Both articles deal with the subject of teenage violence and avoid placing blame on teens for their troubled behavior. Instead, these articles present the idea of imitation as a cause of teen violence, but they differ on who the kids are imitating. Males states that teens are copying the violent behavior of their parents because they are role models who kids want to be like. Males also theorizes that imitation is inherent in a child's learning process; they learn to react to their anger and frustration through their violent parents. Katz and Jhally, on the other hand, assert…… [Read More]

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TV Violence on Children the

Words: 2062 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83827954

In contrast, TV influences children in abandoning the theories they were taught and embrace other concepts, most related to violence. Also, after being exposed to TV violence children feel that it is perfectly natural for them to behave similar to the characters on TV (Langone, 1984, p. 48).

It is extremely important for a child to be assisted by an adult when watching TV. Studies have shown that children are influenced by the way adults perceive TV programs, meaning that a child is likely to gain a better understanding of right and wrong when he or she is supported by a mature individual. Even with that, TV violence can negatively influence children, as they will merely hide their aggression in the cases when they are assisted by an adult who disapproves of violent behavior in watching TV (Langone, 1984, p. 56).

Children are generally willing to do anything in ordered to be rewarded with objects or behavior they consider to be beneficial for them. Thus, consequent to seeing that a character in a cartoon or in a movie is rewarded for the immoralities he or she committed, children are likely to express a desire to behave similarly, in hope they…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Barker, M. & Petley, J. (2001). Ill Effects: The Media/Violence Debate. New York: Routledge.

2. Hoffman, A.M. (1996) Schools, Violence, and Society. Westport, CT: Praeger.

3. Josephson, W.L. (1995). "Television Violence: A Review of the Effects on Children of Different Ages." Retrieved August 16, 2010, from the Media Awareness Network Web site: http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/resources/research_documents/reports/violence/tv_violence_child.cfm

4. Langone, J. (1984). Violence!: Our Fastest-Growing Public Health Problem. 1st ed. Boston: Little, Brown
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Negative Effects of Media on

Words: 1550 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14530354

As we are exposed to more and more sex and violence, these things begin to mean less to us, and indiscriminate and uncaring behavior appears to be one of the major results of this. In order to change the situation without impinging on this country's basic freedoms, media producers will need to shoulder the responsibility and provide content that is more conducive to a happy, well-adjusted, and more neighborly society.

BIBLIOGRAPY

Freedman, Jonathon L. Media violence and its effect on aggression: assessing the scientific evidence. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2002. 1-272.

Kotrla, Bowie. "Sex and Violence: Is Exposure to Media Content Harmful to Children?." Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children 5.2 (Summer/Fall2007 2007): 50-52. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 5 July 2009 .

Yount, William R. "Transcendence and Aging: The Secular Insights of Erikson and Maslow." Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging 21.1/2 (Jan. 2009): 73-87. MasterFILE Premier. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 5 July 2009 .

Millner, Denene. "Messages in the Music." Essence 36.6 (Oct. 2005): 240-242. MasterFILE Premier. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 5 July 2009 .… [Read More]

Kotrla, Bowie. "Sex and Violence: Is Exposure to Media Content Harmful to Children?." Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children 5.2 (Summer/Fall2007 2007): 50-52. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 5 July 2009 .

Yount, William R. "Transcendence and Aging: The Secular Insights of Erikson and Maslow." Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging 21.1/2 (Jan. 2009): 73-87. MasterFILE Premier. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 5 July 2009 .

Millner, Denene. "Messages in the Music." Essence 36.6 (Oct. 2005): 240-242. MasterFILE Premier. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 5 July 2009 .
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Values of Media Life in

Words: 1438 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12562314

With the technology available in today's economy, it is probable that education could go back to the days when students received more individualized instruction. There is no refuting that technology will continue to alter education (Cornell, 2007).

Socialization is the development of a sense of being self connected to a larger social world by way of learning and internalizing the values, beliefs, and norms of one's culture. During socialization people learn to carry out certain roles as citizens, friends, lovers and workers. In the course of internalization our culture becomes second nature. People learn to behave in socially suitable and adequate ways. Some social institutions have precise roles in socializing the young and others have less deliberate but still powerful roles in the process. The mass media is a very influential socializing force. Media affects how people learn about the world and interact with each another. People often base most of their knowledge on government news accounts and not on experience. People are dependent on the media for what they know and how they relate to the world of politics. People read about or watch political debates that are then followed by instant analysis and commentary done by experts. Politicians…… [Read More]

References

A Guide to Critical Viewing for Parents and Children. (n.d.). Retrieved July 30, 2010, from Family Values Television Network Web site:  http://fvtvn.com/articles/taking-charge-of -your-tv/

Bolen, Jackie. (2006). TV's Effect on the Family. Retrieved July 30, 2010, from Web site:

http://tvseffect.blogspot.com/

Cornell, K. (2007). How Technology has Influenced Education. Retrieved July 30, 2010, from Writing Web site: http://www.writing.com/main/view_item/item_id/1322931-How-
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Communications and Media Communication Has

Words: 1245 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5632689

Additional research showed that those who were frequently exposed to these movies were also inclined to develop risk-taking behavior (Greene and Kromar).

Vulnerable young women who had long-term exposure to sexually objectifying media could suffer from decreased self-esteem, according to another study (Aubrey 2006). A group of 149 female undergraduates in a big mid-Western university was surveyed for their responses after having been exposed to such media. The study revealed that the exposure could dent their global self-esteem if they already possessed the vulnerability to these media materials. An example is Seventeen Magazine, which is an example of a sexually objectifying medium (Aubrey).

The media are an effective instrument of war (Payne 2005). Recent conflicts clearly demonstrate that the transmission of information plays a significant part in warfare. Winning a war is considered as decisive as actually beating the enemy at the battlefield. Winning the medial war is, therefore, a main item in the agenda of Western war-planners and policy decision-makers. News stations bring information on a 24-hour basis to their website's current affair section and through blogs. The public's increased interest in constant news must be matched by the military strategist and on an even more complex way to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aubrey, J. S, (2006). Exposure to Sexually Objectifying Media and Body Self-Perceptions Among College Women.16 pages. Sex Roles: a Journal of Research: Springer

Greene, K.and Kromar, M. (2005). Predicting Exposure to, and Liking of, Media Violence. 17 pages. Communication Studies: Central States Speech Association

Holts, S. (2005). Establishing Connections. 2 pages. Communication World: International Association of Business Communicators

Kariithi, N. (2007). Connecting the Continent. 4 pages. Communication World: International Association of Business Communicators
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Cartoons and Comics Affect Children Media Has

Words: 2136 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11621112

Cartoons and Comics Affect Children

Media has a powerful impact on society. Media alters our buying habits, controls our tastes, incites our feelings against or for one or the other group or country, it is a powerful weapon indeed. Considering this influence of media over our lives psychologists and social scientists have become concerned that violence depicted on our media; TV, videos and videogames is responsible for increased violence among the children and in the society.

A number of studies claim to have conclusive proof that violence in the media and bad habits seen in cartoons and comic are making our children aggressive, fearful and developing a negative attitude towards the society. Other researchers and analyst dispute this theses and point to other factors as a cause of increased violence.

This paper reviews the arguments presented by both sides of this divide and also the writer's on opinion on this issue.

MEDIA HAS A MAJOR IMPACT ON DETERIORATING CHILDREN BEHAVIOR

United States is considered a country with a violence problem. The homicide rate among males 15 to 24 years old in the United States is 10 times higher than in Canada, 15 times higher than in Australia, and 28 times…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Cantor, J., (2000), Media Violence and Children's Emotions, Paper presented at American Psychological Association Convention, Washington, [Online] retrieved from World Wide Web on 4th March 2011, http://www.joannecantor.com/EMOTIONS2_sgl.htm

2. Children & TV Violence (1999), [Online] retrieved from World Wide Web on 4 March 2011, http://www.abelard.org/tv/tv.htm

3. Eron, L.D. (1963). Relationship of TV viewing habits and aggressive behavior in children, Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 67, 193-196.

4. Eron, L.D., & Huesmann, L.R. (1986). The role of television in the development of pro-social and antisocial behavior. In: D. Olweus, J. Block & M. Radke-Yarrow (Eds.), Development of antisocial and pro-social behavior, (pp. 285-314). New York: Academic Press
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Analyzing Whether Violence in the Media Contribute to Violent Behavior in Children

Words: 2749 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16407947

Violence in Media Contribute to Violent Behavior in Children?

In this day and age, the media is part and parcel of most people's lives in such a way that there is an interaction with media in different forms each day. People access media for many reasons, some of which are to gather information, to be entertained and in order to advance their education. In today's media, violence has become a common feature, raising fears of what the impact of this might be. This issue is prevalent all around the world today and has been accessed by people of all ages, races and religions. Questions have been raised as to the effect this violence has had and will have on the viewer (Hinkley, et al., 2014). Media can be accessed in various forms, including television, radios, films, games and the internet. All these mediums have a potential to affect people's lives, their perception of life, their attitudes and even their principles. When it comes to children who are impressionable, the effects can go even further to affect them mentally and physically.

Children, in their teenage years, when exposed to this violence on the media, become less sensitive to violence and they…… [Read More]

References

Bushman, B. J., Gollwitzer, M., & Cruz, C. (2015). There is broad consensus: Media researchers agree that violent media increase aggression in children, and pediatricians and parents concur. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 4, 200-214. doi:10.1037/ppm0000046.

Ferguson, C. J. (2015). Does Media Violence Predict Societal Violence? It Depends on What You Look at and When. Journal of Communication 65, E1 -- E22. doi:10.1111/jcom.12129

Ferguson, C. J., Olson, C. K., Kutner, L. A., & Warner, D. E. (2014). Violent video games, catharsis seeking, bullying, and delinquency: A multivariate analysis of effects. Crime & Delinquency, 60, 764-784. doi:10.1177/0011128710362201

Greitemeyer, T., & Mugge, D. O. (2014). Video games do affect social outcomes: a meta-analytic review of the effects of violent and prosocial video game play. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40, 578-589. doi:10.1177/0146167213520459
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Video Game Violence and Restrictive

Words: 1110 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58518945

It would seem that on the basis of the causation rationale that age restrictions on violent video game content is no more logically justified than other types of overly broad restrictions (Olson, 2004).

In the 1950s, several instances occurred where young children watching the original Superman television series fell to their deaths after trying to emulate the star character's leaping takeoff from high-rise building windows. The series was not cancelled or changed to an adult time slot; instead, public service announcements were produced using George Reeves, in character and costume as Superman, expressly warn children not to try to emulate their hero. That approach solved the problem of inappropriate and dangerous behavioral emulation among children too young to distinguish entertainment from reality.

Much more recently, movie theaters began restricting entrance to movies with violent content or expressly sexual themes and imagery based on age; however, those restrictions are flexible enough to accommodate parental decisions. Specifically, restrictions of movies rated "R" admit adolescents with parental supervision. Similar restrictions are not necessarily inappropriate with respect to violent video games, although not necessarily because they are capable of influencing behavior or of increasing the chances that individuals exposed to them will perpetrate violence…… [Read More]

References

American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) "Media Violence" Pediatrics Vol 108.5

(2001): 1222-1227.

Olson CK. "Media Violence Research and Youth Violence Data: Why Do They

Conflict? Academic Psychiatry Vol 28 (2004):144-150.