Methadone Essays (Examples)

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Contingency Management Alcohol & Marijuana

Words: 11354 Length: 41 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27822679

" (1995)

The authors state: "The amphetamines occasioned dose-related increases in d- amphetamine-appropriate responding, whereas hydromorphone did not. Amphetamines also occasioned dose-related increases in reports of the drug being most like "speed," whereas hydromorphone did not. However, both amphetamines and hydromorphone occasioned dose-related increases in reports of drug liking and in three scales of the ARCI. Thus, some self-report measures were well correlated with responding on the drug-appropriate lever and some were not. Lamb and Henningfield (1994) suggest that self-reports are complexly controlled by both the private event and the subject's history of experience with the drug. Some of the self-reports they observed (e.g., feels like speed) are probably occasioned by a relatively narrow range of stimuli because in the subject's experience with drug administration, these reports have been more selectively reinforced by the verbal community relative to other reports (e.g., drug liking). They also suggest that these results imply…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Budney, Alan J. et al. (2006) Clinical Trial of Abstinence-Based Vouchers and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Cannabis Dependence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 2006. Vol.. 74 No. 2. 2006 American Psychological Association.

McRae, a.; Budney, a.; & Brady, K. (2002) Treatment of Marijuana Dependence: A Review of the Literature. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 24 (2003)

Pathways of Addiction: Opportunities in Drug Abuse Research (1996) Institute of Medicine (IOM)

Kamon, J; Budney, a. & Stanger, C. (2005)a Contingency Management Intervention for Adolescent Marijuana Abuse and Conduct Problems. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 44(6):513-521, June 2005.
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Family Care Plan Nursing Family

Words: 782 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39760808



Family Interventions

-Mother can attend cancer support groups and receive advice and education through other channels regarding proper methods of providing care and improving quality of life for her husband

-Son can explore employment options as well as discuss various needs and responsibilities with his parents in order to determine his most effective utilization within the changed family dynamic

-Father can provide the levels of self-care that come easily, but should educate himself regarding his condition and ease care by allowing others to help when necessary

Nursing Interventions

-Provide educational materials/answer questions for both mother and father

-Assist son with psychological transition of increased responsibility/familial dependence

-Instruction of proper care techniques for mother and father regarding father's condition

Evaluation

Levels of comfort and competence in new family roles should be easily assessed in regular visits through brief questioning. Monitoring father's health through standard vital sign and other appropriate tests will…… [Read More]

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Security Assessment Is Done to

Words: 1108 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44740682

This leaves those clients that are inside unsupervised while the guard is outside. There is also a lack of signage inside displaying rules and regulations along with directions. This propagates a lot of unnecessary questions being asked of the surety officer on duty. In order to alleviate these issues it would be essential to place distinct parking signage outside in order to help facilitate clients parking in the correct spaces. It is also necessary to place directional signage within the facility along with general rules and policies. All of these signs together would cost approximately $1,000 to install.

The last security issue that needs to be addressed is that of the security information processes that is in place. As each client arrives at the facility, their license plate numbers are recorded and they are then assigned a number. They are seen by the appropriate medical personnel based upon the order…… [Read More]

References

Conducting a Security Assessment. (2009). Retrieved May 25, 2009, from Processor Web site:

http://www.processor.com/editorial/article.asp?article=articles%2Fp2808%2F30p08%2F30p08.asp

How to Conduct an Operations Security Assessment. (2009). Retrieved May 25, 2009, from eHow.com Web site: http://www.ehow.com/how_2060197_conduct-operations-security-assessment.html

Methadone Maintenance Treatment. (2009). Retrieved May 25, 2009, from Drug Policy Alliance
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Business Plan for a Sleep

Words: 8375 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84888867

Offered under the same roof are "consultative, diagnostic, and treatment services" which are stated to be provided "by board-certified practitioners in the fields of pulmonary medicine, otolarngology, family medicine and more." (2006)

Smith reports that the laboratories experiencing the most dramatic growth are two which are located the "farthest from the Hillsboro flagship" as they are located in two areas that were "formerly underserved." (2006) Smith additionally reports that the demand is stronger in the areas where the two fastest growing centers are located which supplies "plenty of fuel for expansion."

Smith states that the Sleep Health & Wellness NW is attempting to "fill a gap so that patients who previously were overlooked or not being reached or who fell through the cracks no longer are," she says. "We have no plans to open centers in areas where there are already quality sleep services programs. We only want to go…… [Read More]

References

Inspiration! Sleep Study Results & Analysis (2006) Q&a with Ron Richard, senior vice president of strategic marketing initiatives at ResMed HME Business April 2006. Online at http://www.hme-business.com/articles/55305/

Johnson, Duane, PhD (2008) Are you Really Managing Your Sleep Lab? The Business of Sleep. Focus Journal May/June 2008. Online at  http://www.foocus.com/pdfs/Articles/MayJune08/Duane.pdf 

Kay DC, Pickworth WB, Neider GL. Morphine-like insomnia from heroin in nondependent human addicts. Br J. Clin Pharmacol. 1981;11(2):159-169

MacFarlene, James (2009) the Painful Pursuit of Sleep. Sleep Review Journal Jan/Feb 2009. Online available at http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/issues/articles/2009-01_07.asp
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Short Answer Questions on Drugs

Words: 1208 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68309460

economic impact of drug use in the United States might initially seem easy to measure. A legal trial is an expensive proceeding: police officers, prosecutors or public defenders, judges, stenographers, and bailiffs are employees of the state, and even if jurors are barely remunerated, defense attorneys are lavishly remunerated. To prosecute someone for dealing marijuana is an expensive undertaking, and to do so under a "three strikes" law, where the crime is suddenly elevated to a horrific felony with extreme penalties, is even more expensive. The greater expense comes with convictions: America has the largest imprisoned population in the world, with more people behind bars in this country than comprise the entire populations of other sovereign nations. Imprisonment is not a cheap proposition. We can then consider the further economic impact, legally and morally speaking, of drug use in the current extensive misuse of civil forfeiture laws. Ostensibly designed to…… [Read More]

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Punitive Drug Prohibition

Words: 2323 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71282780

Alcohol Prohibition from 1920 to 1933 did not work. There are many parallels from this failed effort and the current laws prohibiting drugs in the United States. Alcohol prohibition was undertaken to reduce crime and corruption, solve social problems, reduce the tax burden created by prisons and poorhouses, and improve the health of Americans. According to research, alcohol consumption of alcohol fell at the beginning of Prohibition, but then it subsequently increased. "Alcohol became more dangerous to consume; crime increased and became "organized"; the court and prison systems were stretched to the breaking point; and corruption of public officials was rampant." Instead of measurable gains in productivity or reduced absenteeism, Prohibition removed a significant source of tax revenue and greatly increased government spending. It led many drinkers to switch to more dangerous substances such as opium, marijuana, patent medicines and cocaine that they would have been unlikely to encounter in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Harm Reduction in the U.S.: A Movement for Change." Canadian HIV / AIDS Policy & Law Newsletter. Vol 3 No 4 & Vol 4 No 1, Winter 1997/98. Canadian HIV / AIDS Legal Network, 11 May 2004. http://www.aidslaw.ca/Maincontent/otherdocs/Newsletter/Winter9798/20GREIGE.html

McDougall, Steven. "The War on Drugs." 03 June 2001. 10 May 2004.  http://world.std.com/~swmcd/steven/rants/war.html 

Overview of drug use in the United States. Retrieved May 10, 2004 from Web site:  http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0880105.html 

Nadelmann, Ethan, Cohen, Peter, Drucker, Ernest, Locher, Ueli, Stimson, Gerry, and Wodak, Alex. "The Harm Reduction Approach to Drug Control: International Progress." Apr. 1994. Lycaeum Drug Archives. 11 May 2004. http://paranoia.lycaeum.org/war.on.drugs/debate/harm-reduction.html
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Harm Reduction and Substance Abuse

Words: 4571 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48858447

This allows the client to place their level of behavior on the continuum and assess the levels of risk associated with their behaviors. The continuum also allows the client to assess the ways in which their behaviors over time, by examining the ways in which their behaviors are now different to past behaviors. This may allow clients to recognize that they have already made some progress toward less harmful behaviors, or may allow them to identify specific events which led to developing more risky behaviors. The harm reduction model allows the client to assess their current situation and plan the actions which they wish to take to change their future behaviors.

Applications of the model

The harm reduction model has been applied predominantly to drug misuse issues, however it is also appropriate to apply the model for a wide range of social and health behavior changes. The model has been…… [Read More]

References

Amato, L., Davoli, M.A., Perucci, C., Ferri, M., Faggiano, F.P. And Mattick, R. (2005) an overview of systematic reviews of the effectiveness of opiate maintenance therapies: Available evidence to inform clinical practice and research. Journal Substitutes Abuse Treatment, 28, 321-329.

Bluthenthal, R.N., Kral, a.H., Erringer, E.A. And Edlin, B.R. (1998) Use of an illegal syringe exchange and injection-related risk behaviors among street-recruited injection drug users in Oakland, California, 1992 to 1995. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Human Retrovirology, 18, 505-511.

Bradley-Springer, L. (1996) Patient education for behavior change: Help from the transtheoretical and harm reduction models. JANAC, 7(1), 23-33.

Des Jarlais, D.C. (1995) Harm reduction: A framework for incorporating science into drug policy. American Journal of Public Health, 85, 10-12.
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Poppy Production in Afghanistan

Words: 2669 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37582050

Target ecommendations

The current opium irradiation program in Afghanistan is failing to address the long-term challenges impacting the country (i.e. poverty, a lack of economic opportunities and corruption). This is resulting in the Taliban and organized crime utilizing it as an avenue to create greater amounts of instability. In the ten years, seizures of opium and heroin have declined by 57 and 77% respectively. This is problematic, as it is making it difficult for the country to move forward beyond the decades of civil war. (Ackerman, 2014)

To address these issues, a new approach must be used that are showing the way forward. This will be accomplished by providing policy recommendations and suggesting a future course of action which can reverse key trends. Together, these insights will enhance stability and decrease the influence of the Taliban / organized crime elements.

Policy ecommendations

The opium trade and poverty are directly related…… [Read More]

References

Drug War? American Troops are Protecting Afghan Opium. (2014) Global Research. Retrieved from:http://www.globalresearch.ca/drug-war-american-troops-are-protecting-afghan- opium-u-s-occupation-leads-to-all-time-high-heroin-production/5358053

The Most Addictive Drugs. (2014). Rehabs. Retrieved from:  http://luxury.rehabs.com/drug-addiction/most-addictive/ 

National Drug Policy. (2001). Canadian Parliament. Retrieved from:  http://www.parl.gc.ca/content/sen/committee/371/ille/library/dolin1-e.htm#3 .

Ackerman, S. (2014). Afghan Opium Production Explodes. The Guardian. Retrieved from: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/30/afghan-opium-production-explodes- billions-spent-us-report
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A Case Study on Rosa Lee

Words: 2833 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68325344

osa Lee Cunningham. Elements such as the subject's health history, legal history, psychosocial history, and diagnostic impressions will be covered.

osa Lee Cunningham

DOB/Age: October 7, 1936

Date of Interview: October 7, 1994

Evaluator:

eason for Assessment: osa Lee Cunningham was discovered having a fit at Washington's Howard University Hospital, owing to over-consumption of heroin. In spite of being enrolled in an intervention for drug treatment, there did not appear to be any inclination in osa to quit drugs. In fact, she wished she could access methadone, a synthetic drug with heroin-like effects. Some days prior to being interviewed, osa awoke to find herself with fever; her condition had exacerbated. By noon, she was admitted to the emergency room (Dash, 1996 Prologue). osa states that her drug consumption levels hinge on the amount of money in her pocket and heroin accessibility. The subject also had Preludin-use history, a drug she…… [Read More]

References

Chapman, D., & Perry, G. (2008). Depression as a Major Component of Public Health for Older Adults. Preventing Chronic Disease, 5(1).Retrieved, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2248771/

Dash, L. (1996). Rosa Lee: A Mother and Her Family in Urban America. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=cc8_CQAAQBAJ&pg=GBS.PA34.w.1.0.349

(n.d.). Drug Addiction Help. Family Therapy. Retrieved October 3, 2015, from http://www.addictions.com/family-therapy/

(n.d.). Drug and Alcohol Detox -- Body Cleansing -- Best Detox Diet Programs .Drug Detox Rehab Programs -- Drug Detoxification Centers .Retrieved October 3, 2015, from http://www.detox.net/articles/drug-detox-rehab-programs/
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Understanding Psychology

Words: 2540 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98502726

Psychology: Alcohol & Drug Abuse

The over-all focus of this paper is to show how alcohol, drug addictions and abuse is fundamentally a disease of the brain. It will focus on various psychological aspects of addiction, such as some theories as to why people get addicted to drugs or alcohol in the first place, and some theories for treatments of those addictions; some psychological processes of how certain drugs work; how those drugs shape addiction through their processes; and finally analyzing the understanding of addiction within the brain.

Some major theories for why people begin to use substance such as drugs (legal or not), and alcohol are the reward and reinforcement theory, recreational use, and the stress-reduction theory. Some theories for treatments include using combinations of cognitive/social support rehabilitation, or using some form of rehabilitation with medications as well. The types of drugs and their effects that will be discussed…… [Read More]

References

Anton, R. "Substance abuse is a disease of the human brain: focus on alcohol." Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics Winter 2010: 735+. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 21 Apr. 2011.

Feldman, R.S. (2009). Understanding psychology (9th ed.). Boston, MA: Mcgraw-Hill.

Drummond, D. (2001). Theories of drug craving, ancient and modern. Addiction, 96(1), 33-46. doi:10.1080/09652140020016941

Oltmanns, T.F., Emery, R.E. (2010). Abnormal psychology (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
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Rosa Lee of All the

Words: 4537 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48380846

Patty's introduction to prostitution certainly reinforces this notion: it became a part of her life as a result of her social situation and a perceived necessity. Still, more fervent moral positions against prostitution, in the Untied States, often come from Christianity. Obviously, it violates the general principles of Christianity to pay for sexual intercourse; however, it is also a violation of Christian principles to engage in premarital sex, extramarital sex, homosexual sex, or even masturbation. Notably, none of these actions are illegal in the United States -- or at least the antiquated laws pertaining to them are not enforced -- and of them, only homosexuality is ever regularly regarded as a form of social deviance; though this too is a matter of debate. Ultimately, viewing prostitution as a moral crime from the standpoint of Christianity fails miserably, because doing so would require accepting that law should be solely determined by…… [Read More]

References

Brown, Stephen E. et al. (1991). Criminology: Explaining Crime and its Context. Cincinnati: Anderson Publishing.

Dash, Leon. (1996). Rosa Lee: a Mother and Her Family in Urban America. New York: Basic.

Pagliaro, Ann Marie and Louis A. Pagliaro. (2000). Substance Use among Women. Lillington: Brunner/Mazel.

Schlaadt, Richard G. (1992). Wellness: Drugs, Society, & Behavior. Guilford: Dushkin.
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Drug Control

Words: 715 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85431002

Drug Control

"Prevention is better than cure" is an age-old and time-tested maxim. It has been proved correct in many different situations. None more so than in the area of drug abuse: it being far easier and more cost effective to prevent drug use than drug treatment. This essay explains why drug treatment is far more expensive than drug prevention.

A study by the Lewin Group for the National Institute on Drug Abuse estimated the total economic cost of alcohol and drug abuse in the U.S. was $245.7 billion for 1992. ("NIDA InfoFacts" 2005) This includes productivity losses (losses from premature death, drug abuse-related illnesses), health costs, and other, primarily crime-related, costs such as losses due to incarceration and criminal careers. If we consider a hypothetical case in which we prevent all alcohol and drug abuse in the United States, we would theoretically save $245.6 billion.

On the other hand,…… [Read More]

References

"Alcohol and Drug Services Study (ADSS) Cost Study." (2004). The DASIS Report. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved on August 27, 2005 from http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k4/costs/costs.htm

'NIDA InfoFacts: Costs to Society." (2005) National Institute on Drug Abuse. Retrieved on August 27, 2005 from http://www.nida.nih.gov/infofacts/costs.html

Keen, Judy. "Bush Plans Hit on Drug Abuse" (2002). USA Today. Retrieved on August 27, 2005 from  http://www.usatoday.com/educate/ondcp/lessons/Activity5.pdf 

The 1992 cost estimate had increased 50% over the cost estimate from 1985; hence the current economic cost due to drug abuse must be much higher.
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Substance Addiction the Magnitude of

Words: 1751 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43378451



ILIOGRAPHY

NLM (2012). Substance abuse treatment of women. Chapter 4. National Library of Medicine: National Institutes of Health. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NK83257

- Screening and assessment. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books.NK83253

rauser, D (2010), Sublingual buprenorphine relieves symptoms of neonatal opioid abstinence syndrome, Medscape: Medscape LLC. Retrieved on December 9, 2012

from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/730366

Fisher, P.A. et al. (2011). The combined effects of prenatal drug exposure and early adversity on neurobehavioral dis-inhibition in childhood and adolescence,

Developmental Psychopathology. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3335443

Hamdan, a.H. (2012). Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Medscape: Medscape LLC.

Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.emedicine.medscape.com/article/978763-clinical

Johnson, K et al. (2003). Treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome, Archive of Disease

in Childhood. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.bmj.com/content/88/1/F.2.2.ful

Johnson, K and Leff, M (1999). Children of substance abusers. Pediatrics. American Academy of Pediatrics. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/103/Supplement_2/1085.long

Kraft, W.K. et al. (2010). Future trends…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

NLM (2012). Substance abuse treatment of women. Chapter 4. National Library of Medicine: National Institutes of Health. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK83257

- Screening and assessment. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books.NBK83253

Brauser, D (2010), Sublingual buprenorphine relieves symptoms of neonatal opioid abstinence syndrome, Medscape: Medscape LLC. Retrieved on December 9, 2012

from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/730366
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Religion's Role in Recovery Religion

Words: 1045 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15989913

02).

Overall, the findings of Shields and colleagues (2007) suggest that religious patients entering a substance abuse treatment program will tend to seek out treatment programs that are more religious. This grouping effect will then have a positive effect on retention rates and commitment to establishing a drug-free lifestyle.

The diversity of individual religious practices is one of the main impediments to researchers attempting to define it efficacy in treatment programs (reviewed by Puffer, Skalski, and Meade, 2012). For example, the eligious Coping Scale (COPE) instrument is intended to bring some measure of standardization to the research being conducted in this area by discriminating between positive and negative religious beliefs. A positive religious coping practice would be the belief in a benevolent Higher Power and finding meaning in personal suffering. Negative religious coping, on the other hand, would be to believe personal suffering is God's punishment for past wrongs.

When…… [Read More]

References

Borras, Laurence, Khazaal, Yasser, Khan, Riaz, Mohr, Sylvia, Kaufmann, Yves-Alexandre, Zullino, Daniele et al. (2010). The relationship between addiction and religion and its possible implication for care. Substance Use & Misuse, 45, 2357-2375.

Flynn, Patrick M., Joe, George W., Broome, Kirk M., Simpson, D. Dwayne, and Brown, Barry S. (2003). Recovery from opioid addiction in DATOS. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 25, 177-186.

Gallup, Inc. (2013). Religion. Gallup, Inc. Retrieved 8 Mar. 2013 from  http://www.gallup.com/poll/1690/religion.aspx .

Magida, Arthur J. (1993, Feb. 19). Using religion to fight drugs: An interfaith task force is hoping spirituality can combat substance abuse. Baltimore Jewish Times, 34.
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Vicodin and Its Addictive Nature

Words: 2516 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42266741

Addictive Nature of Vicodin

According to statistics provided by the Department of Health and Human Services, an estimated one and one-half million people in the United States started taking prescription painkillers for "non-medical" purposes in 1998, three times as many as in 1990. One of the most heavily abused painkillers is Vicodin.

Properly used, Vicodin is one of the most commonly prescribed pain medications, especially for those suffering from lower back pain, arthritis, post-operative distress, malignant cancer or sports injuries. It is not time-released, and therefore provides almost instant relief. Vicodin is a compound of two drugs: acetaminophen (found in Tylenol) and hydrocodone bitartrate. Both are painkillers, but together they are far more effective than either one individually.

Twenty tons of Vicodin are produced annually, and it is marketed under a plethora of brand names including Anexsia, Bancap-HC, Ceta-Plus, Co-Gesic, Dolacet, Hydrocet, Hydrogesic, Hy-Phen, Lorcet, Lortab, Margesic-H, Maxidone, Norco and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Addicted to Vicodin." Extra, The Waismann Institute in the News #08. March 15, 2001. http://www.methadone-detox.com/vicodin_addiction_extra.html[November 10, 2002].

Associated Press article, Naples News, Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2001. "Deaths from abuse of OxyContin, hydrocodone skyrocketing. http://www.naplesnews.come/01/11/florida/d713145a.htm[November 10, 2002].

Costello, Daniel. "Clean and Sober in 48 Hours?." LA Times, October 28, 2002.

Indiana Prevention Resource Center at Indiana University, findings reported in Time article, March 19, 2001. http://www.jointogether.org/plugin.jtml?siteID=iprc&p=1&Tab=News&Object_ID=266437.[November 10, 2002].
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Supreme Court of U S Has

Words: 1974 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25155642



From the study of treatment for mothers on crack, 50 experts in drug dependency as well as 150 addicted women identify components which they believe are important in the treatment of women effectively. Some of the features that they had identified that are always not present within the current programs are: comprehensive health care such as family planning, prenatal as well as prevention of HIV; service for children such as play therapy, day care, parental training and developmental monitoring of a child; an advocacy role such as contact with protective services of a child as well as welfare; and appropriate staffing such as non-confrontational, female staffing as well as cultural and racial sensitive.

As evident in the finding of the study, there is preference within experts and women for a program that combines medical, drug treatment and therapeutic services for the child and the mother, job training and education, long-term…… [Read More]

Reference

MacGi-egor, (1989). Cocaine and prenatal Outcome. Obstetrics and Gyllecology.

Murphy. S.. & Rosenbaum. M., (1999). Pregnant women on drugs: Combating Stereotype.. New York: Guilford Press, 1999.

Reuter, (1994). Setting Priorities: Budget and Program Choices for Drug Control. Reprint h-om Toward a Rational Drug Policy. The University of' Chicago Legal Forum,1994, pp. 14S 173.

Weisdorf, T. Parran. TV., Graham, A. & Snyder, C., (1999). Comparison of pregnancy-specific Interventions to a Traditional treatment Program for Cocaine-addicted Pregnant Women. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment,1999, pp 16(1), 39-45.
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Abnormal Psyche

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24053231

Substance-Related Disorders

A "drug" is any substance, other than food, that affects our bodies or minds. Since not all drugs are bad, the book uses "substance" to clarify the issue. Substance abuse can cause temporary or long-term problems for the abuser. Dependence, tolerance or addiction can develop.

Depressants: slow the central nervous system (CNS) down. Alcohol is a CNS depressant.

Alcohol: nearly 6% of the U.S. population are heavy drinkers, some as young as 11. Men outnumber women 3:1. Ethyl alcohol is quickly absorbed in stomach and intestine. First it depresses the areas of the brain that control judgments and curbs on behavior. Next, motor control is affected. Alcohol can also interfere with both vision and hearing. As the liver metabolizes the alcohol, the blood levels drop and function gradually returns. Patterns of alcoholism vary among socio-cultural groups and by age. Alcoholism can destroy family life, sink a career, and…… [Read More]

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Criminal Justice Narcotic Withdrawal This Is a

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47649552

Criminal Justice

Narcotic ithdrawal

This is a paper on narcotic withdrawal. There are three references used for this paper.

A person who has taken narcotics faces a number of physical difficulties. It is important to look at narcotic withdrawal in order to gain a better understanding of the signs and symptoms associated with it, as well as what the person is experiencing.

ithdrawal

Narcotic drug addiction is a "physical and psychological dependence on a specific class of drugs. Narcotics are drugs that produce a change in response to sensations, mood changes, unconsciousness, or deep sleep. Some examples of narcotics are heroin, codeine, morphine and methadone (www.beryl.net/HTL/DrugAbuse/21505.htm)."

A person may experience withdrawal due to a number of reasons such as "shortage of supply, lack of money, deciding to stop taking the drug to break the drug habit, or confinement in a controlled environment, such as jail, hospital, or other institution where…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Unknown. "Even prescription pain killers can cause addiction in patients." St. Louis Post-

Dispatch. (1999): 29 November.

(Drug Withdrawal Symptoms. (accessed 24 November 2004).

).
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Drug Intervention Annoted Bibliography Anglin

Words: 1224 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82854004

" American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 21(1), 111-35. A research team led by Dr. Michael French gathered to estimate the costs and benefits of residential and publically funded treatment programs for addiction issues. The team was derived from the University of Miami. Program and the client related economic cost estimates were obtained using data collected at the site with the drug abuse treatment cost analysis program (DATCAP). It was concluded that the economic benefit to society was almost four times what the cost of treating residential clients. Short-term follow-up treatment was also beneficial and the economic benefit was even higher.

Hanlon, T.E., Kinlock, T.W., Nurco, D.N. (1991). "Recent research on the relationship between illicit use and crime." Behavioral Sciences & the aw, 9(3), 221-242.

The study reviews previous research on the correlation of drug use and criminal behavior resulting in arrest since 1980. Advances were noted in crime…… [Read More]

Lennings, C.J., Copeland, J., Howard J. (2003). "Substance use patterns of young offenders and violent crime." Aggressive Behavior. 29(5), 414-422. This study's hypothesis was that alcohol use is a significant predictor of violent crime in committed by the youth. Researchers studied 300 juveniles that had been incarcerated in the prison system of New South Wales. Of the 300, more than 70% admitted to having committed violent crimes. Most correlated with the onset of violent crimes was alcohol use followed by cocaine use. The findings accounted for the correlation that exists between the use of substabce and aggressive, violent crime and so, further supported the "Goldstein hypothesis" which believes that substance abuse facilitates violent behavior directly.

White, H.R., Widom, C.S. (1997). "Problem behaviours in abused and neglected children grown up: prevalence and co-occurrence of substance abuse, crime and violence." Criminal Behavior and Mental Health, 7(4), 287-310. The report discussed the correlation of alcohol abuse, drug abuse, non-violent crime and violence concerning children who were abused and neglected during the course of their development through childhood. The study was longitudinal (the subjects were studied over time into adulthood). It was found that abused and neglected females and males have a higher correlation in substance abuse and non-violent arrest. Abused and neglected females were found to be at a higher risk for both drug abuse or dependency diagnosis as well as arrests for violent crime.

Zarkin, G.A., Dunlap, L.J., Hicks, K., Mamo, D. (2005). "Benefits and costs of methadone treatment: results from a lifetime simulation model." Health Economics. 14(11) 1133-1150. Research examined prior studies that included the cost and benefits of methadone abuse treatment. These papers have often been written on single case studies. While valuable to society, the sample size limitation also limits the research because they view heightened problems as being able to be treated in one incident of treatment. A simulation model was created to embody the longitudinal study of the heroine use, criminal behavior, health care and employment of a population between the ages of 18-60. It was found that the model (which takes into account the dynamics of heroine use and views it as a, acute and reoccurring circumstance) finds that the benefits of treatment using this model far outweigh those produced by static models.
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Financial and Economic Impact of Worker's Compensation

Words: 4773 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27687898

Financial and Economic Impact of Worker's Compensation egulations And Compliance

The program and concept of Workers' Compensation might appear to be a product of a civilized society and the modern era, but nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, Workers' Compensation has essentially been around for as long as people have been completing task for payment of some form of another, because people have always been getting hurt in some way, on the job. "The history of compensation for bodily injury begins shortly after the advent of written history itself1. The Nippur Tablet No. 3191 from ancient Sumeria in the Fertile Crescent outlines the law of Ur-Nammu, king of the city-state of Ur. It dates to approximately 2050 B.C.2. The law of Ur provided monetary compensation for specific injury to workers' body parts, including fractures. The code of Hammurabi from 1750 B.C. provided a similar set of rewards…… [Read More]

References

Benyamin, R., Buenaventura,, . R., Datta, S., & Adlaka, R. (2008). Opioid Complications and Side Effects. Pain Physician, S106-S111.

Boggs, C. (2008, July 29). Workers' Compensation History: The Great Tradeoff! Retrieved from mynewmarkets.com:  http://www.mynewmarkets.com/articles/91833/workers-compensation-history-the-great-tradeoff 

Ceniceros, R. (2012, December 12). State reduces workers comp opioid prescriptions. Retrieved from Businessinsurance.com: http://www.businessinsurance.com/article/99999999/NEWS080102/399999826

Eley, L. (n.d.). FEDERAL AGENCY HELPS COAL MINERS DETECT BLACK LUNG DISEASE. Retrieved from Denversworkerscompensationattorney.com: http://www.denverworkerscompensationattorney.com/2011/03/federal-agency-helps-coal-miners-detect-black-lung-disease.shtml
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Pattern of Heroine Use

Words: 2415 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38208844

Heroin

Drug addiction has been the scourge of our times. Heroin and cocaine especially are the leading cause of imprisonment in the civilized world. (Johnson, 1973) The anti-drug lobbies aver with statistics that show that marijuana users often fall prey to more potent narcotics -- especially those that are seeking that perennial "high."

This essay will present a comprehensive picture of the factors -- physical, pharmacological, societal and epidemiological -- that surround heroin in Australia. (Hirst, 1979)

Heroin (Hulburd, 1952). Pharmacologically, heroin belongs to a class of drugs called depressants. This is because heroin use slows down the brain and central nervous system.

Heroin usually comes in powder form. In its pure form, heroin is white. ut depending on how it is "cut" or diluted, it can have different colors. In some third world countries, users are familiar with "brown sugar" (severely cut heroin, occasionally even with rat poison). (Charles,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ashbrook, D.L., & Solley, L.C. (1979). Women and heroin abuse: a survey of sexism in drug abuse administration. Palo Alto, Calif.: R & E. Research Associates.

Bucknall, A.B.V., & Robertson, J.R. (1986). Deaths of heroin users in a general practice. Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 36, 120-122.

Burgess, M. (1998). Smack (1st American ed.). New York: Holt.

Charles, M., Nair, K.S., Britto, G., & National Addiction Research Centre (Bombay India). (1999). Drug culture in India: a street ethnographic study of heroin addiction in Bombay. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.
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Substance Abuse Treatment in Community

Words: 3814 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61851475



The inclusion of alcohol and drug education is a vital component of most drug and alcohol abuse interventions, for both the users and non-user. (Montagne et al., 1992). This education can be offered as a preventive measure to beginners of abuse of substances of to the vulnerable group to save the future generations from the menace and the whole society from the drug's association with crime. Alternatively, it should be offered to be taught as part of the educational curriculum in schools

ecent literature reviews have not found enough evidence to convince many researchers that drug and alcohol awareness programs have great impact on changing substance and drug use, attitude and behavior (Eliany et al., 1993). Although it is of great effort, it has been observed that education alone is not enough to change the actual behavior of alcohol and drug use (Tobler et al1976), in the actual examination of…… [Read More]

References

ADAM (1998) Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program):1998 Annual Report on Adult and Juvenile Arrestees. Addiction Research Foundation ( 1994). Alcohol and Drug Treatment in Ontario, Toronto:

BUREAU of JUSTICE STATISTICS (1998). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Burrell, N. And K. English. 2006. "Successful completion rates from Community Corrections in Colorado decreased for the first time in many years." Elements of Change: Highlighting Trends & Issues in the Criminal Justice System. Colorado Division of Criminal Justice, Office of Research and Statistics. Vol. 10, No.1. Viewed December 26, 2007 at http://dcj.state.co.us/ors/pdf/docs/EOC_No1_071906.pdf.

Bloom, B.E., and Covington, S.S. (2001) "Effective gender-responsive interventions in juvenile
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Role of Social Workers in

Words: 627 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79774030

While the term "addiction" used to relate primarily to chemical addictions (i.e. drugs and alcohol), Straussner reports that social workers now also deal with "process addictions" such as gambling and anorexia. Furthermore, the responsibilities of the social worker toward addicts and their families have become expanded to the point where social workers are now involved in program and policy development, administration and scientific research. I believe that all of these expanding roles and responsibilities will help to solidify addiction as a significant part of the social worker's job description.

Some of the new and expanding roles of the social worker in regard to addiction even extend to other disorders or illnesses that often occur in conjunction with addiction. For example, Straussner reports that social workers have become increasingly involved in the fight against AIDS, the management of methadone treatment programs and mental health disorders that are often a result of,…… [Read More]

References

Richmond, M. (1917/2006) Social diagnosis. Rpt. Russell Sage Foundation, Harvard University

Sciacca, K. (1996, July) On co-occurring addictive and mental disorders: a brief history of the origins of dual diagnosis treatment and program development, American Journal of Orthopsychiatry (66)3. Retrieved from  http://www.psychosocial.com/dualdx/micahist.html 

Straussner, S.L.A. (2001) The role of social workers in the treatment of addictions: A brief history. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions 1(1), 3-9.
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Substance Use and Human Immunodeficiency

Words: 3080 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96944579

Those participants in the high-risk groups were found to significantly associated with certain psychiatric conditions. These included: anxiety/tension, depression, having serious thoughts of suicide, experiencing hallucinations, and difficulties concentrating. In addition, participants who had reported being bothered by psychological or emotional problems, within the last 30 days, were also significantly more likely to be in the high-risk HIV / AIDS group.

This is in contrast to the results of those who had tested positive for HIV / AIDS, with only 15% of respondents who were HIV / AIDS positive being in the high-risk group, according to Fitzgerald, Lundgren and Chassler. In fact, those participants who were HIV / AIDS positive were approximately 82% less likely to be found to engage in the defined high-risk behaviors, when compared with those who had not tested HIV / AIDS positive. In addition, at the bivariate level, the researchers found no significant difference in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fitzgerald, T, L Lundgren, and D. Chassler . "Factors associated with HIV / AIDS high-risk behaviours among female injection drug users." AIDS Care 19.1 (2007): 67-74. Print.

Kressina, T., Bruce, R. & McCance, E. "Medication assisted treatment in the treatment of drug abuse and dependence in HIV / AIDS infected drug users." Current HIV Research. 7.4 (2009): 354-364 / Print.

Von Unger, H. & Collins, P. "Transforming the meaning of HIV / AIDS in recovery from substance use." Health care for Women International 26.4 (2005): 308-324. Print.
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Harm Reduction Model for Substance

Words: 960 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53539217

Therefore, HM is designed to help those who would likely not succeed in traditional treatment methodologies as well as to address the indirect harms associated with the behavior targeted for intervention (Brocato & Wagner, 2003).

In that respect, existing HM-based drug treatment programs have confirmed the social benefit and individual welfare achievable through the more tolerant form of intervention. Universally, the literature documents the extent to which social problems such as petty crime and personal harm such as disease transmission and other types of intravenous infection have been substantially reduced through the HM approach to drug abuse.

In Opposition to the Harm eduction Model

Critics of the HM (especially in connection with illicit drug abuse) strongly object to that approach, largely because they believe that it is tantamount to condoning that behavior or even enabling it in the classical codependency context (O'Neill, 2002). In general, that is equally true with…… [Read More]

References

Brocato, J. And Wagner, E.F. (2003). "Harm reduction: A social work practice model and social justice agenda." Health & Social Work. Retrieved November 02, 2010 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-334573631.html

Denning, P. (2000). Practicing Harm Reduction Psychotherapy: An Alternative

Approach to Addictions. New York: Guilford Press.

Ghetti, C.M. (2004). "Incorporating Music Therapy into the Harm Reduction Approach
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Teen Aggression Is a Serious

Words: 1412 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64568234

In addition, factors that cause stress such as divorce or death increase the likelihood that a teenager will have aggressive tendencies (Peterson and Sheldon 2006). Additionally maternal depression, substance abuse or maternal anxiety can all lead to aggressive behaviors in teenagers (Peterson and Sheldon 2006).

According to Peterson and Sheldon (2006) teenage aggression can also be linked to neuropsychiatric disorders. In fact the authors asserts that

"Persistent aggressive behavior is a common feature in many neuropsychiatric disorders and is the most common reason for referral to a child and adolescent mental health clinic [1]. Neurological features associated with aggression include low overall IQ and relative deficits in verbal learning, memory, and fluency [2]. Deficits in executive functioning and working memory are also common [3] and may be especially pronounced with co-occurring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)."

The aggressive behavior can involve lashing out at family members, friends or strangers. The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arseneault L, Tremblay RE, Boulerice B, (2002) Obstetrical complications and violent delinquency: testing two developmental pathways. Child Development, 73:496 -- 508.

Dodge KA, Pettit GS (2003) A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic conduct problems in adolescence. Developmental Psychology, 39:349 -- 371.

Facts for teen Aggression. Retrieved November 26, 2009 from  http://www.herkimercounty.org/content/Departments/View/11:field=services;/content/DepartmentServices/View/68:field=documents;/content/Documents/File/123.PDF 

Feindler E.L. (2005) Adolescent Aggression and Anger Management. Encyclopedia of Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Springer U.S.
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Substance Abuse Counseling Theories Substance

Words: 3044 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13009622

It has been argued that despite this fact, because substance abuse treatment has been developed by men, for men, it emerged "as a single-focused intervention based on the needs of addicted men." (Covington 2008). ithout empowering substance abusers whose lives have become severely impaired in terms of basic life functioning, treating the abuse or disability as a purely biological function will have little effect, and only address the physical withdrawal symptoms, and surrendering to the addiction may not address the need to seek out new, positive social relationships and to actively construct an environment that does not facilitate the addiction.

Even addicts with jobs who are minimally socially functional may have social structures revolving around their addiction. In the case of many women in particular, the life pattern of being involved with an abusive partner, which may have driven the women to abuse drugs in the first place, becomes a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bakalar, Nicholas. (2006, July 25). Review sees no advantage in 12-step programs.

The New York Times. Retrieved September 27, 2009 at http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/25/health/25drin.html

Buddy, T. (2009, March 7). Are you a functional alcoholic?

About.com. Retrieved September 27, 2009 at http://alcoholism.about.com/od/problem/a/functional.htm
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Nation Is One With Finite

Words: 3640 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55689337

However, with this mandatory sentence comes seemingly excessive punishments for being afflicted with a real disease. hese types of solutions to the drug problem in the United States fail entirely to grasp drug problems as a real medical issue and therefore throw out medical treatment over punitive punishment, (Nadelmann 2007). Not to mention many of these programs go only so far, failing to provide the support and structure many drug addicts need in order to get themselves clean. Much research has shown that more intensive inpatient programs prove more successful than less regulation programs (McKay et al. 1997). herefore, ineffective drug treatment programs within prison walls are failing to truly encapsulate the addict as a means of supporting their efforts to get clean.

One other major solution that is currently being used in many states is the enactment of a drug court to handle specific drug cases. his court can…… [Read More]

This piece shows both favoritism and opposition for mandatory minimum jail sentencing for drug offenders, however does so not from the viewpoint of looking at addiction as a disease, but rather as a limitation on judicial discretion. While many are supportive of minimum sentencing requirements based on the idea that it is the most powerful weapon against the current war on drugs, others believe it to be restricting when looking at individual cases. Overall, many believe that it should be up to the individual judge and the individual case circumstance which determines the nature of punitive punishment in U.S. courts.

Washington Post. (1994). Low-level drug offenders fill one-fifth of prison space. Washington Post. February 5, 1994.

Astounding numbers of drug offenders fill our nation's prisons. This article uses statistics from the 1990s, an era of a crack epidemic, to show exactly how filled the prison system is with low-level and nonviolent addicts who essentially need medical treatment and not prison time.
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Naltrexone the Efficacy of Naltrexone

Words: 2582 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17590678



Croop et al. (1997).

The overall safety profile of naltrexone is good; however, care must be taken in prescribing the drug to certain patient populations; e.g., naltrexone shows a dose-dependent hepatotoxicity (package insert) and is therefore contraindicated in patients with significant hepatic impairment, which is frequently encountered in alcohol-dependent populations.

The clinical trials of naltrexone have typically been conducted in patients without significant impairment in hepatic function. Another consequence of the hepatic impact of naltrexone is the possibility of drug-drug interactions.

Kim et al. (2001) potentially clinically significant interaction has been reported between naltrexone and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; these researchers found elevated liver function tests in study participants receiving both medications, although the doses of naltrexone used in this study were higher than the typical 50 mg daily dose.

Naltrexone is not appropriate for use with patients taking prescribed or illicit opioid drugs. Antagonism of the effects of these drugs…… [Read More]

References

Ait-Daoud, N., & Johnson, B.A. (1999). Medications to treat alcoholism. Alcohol Research & Health, 23(2), 99.

Anton, R.F., & Randall, C.L. (2005). Measurement and choice of drinking outcome variables in the COMBINE study. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 66(4), 104.

Bhagar, H.A., & Schmetzer, a.D. (2006). New antidipsotropics. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association, 9(4), 29.

Bean, P., & Nemitz, T. (2004). Drug treatment: What works? New York: Routledge.
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Referral Never Mind if You

Words: 3241 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1053637

Kinesics interviewing identifies and "interprets a range of verbal and nonverbal, conscious and unconscious behavior" (Ibid) that individual typically exhibit when questioned.

The more definite the pattern of an individual's observed behaviors, the more likely the person being questioned is being "being evasive or untruthful." No single behavior, however, stands alone or can serve as absolute proof regarding the validity of a statement. Instead, a combination of behaviors need to be assessed.

The interviewer must look at the cumulative message of behaviors.

The following behavior includes not only how the words are spoken, but also components that accompany speech; for instance: stalling; hesitating; being excessively polite; responding to a question with another question; trying to attach validity to a response by invoking God or religion ("I swear to God"). (Ibid.) Gaining and maintaining a client's attention during interviews is a key technique for securing relevant data. Although I do not…… [Read More]

References

Grillparzer, Franz (1872; 1996). Columbia World of Quotations. NewYork: Columbia University Press, 1996. Retrieved November 2, 2006 at http://www.bartleby.com/66/13/26313.html.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101429387

Gursansky, D., Harvey, J., & Kennedy, R. (2003). Case Management: Policy, Practice and Professional Business. Crows Nest, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin.

McDonough, Edward. (2005). Asking the Hard Questions: Interviewing and Interrogation Require Often Overlapping, but Sometimes Markedly Different, Approaches.
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Green County Drug Court the Green County

Words: 788 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88364526

Green County Drug Court

The Green County court system has finally decided to implement a "drug court" to bring about some much-needed changes in the current system. The county has authorized a new judge and is debating the merits whether that individual should be elected or appointed. The court is also considering the questions of whether it should operate on a due process model or a crime control model and whether juveniles should be adjudicated.

Green County elects its judges, but in this instance it is recommended that the drug court judge be appointed. The primary reason is expedience. Political campaigns, in addition to being costly in terms of money, are costly in terms of time. Green County needs to address its drug problem immediately and can do so by appointing a judge.

Election campaigns can also take the focus away from an issue. The recent brouhaha over President Obama's…… [Read More]

Reference

Gruenewald, P.J., Johnson, K., Shamblem, S.R., Ogilvie, K.A., and Collins, D. (2009).

Reducing adolescent use of harmful legal products: Intermediate effects of a community prevention intervention. Substance Use & Misuse 44(14), pp. 2080-2098.
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Teen Drug Abuse - Prescription or Not

Words: 5056 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15688478

Teen Drug Abuse - Prescription or Not

Differences between nonalcoholic offspring of alcoholics (family history positive, FHP) and matched offspring of nonalcoholics (family history negative, FHN) have been identified on a variety of behavioral, cognitive, and neurological measures. Compared to FHN teens, FHP adolescents and young adults demonstrate more disturbed school careers, impulsivity, rebelliousness, and nonconformity (National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2006); poorer neuropsychological performance (Worden & Slater, 2009); and significantly lower amplitude in P300 brain waves, which are believed to measure selective attention (Cicero, et al. 2005). Further, following ingestion of alcohol, sons of alcoholics report less body sway and less subjective intoxication (Grant, et al., 2005), higher levels of flushing (McBride, 2011), and decreased P300 amplitudes when performing difficult tasks (Foster, et al., 2009).

Not all individuals with a family history of alcohol dependence become alcohol and/or drug abusers, however, and genetics alone cannot account for…… [Read More]

Resources

Ajzen, I. (2010). The theory of planned behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50(2), 179-211.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]. (2006). Youth risk behavior surveillance -- United States, 2005. MMWR 2006, 55.

Cicero, T.J., Inciardi, J.A., & Munoz, A. (2005). Trends in abuse of OxyContin and other opioid analgesics in the United States: 2002-2004. The Journal of Pain, 6, 662-672.

Drug Enforcement Administration. (2005). Prescription pain medications: Frequently asked questions and answers for health care professionals and law enforcement personnel. Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, 19(1), 71-104.
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Economic Effect of Legalizing Drugs

Words: 2438 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41551324

Economic Effect of Legalizing Drugs

The program for banning the trading and using of narcotic drugs like cocaine, heroine, and marijuana is one of the most essential public welfare program, attracting so much political discourse on the effectiveness of the 'war on drugs' and the substitute programs like legalization, rehabilitation through decriminalization, drug treatment, and medical marijuana. Economists vehemently criticized the success of the war on drugs pointing to the adverse consequences like violent crime and corruption, and suggested the substitute programs like drug legalization and decriminalization. Milton Friedman has since been upheld the legalization of drugs. Garry, Becker, George Schultz, Thomas Sowell and William Niskanan have also approved the liberalization strategy. (Prohibition vs. Legalization: Do Economists each a Conclusion on Drug Policy?)

The legalization envisages exerting regulatory government control over drug sales more practically through the state clinics or stores. There is stringent ban on the advertisement, declaring the…… [Read More]

References

Cussen, Meaghan; Block, Walter. Legalize Drugs Now! The American Journal of Economics and Sociology. July, 2000. Retrieved from http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0254/is_3_59/ai_65348069 Accessed on 15 December, 2004

Maginnis, Robert L. Legalization of Drugs: The Myths and the Facts. Family Research Council. Retrieved from http://www.sarnia.com/groups/antidrug/argument/myths.html Accessed on 15 December, 2004

News and Views from the Dismal Science. Dr. Econ's commentary on local, regional, national, and global economic affairs. Augusta Business Chronicle. September 2001. Retrieved from http://www.aug.edu/~sbajmb/abc065.htm Accessed on 15 December, 2004

Thornton, Mark. Prohibition vs. Legalization: Do Economists Reach a Conclusion on Drug Policy? Paper presented at the Southern Economic Association Convention, New Orleans, Louisiana. November 2002. Retrieved from http://www.mises.org/journals/scholar/thornton3.pdf Accessed on 15 December, 2004
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Drug Policies Major Policies History

Words: 3387 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8012701

14). Soon, Congress passed the Marijuana Tax Act, which was signed into law in 1937. Like the Harrison Act, the Marijuana Tax Act placed marijuana into the same category as the cocaine and opium drugs. It was now illegal to import marijuana into the United States (McWilliams, 1991). However, this law was ineffective in curbing marijuana use (Brecher, 1986, p. 14).

By the early 1940s narcotic addiction had significantly reduced in the United States (Harrison, Backenheimer and Inciardi, 1999). However, this was not the result of legislative initiatives. Instead, it was because World War II was cutting off the "supplies of opium from Asia and interrupt the trafficking routes from Europe" (Inciardi, 1992, p. 24).

Several other legislative efforts in the supply reduction department served to establish more severe penalties for violations of drug laws, and tighten controls and restrictions over legally manufactured narcotic drugs (Harrison, Backenheimer and Inciardi, 1999).…… [Read More]

References

1999). Recreational Drug Information. History of Drug Use U.S. Retrieved from the Internet at www.a1b2c3.com/drugs/.

Brecher, E. (1986). Drug Laws and Drug Law Enforcement: A Review and Evaluation Based on 111 Years of Experience,' Drugs and Society 1:1.

Drucker, Ernest. (1999). Harm Reduction: A Public Health Strategy. Current Issues in Public Health, 1: pp. 64-70.

Drug Policy Alliance. (February 17, 2005). Harm Reduction: Options that Work. Retrieved from the Internet at  http://www.drugpolicy.org/news/021705harm.cfm .
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Parenting Program for Women and

Words: 41621 Length: 150 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12171638

There are many of these individuals, and it is time that this is changed.

Parents often look away from these kinds of problems, or they spend their time in denial of the issue because they feel that their child will not be harmed by parental involvement with drugs or alcohol. Some parents have parents that were/are addicts themselves, and some are so busy with their lives that they do not actually realize that their child has any kind of problem with the lifestyle of the parent until it becomes so severe that it cannot be overlooked, or until it is brought to their attention by police, the school, or someone else that has seen it first hand. Parents are not the only ones that overlook this issue, though.

Sometimes siblings and friends also see problems that they ignore, do not understand, or do not talk to anyone about, and the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aleman-Padilla, L. 2002. Babies First gets last word on infant care Hundreds recognize groups contribution at fourth annual event. The Fresno Bee.

Anderson, D. 2004. Funding cuts impact health services. Precinct Reporter.

Anderson, S.A. (2000). How parental involvement makes a difference in reading achievement. Reading Improvement.

Baker, P.L. (2000). I didn't know: discoveries and identity transformation of women addicts in treatment. Journal of Drug Issues, 30, 863-881.
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Freud's Death Instinct The Writer

Words: 1663 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41220250



When this theory is applied to those who are suffering from major depression it drives home the possible underlying cause of one of the key signs of depression. When one no longer gets pleasure out of things that at one time gave them pleasure it is a sign of depression. Even if those activities one time gave them pleasure if they do not now, it is possible that it is because the person is giving in to their subconscious death instinct desire.

CONCLUION

As the field of mental health continues to advance many of the original founders' theories and opinions may find that they are tossed aside as more knowledge about the working of the mind is gathered. Freud has had many of his theory come under scrutiny over the years and some of his theories are no longer considered applicable.

The Death Instinct theory however, is one theory that…… [Read More]

Strachey, James (2002) the standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (Unknown Binding) by Sigmund Freud W.W. Norton & Company

Sousa, Ronald (2003) Perversion and death. The Monist (Accessed 9-30-06)

Theory http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/freud.html
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American Academy Pediatrics Publication a Critique a

Words: 2077 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16495931

American Academy Pediatrics publication a critique a media portrayal substance, links made AAP statement material. The password EBook: apusstudent I uploaded rest material.

American Academy of Pediatrics' Policy Statement concerning media portrayal of substance abuse touches upon several important issues that arise along with the media products' influence on America's young population at large. The article's targeted list of open-access channels associated with messages of noxious substance use include advertisements, television shows, motion pictures, social websites and music. Attention is directed specifically towards the findings of broadly conducted research in the matter of harm inflicted on children and adolescents as a result of the entertainment industry's depictions of legal and illegal substances, such as alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and heroin. Based on these findings, Pediatrics proposes a set of familial, institutional and legislative measures designed to minimize or abolish the destructive influence that media effects on a child's and teenager's development…… [Read More]

References

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2010, October). Policy Statement -- Children, Adolescents, Substance Abuse and the Media. Pediatrics, Vol. 126, No. 4, pp. 791-799.

Levinthal, C.F. (2012). Drugs, Behavior, and Modern Society, Seventh Edition. New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Macdonald, A. (Producer), & Boyle, D. (Director). (1996). Trainspotting [Motion picture]. United Kingdom: Channel Four Films.

Roberts, D.F. et al. (1999). Substance Use in Popular Movies and Music. Office of National Drug Control Policy, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (U.S.). Retrieved from www.ncjrs.gov
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CVD Vascular Leg Disorders in Adults With

Words: 312 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90890585

CVD

Vascular Leg Disorders in Adults with Substance Abuse Issues

Vascular leg disorders, namely chronic venous disorders (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), are frequent yet generally unacknowledged complications of injection drug use (IDU) (Pieper, Templin, Kirsner, & Birk, 2010). One study provides a quantitative analysis of the relationship between PAD and exercise habits in adults that engage in IDU. In the sample that was used, overall activity was relatively low and most participants walked less than half a mile a day (Pieper, Templin, Kirsner, & Birk, 2010). There is a significant inverse between PAD and CVD and being active and engaging in some form of walking or exercise. This study is quantitate in nature and provides that statistical findings of the experiment with a large sample.

By contrast, other articles are more informative in nature. One informative article gives an overview of a particular drug that can be used…… [Read More]

Works Cited

McKeage, K., & Keating, G. (2008). Parnaparin. Adis Drug Evaluation, 106-122.

Pieper, B., Templin, T., Kirsner, R., & Birk, T. (2010). The Impact of Vascular Leg Disorders on Physical Activity in Methadone-Maintained Adults. Research in Nursing & Health, 426-440.
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Fill Blanks Document PDF File Submitted

Words: 534 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16540090

Mixed Method, Systematic Reviews, Integrated Reviews, Review of the Literature, Expert Opinions, Informative Articles are not appropriate for this assignment.)

Record your responses in the space provided. he boxes will expand as you type.

Your responses should be your own words and written in complete sentences. No "yes" or "no" answers. You should provide an explanation/rationale for each response.

Did the authors specifically indicate that the human rights of the subjects were protected? Did they specifically identify Institutional Review Board approval/Ethics Committee approval for this study? Did they indicate that they obtained informed consent for the study from the sample/participants? State what page numbers this information was found.

he participants gave informed consents and the procedures were performed in accordance with standards from the Committee of Human Experimentation of the University Institutional Review Board (Pieper, B., et al., 2010, p. 19).

15b: Does the study indicate that the subjects/participants received…… [Read More]

The study was identified as a quantitative study based on the research questions. Most of the answers were easily identifiable in the study and the textbook. Identifying the strengths for reliability was difficult in determining the viability of the study.

Bib1iography

Pieper, B., et al., (2010), The Impact of Vascular Leg Disorders on Physical Activity in Methadone-Maintained Adults, Res Nursing Health, 33:426-440, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Psychology in Order to Develop Effective Treatment

Words: 1369 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31250655

Psychology

In order to develop effective treatment programs for drug addicts, it is essential to maintain a basic knowledge of the physiological basis of their cravings. Given social and political mandates calling for a cessation of drug abuse or at the very least for the implementation of harm reduction, it is just as important to administer to those exposed to addictive substances as it is to develop methods of preventing exposure. In addition, an ability to explain the neuro-scientific effects of drug use allows those that are responsible for prevention to provide potential users with deterrents that are less dogmatic and more circumspect. To these ends, neuroscience has developed a new understanding of the reasons for addiction.

Behavioral neuroscience has taught us that humans, like other animals, crave certain pharmaceutical agents. Studies have enabled scientists to better understand the neuro-chemistry of pleasure and of cravings. A side effect of these…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=27130511

Bolles, Robert C., ed. The Hedonics of Taste. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1991. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=14214733

Isralowitz, Richard E., and Darwin Telias. Drug Use, Policy, and Management. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1998. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=87280154

Leaf, Russell C., and Stacy Lamon. "5 Development of a New Clinical Procedure for Conditioning Aversions to Cigarette Smoking with Perceptually Induced Nausea." Affect, Conditioning, and Cognition: Essays on the Determinants of Behavior. Ed. Brush, F. Robert. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1985. 75-76. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=87280154
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Fiscal Impact of the Maryland Budgetary Crisis

Words: 5056 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79562335

Maryland Prison System

Crime is expensive. But so too is punishment. The state of Maryland, like the majority of states across the nation at the moment, is facing a period of slow economic growth and shrinking economic resources even as it continues to have to meet the needs of its citizens. This paper examines the effect on the state's overall budget of the cost of incarcerating prisoners.

The treatment of prisoners causes few legal problems for the government of a dictatorship. A government that refuses to acknowledge the human rights of even its law-abiding citizens is not likely to show too many qualms about shoving its criminals into overcrowded and unsafe prisons - or even to worry about whether the niceties of due process were considered in getting the person to prison to begin with. But the rule of constitutional law changes all that. Because we live in a country…… [Read More]

References

Feely, M. And Edward, R. (1998). Judicial policy making and the modern state: How courts reformed. Cambridge: Cambridge University.

Hafetz, J. (1995). Tough justice. New York Empire State Report. http://216.239.57.104/search?q=cache:5haT4coRUqgJ:www.mdgreens.org/montgomery/pdf/schoolsnotprisons.pdf+maryland+state+budget+prison&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

 http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/cases/prisons/Estelle_v_Gamble.htm 

http://www.caps.ucsf.edu/inmaterev.html
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Avoidant Personality Disorder

Words: 4280 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14227618

Avoidant Personality Disorder

As per the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), a certain case of avoidant personality disorder (APD) is featured by the existent sign of social inhibition, feeling of being short of requirement, and hypersensitivity to negative valuation. (American Psychiatric Association, 1994, p.1) Even though personality disorders are not often discovered in persons below age 18, children who come within the condition of APD are recurrently portrayed as being aloof to the core, fearful in arising circumstances, and afraid of dissention and social boycott. The proportion of the signs and the inability is way behind the practice of inhibition that is prevalent in as much as 40% of the populace. Hence it is of great relevance of examining the disorder as it relates to professional counseling.

Exploration of disorder

Bearing a semblance to other personality disorders, the state of Avoidant Personality disorder turns out…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association: (1994) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

Beck, Aaron T; Freeman, M.D; Arthur, Ed.D. (1990). "Cognitive Therapy of Personality Disorders." New York: The Guilford Press.

Benjamin, Lorna Smith (1996) "An Interpersonal Theory of Personality Disorders," in Major Theories of Personality Disorder, Clarkin, John F. & Lenzenweger, Mark F (Eds.). New York: The Guilford Press

Craig, Robert J. (1995). "Interpersonal Psychotherapy and MCMI-III -- Based Assessment, Tactical Psychotherapy of the Personality Disorders An MCMI-III -- Based Approach." Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
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Needle Exchange Evidence

Words: 1548 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33388566

Exchange

Definition of Policy

A needle exchange is a harm reduction strategy wherein the program provides clean, unused needles to addicts for the injection of intravenous drugs. The principle is that when addicts do not have access to clean needles, they are far more likely to share needles among themselves. Needle exchanges are typically set up in areas with a high concentration of intravenous drug users. They provide clean, unused needles free of charge.

Arguments for the Policy

The arguments in favor of a needle exchange center around the harm reduction principle. Intravenous drug users exist, and will continue to exist. The role of health providers with respect to these individuals is to reduce the harm that they do to themselves and to others. The policy makes no value judgments against the users, but merely seeks to reduce the spread of HIV / AIDS among that community. This is important…… [Read More]

References

Duplessy, C. & Reynaud, E. (2014). Long-term survey of a syringe-dispensing machine needle exchange program: Answering public concerns. Harm Reduction Journal. Vol. 11 (16) 1-9.

Huang, G. (2014). Modeling the impact of needle exchange programs accounting for both HIV and HCV infections and HIV/CV co-infections. Queen's University. Retrieved March 21, 2015 from http://qspace.library.queensu.ca/jspui/bitstream/1974/12155/1/George_Huang_Y_201404_MSc.pdf

Hyshka, E., Strathdee, S., Wood, E. & Kerr, T. (2012). Needle exchange and HIV epidemic in Vancouver: Lessons learned from 15 years of research. International Journal of Drug Policy. Vol. 23 (4) 261-270.

Kwon, J., Anderson, J., Kerr, C., Thein, H., Zhang, L, Iversen, J., Dore, G., Kaldor, J., Law, M., Maher, L, & Wilson, D (2012). Estimating the cost-effectiveness of needle-syringe exchange programs in Australia. AIDS. Vol. 26 (17) 2201-2210.
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Needle Exchange Policy Analysis

Words: 1807 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26014247

Exchange is a program designed to educate and promote health among drug-users. Needle Exchange, and similar programs that provide needles and syringes to drug-users are a harm-reducing motive whose aim is to enable access to sterile needles and syringes for individuals injecting drugs. This kind of action is recommended by The World Health Organization (WHO), whose experts suggest that each drug-user injecting drugs needs to be given access to two hundred clean needles and syringes on an annual basis as a way of tackling and preventing the transmitting of HIV and other blood-borne viruses through this method.

Overall, most programs similar to Needle Exchange are facilitated by pharmacies. Some of these programs work from fixed locations, while others are mobile, and some even employ strategically placed sites. The aim of most Needle Exchange programs is to alleviate and prevent the transmission of HIV, as well as other blood-borne viruses, through…… [Read More]

References

Harris, Gardenia, Bernard I. Tamas, and Nancy S. Lind. Dynamics of Social Welfare Policy: Right vs. Left. Lanham [u.a.:Rowman & Littlefield, 2007. Print.

Brownstein, Joseph. "Opposition to Clean Needles for Addicts: Symbolism over Science? | Al Jazeera America." Opposition to Clean Needles for Addicts: Symbolism over Science? | Al Jazeera America. 18 Apr. 2014. Web. 10 Mar. 2015. .

"Needle Exchange Program - Alcohol Rehab." Alcohol Rehab. 27 Dec. 2011. Web. 10 Mar. 2015. .

Strike, C., et al. "Ontario Needle Exchange Programs: Best Practice Recommendations. 2006." Toronto: Ontario Needle Exchange Coordinating Committee.
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Fictional Drug Abuse Case

Words: 5191 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7740320

Chemical Dependency

Jesse Bruce Pinkman is one of the most important characters in the popular TV series, 'Breaking Bad'. He plays the deuteragonist (2nd most important character) in the series, partnering with Walter White in his methamphetamine drug ring. Pinkman acts as a dealer and manufacturer of methamphetamine, and is also a methamphetamine user. Jesse was also a former student in White's chemistry class.

According to the program script, Pinkman was born September 14, 1984, into a middle income family in Albuquerque, New Mexico. While still in high school, he began using and dealing methamphetamine. After being thrown out of the house for his continued drug use, he moved into his Aunt Ginny's place, and looked after her until she died of lung cancer. After her death the ownership of the house fell to his parents who allowed him to continue staying there. The rift between Pinkman and his family…… [Read More]

References

Bettmann, J., Russell, K., & Parry, K. (2013). How Substance Abuse Recovery Skills, Readiness to Change and Symptom Reduction Impact Change Processes in Wilderness Therapy Participants. Journal Of Child & Family Studies, 22(8), 1039-1050. doi:10.1007/s10826-012-9665-2

DSM-5.pdf (PDFy mirror). (n.d.). Retrieved May 19, 2015, from https://archive.org/stream/pdfy-85JiVdvN0MYbNrcr/DSM-5#page/n136/mode/1up

Gregorowski, C., Seedat, S., & Jordaan, G.P. (2013).A clinical approach to the assessment and management of co-morbid eating disorders and substance use disorders. BMC Psychiatry, 13(1), 1-12. doi:10.1186/1471-244X-13-289

Hall, W., Farrell, M., & Carter, A. (2014). Compulsory treatment of addiction in the patient's best interests: More rigorous evaluations are essential. Drug & Alcohol Review, 33(3), 268-271. doi:10.1111/dar.12122
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Combating Alcoholism and Addiction

Words: 2074 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46383990

vignette pertaining to addiction. Ethical and legal factors will be considered. Also discussed will be cross cultural matters related to the topic. Possible solutions to the issue at hand will also be considered.

Middle-aged couple, Anna and James, drops in for an appointment as Kevin, their son aged 16 years, faces suspension from school because of 'drug paraphernalia' found in his school bag. While James is Native-American, Anna is Japanese-American. James goes on to say that it is all Anna's fault, stating that she has smoked pot on a daily basis for the most part of their married life. Anna is of the view that she at least isn't a slobbering drunk like James, further elucidating that James over-indulges in drinking alcohol on weekends. It is discovered, in the course of assessment that James as well as Anna come from alcoholic homes.

Session one

Much is to be taken into…… [Read More]

References

(n.d.).CASAColumbia - Addiction Science, Prevention & Treatment Research. Designing an Addiction Treatment Plan | CASAColumbia. Retrieved May 19, 2015, from http://www.casacolumbia.org/addiction-treatment/treatment-plan

(n.d.). Internet Archive: Digital Library of Free Books, Movies, Music & Wayback Machine. DSM-5.pdf (PDFy mirror).Retrieved May 19, 2015, from http://archive.org/stream/pdfy-85JiVdvN0MYbNrcr/DSM-5#page/n637/mode/2up

(n.d.).National Center for Biotechnology Information. Chapter 4 Integrated Models for Treating Family Members - Substance Abuse Treatment and Family Therapy - NCBI Bookshelf.Retrieved May 19, 2015, from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64266/ 

(n.d.).National Center for Biotechnology Information. Chapter 4: Screening and Assessment - Substance Abuse Treatment: Addressing the Specific Needs of Women - NCBI Bookshelf. Retrieved May 19, 2015, from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK83253/
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Drug Abuse Scenario Analysis

Words: 1958 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41487760

drives under the influence of alcohol, it is a criminal offense abbreviated as driving under the influence (DUI). However alcohol is but one of the many substances that can interfere with one's driving capability. DUI charges can also be pressed against individuals who are driving under the influence of other kinds of drugs, including illegal drugs and even prescription medication. Taking drugs and driving at the same time, whether the drugs are just prescription muscle relaxers or medicinal marijuana is illegal and a DUI offense. The argument that one took drugs because of doctor's orders is not a defense to DUI charges. Various drugs have different effects on drivers. The drugs that impair concentration, judgment, alertness and/or motor skills are regarded as dangerous and in several cases even more dangerous than alcohol. Driving while having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of more than 0.08% or higher is illegal in the…… [Read More]

References

African-Americans, Substance Abuse and Spirituality - Minority Nurse. (2013, March 29). Retrieved from http://minoritynurse.com/african-americans-substance-abuse-and-spirituality/

Cohagan, A., Worthington, R., & Krause, R. (2013, July 3). Alcohol and Substance Abuse Evaluation . Retrieved from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/805084-overview#aw2aab6b3

FindLaw. (n.d.). Driving Under the Influence of Drugs - FindLaw. Retrieved from http://dui.findlaw.com/dui-charges/driving-under-the-influence-of- drugs.html

MedlinePlus. (n.d.). Steroids: MedlinePlus. Retrieved from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/steroids.html
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The Substance Abuse Disorder and Mental Health Issues

Words: 1212 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95639487

Co-Occurring Disorder and the Substance Disorder

The concept of disorder in people has been a hard to grasp condition and psychiatrists often face various challenges in handling these patients since there is no single blueprint on how to handle the patients who walk into their offices. The co-occurring disorders effectively present an even more complex situation as the psychiatrist has to deal with the preceding disorder and the occurring disorder in order for the patient to be claimed to have fully recovered. With the high rates of recidivism this is a task that is very complicated and rarely achieved.

The statistics in the presented in the chapter speck volumes of the way the co-occurring disorder is being handled in the U.S. and even more so the related drug abuse statistics that are captured in various researches. One statistical piece that never presented a surprise in the read is the high…… [Read More]

References

Hasin D.S., et.al, (2013). DSM-5 Criteria for Substance Use Disorders: Recommendations and Rationale. http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/pdf/10.1176/appi.ajp.2013.12060782

Nuget C.D., (2012). Addictions and Mental Health Recovery Dialogue: Similarities and Differences in Our Communities. http://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/similarities-differences-dialogue.pdf
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Mental Health and Addiction

Words: 2699 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64549580

ecovery can be a difficult journey for many. The reality of having to change old habits for new ones can take a lifetime. The recovery approach/model realizes the struggle of change and transformation and makes it so that way emphasis is not placed on the destination, but rather the journey. Although other approaches like the disease/medical model aim to treat one aspect of recovery from addiction, the recovery model encompasses all aspects making it one of the most advantageous models to adopt to fight addiction.

The recovery approach/model to addiction and/or mental disorder places a strong emphasis on a support for an individual's potential for recovery. ecovery means a person undergoing a personal journey instead of determining and setting an outcome. This personal journey involves the development of hope, a sense of self, a secure base, social inclusion, meaning, empowerment, and coping skills that will take that person past the…… [Read More]

References

Barker, P. & Buchanan-Barker, P. (2012). Tidal Model of Mental Health Nursing. Currentnursing.com. Retrieved 24 July 2016, from  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Tidal_Model.html 

Best, D. & Lubman, D. (2012). The recovery paradigm - a model of hope and change for alcohol and drug addiction. Aust Fam Physician., 41(8), 593.

Hall, W., Carter, A., & Forlini, C. (2015). The brain disease model of addiction: is it supported by the evidence and has it delivered on its promises?. The Lancet Psychiatry, 2(1), 105-110. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s2215-0366(14)00126-6

Hammer, R., Dingel, M., Ostergren, J., Partridge, B., McCormick, J., & Koenig, B. (2013). Addiction: Current Criticism of the Brain Disease Paradigm. AJOB Neuroscience, 4(3), 27-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21507740.2013.796328
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psychology and neuroplasticity for change

Words: 957 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50838371

Neuroplasticity has gained traction, in the realm of pop psychology and also in the more credible arenas of counseling and clinical psychology. In Doidge's (2007) book, neuroplasticity is presented for a general audience but using research to substantiate claims. Therefore, the case studies that comprise The Brain That Changes Itself can become effective blueprints for personal change. The book delves into various aspects of neuroplasticity. Three of those include sexual attraction, addiction, and pain.

Chapter 4 of The Brain That Changes Itself covers the neuroplasticity of sexual attraction and love. Doidge (2007) claims that human beings "exhibit an extraordinary degree of sexual plasticity compared with other creatures," (p. 94). Specific examples of sexual plasticity include trying different sexual positions, techniques, or toys with the same partner or with multiple partners, becoming fixated on certain "types" of people for a while, or going through periods of high versus low sexual energy.…… [Read More]

References

Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain that Changes Itself. New York: Penguin.
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How Does Heroin Impact a Caucasian Family

Words: 3326 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64761555

Heroin Impact on Caucasian Family?

A large number of Caucasian families are plagued with the issue of heroin use, mostly consumed via injections. This is a major public health issue. Viral hepatitis, HIV and other dangers associated with heroin dependence, as well as social harm resulting from accompanying poverty and crime, exceed those of almost all other drugs used. A majority of Caucasian households are indirectly as well as directly impacted by the aforementioned diseases.

Increased pureness and decreased drug costs are potential factors contributing to the trend of decreased age of first-time consumption and increased initiation into habitual consumption in the Caucasian population. As heroin dependence can be successfully cured, primary care providers need to check their patients for this problem.

This paper serves two purposes. Firstly, it attempts to study substance abuse's socio-economic effects on Caucasian people. Secondly, depending on this analysis, it attempts to provide recommendations on…… [Read More]

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Working for a Community Mental Health Agency

Words: 1218 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25326004

working for a community mental health agency that serves male adolescents aged 14-16 who have received a diagnosis of conduct disorder. You have been asked by your director of clinical training to answer the following questions (choose only one): a) What family treatment modes have been found to be effective (best practices, evidence-based) for treating this population?

Submit an annotated bibliography with an entry for each of your resources. Include the references in proper APA format. Write a brief summary highlighting the theory, treatment, intervention, and research methodology discussed in each resource.

Authors conducted thorough review of existent studies on psychosocial conduct disorder and interventions in regards to children and adolescents. They also investigated oppositional defiant disorder. 82 experimental studies were evaluated using certain criteria created by the Clinical Psychology Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures. Authors concluded that the two most effective programs that met all…… [Read More]

Brestan, EV. & Eyberg, EM (1998) Effective psychosocial treatments of conduct-disordered children and adolescents: 29 years, 82 studies, and 5,272 kids Journ. Clin. Child Psyc. 27, 180-189

Burke, JD, Loeber, B., & Birmaher, R. (2002) Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder: A Review of the Past 10 Years, Part II, J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry, 41, 1275-1293.

Kumpfer, K & Alvarado, R (2003). Family-Strengthening Approaches for the Prevention of Youth Problem Behaviors American Psychologist, 58, 457-465
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Innocent Child Archetype of the

Words: 1167 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17199265

Jung believed that the unconscious mind has two very distinct layers. The first layer is the personal unconscious. The personal unconscious is where the individual's memories of experiences and events reside. The collective unconscious, on the other hand, is something that we are born with. There is a shadow that Jung also talks about, which is a darker side of the personality and the shadow may be filled with darker aspects of personality (violent tendencies, etc.); these are elements that we may not recognize in our personalities. Therefore, self-actualization is the most important step to take in therapy.

Bennett (year) discusses the integrative archetypal model and how it lends itself to two separate categories of self-representation ("and, by extension, personality as an epiphenomenon of self-representation" (year)). These are the horizontal and vertical factors and they are normally discussed in terms of "splitting" (year), "which is a defensive separation of various…… [Read More]

References:

Bennett, C.L. Freedom and dignity. Chapter 8, pp. 67-83.

Palmer, P.J. (1999). Let your life speak: Listening for the voice of vocation. San Francisco: CCA Jossey-Bass, 56-72.

Schmidt, W.S. (1986). An ontological model of development. Journal of Pastoral Care,

40(1) 56-67.