Medical Technology Essays (Examples)

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Technology and Healthcare Demographics of the Global

Words: 1063 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48110564

Technology and Healthcare

Demographics of the global community are rapidly changing so that each year there are more and more seniors within the population base. This has a profound implication on the healthcare system of many regions since a large number of elderly citizens will be spending their lives in the confines of their home, and some may have chronic illness that require continuous monitoring. Clinical telemedicine is one way to offer greater services to rural or homebound populations. Indeed, a variety of technological advances have made it possible to change the paradigm of healthcare. Clinical information systems, for instance, have expanded in scope and depth. Increased processor speeds and data storage devices have made it possible to collect more data than ever on the detailed encounters that make up the provider-patient care delivery process, and present it more effectively to a wider range of users. Healthcare monitoring is part…… [Read More]

Luppicini, R. And R. Adell, eds., (2008). Handbook of Research on Technoethics. New York: Information Science Publishing Company.

Teo, T., et.al. (2008). "Wireless Healthcare Monitoring Systems. World Academy Of Science, Engineering, and Technology. 42 (1: Retrieved from:

http://www.waset.org/journals/waset/v42/v42-98.pdf
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Technology Is the Technical Means That People

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64168517

Technology is the technical means that people use, to improve their surroundings. It is also knowledge of using tools and machines to do tasks efficiently. We use technology to control the world in which we live. Technology is people using knowledge, tools and systems to make their lives easier and better. As the old saying, "Necessity is the mother of all inventions."

People use technology to improve their ability to do work. Through technology, people can do things twice as fast and twice more efficient than people did a century ago. Technology helps people to cope with our ever-growing population, so that everyone may have enough food to feed him or herself and satisfy there needs. Technology gives us larger possibilities by giving us ideas that we haven't thought about in the past. It further enhances our perspective in the things we do and makes simpler solutions in the problems…… [Read More]

References

"Definition of Technology." Definition of Technology. Bergen.org. 7 May 2005

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'Effects of Technology." Midtermpapers. 2004. Midterm Papers. 6 May 2005

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Technology as Compared to Science

Words: 868 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38169119


Many things we take for granted in modern life are the result of the
Industrial Revolution. We no longer have to sew our own clothes, make
everything we eat from scratch, and we have access to a greater array of
cheap consumer goods. People no longer have to work from sundown to sunup,
farming for food, sewing, weaving, and fighting to stay alive. We now have
greater leisure time, but also the things we produce during our work life
are no longer our 'own,' in contrast to an agrarian societies where people
own the food they produce on their lands, and make only the clothing and
things they need to survive. We receive wages for the goods and services we
provide to strangers. Instead, what we do at work is often very different
than how we pursue in our private lives-one reason that the Industrial
Revolution is often said to…… [Read More]

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Technology and Death Policy Redefining

Words: 2007 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46510951



Discussion about Brain Death and Cerebral Definitions

It has been researched that the human brain collapses at prior to the cessation of the human organs; the collapse of the human brain is attributed to the elimination of the large numbers of redundant neurons, and the aging process i.e. The gradual loss of sensory capacities. It has been reported that the visual acuity decline on linear basis between the age limit of 20-60, and soon after sixty the declination of the visual acuity is exponential. By the age of 45, the depth perception is reported declination in accelerated manner, and the speech comprehension is expected to get affect after the age of 80 due to the quarter loss of the extensive neurons in the superior temporal gyrus of the auditory cortex. The research has observed that significant decrease in the neuron density is expected, as a result of the aging process.…… [Read More]

References

Robert H. Blank. Technology and Death Policy: Redefining Death. Department of Government, Brunel University. 2001.

Peter Monaghan. The Unsettled Question of Brain Death. The Chronicle of Higher Education Vol. 48, Issue, 24. 2002.
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technology and'social change

Words: 1542 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40697662

technology and social change, and discusses how they are related.

Ever since the prehistoric eras, technology has had a role to play in the lives of human beings. Mankind has invented and perfected means of communicating, traveling, manufacturing goods, curing ailments, growing food, constructing edifies and meeting other requirements using technology. Thus, one may claim that by means of technology, we have transformed our world (ITEA, 1996; ITEA, 2006). At present, all human activities are reliant on different machines with technological dominance being at a record level in the current era. For instance, automobiles have transformed how and where individuals live, and a colossal infrastructure encompassing roads, service stations, bridges, rules and insurance policies has developed. Technology impacts individual participation in the democratic process and successively impacts what must be taken into account for preparing pupils to actively participate in democratic societies (Crowe, 2006).

Most specifically, social change implies the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Crowe, A. R. (2006). Technology, citizenship, and the social studies classroom: education for democracy in a technological age. International Journal of Social Education, 21(1), 111-121.

Howard, P., Busch, L., & Sheets, P. (2010). Comparing Digital Divides: Internet Access and Social Inequality in Canada and the United States. Canadian Journal of Communication, 109-128.

International Technology Education Association. (1996). Technology for All Americans. Reston, VA: Author.

International Technology Education Association. (2006). Technological Literacy for All (2nd Ed.). Reston, VA: Author
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Medical Devices

Words: 1016 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54098253

MedSun

Patton-Fuller Community Hospital

The need for reporting on adverse events related to medical device usage has never before been more salient. Medical technology has certainly been responsible for improving the quality of care, the quality of life, as well as health outcomes. However, at the same time, medical devices are being developed and released at a much faster rate than ever before. To monitor the progress and the safety of these devices, it requires a centralized monitoring system to evaluate outcomes; especially the adverse outcomes. This can allow the monitoring of devices that have issues associated with them in an efficient and effective manner and would give regulators a better opportunity to stop the usage of devices with questionable track records.

The Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) is an adverse event reporting program launched in 2002 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Engleman, D., Rish, S., Powell, T., & Flack, M. (2008). Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun) Collaborates with Medical Product Users to Create Specialty Subnetworks . Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Volume I.

FDA. (N.d.). MedSun: Medical Product Safety Network. Retrieved from U.S. Food and Drug Administration:  http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/Safety/MedSunMedicalProductSafetyNetwork/default.htm 

FDA. (N.d.). MedSun: Subnetworks. Retrieved from U.S. Food and Drug Administration: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/medsun/news/subnetworks.cfm

MedSun. (2014, September). Highlighted Reports. Retrieved from MedSun: Newsletter #99, September 2014: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/medsun/news/newsletter.cfm?news=99#5
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Technology Nursing

Words: 923 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10179217

Nursing

Technology is crucial for healthcare delivery. Healthcare technologies range from those directly related to medical care interventions, namely medical technologies, and technologies that support and enhance care delivery and administration. It is the latter sector that healthcare leader and hospital administrator Jane Doe Francis became interested in after attending a seminar in 2008 on emerging technologies. The seminar inspired Francis to explore the different types of healthcare information technologies, informatics, and options for making administration more efficient, more effective, and error-free. Digital medical records became Francis's passion, and she has spoken about the importance of creating technology standards for American healthcare institutions. Consistency and reliability, as well as confidentiality and privacy, are key concerns for Francis and her colleagues in hospital administration. Currently, Francis is involved with a massive push toward cloud-based medical technologies that go beyond the electronic medical records database to include connectivity with medical technologies themselves…… [Read More]

References

Carr, D.F. (2015). UPMC: New leaders, same big health tech ambitions. Information Week. Retrieved online:  http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/leadership/upmc-new-leaders-same-big-health-tech-ambitions/d/d-id/1318430 

Francis, J.D. (2015). Interview.

Leung, S. (2015). Mass. Business leaders bet on health care tech. The Boston Globe. 4 Feb 2015. Retrieved online: http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2015/02/03/leung/PKOkXUsTSyG3tKGRwvZXnK/story.html
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Technology Evolution Many of the Electric Gadgets

Words: 1461 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93582067

Technology Evolution

Many of the electric gadgets we use today like the cell phones and the home computers were invented in the 80s. Many multinational corporations came into existence in the 80s this spur the growth to a record 3.2% per year (Bellis, 2012). This was the highest nine-year rate in American history. This was occasioned by a number of factors some of which were economic, financial, legislative, and regulatory frameworks. This unprecedented growth led to failure of a number of banking institutions. From these failures, a term "corporate greed" was coined. This essay seeks to enumerate how technology advanced in the 80s (Coppens, 2012).

In 1980, Hepatitis B Vaccine was invented by Baruch Blumberg. This research physician discovered an antigen that provoked antibody response against Hepatitis B Other took queue from this discovery to develop a vaccine against this viral hepatitis. Baruch together with Irving Millman invented a vaccine…… [Read More]

References

Bellis, M. (2012). The 80s -- the technology, science, and innovations. Retrieved October 3, 2012 from http://inventors.about.com/od/timelines/a/modern_4.htm

Coppens, T. (2012). Major Inventions Timelines: 20th Century. Retrieved October 3, 2012 from http://teresacoppens.hubpages.com/hub/Major-Inventions-Timeline-20th-and-21st-

Centuries

Kotelinkova, S. (2012). History of Genetic Engineering. Retrieved October 3, 2012 from http://sgugenetics.pbworks.com/w/page/47775520/The%20History%20of%20Genetic%2
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Technologies Impact on Healthcare Level

Words: 1489 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14958513

This is necessary to provide a seamless platform on which health solutions can be effectively integrated and deployed. Without using such a platform, the development of electronic health care facilities will be more difficult to deploy. In other words, Tele-health is part of the overall healthcare ICT (Information Communications Technology) solutions that enables healthcare to be pushed out to the edge, for local delivery, and to be more evenly, efficiently and effectively distributed.

Broadband communication is the underlying technology of choice when discussing electronic applications. It is certainly important for inter-healthcare provider communications delivering sufficient bandwidth capacity between sites. The delivery of home care electronic should not rely on the broadband technology is not universally accessible, particularly in rural and remote areas, and it can also be prohibitively expensive. Some broadband technologies can be delivered to remote locations, such as satellite-based technology, but this is impractical and too costly to…… [Read More]

References

Goldberg, a. (2002, April 29). Internal Report: Telehealth, Privacy, & Health Care: Review, Expectations & Proposals. Goulston & Storrs, Boston, MA.

Lovata, F. (2000, May 21-24). Telemedicine via the Internet: Successful Program Strategies. American Telemedicine Association Conference,

Puskin, D., Mintzer, C., & Wasem, C. (1997). Chapter 14, Telemedicine: Building Rural Systems for Today and Tomorrow. In P. Brennan, S. Schneider, & E. Tornquist (Eds.), Information Networks for Community Health. (p. 276). Computers in Health Care Series. Springer-Verlag.

Telecommunications: Protecting the Forgotten Frontier. (2001, August). SC Magazine-Info Security News, 12 (8), 36-40.
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Medical Errors Are Preventable Adverse

Words: 1497 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70782223



Conclusions - by the very nature of culture and humanity, humans tend to be group animals -- they thrive in groups, coalesce into groups, indeed, the very process of moving from hunter-gatherer to cities was part of a group behavior. Group norms are internal rulings that are followed by individuals so that the synergistic effect of the group will be more efficient. These values usually focus on the way members of that group look and behavior towards themselves, and the hierarchical structure they tend to set up to "police" their efforts. Norms help groups solve problems, define and address new situations, make better decisions, and even process their daily work. Groups, in this case members of the medical community, join these groups in order to reflect specific notions and values associated with the overall group. Normative behavior in the medical field is covered by a willingness to help, to "do…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Physicians Want to Learn from Medical Mistakes. (2008, January 9). Retrieved November 2010, from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: http://www.ahrq.gov/news/press/pr2008/errepsyspr.htm

Error Disclosure. (2009, March). Retrieved from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: http://psnet.ahrq.gov/primer.aspx?primerID=2

Improving America's Hosptials. (2010, March). Retrieved November 2010, from the Joint Commission's Annual Report on Quality and Safety: http://www.jointcommission.org/NR/rdonlyres/D60136A2-6A59-4009-A6F3-04E2FF230991/0/2010_Annual_Report.pdf

Dewar, D. (2010). Essentials of Health Economics. Philadelphia, PA: Jones and Bartlett.
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Medical ID Theft and Securing Ephi Medical

Words: 617 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73255136

Medical ID Theft and Securing EPHI

Medical Identity Theft

Medical information can be stolen by 1) the bad guys getting sick and using a victim's information to obtain services, 2) friends or relatives use another friend's or relative's information to obtain treatment, 3) when professionals, such as physicians, fabricate services that did not exist, 4) organized crime, and 5) innocent or not so innocent opportunists (Lafferty, 2007). ad guys that get sick can take a victim's insurance information to obtain services for treatment. Professionals can fabricate false claims to cover medical errors. Opportunists have access to patient data and the ability to steal, use, or sell that information.

Effective security requires clear direction from upper management (Whitman). Assigning security responsibilities and access controls with audit controls to organizational elements and individuals helps to place accountability on individuals. They must formulate or elaborate security policies and procedures based on the organizational…… [Read More]

Bibliography

HIPAA Security Series. (n.d.). Retrieved from HHS.gov: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/securityrule/techsafeguards.pdf

Hoffman, S. & . (2007). SECURING THE HIPAA SECURITY RULE. Journal of Internet Law, 10(8), 1-16.

Lafferty, L. (2007). Medical Identity Theft: The Future Threat of Health Care Fraud is Now. Journal of Healthcare Compliance, 9(1), 11-20.

Whitman, M. & . (n.d.). Case B: Accessing and Mitigating the Risks to a Hypothetical Computer System, pages B1-B24 .
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Technology in Nursing History of

Words: 2357 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2678661

(Nursing profession studied) This is clearly not very high, and there does not seem to be a high impact of the change in technology on nurses and their employment.

This leads to a dichotomy in the view about nurses - they are viewed as targets of change rather than the force which leads to changes through proposals, leadership and implementation. This often causes them difficulty in carrying on with their jobs when there are rapid changes within the organization. To save their own position, it is important that nurses learn about change theory, change strategies and methods of anticipation and managing change. This may take place in organizations which wants to change its staff mix so that it can save on costs through inclusion of more unlicensed assistive personnel. These personnel will generally try to maintain their position through direct assertion, but there have to be an analysis of the…… [Read More]

References

Barnard, Alan; Gerber, Rod. (September 1999) "Understanding Technology in Contemporary

Surgical Nursing: A Phenomenographic Examination" Nursing Inquiry.

Vol: 6; No: 3; p. 157.

Barnard, Alan. (May 2000) "Alteration to Will as an Experience of Technology and Nursing"
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Medical Home Model and Health Disparity Nursing

Words: 1107 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51153740

Medical Home Model and Health Disparity

Nursing esearch Proposal

The Impact of the Medical Home Model on Health Disparities

The Impact of the Medical Home Model on Healthcare Disparity

Medical homes are primary care practices where a physician or NP establishes a long-term care relationship with patients and provide patient/family-centered, coordinated, and culturally-sensitive care (AANP, n.d.; Strickland, Jones, Ghandour, Kogan, & Newacheck, 2011). The benefits include improved healthcare access, quality, and safety. A number of states have enacted statutes supporting the medical home model after research findings revealed health disparities for racial and ethnic minorities were reduced (NCSL, 2013).

As a nurse practitioner I am interested in how effective a medical home model would be in reducing healthcare disparities, especially for racial and ethnic minority children residing in underserved communities. Nurse practitioners have traditionally practiced in underserved communities and will continue to do so; therefore, any strategy that could improve…… [Read More]

References

AANP (American Association of Nurse Practitioners). (n.d.). Medicare legislation: Fact sheet: The medical home -- What is it? How do nurse practitioners fit in? Retrieved from: http://www.aanp.org/legislation-regulation/federal-legislation/medicare/68-articles/349-the-medical-home.

Abrams, M., Nuzum, R., Mika, S., & Lawlor, G. (2011). Realizing health reform's potential: How the Affordable Care Act will strengthen primary care and benefit patients, providers, and payers. The Commonwealth Fund. Retrieved from:  http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/Files/Publications/Issue%20Brief/2011/Jan/1466_Abrams_how_ACA_will_strengthen_primary_care_reform_brief_v3.pdf .

NCSL. (2013). Health disparities: State laws. Retrieved from: http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/health-disparities-laws.aspx.

Strickland, B.B., Jones, J.R., Ghandour, R.M., Kogan, M.D., & Newacheck, P.W. (2011). The medical home: Health care access and impact for children and youth in the United States. Pediatrics, 127(4), 604-11.
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Medical Records Case Study Section I Introduction

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77572928

Medical Records Case tudy

ection I (Introduction) -- Liam O'Neill and William Klepack, the authors of Case tudy # 3, Integrating Electronic Medical Records and Disease Management at Dryden Family Medicine, begin their published findings by introducing readers to the concept of electronic medical records (EMR). The authors immediately narrow their focus to the adoption and implementation of EMR by Dryden Family Medicine, a rural family practice located in upstate New York, and explain that "for smaller group practices, electronic medical records (EMR) adoption is a huge undertaking that poses significant risks" (O'Neill and Kleback, 2010). The Introduction section then covers the multitude of obstacles encountered by small group practices attempting to convert to EMR, including the limited information technology experience possessed by most staff members, and the constant concern of budgetary constraints. Finally, the authors seek to clarify the emphasis of their study by stating that their focus remains…… [Read More]

Section III (The Vendor Selection Process) -- This section covers the process employed by Dryden Family Medicine to direct the transition to EMR. The authors begin with the steering committee established in 2002, which was "composed of one physician, the office manager, the nursing supervisor, and the front-desk supervisor" (O'Neill and Kleback, 2010). The issue of vendor fallibility is explored, as the choice of an unprepared or unskilled billing systems provider could easily undermine the practice's 50 years of record keeping. Finally, the reader is guided through the EMR vendor selection process, from the industry trade journals to consultations with fellow family practices that have previously implemented EMR systems.

Section IV (Stages of EMR Implementation) -- This section includes a detailed timeline of the EMR implementation process utilized by Dryden Family Medicine. Found in Table C3.1 and Figure C3.1 are various benchmarks in the EMR adoption process, such as "August 2003 Prescriptions generated electronically and faxed to pharmacies" and "March 2005 Patient education literature is scanned into the system and linked to EMR" (O'Neill and Kleback, 2010). The informative tables are followed by a thorough analysis of the three-stage process used to effectively introduce EMR strategies to Dryden Family Medicine's overall system. The section concludes with a concrete example of EMR-based improvements, as the authors recount a 2005 incident involving the painkiller Bextra and a Food and Drug Administration recall that patients were notified about immediately.

Section V (Impact on Job Responsibilities) -- The purpose of this section is to determine the impact of implementing an EMR system which clearly "resulted in changes in the job descriptions and responsibilities of all members of the practice" (O'Neill and Kleback, 2010). The authors observe several instances involving physician's problematic interaction with
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Technology -- Blessing or Curse

Words: 474 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35198703



Response

Yes, technology generates problems, and it is shrewd and apt to point out that for every net gain to certain members of society via technology there is a net loss. The hand weavers of the 18th century were put out of business by 19th century factories that could manufacture clothing cheaply, computers have probably collectively caused the art of calligraphy to die, and made even professional writers overly reliant on spell check and less willing to rewrite their work from scratch. However, would any of the authors included in the collection summarized in the essay really wish to go back to a world without antibiotics? Technology has enabled people whose vision would be a blur to see with 20/20 perfection, and made travel financially accessible to millions who would have been relegated to the narrow point-of-view of their homes. hile it is easy to find detriments to these benefits…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Vaidhyanathan, Siva. Rewiring the "Nation": The Place of Technology in American

Studies. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 2007.
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Technology in Innovation the Role

Words: 608 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47538234

The cloud computing platform has also made it possible for companies to integrate their information technologies and services into a common strategy; a goal that had not been attainable in the past (Buttol, Buonamici, Naldesi, inaldi, Zamagni, Masoni, 2012).

A second strategic technology that is driving a high level of innovation in organizations is mobility and the rise of mobile computing, incouding the latest generation of operating systems in this area. Apple's iOS, Google's Android and many other operating systems are the foundation of disruptive innovation throughout many enterprises today. The early advances in mobile technologies are a case in point, as are the continued development of medical applications for the Apple iPad (Wickramasinghe, Sharma, Goldberg, 2003). Mobility is also showing the potential to be a technology that can support precise geo-positioning and analysis of the best delivery routes for courier services and supply chain-based companies as well. The rise…… [Read More]

References

Arinze, B., & Anandarajan, M. (2010). Factors that determine the adoption of cloud computing: A global perspective.International Journal of Enterprise Information Systems, 6(4), 55.

Buttol, P., Buonamici, R., Naldesi, L., Rinaldi, C., Zamagni, A., & Masoni, P. (2012). Integrating services and tools in an ICT platform to support eco-innovation in SMEs. Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy, 14(2), 211-221.

Kleis, L., Chwelos, P., Ramirez, R.V., & Cockburn, I. (2012). Information technology and intangible output: The impact of IT investment on innovation productivity. Information Systems Research, 23(1), 42-59,280,282-283.

Nambisan, S., Bacon, J., & Throckmorton, J. (2012). The role of the innovation capitalist in open innovation. Research Technology Management, 55(3), 49-57.
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Technology Blessing or Curse

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99364076

Technology: Blessing or Curse?

Imagine studying machinery that is becoming smaller and smaller every day. What will one discover? This is a hot topic that is on a lot of individuals mind in our society today. People are curious about how it is evolving, and ways to stay current with it. One will discuss whether or not this is a blessing or a curse for technology.

According to a recent study by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, 25% of respondents felt that their family today is closer than their family when they were growing up, thanks to the use of the Internet and cell phones. Only 11% felt technology had made them less close (Ahmad, 2011).

Another study that is worth mentioning in regards to technology. "The Pew study also reported that busy, tech-using families-who are more likely to be dual income households work longer hours-are less likely…… [Read More]

For example, when looking at each location, one will notice that there are significant differences in how it is done on a daily basis, especially with technology. This is the case when it comes to individuals who do have insurances vs. those who do not. Much could get said about this particular set-up in the United Statse because of the lack of consistency (Dale, 1999).

In Boston as well as New Haven care is considered excellent with their technology and services (Far To Here, 2009). The people there do not question the quality provided to them; however, medicare patients located in Boston is twice as much compared to that of New Haven. Despite the cost differnce, not much is diverse about the outcomes of the matter with the patient (Hailpern & P., 2006). This demonstrates that those in New Haven are deprived good healthcare, but this is not the case (Greystone, 2010).

The upscale spending patterns begin at the primary-care level. Primary-care physicians in high-spending areas are more likely to make specialist referrals, order more expensive diagnostic tests (even with minimal potential value), and recommend more-frequent return visits. Even within a single region (and controlling for patient illness characteristics), doctors'
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Technology for the Deaf There

Words: 624 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63187631

188).

Closed Captioning/CAT -- Closed captioning provides an ongoing written transcription of movies, television, and/or stage productions. With new technology, Closed Captioning has moved into Communication Access eal-Tim Translation, or CAT. CAT transcribes spoken words into printed text onto a screen or computer, and is much more interactive and used for not only entertainment, but court or other official meeting presentations (Nomeland, pp. 180-1).

Alert Systems -- Are relatively low-tech; flashing lights when the doorbell rings, vibrating pillows if there is a smoke or burglar alarm, etc. Most of these technologies have been supplanted by more sophisticated applications on smart phones (Nomeland, p. 187).

Internal devices are medically oriented implants that either amplifies sound in those who have a hearing disability or replace some of the inner ear mechanisms to allow the deaf person to actually "hear" sounds. These are becoming more and more sophisticated, some even with computer "smart"…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

The Cochlear Implant Controversy. (February 11, 2009). CBS News Sunday Morning.

Television Show Transcript.

Baron, N 2008, Always on: Language in an Online and Mobile World, Oxford

Univeristy Press, New York.
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Technology Integration Poses New Ethical Dilemmas for Healthcare

Words: 1379 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11065318

Technology Integration Poses New Ethical Dilemmas for Healthcare

Imagine studying the effects of globalization on healthcare. What would one find from his or her research? Is there a possibility that policies need changed? How does this affect one's licensure? One will study in depth this trend and find ways to solve the issues that arise before it is too late.

Within the United States, "globalization of healthcare encompasses both exporting patients (medical tourism) and importing medical services (outsourcing)" (Herrick, 2007). This makes competition increase, which means that what happens in the U.S. could rival that of Japan; consequently, healthcare would have to improve their quality and provide patients with more choices (Herrick, 2007). Whatever the case, many tasks are getting outsourced to those in foreign countries (Herrick, 2007). This includes "long-distance collaboration-incorporating the services of foreign medical staff into the practice of American medical provides" (Herrick, 2007). One has to…… [Read More]

References

Herrick, D. (2007). Medical tourism: Global competition in health care. National Center for Policy Analysis, 1-12.

Hogenbirk, J.C., Brockwayw, P.D., Finleyz, J., & Jennetty, P. (2006). Framework for Canadian telehealth. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 12, 64-70.

Johnson, T. (2010, March 23). Healthcare costs and U.S. competitiveness . Retrieved May 27, 2011, from Council on Foreign Relations: http://www.cfr.org/health-science-and-technology/healthcare-costs-us-competitiveness/p13325.

Smith, S.J. (2010). Introduction to the special issue on technology integration. Learning Disability Quarterly, 240-242.
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Medical Writing Boon and Bane'

Words: 1034 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36094312

These examples highlight that technology is always a tool, a way of enhancing human judgment -- we must not mistake it as a replacement for good nursing practice.

After all, the use of a computer is no substitute for a medical education. Anyone who works in a hospital can see this -- the increased accessibility of information through the Internet also means that patients often come in, convinced that they are suffering from a serious illness, allergy, or condition, based more upon a diagnosis Googled on WebMD, rather than upon the fact that they saw a doctor! If a computer alone was required to diagnose, everyone would have a degree!

Don't get me wrong -- I use technology every day in my life, and thank my lucky stars, and my patient's lucky stars, that it is so ubiquitous. When health care providers wish to communicate, the use of cell phones…… [Read More]

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Technology and Healthcare Please See the Attached

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27000369

Technology and Healthcare

Please see the attached case and answer 1a with it. also answer questions 2 and 3

Implementing a syndromic surveillance system & Case Study 3: Selection of a patient safety strategy

How the projects address current problems in health informatics

One of the most common problems with implementing a new informatics system is creating a cohesive network. In "Case Study 13: Implementing a syndromic surveillance system," all of the hospitals involved in the IT overhaul had different systems, with different vendors and data sets. There were also radically different levels of knowledge and willingness amongst staff members to devote time, money, and manpower to support the new interface. Federal grants would support the initial implementation, but it still needed to be financially sustainable and the staff needed to know how to analyze the data correctly at all of the member hospitals. Each hospital had widely different patient…… [Read More]

References

Anshari, Muhammad & Mohammad Nabil Almunawar. (2011). Evaluating CRM implementation in healthcare organization. International Conference on Economics and Business

Information. IPEDR, 9: 30-34. Retrieved:

 http://www.ipedr.com/vol9/5-I00005.pdf  2011

Electronic medical records (EMR). (2005). Open Clinical. Retrieved:
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Technology Is Good Agree That Technological Process

Words: 1817 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75005823

Technology Is Good agree that technological process is always good. Learning is an important facet of life and without it, we cannot grow. Growth is an important aspect of life. It is human nature to be curious and it is the human spirit to explore. Intelligence increases with each new discovery and with all of the exciting possibilities that technology has to offer, we should look forward with enthusiasm.

This is not to say that, as a society, we will not encounter problems that might arise from the advancement of technology. Just recently, we have seen some of the repercussions of technology with the first so-called cloned human baby. Many people are opposed to technology because of problems just like this. In fact, many people refer to Dr. Frankenstein and his monster whenever technology seems to interfere with moral issues. If we can learn to approach each situation responsibly and…… [Read More]

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Technology Chapter 9 Read Mary Mcclain

Words: 1083 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2762374

Hopefully the school she chooses to attend will have similar resources. Some sources Mary may find useful include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) website [www.ada.gov], the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, which has resources for people who have suffered traumatic brain injury [http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/tbi/tbi.htm].

References

Beard, L.A., Carpenter, L.B., & Johnston, L. (2011). Assistive technology: Access for all students. 2e Kindle edition. Columbus, Ohio: Merrill.

Speaker. 2011. Softonic International. Retrieved from http://speaker.en.softonic.com/

ask 2: Identify 4 web sites that you will continue to utilize as an educator for A or UDL assessment or planning. Please specify why you prefer to use them.

Closing the Gap Solutions [www.closingthegap.com] is an affordable subscription-based resource -- $37.50 per year after a fourteen-day free trial. he site has an electronic journal with articles explaining the use of various Assistive echnology devices and strategies. A searchable resource directory allows the user to search…… [Read More]

The U.S. Department of Education's IDEA website [http://idea.ed.gov] is designed as a "one-stop shop" resource. It features news articles, links to events, a document archive, and many major topics of interest to special educators and anyone who works with this student population. Like the website above, there is the capability for submitting questions. It can be reassuring to have someone to ask when one cannot find the answer being sought. The website is continually updated, so there is new information all the time. When teaching students and families to be advocates, it is a source that a teacher can highly recommend.

A teacher should always be familiar with the offerings of the state department of education website. In the case of California, there is a comprehensive section on the use of assistive technology [http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/se/sr/astvtech.asp]. The site explains assistive technology and the law, and provides a number of links with basic AT resources. As with two of the other sites mentioned, there is a point of contact for users with questions.

All four websites will be useful in my career as a teacher; they provide professional resources I can use and also ones I can recommend to colleagues and families. The sites are dynamic, adding new content as laws change and more information becomes available.
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Technology and Health Information Usage

Words: 6821 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66338022

" (MediLexicon International, Ltd., 2006).

The PCIP was formed from the recognition that high costs and low quality inherent in the Healthcare system of the U.S. is largely due to a system that is antiquated and fragmented (DOHMH, 2006a). The inability to properly collect and use health information is one of the primary problems associated with proper health care maintenance. The PCIP. was formed in response to this need. The primary care physician acts as the conduit between the patient and the healthcare system. However, the physician often has no means to effectively transmit the information that they collect to other entities within the system. The PCIP grew out of a need for the primary health care Physician to be able to transmit the needed information to others in the Healthcare system.

There are three essential parts to the PCIP. The first is the Primary Care Health Information Consortium (PCHIC).…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. (DOHMH) 2006. PCIP. Retrieved August 30 at http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/pcip/pcip.shtml

DOHMH 2006b. Primary Care Health Information Consortium (PCHIC). Retrieved August 30 at http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/pcip/pcip-pchic.shtml.

MediLexicon International, Ltd. (2006). 1,000 New York City Doctors Will Get Electronic Health Records Systems. Retrieved August 30 at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=42483

The American Health Quality Foundation (AHQF)(2006). Quality Improvement Organizations and Health Information Exchange. March 6, 2006. Retrieved August 30 at http://www.ehealthinitiative.org/assets/documents/QIOHIEFinalReportMarch62006.pdf#search=%22Health%20care%20information%20management%20PCIP%22
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Medical Skills Needed to Be

Words: 2203 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74711001



According to the work of Fulford (1994) in an Oxford Practice Skills Project eport "Three elements of practice (ethics, law and communication skills) are approached in an integrated teaching programme which aims to address everyday clinical practice. The role of a central value of patient-centered health care in guiding the teaching is described. Although the final aim of the teaching is to improve the actual practice, we have found three 'sub-aims' helpful in the development of the programme. These sub-aims are: increasing students' awareness of ethical issues; enhancing their analytical thinking skills, and teaching specific knowledge. (Hope, 1994)

In the work of Miles, et al. (1989) entitled "Medical Ethics Education: Coming of Age it is stated that "medical ethics education is instruction that endeavors to teach the examination of the role of values in the doctor's relationship with patients, colleagues and society. It is one form of a broad curricular…… [Read More]

References

Fryer-Edwards, PhD (2005) Tough Talk: Helping Doctors Approach Difficult Conversations - Resources for Teaching- Domains for Small Group Teaching Prelude 3 Department of Medical History and Ethics University of Washington School of Medicine.

Siegler, Mark MD (2001) Lessons from 30 Years of Teaching Clinical Ethics AMA Journal 2001 October.

St. Onge, Joye (1997) Medical Education Must Make Room for Student-Specific Ethical Dilemmas" Canadian Medical Association Journal 15 Apr 1987, 156(8).

Hicks, L. et al. (2001) Understanding the Clinical Dilemmas that Shape Medical Students' Ethical Development: Questionnaire Survey and Focus Group study. BMJ Journal 2001;322-709-71- 24 march 2001.
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Technology for the Deaf His

Words: 3084 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34005990

Three years later, the company improved its picture clarity and introduced the "emotional intonation" feature, considered important components of visual language. ut at present, only 10% of the deaf and hard-of-hearing know about VRS. The Internal Revenue Service refuses to accept VRS calls. And VRS can be performed only with high-speed internet access. ut companies, like Sorenson, provide videophones for free. Those who have no high-speed internet access or a videophone may use IPP relay. It is similar to the outdated TTY but performs faster and more smoothly. The deaf user types his message on a computer.

For the working deaf who need to use the telephone, Able Planet launched the wireless device. This is a telephone and a hands-free set for a cell phone to address these difficulties in the use of a telephone. The technology enables wireless communication with a telecoil in hearing aids. At the same time,…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Associated Press. Hearing Impaired Get Help with Wireless Device. Deseret News:

Deseret News Publishing, 2003. Retrieved on October11, 2009 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4188/is_20030623/ai_n11400486/?tag=content;col1

Bergstein, Brian. IBM Develops Virtual Deaf Interpreter. Oakland Tribune: ANG

Newspapers, 2007. Retrieved on October 11, 2009 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4178/is_20070917/ai_n20504469/?tag=content;col1
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Technology Cochlear Implants a Cochlear

Words: 1573 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7802919

It is not unusual to see cochlear implant users experience improvement for several years after the surgery. Children often improve at a slower pace than adults. A lot of training is needed after implantation to help the child use their new hearing. Most are able to distinguish loud, medium and soft sounds without problem. People have reported that they can perceive different types of sounds, such as footsteps, slamming doors, sounds of engines, ringing of the telephones, barking of dogs, whistling of the tea kettle, rustling of leaves, and the sound of a light switch being switched on and off. There are many patients that report being able to understand speech without having to read lips. Many people can make telephone calls and understand familiar voices over the telephone. Some can even make normal telephone calls and understand an unfamiliar caller on the other end. Not all people who have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cochlear Implants. (2007). Retrieved July 6, 2009, from NIDCD Web site:

http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/coch.asp

Cochlear Implants. (2009). Retrieved July 6, 2009, from FDA Web site:

http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProstheti
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Patient Centered Medical Homes

Words: 3042 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30529280

Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMH) are often confused as being actual "homes" for patients to be admitted in and given medical treatment and care. PCMH is actually a health care model based on which health care is provided to patients, under the supervision of physicians. The PCMH model of health care provides patients with continuous, comprehensive medical care, in order to increase the chances of achieving the goal of benefitting the patient with as much attention and medical care in order to maximize his/her health outcomes.

Over the years the PCMH model of health care has become widely adopted and preferred. This is because of the philosophy and approach that the model adopts in organizing and delivering the health care initiatives. The PCMH model is based upon delivering medical care and attention to patients with team-based health and medical experts that are focused strongly on the quality and the safety…… [Read More]

Bibliography

109-432, P.L. (2006, December 20). TAX RELIEF AND HEALTH CARE ACT OF 2006. Public Law 109-432 (109th Congress) .

Backer, L.A. (2009). Building the Case for the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Family Practice Management 16 (1), 14-18.

De Geest, S., Moons, P., Callens, B., Gut, C., Lindpaintner, L., & Spirig, R. (2008). Introducing advanced practice nurses/nurse practitioners in health care systems: a framework for reflection and analysis. Swiss Medical Weekly (138), 621-628.

NASHP. (2013, April). Medical Home & Patient-Centered Care. Retrieved from The National Academy for State Health Policy: http://www.nashp.org/med-home-map
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Use of U S Technology in Thai Hospitals

Words: 4145 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35270598

U.S. technology in Thai hospitals will have a positive, negative or neutral effect on the mortality rate of patients in Thailand. U.S. hospitals currently offer patients some of the most modern and complex technology available. Patients whether at private or public facilities are very often afforded modern urgent care that reduces the likelihood of mortality from common and less common illness. The mortality ratio, or comparison of patients admitted vs. discharged in most U.S. hospitals is close to or less than 1.00 (Comaro, 2003).

In Thailand hospitals, modern technology used in community hospitals is somewhat limited and typically consists of the use of X-ay technology and ultrasound for imaging and diagnosis (Dionson, 2003). Many community hospitals currently lack the advanced technology available in U.S. hospitals that has been proven to save lives. There are several private institutions within Thailand however, that do offer more advanced technology.

However, Thai hospitals historically…… [Read More]

References

Alreck, P.L., & Settle, R.B. (1995). The survey research handbook." Chicago, Irwin.

Abbot. (2003) Abbot Laboratories Systems and Tests. Retrieved November 13, 2003, http://www.abbottdiagnostics.com/systems_tests/syscat.cfm?syscat_id=3&path=1

Andrews, Charles G. (2003). Comparative Analysis of Management. Retrieved November 16, 2003, at http://www.coe.unt.edu/allen/Dissertation-Example/CharlieAndrewsdissertation.pdf

Boyer, K.K., Olson, J.R., Calantone, R.J., & Jackson, E.C. (2002). Print vs. electronic surveys: A comparison of two data collection methodologies. Journal of Operations Management, 20 (4), 357-373.
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Access to Technology Is Use

Words: 2360 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87042323



The fourth is invading privacy an example for this is having an access to your credit card number while you are having transaction using the Internet this is done usually by many hacker in the Internet.

The fifth is that technology increase delinquency in children attitude this is the cause of most violent computer games nowadays in our country. Even though computer games give fun and entertainment for children it also give some bad benefits especially to their attitude because most of them become aggressive if they are playing such type of computer games.

The sixth is manipulation of the truth; one example for this is the issues and information that we have in the web. This is usually happen to the person that is very famous to the country.

Lastly, pornography which is usually happen to the web that even children can have an access to that without even…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Critical Issue: Using Technology to Improve Student Achievement." North Central Regional Educational Laboratory. 1999. North Central Regional Educational Laboratory. 9 Nov. 2004. http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/methods/technlgy/te800.htm

Definition of Technology." 8 Nov. 2004. http://www.bergen.org/technology/defin.html

Life Lessons: Studying Education's Effect on Health." Center for the Advancement of Health. 2001.Center for the Advancement of Health. 9 Nov. 2004. http://www.cfah.org/factsoflife/vol7no12.cfm

Technology and its Effect to Society." Technology and its Effect on Society. 1990. James C. Graves, Jr. 10 Nov. 2004. http://home.xnet.com/~ansible/graves.hist.html
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Genetics Technology

Words: 2679 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77976389

Genetics Technology

WHERE THE UCK STOPS

Interdisciplinary Team

This will consist of a physician, a geneticist, an ethicist, a lawyer or legal practitioner, and a health care provider. The physician or pediatrician will make the diagnosis (of Tay-Sachs), the geneticist, as a specialist, will provide more specific information on genetic diseases, particularly Tay-Sachs, as to causes and risks, prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The physician and geneticist can together form a plan of care for the nurse's implementation. The ethicist will provide information on the accepted moral values of correct human conduct, behavior and decisions involved in dealing with Tay-Sachs disease. The lawyer or legal practitioner will inform the parties on current laws and court decisions covering or affecting the management of these genetic disorders. And the nurse who will carry out the detailed instructions of the geneticist and the physician and incorporate the guidelines provided by the lawyer into these…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

CEJA (1991). Ethical issues in carrier-screening of cystic fibrosis and other genetic disorders. CEJA Report. Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs: American Medical

Association. Retrieved on October 24, 2011 from http://www.ama-ass.org/ama/pub/upload/mm/369/ceja_1191.pdf

Committee on Bioethics (2001). Ethical issues with genetic testing in pediatrics. Vol 107

# 6 Pediatrics: American Academy of Pediatrics. Retrieved on October 24, 2011 from http://aapolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/pediatrics.107/6/1451
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Assistive Technology What Is the

Words: 4146 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50166555

Many of the answers used to hold workers with disabilities can also crack work-related problems of older workers. But older workers would not point out that they are disabled, even though they may come across functional limitations that are comparable to those met by persons with disabilities. Elder workers with vision, hearing, dexterity, memory, attention, standing, and/or sitting disabilities may come across difficulties on the job. There are a range of AT aids and other useful products available to tackle the issues that older workers may experience. (Assistive Technology and Aging)

6. Describe a process as to how assistive technology devices will be transferred to and/or purchased by another agency to support postsecondary activities

Once the nature of the needs have been identified, you can then look at the appropriate assistive technology devices and services. It is also important, that most technologically advanced system may not be the best solution.…… [Read More]

References

"A framework for assistive technology planning" (2002) Education Tech Points. Retrieved from http://www.edtechpoints.org/manual.htm Accessed on 20 February 2005

"Assistive Technology and Aging" Virginia Assistive Technology System. Retrieved from  http://www.vats.org/aging.htm  Accessed on 20 February 2005

Assistive Technology Fact Sheet #2. (November 30, 2004) Department of Public Instruction and Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative. Retrieved from http://www.wati.org/BestPractices/factsheet2.html Accessed on 20 February 2005

'Assistive Technology: What is it?" Massachusetts Department of Education. Retrieved from http://library.thinkquest.org/11799/data/assistech.html Accessed on 20 February 2005
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New Technology the Best Cure

Words: 13809 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56996011

Taken in isolation, some of the new, minimally-invasive procedures are less expensive by far, when analyzed on a procedure-by-procedure basis, than previous significant surgical interventions, as demonstrated below:

Procedure

Cost

Estimated duration of 'cure'

CAG

5-7 years

PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention

3-5 years

ased on the above analysis, it would appear to be clear that a PCI is more cost-effective than CAG procedures. This may not be true when all costs are considered, however. The logic of comparison needs to include additional factors than the 'cure' period and the direct procedural costs.

CAG cost discussion

CAG can vary from a simple mammary artery, single bypass to a 3- to 5-vessel bypass graft operation with the use of saphenous vein grafts from the leg. Many of the single-artery bypass operations have been overtaken by PCI in the past few years, as the need to 'open' single vessels has been taken in…… [Read More]

Bibliography: Note -- these are additional articles which I included, which you may wish to delete.

Chen, J. a. (2008). Treatment of Restenotic Drug-Eluting Stents: Ultrasound Analysis... Recurrent Coronary Stent Thromboses and Myocardial Infarctions. J of Invasive Cardiology, n.p.

Economist. (2007). 2008 World Almanac. London: Economist.

Edwards. (2008). PVT valve. Retrieved February 13, 2008, from Edwards: www.edwards.com

Glassman, a. (2007). Depression and cardiovascular comorbidity. Dialogues Clinical Neuroscience, 9-17.
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Individualized Innovations and Technology in Healthcare

Words: 4367 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88476501

Personal Healthcare Technology

Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center and the Sunrise Children's Hospital

The Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center, which includes the Sunrise Children's Hospital, is an approximately 55-year-old facility located in Southern Nevada; it serves the greater Las Vegas area and the surrounding communities. The Sunrise Health and Medical Center is proud of its quality initiatives to ensure patient safety and comfort, including direct approaches to pharmaceutical safety such as safe medication dosing via smart pump technology, and bar coding on medications. As well, the Sunrise Health and Medical Center does not discriminate with respect to HIV / AIDS or in any manner related to employment, program participation, admission and/or treatment.

Sunrise has been rated as the most popular area hospital for 15 years in patient surveys. As well, Sunrise Health and Medical Center has developed community outreach programs for health education in a variety of areas, often based…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Appari, A., & Johnson, M.E. (2010). Information security and privacy in healthcare: Current state of research. International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management, 6 (4), 279-314. Retrieved from http://www.ists.dartmouth.edu/library/501.pdf

Ayanian, J.Z., & Weissman, J.S. (2002). Teaching hospitals and quality of care: A review of the literature. The Milbank Quaterly, 80(3), 569-593. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2690120/pdf/milq0080-0569.pdf

Baker, J.J., & Baker R.W. (2000). Health care finance: Basic tools for nonfinancial managers. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen

Byington, R., Keene, R., Masini, D. (2006). The impact of federal and state funding levels on strategic decisions and how those decisions affect patient care. The Internet Journal of Healthcare Administration. (4)2. Retrieved from https://ispub.com/IJHCA/4/2/5827
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Electronic Medical Health Records Utilizing Electronic

Words: 5456 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39373512

However, because they make billing more efficient, the majority of large urban practice groups and hospitals have already made the switch to electronic records, according to Michael R. Costa, attorney and associate at Greenberg Traurig, LLP, in oston, Mass. However, he adds, most of these organizations maintain warehouses where they store paper records that have been transcribed to electronic form. "There is resistance from some about going to a completely electronic format because there are still some questions about privacy," Costa says. "There is definitely still a place for paper-based medical records, but the focus from now on will be on making sure that information can be adequately secured" (Fiske).

Frederick Geilfuss, partner in the health law department of Foley & Lardner, in Milwaukee, Wis. says that while many larger providers have already begun the shift, he has not encountered any institutions that have made a complete transition -- an…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ball, Marion, Carla Smith and Richard Bakalar. "Personal Health Records: Empowering Consumers." Journal of Healthcare Information Management (2007): 76-83.

Brenner, Bill. "Secure Electronic Medical Records: Fact or Fiction?" 3 March 2009. The Standard. 10 April 2009 .

Bright, Beckey. "Benefits of Electronic Health Records." 29 November 2007. The Wall Street Journal. 10 April 2009 http://hfs.illinois.gov/assets/ilhie_112907.pdf

Byers, Jay. "Medical Records Scanning: Convert your paper-based patient records into electronic records." December 2008. EMR Services of Canada. 9 April 2009 .
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Porter's 5 Forces Analysis of the Medical Devices Industry in Australia

Words: 555 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54343627

Porters Australia

Porters Five Forces Analysis of Medical Devices in Australia

Threat of New Competition -- Medium

The threat of new competition in the medical devices industry is believed to be at a medium level. This is primarily due to the fact that this industry is heavily regulated and must comply with legislation such as the Therapeutic Goods Act of 1989 (Department of Health and Ageing, 2011). The regulatory environment acts as a deterrent for many potential competitors. However, given the profitability potential in the industry, there is still a significant threat from new competitors as many firms will tackle the regulations.

Threat of Substitute Products -- High

It was identified that there is a significant threat to most medical devices in the Australian market. Australia is an advanced economy with a great deal of innovation that floods the market with quality products. Although not all medical devices can be…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AusMedtech, 2011. Australian Medical Technology. [Online]

Available at:  http://www.ausbiotech.org/content.asp?pageid=109 

[Accessed 20 February 2012].

Consumers Health Forum of Australia, 2007. Information Paper. [Online]
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Market Model Changes the Medtech or Medical

Words: 865 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11539350

Market Model Changes

The medtech, or medical technology, industry is a large and intensely competitive industry that produces highly innovative medical devices for hospitals and other healthcare facilities in the effort to save lives and improve health for patients (Research, 2012). It is spread across different segments including, cardiology, oncology, neuro, orthopedic, and aesthetic devices. It relies largely on aging baby boomers, high unmet medical needs, and increased incidence of lifestyle diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

The industry is being challenged by pricing concerns, hospital admissions and procedural volume, uncertainty concerning healthcare reform, Medicare reimbursement issues as agencies are looking for cost reduction measures, and regulatory overhang. There is a rise in patients deferring treatment in elective procedures. "One factor aligning economic and clinical forces: in the U.S., the number of medical practices owned by hospitals grew from 25% in 2005 to 50% in 2008" (practice, 2011).…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Blog, I. (2012, Mar 12). MedTech Industry Stock Outlook. Retrieved from Financial Content: http://markets.financialcontent.com/stocks/news/read/20832505/MedTech-Industry-Stock-Outlook

practice, B.G. (2011, Feb 9). Creating a new commercial model for the changing medtech market. Retrieved from Bain & Company: http://www.bain.com/publicatgions/articles/creating-a-commercial-model-for-changing-medtech-market.aspx

Research, Z.E. (2012, June 15). MedTech Industry Stock Outlook-June 2012-Zacks Analyst Interviews. Retrieved from Nasdaq: http://community.nasdaq.com/News/2012-06/medtech-industry-stock-outlook-june-2012-zachs-analysts-interviews.aspx?
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An Analysis of Four Medical Codes of Ethics

Words: 2329 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87063768

Institutional Code of Ethics

Today, the healthcare industry is faced with rising costs, increasing regulation and growing numbers of patients with age-related conditions as the Baby Boomer segment of the U.S. population enters their retirement age. Combined with innovations in medical technologies, these trends have created the need for codes of ethics that can provide clinicians and employees with the general guidelines they need to resolve the wide range of day-to-day ethical dilemmas that are endemic to the healthcare profession. For this purpose, the American Medical Association (AMA) publishes a code of medical ethics and many public and private sector hospitals likewise maintain codes of ethics for their clinicians and employees. To gain some fresh insights into these issues, this paper reviews the literature to provide an analysis of the specific requirements of a code of ethics, three critical elements of the AMA's code that are deemed the most important…… [Read More]

References

AMA code of medical ethics. (2013). American Medical Association. Retrieved from http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/physician-resources/medical-ethics/code-medical-ethics.page.

Baker, R. & Emanuel, L. (2000, July). The efficacy of professional ethics. The Hastings Center Report, 30(4), 13.

Doran, E. & Fleming, J. (2015, January 1). Managing ethical issues in patient care and the need for clinical ethics support. Australian Health Review, 39(1), 44-47.

Greenville Memorial Hospital code of ethics. (n.d.). Greenville Health Systems. Retrieved from http://cloudfront.greenvillehealthsystem.net/docs/greenville-health-system-code-of-excellence-employee.pdf.
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Clinical Journal Leadership Nursing Medical-Surgical

Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10650151

The nurse must 'read' the patient's personality, and know whether acting firm or sensitive is the best way to deal with the individual. A nurse must always comport herself in a professional manner, but needs to take a different tone with a child vs. An adult; a person in a dissociated state vs. A man experiencing chest pains. Communications decisions, much like medical decisions, must often be undertaken in a split second. The first few minutes of the encounter can set the tone of the entire client-nurse interaction, even the tone of the patient's entire experience on the unit.

Effective communication is also required with other healthcare professionals on the unit, including but not limited to doctors, other nurses, and physician's assistants. 'Triage' -- deciding what patients and procedures are of highest priority, establishing standard operating procedures to deal with being short-staffed, and using time and resources in an effective…… [Read More]

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Ethics Reproductive Technologies - There

Words: 768 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62174015

The next objection of IVF separating the procreation and marital aspects of marriage and in the end damaging the marital relationship was totally untrue in this case. This couple had a very strong relationship and going through the process of gestational surrogacy strengthen their martial relationship as opposed to damaging it. The last objection of adoption is a better answer to the trouble of childlessness may very well be true for a lot of people. One cannot argue the fact that there are a lot of children out there that need to have good homes and there are many couples that could benefit tremendously from this avenue. But in the case of the couple in this article the idea of having a biological child was something that was very strong from them, thus making the path that they took the best one for them.

IVF, just like many other things…… [Read More]

References

Kuczynski, Alex. 2008. "Her Body, My Baby." Web. 5 July 2011. <

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/30/magazine/30Surrogate-t.html?_r=2&pagewanted=1>

Singer, Peter. IVF: The Simple Case. Biomedical Ethics. By Degrazia, David, Mappes,

Thomas A. And Brand-Ballard, Jeffrey. 2010. 7th ed. Columbus: McGraw-Hill. 2010.
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Swedish Medical Center Case Study

Words: 3071 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34419998



omen's Health -- Focused on prevention and care for breast health, mammography, etc.

Transplant Programs - Swedish is one of seven kidney transplant centers and one of just four liver transplant centers serving the entire Pacific Northwest. The Organ Transplant Program at Swedish is at the forefront of new advances in transplantation surgery, including pancreas transplants and transplants between unrelated living organ donors and recipients (Swedish Medical Center, 2011).

Service design, operational activities, strategic decisions- Swedish is nothing but on the move -- strategically and tactically. In October, 2011, Swedish opened a new full-care facility with a 550,000 square foot campus in the city of Issaquah, southeast of Seattle city proper. This new facility was designed to be an entirely new hospital experience. Some of the operational innovations include a new Childbirth Center with eight new Labor/Delivery/Recovery rooms that include sleeping areas for partners, iPod access and a hotel room…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arnold, E. (2007). Service-Dominant Logic and Resource Theory. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Sciences, 36(1), 21-24.

Crosby, J. (2011, November). Human Resource - Swedish Hospital.

Institute of Medicine. (2000). To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

King, D. (2008). Designing the Digital Experience: How to Use Experience Design. Medford, NJ: Information Today Press.
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Effect of Technology on the Cost of Healthcare

Words: 607 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9818612

Supply and Demand theory show up in your company's strategies?

In sharp contrast to the need for health care services, demand is associated with the costs of health care services. It is therefore reasonable to suggest that Smith's (2011) assertions concerning the demand for health care increasing if its costs were reduced is accurate, and it also reasonable to conclude that companies of all sizes and types can become more competitive by reducing their costs. Indeed, it health care could be provided cheaply enough, there would be no need for health care insurance because pocket change would cover a visit to the emergency room and no one would have to forego other necessities of life such as food or heat in order to have a prescription filled. According to Smith (2011), "Such a world could only be achieved by changes on the supply side. Health care would have to become…… [Read More]

References

Smith, K. (2011, June 1). Make health care cheap. The Washington Post. Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/post/make-health-care-cheap/2011 / 06/01/AGdr2MGH_blog.html%22%20http:/www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra- klein/post/make-health-care-cheap/2011/06/01/AGdr2MGH_blog.html.
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Technology Decision Making Effect of Technology Decision

Words: 2527 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72232227

Technology Decision Making

Effect of technology decision making

Technology has been growing over a period of years due to globalization. All individuals, organizations, and even the society as a whole have been affected by the information and communication uprising. This has even changed their lifestyles. The Information is readily available in the computers mostly through internet technology and telecommunications. The Organizations are able to build their information systems in a variety of formats. A System may be defined as a sequence of functional components which are connected by communication links showing or demonstrating purpose and objective directed performance (Kampov 2010). However, it is important to analyze and discuss systems, informatics theories and DIK model. The paper will also discuss the role of expert system in nursing care, use of decision aids and also the decision support systems. There will be discussion on how the effect of technology on decision making…… [Read More]

References

Bahamonde L., DuMouchel W, Shea S . (2003). A meta-analysis in16 randomized controlled trials for evaluating computer-based clinical reminder systems in preventive care for ambulatory setting. J Am Med Inform Asso. c;3:399-409

Greenes R.A. (2009). Informatics and a health care strategy for the future -- general directions. Studies In Health Technology AndInformatics [Stud Health Technol Inform], Vol. 149, pp. 21-8; PMID: 19745469

Hart J. K, Newton B. W, Boone S.E. (2010).University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic healthrecord and medical informatics training for undergraduatehealth professionals. Journal Of The Medical Library Association: JMLA [J Med Libr AssocVol. 98 (3), pp. 212-6.

Kampov J. (2010). Survey of biomedical and health care informatics programs in the United States. Journal of Medical Library Association.
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Medical Records System Definition of

Words: 3005 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30994463

The master patient index (MPI) value was mainly liked by the personnel in the medical record section.

The Golden 90s

Equipped with MPI and record-keeping growth, software designers sustained to generate and progress with a new emphasis on individual hospital sections. Auxiliary department purposes, for example radiology and laboratory showed to be fairly adaptive to software that is fresh and innovative, and computer healthcare applications start to show on the market. Patient test outcomes that instigated in the laboratory and radiology department now too were obtainable via computers nonetheless again with limit as the outcomes were separate and were not linked to one another, or to any other software for instance that being done with the patient registration. A lot of these applications had basically been marked as "source" governments, and they were not courteous to assembly athwart the healthcare aptitude. This is the state that mechanization in healthcare found…… [Read More]

References:

Holden, R.J. (2011). Cognitive performance-altering effects of electronic medical records: An application of the human factors paradigm for patient safety. Cognition, Technology & Work, 13(1), 11-29.

Kaliyadan, F., Venkitakrishnan, S., Manoj, J., & Dharmaratnam, a. (2009). Electronic medical records in dermatology: Practical implications. Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, 75(2), 157-61.

Kochevar, J., Gitlin, M., Mutell, R., Sarnowski, J., & Mayne, T. (2011). Electronic medical records: A survey of use and satisfaction in small dialysis organizations. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 38(3), 273-81.

Kurbasic, I., Pandza, H., Masic, I., Huseinagic, S., Tandir, S., Alicajic, F., & Toromanovic, S. (2008). The advantages and limitations of international classification of diseases, injuries and causes of death from aspect of existing health care system of B&H. Acta Informatica Medica, 16(3), 159.
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Technology in Nursing Impacting Medication Administration

Words: 1541 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38427021

Medication changes with technology: A description and detailed review of five clinical electronic systems that correlate with the process of medication administration technology.

Computerized physician / prescribed order entry (CPOE)

In 2000, following the huge spate of accidental death (approximately 2 million) that occurred nationwide, the Department of Health Services (DHS) surveyed hospitals in California regarding the nexus of patient safety and technology and which technological system they had it in mind to procure by 2005.

46% of the hospitals surveyed rated the computerized physician / prescribed order entry (CPOE) as their preferred technological system since it helps the prescribing clinician enter the medication order directly into the system (Spurlock, et al., 2003). The CPOE, moreover, can instantly detect any error in the prescription as well as employing various levels of decisions support to detect errors to situations that could have led to an error in the prescription (such as…… [Read More]

References

Spurlock, B. et al. (2003) Legislating Medication Safety: The California Experience. Convergence Health Consulting.

http://www.premierinc.com/quality-safety/tools-services/safety/safety-share/12-03-downloads/04-CA-med-safety-tech-legislation.pdf

Health Information Technology (2009) Electronic medication administration records improved communication and decision-making in nursing homes http://www.ahrq.gov/research/jul09/0709RA29.htm

Institute of Medicine (2001). Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. The National Academies Press. http://www.nap.edu/books/0309072808/html.
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Technology on Disruptive Behavior What

Words: 5645 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88322181

The teachers acknowledge that the other disruptive behaviors propagates the destruction of the school property therefore computer-based management results in the upstaging of the security of the school properties. This eminent vandalism is prominent in the cases where the students would like to have money selling the school properties.

The teachers separately attribute the poor morals of the students to inexperience and the ignorance of the students. Involving of computer-based programs in the student behavior management clears the doubt in the effectiveness of the management of the issues entailed. The perspective to the approach assists in the enhancement of the Developmental period of the basis of the Phase learner. They view the approach to increase the contact between the teacher and the student in the countering of the trends emergent in the process. They attribute the computer approach to the advancement in the mastery of the life skills for the…… [Read More]

References

Dziegielewski, S.F. (2010). DSM-IV-TR in action. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

O'Donnell, a.M., Reeve, J., & Smith, J.K. (2011). Educational psychology: Reflection for action. Hoboken, N.J: Wiley.

Spiegler, M.D., & Guevremont, D.C. (2010). Contemporary behavior therapy. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Leaman, L. (2009). Managing very challenging behaviour. New York: Continuum
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Medical Examiners

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41503664

medical examiners of years past to the current technological advancements of medical examiners today. The earliest medical examiners were called coroners, and they still exist in some areas of the United States, although they have largely been replaced by medical examiners. Medical examiners are licensed physicians trained in pathology and death investigation.

In the past, coroners had much more power than they do today. They were more involved in criminal justice, and could even arrest prisoners and set their bail. They were not paid a salary, but paid for each inquest they conducted. They were also open to bribes and embezzlement, since they did not receive a salary. Families would offer bribes to cover up suicides, and politicians would offer bribes to cover up embarrassing accidents or other deaths that might impact their political careers. One New York City coroner said, "A few of the coroners, and let me emphasize…… [Read More]

References

Timmermans, Stefan. "Postmortem: How Medical Examiners Explain Suspicious Deaths." University of Chicago Press. 2006. 2 Oct. 2009.
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Technology Has Revolutionized Society Communication Transportation Commerce

Words: 1736 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84215378

technology has revolutionized society: communication, transportation, commerce, and especially medicine. . Ironically, for centuries and still in Oriental Medicine, healthcare was and is tailored to the individual. Even the Greek Physician Hippocrates wrote that he prescribed sweet elixirs to some and astringents to others depending on their individual condition (Pray, 2008). 21st century medicine, though, is more about an individual person's genetic code, and is made possible by advances in genetic technology and engineering. This is partially due to the Human Genome Project, a massive program completed in 2003 that focused on the identification of the individual genes that make up human DNA with the overall hope that it would initiate genomic medicine -- healthcare delivered based on the individual's medical history and genetic profile (About the Human Genome Project, 2011). Traditionally, medicine diagnoses human illnesses based on quantitative and qualitative signs and symptoms. With the advent of genetic technology,…… [Read More]

References

About the Human Genome Project. (2011, September 19). Human Genome Management Information Systems. Retrieved from: http://www.ornl.gov/sci/techresources / Human_Genome/project/about.shtml

Gattaca. (1997, March). Retrieved from International Movie Database:  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119177/ 

Personalized Medicine - An Overview. (2011, January 11). Retrieved from: U.S. News Health report: http://health.usnews.com/health-conditions/cancer/personalized-medicine

Public Law 110-223. (2008). The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008. Retrieved from: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-110publ233/content-detail.html
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Technology Updates the Cost of Technological Advances

Words: 1443 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88902659

Technology Updates

The Cost of Technological Advances

The development of technological advances has been significant in the last 50 years but more so in the last 30. According to Moore an early pioneer in silicone technology, the capacity for engineering technology innovation is clearly rapid. Moore set a benchmark for silicone technology claiming that capacity would double the number of transistors on a chip, which determines the capacity for memory every 24 months. This law served as a standard for Intel and other chip manufacture companies, creating a demonstrative goal that was followed almost to the letter from its inception to now (Intel, 2011). This rapid advancement of technology has made many functions and aspects of technology capabilities possible as computers and servers can process more and more tasks and information more rapidly than ever. The result of these advances has been both an extreme learning curve cost as well…… [Read More]

References

Ford, G.C. (2012, January 15). Demand for allied health professionals creating shortages.

Gazette, The (Cedar Rapids, IA).

Staff Writer (March 17, 2012) Stockton bankruptcy: City would be largest in American history to declare bankruptcy. Huff Post, San Francisco, CA.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/23/stockton-bankruptcy-biggest-in-american-history_n_1298055.html 

Intel. (2011). Moore's Law inspires Intel innovation. Retrieved from http://www.intel.com/about/companyinfo/museum/exhibits/moore.htm
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Medical Home Concept and Describe the Principles

Words: 1055 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56730739

medical home concept and describe the principles (operational characteristics mentioned above) of the PC-MH as defined by these organizations. How does this concept differ from the gatekeeper concept of Managed Care Organizations?

According to the 'gatekeeper' philosophy of health management organizations (HMOs), physicians are intentionally given incentives to reduce access to care. This is based upon the assumption that patients will want to obtain as much care as they can receive and physicians will want to bestow that care to please patients and incur more revenue. HMOs encourage physicians to do the opposite and often financially reward physicians for cost reductions and limiting access of patients to specialists or heroic treatments. In the HMO model, physicians try to restrict access to specialists when they do not deem it necessary.

In contrast, the medical home concept is viewed as a partnership between "individual patients, and their personal physicians, and when appropriate,…… [Read More]

References

Case for change to the PC-MH Model (2011). American Dietetic Association.

Retrieved October 19, 2011 at http://www.eatright.org/HealthProfessionals/content.aspx?id=7059

Joint Principles of the Patient-Centered Medical Home. (2007). American Academy of Family

Physicians (AAFP). American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). American College of Physicians (ACP). American Osteopathic Association (AOA)
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Technology Underlying Healthcare Information and Determine the

Words: 1037 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69509401

technology underlying healthcare information and determine the most pressing need for innovation.

Technology in any field is critical, but in healthcare, because of the importance of the product, it is even more important. Healthcare information technology is a way for different departments within an organization to talk to one another about a specific person and their needs, or it can even be between organizations. Whatever the need, there are going to be issues that need to be corrected.

Probably the biggest issue with any type of technology is error, and, generally, that error is due to the operator. If a wrong number is entered into a system, or an operator makes some other type of error, it can be detrimental to the patient. Therefore, one of the most pressing issues as far as information technology is concerned is operator training. Without an adequate training program, an organization cannot be sure…… [Read More]

References

Herrick, D.M., Gorman, L., & Goodman, J.C. (2010). Health information technology: Benefits and problems. National center for Policy Analysis, 327. Retrieved from  http://www.ncpa.org/pdfs/st327.pdf 

PCA Cares. (2012). Service details. Retrieved from http://www.pcacares.org/ServiceDetail.aspx?service=West+Oak+Lane+NORC+I initiative+-+Information+%26+Referral

Skinner, R.I. (2003). The value of information technology in healthcare . Frontiers of Health Services Management, 19(3), 3-16.
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Technologies the One Thing That Clearly Defines

Words: 820 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76083832

Technologies

The one thing that clearly defines our modern world is technological revolution. People around the globe stand to benefit from manifold advantages of technologies in all realms of our personal and professional lives. While the opponents of this great technological revolution have some very valid and sound arguments in favor of their stance, I personally believe that no technology can ever be solely negative in nature, it all depends on the way we use it since technologies are primarily meant to benefit mankind. In my assessment of the impact of technologies, I have found that its advantages significantly outweigh its disadvantages.

Technologies have definitely had a positive impact on our personal lives. Internet, telephone, television and such other technologies have dramatically changed our lives so much so that a life without them is inconceivable. These technologies have enhanced quality of our lives by sharing our workload and helping us…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

1) Albert, Harry. The Ins and Outs of buying online, Grounds Maintenance, 01-01-2001

2) Ellen Brockley, Amber Cai, Rebecca Henderson, Emanuele Picciola and Jimmy Zhang, The Next Technological Revolution: Predicting the Technical Future and its Impact on Firms, Organizations and Ourselves. A paper prepared for the MIT Sloan School's 50 thAnniversary Celebrations, Retrieved online 19th February 2004, http://mitsloan.mit.edu/50th/techrevpaper.pdf

3) Janaro, Richard Paul; Altshuler, Thelma Art of Being Human. HarperCollins Publishers December 1992
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Medical Coding

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5515484

health information technology occupation and conduct a search of the Internet, consult professional

Thorough Job Details: Although there are not an abundance of qualifications that an individual must have to earn a position as a professional medical coder, there are several different avenues to pursue them. Candidates typically must have graduated high school or earned the equivalency of a high school diploma. Once they have completed this step, they can satisfy the general education requirements in a couple of different ways: either by earning an associate's degree or a postsecondary certification in health information technology or in a related field. Certificate programs typically last less than a year, whereas associate's degree programs are generally two years of full time study. The completion of these courses usually qualifies individuals to begin working within the field of medical records and health information technology as a medical coder. It is also permissible for…… [Read More]

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2014). Medical records and health information technicians. www.bls.gov. Retrieved from  http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Healthcare/Medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm 

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2014). Medical and health services manager. www.bls.gov. Retrieved from  http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm
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Technologies the Recent Changes to

Words: 727 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55250122

This will allow sufficient time to integrate the different it support functions together. At the same time, the staff members can be highly trained in using this protocol. Next, administrators need to monitor these changes and the impact they are having on addressing these issues. This will allow for any kind of adjustments to be made in the strategy. Once the process has been streamlined is when this protocol could be introduced to the entire facility. (Michael, 2006) (Noimanee, 2007, pp. 80 -- 92)

The biggest risks associated with using this kind of technology is that the security and storage of personal information could be compromised. If this were to happen, it could give hackers unprecedented access to the location of staff members and employees inside the hospital. At the same time, they could use this as a way to look up personal information about patients or employees. (Michael, 2006)…… [Read More]

References

Michael, K. (2006). The Emerging Ethics. Facility of Informatics.

Noimanee, S. (2007). The Vital Signs Data Monitoring. WSEAS Transaction on Biology, 6 (4), 80 -- 92.
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Medical Records

Words: 499 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63667855

EMR

Electronic Medical Records

Electronic Medical Record (EMR) keeping can definitely add efficiency into the modern healthcare system. However, this efficiency might be associated with some hidden costs. One example of such a cost will be due to the loss of privacy that is allowed by shared records. Not only will doctors be able to see your entire medical history, but other agencies that you might not want to share information with will have access as well. Therefore, there are both advantages and disadvantages associated with the move to a digital system.

"Imagine a world where everything important about a patient is known to the physician the first time that patient presents," says Andrew Rubin, vice president for NYU Medical Center Clinical Affairs and Affiliates in New York City (Mann, N.d.).

Doctors have full access to a patient's medical health history has the potential to reduce errors and improve patient…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Mann,, . D. (N.d.). Technology Plays Key Role in Health Care Reform. Retrieved from WebMD:  http://www.webmd.com/health-insurance/technology-plays-key-role-in-health-care-reform
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Technology in the Classroom to

Words: 1375 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72617322

As students interact with the website and take assessments, the teacher is notified of the student's progress. Once the student submits his assessment, Molecular Workbench (2010) reports, "SAM activities end by generating a report that includes answers to multiple choice questions, annotated snapshots, and the text of open responses. These reports are emailed to the teacher. Students have a chance to edit reports before they are submitted." Use of this website could produce the next generation of scientists.

Technology used directly in the classroom to allow students and teachers to interact with each other includes the Audience Response System. According to Turningtechnologies.com (2010) the function of the system is declared, "TurningPoint audience response system integrates 100% into Microsoft® PowerPoint® and allows audiences and students to participate in presentations or lectures by submitting responses to interactive questions using a ResponseCard ™ keypad or other hand-held/computer devices." Made up of three basic…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Audio Response System. (2010). Retrieved on April 16 from http://www.turningtechnologies.com

DIIGO. (2010). Retrieved on April 16 from  http://www.diigo.com/learn_more 

Klopfer, E.; Osterwell, S.; Groff, J.; and Haas, J. (2009). "The Instructional Power of digital games, social networking, simulations and How Teachers Can Leverage Them."

Retrieved on April 12, 2010 from http://education.mit.edu/papers/GamesSimsSocNets_EdArcade.pdf
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Technologies Used by the Police

Words: 2059 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79273948

These breath-testers use a range of technologies including electrochemical fuel cells, infrared absorption, metallic oxide semiconductors and disposable color-change testers.

The disposable breath-testers are cheap to purchase and very useful in detecting alcohol in a person's system. When the test is positive, to check for other drugs in his system, the person is required to give a blood sample for confirmation by a laboratory. In addition his urine sample is also taken to test for the presence of other drugs in his system.

Breath testers have been in use in the United States since the 1940s. Then the machines used to detect alcohol were not as accurate as the ones used today. Nowadays mostly infrared absorption devices are used. They have a sample chamber from where the breath passes. This comes in contact with the infrared light, which counts the ions of alcohol thus measuring the alcohol level.

The Tennessee…… [Read More]

REFERENCE:

1. Jerry W. Kilgore - "DNA Samples Prove to Be Effective in Solving Crimes." Magazine Title: Corrections Today. Volume: 65. Issue: 4. July 2003. 28.

2. "DNA Money." Newspaper Title: The Washington Times. March 12, 2003. A06.

3. Richard S. Julie - "High-Tech Surveillance Tools and the Fourth Amendment: Reasonable Expectations of Privacy in the Technological Age." Journal Title: American Criminal Law Review. Volume: 37. Issue: 1. Publication Year: 2000. Page Number: 127

4. News Story: Camera detects concealed weapons in real-time. [http://news.thomasnet.com/fullstory/463051] Accessed Aug 21, 2005